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Information Technology Solutions GuardDog: Ultra-Wideband Intrusion

Detection

Business Development Executive


Annemarie Meike Telephone: (925) 422-3735 Email: meike1@llnl.gov

Background
Current low power intrusion-mitigation networks suffer from a variety of problems including short lifetimes, inadequate communication channel capacity, and weak on-board sensor processing. These networks have the ability to detect activity at each sensor, but often lack the ability to discriminate potential targets from the environment and background activity, due to the complexities and inconsistencies in the sensors. LLNL researchers have developed a discrimination sensor system that can be networked to provide detection, tracking and discrimination of intrusion activity. A low-power network of these sensors is able to detect motion, track that motion through the monitoring region, and reliably determine whether the moving object represents a breach of the monitored area or its perimeter.

Industrial Partnerships Office


7000 East Avenue, L-795 Livermore, CA 94550 https://www.ipo.llnl.gov

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory


www.llnl.gov

Description
GuardDog is a revolutionary network of sensors that can constantly monitor an area for intrusion and relay the sensed data to a satellite or other remote receiver. The basic system can detect motion or trigger another device such as a camera or radiation detector. More sophisticated networks can distinguish human activity from motions generated by wildlife, wind, etc., and can track and record the exact locations of the activity. Most importantly, communication is via ultra-wideband (UWB) signals for high performance in harsh propagation environments where even the most advanced commercially available sensors face difficulty. These include heavily cluttered environments found in dense urban areas, and interior spaces such as warehouses and cargo containers with metallic and concrete obstacles. GuardDog technology uses UWB impulse sensors (also known as micropower impulse radar or MIR), optional global positioning systems (GPS), local signal processing, and user-selectable (power and bandwidth) radio frequency (RF) communication transceivers. By employing a precise range-gate, UWB signals are used to create an omni-directional detecting shell of user-selected diameter. A network of these sensors can form a protective ad-hoc area-wide coverage, be placed strategically, or form a fence around selected facilities, in which all motion inside or outside the area of interest is ignored.

Applications
Perimeter monitoring for infrastructure protection Personnel/vehicle access control Smart home/office environments Habitat monitoring Border control

Information Technology Solutions

Advantages
Resistant to jamming, detection, tampering High performance in cluttered and noisy environments Low transmit power extends battery life Omni-directional antenna gives 360o field of view Networkable Does not require line of sight to intruder
Business Development Executive
Annemarie Meike Telephone: (925) 422-3735 Email: meike1@llnl.gov

IP Status
LLNLs UWB GuardDog sensor network is protected by issued patents and patent applications claiming the signaling method, sensor and transceiver architecture and communications, range-gating, and other aspects of the network. Representative patents include: U.S. Patent Application Publication 20080007445. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks.

Industrial Partnerships Office


7000 East Avenue, L-795 Livermore, CA 94550 https://www.ipo.llnl.gov

Development Status
Prototype sensor systems have been built with radar ranges up to 40 feet. Prototypes include advanced low-power message hopping protocol, automatic background noise calibration, GPS, and health status checks. This technology had been successfully fielded and tested for DOD in a variety of exercises, including a 5 star node configuration outdoors with satellite exfiltration and simultaneous internet broadcast. Prototypes were also tested 24/7 over several months for DOE in a 12-node network (indoors) with low false alarms. The system is ready for larger deployment.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory


www.llnl.gov

References/Publications
Science & Technology Review September 2004. Exploring the Ultra Wideband. UCRL-TR -52000-10-4/3. Science & Technology Review December 2007. Wireless That Works. UCRL-52000-07-12.