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1. GENERAL INFORMATION
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Gedung Dekanat FTUI
1.1. University of Indonesia
As one of the oldest universities in Indo-
nesia, the University of Indonesia (UI) has
pride its reputation which is established by
its outstanding learning in 12 faculties, one
graduate school and qualifed graduates who
have been very infuential in the countrys
history. Since its establishment in 1950, UI
has continued to grow and fourish. Today
UI remains a dynamic center of excellence
for research and learning, attracting more
than 30,000 students. UI maintain its activi-
ties in its two campuses, the main campus
located at Depok and the campus at located
at Salemba, Jakarta.
1.2. The Beginning of FTUI
The history of Faculty of Engineering of
University of Indonesia (FTUI) began when a
number of young engineers associated with
PII (Indonesian Engineer Association) offered
to the frst Indonesian President, Soekarno,
that PII renovate damaged main streets in
Jakarta. At that time Jakarta was preparing
for the big international sports event, the
Ganefo, and the offer was well accepted by
the President. Headed by Ir. Bratanata, Ir.
Roosseno, Ir. Sutami, and Ir. A.R. Soehoed,
the project was completed on time. After
accomplishing the street renovation project,
the young engineers brought a brilliant idea
to the President: Why not establish an en-
gineering faculty in Jakarta so that it is not
necessary to go to Bandung for study. The
President undoubtedly agreed with the idea
and appointed Prof. Ir. Roosseno as the frst
Dean of the Faculty in the University of Indo-
nesia which was headed by dr. Syarief Thayeb
as a Rector. Faculty of Engineering was of-
fcially established on 17 July 1964, consisting
of Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering,
and Electrical Engineering Departments. The
Department of Metallurgy and the Depart-
ment of Architecture were opened in the
following year. The Gas and Petrochemical
Engineering and the Industrial Engineering
Department were established much later, in
1985 and in 1999, respectively.
1.3. FTUI Nowadays
FTUI is now a modern and a respected engi-
neering education institution within Univer-
sity of Indonesia with a vision of becoming
a world-class engineering education. To
achieve its vision, FTUI has declared its mis-
sion statements:
Preparing its graduates to become life-long
learners, to be able to adapt to the working
environment, and to acquire decent person-
alities and leadership qualities.
Becoming center of excellence for education
and research activities, to serve stakehold-
ers needs through facilitation of conducive
academic environment.
Becoming a leading institution that responds
to local, national and global societal needs.
Faculty of Engineering is the largest Faculty
with approximately four thousand students
and close to two hundred and ffty academic
staff. More than sixty percent of the aca-
demic staff graduated from overseas institu-
tions with Ph.D./Masters degrees.
FTUI consists of seven Departments and
eight Study Programs. A Department man-
ages academic resources to implement study
plan based on a relevant curriculum, while, a
Study Program is a coherent study plan based
on a certain curriculum so that learners at-
tain a suffcient level of knowledge, skills,
and attitudes as targeted by the Study Pro-
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gram. The existing Departments and Study
Programs are:
Department of Civil Engineering consisting of
Civil Engineering and Enviromental Engineer-
ing Study Program.
Department of Mechanical Engineering con-
sisting of Mechanical Engineering and Naval
Engineering Study Program.
Department of Electrical Engineering con-
sisting of Electrical Engineering and Com-
puter Engineering Study Program.
Department/Study Program of Metallurgical
and Material Engineering Department
Department/Study Program of Architecture
Department/Study Program of Chemical
Engineering
Department/Study Program of Industrial
Engineering
There is also the Opto-Electrotechniques and
Laser Application Study Program that accepts
only graduate students.
1.4. International
Undergraduate Program in
Engineering (Double-Degree)
The international undergraduate programs
in engineering (double-degree program)
have been established between FTUI and
the following Australian higher education
institutions:
Faculty of Built Environment and Engineer-
ing, Queensland University of Technology
(QUT), Australia, in 2001
School of Physics and Materials Engineering,
Monash University, Australia, in 2001
Department of Chemical Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering, Monash University,
Australia, in 2002.
The international undergraduate program
(International Class) promotes high-qual-
ity engineering education through interna-
tional collaboration where students study
at two institutions, the frst two years at
FTUI followed by two years of study at
QUT or Monash University (except chemical
engineering). At the completion of their
studies in Australia, students will be awarded
a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the
Australian University and a Sarjana Teknik
degree when they return to FTUI and fulfll
certain requirements. Chemical engineer-
ing students are required to fnish their last
semester at UI before they are awarded both
the B.E. and the S.T. degrees.
Queensland University of Technology
(QUT)
QUT is one of Australias largest universities
offering a great choice of undergraduate
courses than most other universities. As a
university for the real world, QUT focuses
on preparing students for professional prac-
tices with a balance of theory and practical
education. The Faculty of Built Environment
and Engineering is one of the largest facul-
ties in QUT and enrolls about 4000 students
in a broad range of undergraduate and post
graduate courses. The Faculty promotes
practical teachings with industry representa-
tives and professionals contributing to course
development and leadership in applied re-
search that directly benefts industry and the
professions. Using innovative teaching and
learning methods, the Faculty provides op-
portunities to develop sound communication
skills, technical abilities, and management
skills. Further details can be found in QUT
website.
Monash University
Monash University is the largest of Australias
38 universities, which some 45,000 students
and 5,500 staff and one of the Groups
of Eight, Australias leading universities.
Monash Universitys contribution to global
research and education is resulting in inter-
national partnership and alliances that are
steady growing its Research and Develop-
ment (R&D) base, industrial links and inter-
national recognition. Faculty of Engineering
has outstanding records in industry interac-
tion demonstrated by its participation in 9
Cooperative Research Centers, and numerous
industry partnerships. Monash University of-
fers an opportunity to establish a research or
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commercialization offce in an internationally
recognized Center of Excellence, and access
to the brightest and best undergraduate and
postgraduate students, as well as access to
world class R&D. Further details can be found
in Monash Universitys website.
Double Degree Options
Sarjana Teknik Sipil / Bachelor of Engineer-
ing (Civil)
Civil engineering centers on planning, de-
sign, construction and maintenance of the
Worlds infrastructure. Student can major in
environmental engineering in the fnal year.
Civil engineers are employed by governments
and private companies to engage in planning,
designing, constructing, and maintaining
structures and facilities including large build-
ings, roads, bridges, railways, dams, water
supply and sewerage systems.
Sarjana Teknik Mesin / Bachelor of Engineer-
ing (Mechanical)
Mechanical Engineering focuses on mechan-
ics, design, materials, manufacturing, ther-
mofuids, tribology and engineering manage-
ment. Many graduates fnd employment as
designers, consultants or project managers in
industries associated with the use of natural
resources, including defense, power genera-
tion, sugar refning, oil refneries, mining and
manufacturing plants.
Sarjana Teknik Elektro / Bachelor of Engi-
neering (Electrical and Computer)
This option provides a broad technical edu-
cation and develops students fundamental
skills in electrical, electronics and computer
engineering. Electrical and computer engi-
neers design, install and maintain electri-
cal, electronic, telecommunications and
computing systems on behalf of government
electricity boards, and large manufacturing
and engineering companies.
Sarjana Teknik Metalurgi dan Material /
Bachelor of Engineering (Metallurgical and
Material)
A broad technical education and develops
student fundamental skills in metallurgy and
material engineering.
Sarjana Teknik Kimia and Bachelor of Engi-
neering (Chemical)
A high-quality basic education in chemical
engineering fundamentals to develop the
skill required to apply these fundamentals
to chemical engineering, processes and
system whilst fostering students personal
development.
Sarjana Arsitektur and Bachelor of Design
(Architecture)
Provides graduates who has strong basic
knowledge of architecture and its applica-
tion, with ability of applying responsif and
environmentally friendly architecture design
method. They are employed in construction
industries as architecs, interior design-
ers, or supervisors in building construction
project.
1.5. Other Academic Programs
at FTUI
Undergraduate Program: Regular Class
and Extension Class
FTUI has managed undergraduate programs
since 1964 starting with civil, mechanical
and electrical engineering departments. In
1985, the Faculty established the depart-
ment of gas and petrochemical engineering
(now chemical engineering) and in 1999
established the department of industrial
engineering. In 2000, FTUI opened the naval
engineering study program as part of the me-
chanical engineering department. The total
length of study is between 8 to 12 semesters
to accommodate the total academic load of
144 credit hours scheduled to be completed
in 8 semesters resulting in undergraduate
engineering or Sarjana Teknik (S.T.) degree,
or, in the case of the architecture study
program, Sarjana Arsitektur (S.Ars.). The
present FTUIs undergraduate student body is
approximately two thousands students.
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Graduate Program
FTUI began its Masters Program in 1992 start-
ing with civil, mechanical, electrical and
metallurgical engineering study programs.
Chemical engineering, industrial engineering,
and architecture study programs followed in
2000. In the same year, the Opto-Electrotech-
niques and Laser Application Study Program
joint the Faculty of Engineering. Masters
programs that have been accredited by the
Indonesian National Accreditation Board of
Higher Education (civil, mechanical, electri-
cal, metallurgical and opto-electrotechnique
study programs) have been awarded Excel-
lence (Unggul) rating. There are around four
hundred Masters level graduate students at
FTUI. FTUI also offers doctoral degree pro-
gram, which at the present, are offered only
by civil engineering, electrical engineering,
and opto-electrotechniques and laser ap-
plication study programs. There are around
sixty doctoral students at FTUI.
1.6. UI and FTUI Administra-
tion
UI
1. Rector: Prof. dr. Usman Chatib Warsa,
Ph.D., SpMK
2. Vice Rector for Academic Affairs: Prof. Dr.
Ir. Sutanto Soehodho, M.Eng
3. Vice Rector for General Administration
and Finance: Darminto, SE,MBA
FTUI
4. Dean of Engineering: Prof. Ir. Rinaldy Da-
limi, M.Sc., Ph.D.
5. Vice Dean for Academic Affairs: Ir. Herr
Soeryantono, M.Sc., Ph.D.
6. Vice Dean for Non-Academic Affairs/Fi-
nance Manager: Dr. Ir. Sigit Pranowo Hadi-
wardojo, DEA
7. Secretary of Faculty and Head of Adminis-
tration Center: Dr. Ir. Harinaldi, M.Eng.
8. Educational Affairs Manager: Ir. Mahmud
Sudibandrio, M.Sc, Ph.D.
9. Research Manager and Head of Academic
Quality Assurance Unit: Dr. Ir. Gunawan
Wibisono, M.Sc.
10. Student Affairs and Alumni Manager: Ir. R.
Jachrizal Soemabrata, M.Sc., Ph.D.
11. Human Resources & Commercial Venture
Manager: Ir. Antony Sihombing, MPD,
Ph.D
12. General Affairs and Facilities Manager: Ir.
Sahrika Kosasih, M.T
13. Head of Center for Electronic Campus De-
velopment (Digital Campus): Dr. Ing. Kal-
amullah Ramli, M.Eng.
Departments
The following are list of Head of Department,
Vice Head for Academic Affairs and Vice Head
for Non Academic Affairs, respectively:
Civil Engineering: Prof. Dr. Ir. Irwan Katili;
Mulia Orientilize, S.T., M.Eng.; Ir. Nachry
Chadijah, M.T.
Mechanical Engineering: Ir. Hendri DS Budiono,
M.Eng.; Ir. Yulianto S. Nugroho, M.Sc.,
Ph.D.; Dr.-Ing. Ir. Nandy Putra.
Electrical Engineering: Prof. Dr. Ir. Eko Tjipto
Rahardjo, M.Sc.; Muhammad Salman, S.T.,
M.I.T.; Aries Subiantoro, S.T., M.Sc.
Metallurgical & Material Engineering: Dr. Ir.
Dedi Priadi; Ir. Anne Zulfa, M.Phil.Eng,
Ph.D.; Dwi Martha Nurjaya, S.T., M.T.
Architecture: Ir. Kemas Ridwan Kurniawan,
MSc, Ph.D; Ir. Achmad Hery Fuad, M.Eng.;
Yulia Nurliani Lukito Harahap, S.T., M.Des.
S.
Chemical Engineering (Gas & Petrochemical):
Dr. Ir. Widodo Wahyu Purwanto, DEA.;
Dr. rer.nat. Ir. Yuswan Muharam, M.T.; Ir.
Praswasti PDK Wulan, M.T.
Industrial Engineering: Dr. Ir. T. Yuri Maemun-
syah, MEngSc.; Ir. Betrianis, M.Si.; Ir. Akh-
mad Hidayatno, MBT.
Professors
Full Time
Prof. Ir. Sidharta S. Kamarwan; Prof. Dr. Ir.
Zuhal, MSc. EE.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Djoko Hartanto,
M.Sc.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Budi Susilo Soepandji; Prof.
Dr. Ir. Sar Sardy, MEng.Sc.; Prof. Ir. Gunawan
Tjahjono,Ph.D., M.Arch.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Eddy S.
Siradj, MEng.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Sutanto Soehodho,
M.Eng.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Sulistyoweni Widanarko,
Dipl.SE, SKM; Prof. Dr. Ir. Dadang Gunawan,
M.Eng.; Prof. Dr. Ir. I Made Kartika D., Dipl.
Ing.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Mohammad Nasikin, M.Eng.;
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by PAF. The services provided for students
include academic records, change of grades
from lecturers, diploma and academic tran-
scripts, registration, absence of leave, enroll-
ments and letter of references. The working
hour starts at 08.00 to 19.00 from Monday to
Friday during regular semester and at 08.00
to 16.00 during semester breaks.
Library
FTUI library building is located next to the
Faculty of Economics and the library itself
is on the fourth and ffth foor. FTUI library
features collections related to science and
engineering including civil engineering,
mechanical engineering, electrical and
computer engineering, metallurgical and
material engineering, architecture, chemical
engineering as well as industrial engineering.
The library provides services on:
circulation services, memberships, book
lending;
reference services provides reference
books, dictionaries, encyclopedia, hand-
books and annual reports, etc. (1,131 col-
lections);
text books on various subjects (9,059 col-
lections);
fnal reports, thesis, dissertations for
members only (10,944 collections);
research reports services (842 collec-
tions);
magazines, periodicals and journals ser-
vices for reading and photocopying only
(962 collections);
on-the-job training reports and seminars;
photocopy and scanning services.
The library opens in working days at 08.30
to 19.00 (Monday to Friday) without break,
except Friday (break from 11.30 to 13.30).
During the semester breaks, the library only
opens from 08.30 to 16.00. The library web-
site is http://www.lib.eng.ui.ac.id. Besides
FTUI Library, students can also use the UI
Central Library located in Depok Campus that
open for public at 08.30 to 19.00 (Monday to
Friday), except Saturday open until 15.00.
The central library website is http://www.
lib.ui.ac.id
Prof. Dr. Ir. Bambang Suryawan, MT.; Prof.
Dr. Ir. Irwan Katili; Prof. Dr. Ir. Eko Tjipto
Rahardjo, MSc.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Bagio Budiardjo,
MSc.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Roekmijati W.S., M.Si.;
Prof. Dr. Ir. Tresna P. Soemardi, SE, MSi.;Prof.
Ir. Rinaldy Dalimi, M.Sc., Ph.D.;Prof. Dr. Ir.
Tommy Ilyas M.Eng.;Prof. Dr. Ir. Raldi Artono
Koestoer, DEA.;Prof. Dr. Ing. Ir. Harry Sudibyo.
S, DEA
Emeritus Professors
Prof. Ir. Abdulkadir; Prof. Nakoela Soenarta
Dipl.Ing.; Prof. Ir. Soewondo B. Soetedjo Dipl.
Ing.; Prof. Dr. Ir. Muhammadi
1.7. Academic Calendar
Administrative and academic schedules is
based on academic calendar set forth by UI
and FTUI.
Odd Semester
July-August: Administrative registration at UI
and academic registration at FTUI
August-December: Course period
October (1 week): Mid-semester examina-
tion
December-January (2 weeks): End of semes-
ter examination
February: Graduation
Even Semester
January/February: Administration registra-
tion at UI and academic registration at
FTUI
February-May: Course period
March-April (1 week): Mid-semester exami-
nation
May-June (2 weeks): End-semester examina-
tion
August: Graduation
1.8. Facilities
FTUI Administration Center (Pusat
Administrasi Fakultas/PAF)
Academic administrative services for all of
the academic programs in FTUI are managed
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Career Development Center (CDC)


Career Development Center (CDC) facilitates
interactions between students/graduates and
industry to create employment opportunities.
CDC also provides employment information
to its members and organizes presentations
and interviews sessions for various companies
looking for students/alumni. CDC is located
at the 1st foor of the Engineering Center
(EC) Building and its phone number is 021-
78880766.
1.9. Laboratories
There are several laboratories in each De-
partment supporting the academic and/or
research activities.
Department of Civil Engineering: Materi-
als Laboratory, Soil Mechanics Laboratory,
Hydraulics, Hydrology and River Labora-
tory, Structural Mechanics Laboratory,
Transportation Laboratory, Mapping and
Surveying Laboratory, Sanitation & Envi-
ronmental Laboratory.
Department of Mechanical Engineering:
Mechanical Design, Mechanical Technol-
ogy, Thermodynamics, Heat Transport,
Fluids Mechanics, and Manufacturing
Technology.
Department of Electrical Engineering:
Electrical and Electronic Measurement,
Electrical Power System, Electrical Ma-
chinery, Electronics, Control, Digital,
Telecommunication
Department of Metallurgy and Materials
Engineering: Chemical Metallurgy, Physi-
cal Metallurgy, Metallurgy Processing,
Mechanical Metallurgy, Corrosion, Metal-
lography and HST.
Department of Architecture: Building
Physics, Two Dimensions, Three Dimen-
sions, Photography
Department of Chemical Engineering:
Chemical Reaction Engineering & Natural
Gas Conversion, Thermodynamics, Energy
& Environment, Basic Processes and Op-
erations, Basic Chemical Processes, Sepa-
rations, Bio Process and Chemical Process
Systems
Department of Industrial Engineering:
System Modeling, Management Informa-
tion System, Decision Support System,
Human Factors
Center for Electronic Campus
Development (Digital Campus)
The Center for Electronic Campus Develop-
ment (CECD) provides services related to
education and information technology de-
velopment for students and academic/non-
academic staff. The center is located at 2nd
foor of GK Building at FTUI, Depok Campus.
Main duties of the center are to provide
education facilities for students, learning and
research facilities for lecturers, and services
for education administration, students and
personnel. CECD also provides connection
services to internet and local area network
at the Faculty and the University. At FTUI,
computer connections have reached all of the
buildings and for internet access (http, ftp,
ntp and email). These facilities can be used
by students as well as faculties. All computer
networks have been connected by fber optic
cables for inter-building and copper cable
in the buildings with capacity of 100 Mbps.
Besides providing local networks, CECD also
controls 7 computer servers with redundancy
backup to minimize troubles in academic
and research services. Computers are also
available for students at various locations at
FTUI i.e. computer laboratory at 2nd foor of
GK Building, at 2nd foor of Library building
(Master Program computer laboratory) as well
as at FTUI building at Salemba Campus. The
service begins at 09.00 to 17.00 from Monday
to Friday. For further information please
contact CEDC at GK Building, 2nd foor, tel.
021-7863508, 021-2720011 ext. 64, or send
email to uptkftui@eng.ui.ac.id or visit our
website at http://www.cecd.eng.ui.ac.id.
LIA English Course
In cooperation with a well-known language
Institution LIA, FTUI jointly offer English
language training for students who wish
to improve their English through conversa-
tion and TOEFL preparation classes. FTUI
students, particularly international class
students are encouraged to take advantage
of this course. Please contact PAF for further
information and registration. Courses are
conducted at the frst foor of Engineering
Center (EC) Building.
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Study Program of Opto-Electrotechniques:
Image Processing and Remote Sensing,
Optical Communication, Applied Spec-
troscopy, Photonic Instrumentation
1.10. Student Services
Several student services are available:
Student Health Center or Pusat Kesehatan
Mahasiswa (PKM) that operates 2 clinics at
Depok and Salemba Campus. The clinics
provide general health, dental, and phar-
macy services.
Professional Counseling Services (psy-
chologist and psychiatrist) are available
to help students deals with issues related
to students personal problems, located
at the Student Health Center.
Student Dormitory in Depok Campus.
Shuttle bus from 07.00 to 21.00.
Accident Insurance to cover students dur-
ing traveling to and from campus, inside
campus and during universitys activities.
Sports Center (soccer feld, feld and
track, gymnasium, tennis courts, basket
ball and badminton).
Student Activity Center both in Depok and
Salemba Campuses.
Canteen/cafetaria in each faculty.
Banks and ATMs in both campuses.
1.11. Student Organizations
Formal student organizations at the university
level are Majelis Permusyawaratan Mahasiswa
(MPM) and Badan Eksekutif Mahasiswa (BEM)
while those at the faculty level are Badan
Permusyawaratan Mahasiswa (BPM) and Senat
Mahasiswa (SM). Students can also spend their
special interests and hobby through Unit
Kegiatan Mahasiswa (UKM) such as marching
band, choir, softball, martial arts, etc. Since
2004, the international class students have
their own student organization called Ikatan
Mahasiswa Program Internasional (IMPI) to
facilitate their activities.
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1.12. Scholarships
In recognition of the special relationship be-
tween Monash Engineering and the University
of Indonesia, high-achieving students will be
granted a scholarship to assist them to make
the transition to Australia. The requirements
of this scholarship include GPA of at least 2.8
during their study at UI, acceptance of the of-
fer from Monash University at least two weeks
before the start of the semester, and student
does not receive multiple scholarships.
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2. ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND REGULATIONS
2.1. General
International Undergraduate Program in En-
gineering is a joint double-degree program
between UI/FTUI and Queensland University
of Technology (QUT) at Brisbane and Monash
University at Melbourne. In general, students
should follow academic regulations in each
institution. The program is designed for four
years of study where students spend the
frst half of the program at UI followed by
the second half in Australia. One semester
consists of 17-18 weeks of courses and other
scheduled academic activities, including 2-3
weeks of mid-term and fnal-term examina-
tion periods. Learning activities consist of
class sessions, laboratory work, studio, ex-
aminations, quizzes, assignments, and fnal
project seminar (required for attainment of
Sarjana Teknik degree). Courses at Univer-
sity of Indonesia are conducted in English
to prepare students for their later study
in Australia. To maintain and to improve
quality of academic processes at FTUI, the
Academic Quality Assurance Unit carry-out
regular evaluation to on-going course activi-
ties, specially distributing questioners to the
students at the end of semesters. This way
student has opportunities to give feedback
on learning activities at FTUI.
2.2. Semester Credit Unit
(SKS)
The academic load of all scheduled academic
activities such as courses, laboratory work,
and studio are measured in terms Semester
Credit Unit or Satuan Kredit Semester (SKS).
The efforts expended by students for one SKS
is equivalent to 3 hours of work in a week for
one semester, including I hour of scheduled
academic interaction, 1-2 hour(s) of struc-
tured activities such as doing assignments
and homework, and 1-2 hour(s) of individual
activities such as reading textbooks.
2.3. Grades
At the end of semester, students will receive
Semester Grade Report or Daftar Nilai Se-
mester (DNS) as a report on their academic
performance, consisting of name and code of
courses taken with the corresponding letter
grades. The letter grades and its grade point
values are listed in Table 1.

Table 1. Letter grades and its grade point
values
L e t t e r
Value
G r a d e
Point Val-
ue
L e t t e r
Value
Gr ade
P o i n t
Value
A 4.00 C 2.00
A- 3.70 C- 1.70
B+ 3.30 D 1.00
B 3.00 E 0.00
B- 2.70 T 0.00
C+ 2.30 I -
The highest letter grade is A with grade point
value of 4.00 and the minimum passing grade
of a course is C with grade point value of
2.00. The instructor may assign the Incom-
plete (I) grade if the student has not made
a reasonable attempt to complete major
session assignments, laboratory projects and
the lecturer has made a reasonable effort to
inform the student as early as possible that an
important part of session work is incomplete.
The I mark should be changed to another
letter grade within 1 month. Should the mark
does not change to other grade in that period;
it will be changed to E grade.
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2.4. Grade Point Average
(GPA)
Grade Point Average or GPA is used to evalu-
ate students performance either for a par-
ticular semester in term of Indeks Prestasi
Semester (IPS), or, cumulatively for all of
the semester up to the most recent one in
term of Indeks Prestasi Kumulatif (IPK). The
2.5. Length of Study and Aca-
demic Load
International class curriculum is designed
for 4 years of study with maximum length
of study of 12 (twelve) semesters, including
those spent at the partner university. Table
2 shows the international program and its
study time allocation.
Table 2. FTUIs International Class pro-
grams.
Departments P a r t n e r
Universities
Dur at i on
( s e me s -
ters)
Civil Engi-
neering
QUT 4 + 4
Mechanical
Engineering
QUT 4 + 4
Electrical
Engineering
QUT 4 + 4
Metallurgical
and Materials
Engineering
Monash 4 + 4
Chemical
Engineering
Monash 3 + 4 + 1
n = 1
n = 1
) (
GPA
Grade Point Value x Semester Credit Unit
formula used to calculate either IPS or IPK
is as follows:

IPS is used to determine the maximum credit
units allowed to be taken by a student in
the upcoming semester, while, IPK is used
to determine students evaluation status,
eligibility to transfer status and graduation
predicate at the end of their study.
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The term 4+4 means that the frst four semes-
ters of study is completed at FTUI and the
later four semesters of study completed at
partner universities. In the case of chemi-
cal engineering option, the allocated study
time is 3, 4, and 1 semester spent at UI,
Monash, and UI, respectively. The frst part
of the curriculum given at FTUI consists of
mainly of basic science or basic engineering
courses and requires no elective courses,
therefore, students are required to take all
of the courses offered in the curriculum.
The detailed course program consisting of
73-76 semester credit units to be completed
at FTUI could be seen in each Departments
curriculum. Beginning in the ffth (the fourth
for chemical engineering students) semester,
students can register up to the maximum
credit hour allowed as given in Table 3.
Table 3. Maximum SKS in the 5th (4th for
chemical engineering) and
subsequent semesters.
IPS Maximum SKS
2.00 16
2.01 2.50 18
2.51 3.00 20
3.01 3.50 22
> 3.50 24
2.6. Academic Performance
Evaluation
During the academic semester, students aca-
demic performance is continuously monitored
through regular assignments, home-works,
quizzes, or examinations. The minimum
evaluation components of a course are mid-
semester and end-of-semester grades. To
receive end-of-semester grades, students
should fulfll the following requirements:
The courses taken have been registered
and verifed by PA during the academic
registration period;
Have fulflled all of the administrative
and academic requirements for the on-
going semester;
Have completed all of the required as-
signments.
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Satisfactory completion of the academic
program in partner universities.
Completion of all of the required courses
at UI with grades equal to or better than
C.
Total length of study spent at UI and part-
ner university not longer than twelve se-
mesters.
Students take and complete fnal project
at the end of their study in Australia and
present their fnal project results to Fac-
ulties in their home Department in FTUI.
2.8. On-the-Job Training
Students must complete on-the-job training
when they are in the university partners in
Australia as one of the requirements set by
the Institute of Engineers Australia (IEAust) to
obtain accredited B.E (Bachelor of Engineer-
ing) degree. On-the-job training is a good
opportunity for students to apply their skills
and build networks in industry.
2.9. Student Record, Aca-
demic Transcript and Diploma
Students record, academic transcript and
diploma can be obtained from the Faculty
Administration Center (PAF). Students re-
cord and academic transcript list the names,
codes, and grades of all of the courses at-
tempted by a student and also show the cu-
mulative GPA. Student record is issued only
if requested by a student, while, academic
transcript is automatically issued when a
student fnishes his/her study. Graduates of
the international double degree program will
get transcripts and diplomas from both UI and
QUT or Monash University. Those who choose
to get their S.T. degree must obtain their B.E.
degree from QUT or Monash University and
return to UI to present their fnal project.
2.10. Requirements for Trans-
fer to University Partners in
Australia
Eligible student can continue his/her study
to university partners in Australia if he/she
fulflls the following requirements:
The university also requires that students
maintain satisfactory academic performance
during their study at FTUI and meet the
following evaluation criteria to be able to
continue their studies:
Attain at least 24 SKS and obtain IPK not
less than 2.00 at the end of their second
semester
Attain at least 48 SKS and obtain IPK not
less than 2.00 at the end of their fourth
semester (4+4 program)
Attain at least 36 SKS and obtain IPK not
less than 2.00 at the end of their third
semester (3+4+1 program)
Carry-out administrative and academic
registration during the registration pe-
riod
Conform to UI code of student conduct
Students who fail to do administrative and
academic registration in two consecutive
semesters will not be able to continue their
studies.
2.7. Academic Degrees
After completing the international under-
graduate degree in Engineering, students will
gain the two academic degrees:
B.E. (Bachelor of Engineering) degree
form QUT and Monash accredited by the
Institute of Engineers Australia (IEAust)
and the Department of National Educa-
tion of Republic of Indonesia.
S.T. (Sarjana Teknik) degree from Uni-
versity of Indonesia, the same degree
awarded to the engineering undergradu-
ate program graduates accredited by the
Department of National Education of Re-
public of Indonesia.
All of the international undergraduate pro-
gram students, except chemical engineering
students, have an option not to obtain their
S.T. degrees. Chemical engineering students
can not waive their S.T. degrees but they
will receive S.T. and B.E. degrees simultane-
ously, after successfully completing their 8th
semester at UI.
Requirements for an S.T. degree are:
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1. Has attained GPA of 2.75 at the end
fourth semester for the 4+4 program or at
the end of third semester for the 3+4+1
program;
2. Has attained IELTS score of > 6.0 with no
test component with score less than 6.0
or has attained TOEFL score > 550 (written
test) or > 213 (computer-based).
3. If GPA < 2.75, student has opportunity to
improve his/her GPA while administrative-
ly and academically registered at FTUI.
4. If GPA > 2.75, and IELTS score <6.0 or
TOEFL score < 550 and wishes to gain a
Sarjana Teknik degree, he/she should im-
prove his/her IELTS/TOEFL score while
administratively and academically regis-
tered at FTUI.
5. If GPA > 2.75, and IELTS score <6.0 or
TOEFL score < 550 and do not wish to gain
a Sarjana Teknik degree, he/she has op-
portunity to improve his/her IELTS/TOEFL
score without having to register adminis-
tratively at FTUI.
2.11. Administrative and
Academic Registration
Registration and Course Guidelines
Before administrative registration takes
place, FTUI publishes an academic calen-
dar for one semester listing schedules for
courses, mid-term, fnal-term examinations
and other academic activities. The academic
calendar could be browsed at http://www.
eng.ui.ac.id, and the course schedule could
be accsess at SIAK NG.
Administrative Registration
Administrative Registration includes pay-
ments of tuition fee and admission fee.
Students are responsible for paying fees by
the payment deadline. Students who do not
complete the registration process by the pay-
ment deadline will not be registered at that
particular semester will be included toward
students allowed length of study.
Academic Registration
Students should do online academic registra-
tion, consult his/her PA for approval and sign
the course plan form or Formulir Rencana
Studi (FRS) during the academic registration
period. The main duties of PA are:
Helping and directing students in their
study plan particularly in selecting courses
and in solving their academic problems
Monitoring and evaluating students aca-
demic performance during their period of
study.
Students should logon to https://academic.
ui.edu using username and password provided
by the Direktorat Pengembangan Pelayanan
Sistem Informasi (PPSI) UI, A Building at the
Faculty of Computer Science, Depok Campus,
to new students in the beginning of the se-
mester. Students could also download course
schedules and academic calendar from the
website. After completing the online FRS
students should print the form (3 copies) and
meet their PA to discuss, verify and validate
the courses taken. Students have to check
their FRS after registration period to ensure
that the courses taken are correct. Fines
will be levied to students who are late in
administrative and academic registration
according to the university or the faculty
regulations.
Sanction
1. Students who do not complete the admin-
istrative registration, will obtain a non-ac-
tive status during current semester and in
their length of study will be counted.
2. Students who do not complete the aca-
demic registration, will not able to follow
academic activity during semester and in
their length of study will be counted.
3. The non-active students will not be
charged for the payment of tution fee.
4. Students who do not complete the ad-
ministrative registration and academic
registration 2 (two) semester in a row, will
be considered resign as a student without
notifcation from the university.
5. Active students who do not fulfll the
payment according to the agreement they
made until the end of semester will subject
to 25% penalty from the amount of unpay-
ment fee.
6. The penalty payment must be paid on the
next semester.
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Exception Administrative Registration
When non-active students, in every reason
want to maintain their status as active stu-
dents, they have to follow the procedure of
administrative registration:
Obtain the approval from the faculty/
post-graduate program.
The students must come to the Direc-
torate of Finance UI to obtain the per-
mission for paying the tuition fee after
paying the penalty 50% from the tuition
fee on the current semester.
The permission will be used by the
students for paying the tuition fee
manually.
Students must give the copy of the pay-
ment bills to the Directorate of Finance
UI for verifcation.
2.12. Registration while in Uni-
versity Partners in Australia
Students who are willing to obtain the Sar-
jana Teknik degree from FTUI while they are
in the university partners in Australia should
pay 10% of the tuition fee to UI during admin-
istrative registration period. This regulation
is not applicable to those who do not wish to
obtain the S.T. degree from UI.
2.13. Academic Leave of Ab-
sence
Students who wishes to be away from his/
her academic endeavors at FTUI for one to
two semesters, but intends to return at a
later date are eligible for academic leave
of absence. Leave of absence could be only
given to student who has resided at least two
semesters at FTUI.
Procedures of Academic Leave of Absence
1. To obtain leave of absence, a student must
fle a form which is available at Faculty ad-
ministrative building before the beginning
of the administrative registration period of
semester.
2. If the submission of applicants is approved,
the academic administrative division at the
Faculty will change the status of the stu-

dent as academic leave of absence and the


amount of tuition fee will also be changed.
3. The applicants must pay 25% of tuition fee
of the administrative registration period of
semester for which the leave is desired.
4. If the approved submission does not fulfll
the tuition fee during the administrative
registration period, the applicants will
meet the Regulations for Exception Admin-
istrative Registration.
5. If the submission of Academic Leave of
Absence does not follow the above stated
in point 1, or submitted for the current
semester, the applicants must pay 100% of
tuition fee.
2.14. Offenses and Sanction
It shall be an offence for a student who
engages in any form of cheating, academic
dishonesty, falsifying any document, un-
fairness or misconduct particularly in the
examinations and assignments. If detected
and substantiated, these acts would have
resulted in an academic sanction such as no
course mark would be granted (E mark),
course cancellation, and suspension, up to
termination from FTUI. If necessary, the case
could be brought to UI hearing panel for Code
of Conduct Committee (P3T2). Curriculum
of International Undergraduate Program in
Engineering
2.15. General
In-line with global science and technology
development, curriculum for the interna-
tional undergraduate class emphasizes on the
following three important aspects:
Flexibility in pursuing development of sci-
ence and technology
Market oriented curriculum structure to
fulfll local and international expertise
needs
Core subject matter is developed and
updated based on curriculum of partner
universities abroad and on international
accreditation standard set up by Accredi-
tation Board for Engineering and Technol-
ogy (ABET).
Compilations of each courses objectives and
syllabi offered by the study programs are
listed alphabetically for each department.
13
3.1.2. VISION, MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
ENGINEERING FTUI
Vision of the Department of Civil Engineer-
ing FTUI
Become a Professional Education Body as
well as have a Reliable Management Sys-
tem
Mission of the Department of Civil Engineer-
ing FTUI
A. Create a reliable management system.
B. Develop premium elements of the educa-
tion process in the Department of Civil
Engineering.
C. Execute continual guidance towards the
existing human resources.
Objectives of the Department of Civil En-
gineering FTUI
A. The objectives of the education sector
are harmonized with the purpose of the
Study Program.
B. The objectives of the research feld are:
1. Provide contribution for the develop-
ment of science and technology.
2. Increase the relevancy of the study
process to the development of modern
science.
C. The objectives of the society devotion
feld are:
1. Function as well as contribute in the
national development.
2. Contribute ideas as well as have direct
involvement in society.
3.1.3. VISION, MISSION AND OBJECTIVE
OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING
STUDY PROGRAMFTUI
Vision of the Civil Engineering Study Pro-
gram FTUI
Become a superior center of science and
technology in the Civil Engineering field
which has environmental visions and can
participate in the global market.
3.1. DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL
ENGINEERING
3.1.1. GENERAL
Civil Engineering is the oldest engineering
discipline and has the widest coverage. Civil
Engineering is not just an applied science, but
relates with real life problem solving which
affects to the quality of life in society.
Civil engineering has a wide scope which
includes the public as well as private sec-
tors in answering current challenges such
as problems of pollution, development and
conservation of facilities for foods, earth-
quakes, traffc jams and the development
of urban areas. A civil engineering graduate
plans, designs and develops as well as man-
ages various facilities in the efforts to fulfll
the requirements of modern human life.
Works that need the expertise of civil en-
gineering varies in dimension as well as
coverage, such as: bridges, buildings and
structures, power plants, offshore struc-
tures, sea ports and sea transport channels,
piping, roads, airports, transportation sys-
tems, dams, drainage systems, clean water
systems, solid and liquid waste management
systems and other dangerous poisonous waste
management systems.
Civil Engineering education prepares student
so that they are able to create in the area of
planning, design, construction and manage-
ment of various Civil Engineering work.
The Department of Civil Engineering FTUI
at this moment manages one study program
which is the Civil Engineering Study Program.
It carries out the 1st level up to the 3rd
level Strata education program, which each
produce Graduates, Masters, and Doctors
of Engineering in the science area of Civil
Engineering.
3. DEPARTMENTS
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In the agenda of producing graduates with the
above qualifcations, the Civil Engineer-
ing Study Program FTUI supplies students
with:
A. Strong basics in science (mathematics,
physics, chemistry, and engineering).
B. Ability to design and carry out research as
well as analyze and interpret data
C. Ability to identify, formulate and solve
problems in the engineering feld based
on inquiry of recent issues.
D. Introduction to applied economics, risk
analysis and decisions in facing uncer-
tainty, and social-politic impacts towards
engineering work.
E. Ability in techniques of communication,
forming a team, and leadership.
F. Ability to design a system, components or a
process to fulfll the required needs.
Graduates of the Civil Engineering Study Pro-
gram serve society through the application
of their knowledge and skills of planning,
designing, construction of facilities in various
extensions of discipline such as:
a. Structural Engineering: buildings, bridges,
power stations, dams, tunnels, sea ports
and other structures.
b. Water Resources: management of water
resources, irrigation, food and drainage
control, power plants, offshore and coast-
al engineering.
c. Environmental Engineering: Providing of
drinking water and its distribution, chan-
neling and processing waste, control of
air and water pollution, and garbage man-
agement.
d. Transportation Engineering: airports, sea
ports, main roads, railroads, transpor-
tation systems along with the facilities
which accompany them.
e. Construction Management: planning and
control of construction, construction
technology, cost estimation, and fnanc-
ing of construction projects.
f. Geotechnical Engineering: investigation
of soil, foundation design, bevel stability,
stockpile/reclamation & land excavation,
bevel stability, repair & land stabilization,
utilization of underground rooms/tun-
nels.
Mission of the Civil Engineering Study Pro-
gram FTUI
A. Increase the quality of graduates in the
thorough knowledge of civil engineering
education, with a strong foundation, and
international standards to which have en-
vironmental visions.
B. Actively contribute ideas through research
as well as direct involvement in the de-
votion to society which is orientated to
the development of basic facilities in the
civil engineering feld, which remain to
consider the compatibility of humans and
nature.
C. Form and guide students who have inde-
pendent leadership and personalities, as
well as can socialize, communicate ef-
fectively, and highly respect professional
ethics.
Objectives of the Civil Engineering Study
Program FTUI (Undergraduate Engineering
Education Program /Strata-1)
The civil Engineering Study Program is aimed
to produce graduates who are able to:
1. Apply elementary civil engineering knowl-
edge into activities of planning, design,
management, problem solving in the Civil
Engineering area.
2. Conduct experiments and analysis as well
as interpret data / information in the Civil
Engineering area.
3. Describe ways to use software and labora-
tory equipment for planning, design, con-
struction and system management needs
in Civil Engineering.
4. Describe standards and regulations which
apply in the Civil Engineering feld and use
them in planning.
5. Describe legal aspects and the relation-
ship with the civil engineering industry.
6. Describe several management and eco-
nomic aspects in execution of simple civil
engineering building constructions.
7. Communicate effectively minimal in Ba-
hasa Indonesia and English and socialize
with groups in the civil engineering feld
and other felds as well as be able to work
independently as well as in a team with
full responsibility as well as high respect
to professional ethics.
15
Sutanto Soehodho
(Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1986, M.Eng. Tokyo Uni-
versity, Japan, 1989, Dr. Tokyo University,
Japan, 1992, Prof., UI, 2004) Transporta-
tion System, Traffc Engineering, Artif-
cial Intelligence, Public Transportation
Logistics, Transportation Policies.
Sulistyoweni Widanarko
(Ir, Sanitation Engineering, ITB, 1969,
Dipl. SE. Institute of Hydraulics Engineer-
ing, Delft, Netherlands, 1974, SKM, FKM-
UI, 1981, Dr., IKIP Jakarta, 1998, Prof.,
UI, 2004) Water Treatment Technology,
Clean Water Treatment System, Garbage
Treatment, Education Technology.
Irwan Katili
(Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1985, DEA. Universite
Technique de Compiegne, France, 1988,
Dr. Universite Technique de Compiegne,
France, 1993, Prof., UI, 2005) Finite Ele-
ment Method
Tommy Ilyas (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1979, M.Eng. Shef-
feld University, UK, 1983, Dr. FTUI, 2002,
Prof., UI, 2006) Structural System Plan-
ning, Geotechnical Engineering, Project
Management.
Permanent Lecturers:
Alan Marino (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1984, MSc., Wis-
consin Madison Univ., USA, 1989) Road
Pavement Planning, Traffc Management,
Transportation/Traffc Software Develop-
ment, Data Bank & Information System.
Alvinsyah (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1986, M.S.E., Univer-
sity of Michigan, Ann Harbor, USA, 1990)
Transportation System Planning, Arti-
fcial Intelligence, Traffc Engineering,
Public Transportation, Road Pavement.
Bambang Setiadi (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1979) Water
Engineering, Project Management, Struc-
tural Engineering.
Bambang Trigunarsyah (B.Sc. Colorado School
of Mines, USA, 1988, MT, FTUI, 1996, PhD,
University of Melbourne, Australia, 2002)
Construction Management, Engineering
Economics, MIS, Procurement.
Damrizal Damoerin (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1979,
MSc., ITB, 1991) Structural Planning, Soil
Mechanics.
Djoko M. Hartono (Ir, Sanitation Engineering,
ITB, 1979, M.Eng Asian Institute of Tech-
nology, Bangkok, Thailand, 1984) Clean
Water System Planning, Waste Water, San-
itation & Garbage Management, Plumbing
The spans of the above disciplines are carried
out by the Civil Engineering Study Program
and grouped to become fve interests, which
are:
1) Structure
2) Water Resources Management and Envi-
ronmental Engineering
3) Transportation
4) Construction Management
5) Geotechnical Engineering
3.1.4. STAFF
Head of Department:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Irwan Katili
Vice Head of Department for Academic
Affairs:
Mulia Orientilize, ST, Meng.
Vice Head of Department for Non Academic
Afairs:
Ir. Nachry Chadijah, MT
Head of Materials Laboratory:
Dr.-Ing. Ir. Henki W Ashadi
Head of Soil Mechanics Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Wiwik Rahayu
Head of Hydraulics, Hydrology and River
Labortory:
Ir. Siti Murniningsih, MS
Head of Structural Mechanics Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Yuskar Lase
Head of Transportation Laboratory:
Ir. Ellen S. W. Tangkudung, MSc
Head of Mapping and Surveying Laboratory:
Ir. Alan Marino, MSc
Head of Sanitation & Environment Labora-
tory:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Sulistyoweni Widanarko, Dipl.
S.E.,SKM
Corresponding Address :
Departemen Teknik Sipil
Fakultas Teknik Universitas Indonesia
Kampus UI, Depok 16424
Phone :+62 21-7270029/+62 21-787 1760
Fax. :+62 21 7270028
Permanent Proffesors :
Budi Susilo Soepandji
(Ir, Civil Engineering, FTUI, 1979, DEA
Ecole Centrale Paris, France, 1983, Dr.
Ecole Centrale Paris, France, 1986, Prof.,
UI, 1998) Soil Repair, Consolidation,
Foundation Engineering, Soil Mechanics,
Geotechnical Engineering.
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Bangkok, Thailand, 1984) Transportation
& Design Engineering, Material Proper-
ties.
Herr Soeryantono (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1982, MSc.
Civil Engineering, Michigan State Univer-
sity, USA, 1988, Ph.D, Michigan State Uni-
versity, USA, 1995) Hydrology, Hydraulics,
Ground Water, Finite Element Method,
Management Information System.
Heru Purnomo (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1985, DEA.
Insa de Lyon Universite Blaise Pascal,
Clermont Ferrand, 1989, Dr. Universite
dOrleans. France, 1993) Structure Ex-
plosion Interaction, Structural Design.
Henki Wibowo Ashadi (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1987,
DR.-Ing, TH Darmstadt, Germany, 1997)
Structural Mechanics, Bridge Design, Steel
Structures, Earthquake Resistant Struc-
tures.
IGA. Ktut Alit (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1971) Structural
Planning, Building Construction.
Irma Gusniani Sofan Danumihardja (Ir, Sani-
tation Engineering, ITB, 1979, MSc. Uni-
versity of Colorado, Boulder, USA, 1993)
Hazardous Waste Treatment.
Iwan Renaldi Soedigdo (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1978,
MSCE. The George Washington University,
USA 1988, Ph.D., Texas A & M University,
USA, 1999) Coastal and Off-shore Engi-
neering, Marine Hydrodynamics, Off-shore
Structural Planning (shallow and deep
water), Floating Offshore Structures, Sub-
marine Pipelines and Underwater Struc-
tural Systems, Harbor & Marine Design
and Planning, Finite Element Method, Sea
Energy Resources.
Jachrizal Sumabrata (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1988,
MSc., Leeds Univ., Leeds, UK, 1994, Dr.,
Melbourne University, 2004) Transporta-
tion Management & Engineering, Highway
Engineering.
Josia Irwan Rastandi (Ir. Civil FTUI, 1994, MT.,
FTUI, 1996, DR.-Ing., Technische Univer-
stat, Munchen, Germany, 2003) Earth-
quake Resist Design, Dynamics, Soil Struc-
ture Interaction, Structural Mechanics
Madsuri (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1979, MT., UI, 1995)
Concrete Structures, Material Properties.
Martha Leni Siregar (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1987, MSc.
In Transportation Planning & Engineering,
Univ. of Southampton, 1991) Environmen-
tal Effects Analysis of Transportation,
Land Surveying, Road Geometry.
Mulia Orientilize (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1996, MSc.,
System Planning.
Djunaedi Alwi, (Ir, Teknik Sipil, ITN, 1965)
Structural Planning, Structural Mechan-
ics.
Dwita Sutjimingsih SM (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1977,
Dipl. HE. Institute of Hydraulics Eng.
(IHE), Delft, Netherlands, 1981, Dr.-Ing.
Institute fr Wasserwirtshaft, Hydrolo-
gie und Landwirtschaftlichen Wasserbau,
Univ. Hannover, Germany, 1984) Coastal
Engineering, River Engineering, Hydrol-
ogy, Drainage Systems.
El Khobar Muhaemin Nazech (Ir, Civil, FTUI,
1982, M.Eng Asian Institute of Technol-
ogy, Bangkok, Thailand, 1988) Sanitation
& Environment Engineering, Draination
System, Urban & Rural Planning, Pollution
Prevention.
Ellen SW Tangkudung Karamoy (Ir, Civil, FTUI,
1982, MS. Civil, ITB, 1992) Highway Engi-
neering, Economic Analysis of Transporta-
tion Projects, Traffc Engineering.
Elly Tjahjono Sutiono (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1980,
DEA. Insa de Lyon, France, 1989, Dr. FTUI,
2005) Structural Mechanics, Concrete
Structures, Building Structure Planning.
Essy Ariyuni (Ir, Civil Engineering, ITS, 1975,
MSc., University of Wisconsin, Madison,
USA 1979) Structural Mechanics, Building
Structure Planning, Concrete Structures,
Steel Constructions.
Firdaus Ali (Ir, Environmental Engineering,
ITB, 1982, MSc., Environment Engineer-
ing, University of Wisconsin, Madison,
USA, 1998, Ph.D, Environment Engineer-
ing, University of Wisconsin, Madison,
USA, 2002) Clean Water System Planning,
Domestic and Industrial Waste Water
Treatment System.
FX. Supartono (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1978, DEA Civil
Engineering & Applied Mechanics, Ecole
Centrale de Lyon, France, 1982, Dr. Civil
Engineering & Applied Mechanics, Ecole
Centrale de Lyon, France, 1985) Struc-
ture & Foundation System Planning and
Supervision, Geotechnical Investigation,
Concrete Constructions.
Harianto Sunidja (Ir, Civil Engineering, ITB,
1964, MSc., University of Denver, USA,
1970, Ph.D University of Illinois, USA,
1982) Prestressed Concrete Construction
Planning.
Heddy Rohandi Agah (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1978,
M.Eng. Asian Institute of Technology,
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Nanyang Technological University, Singa-
pore, 2000) Mechanical Engineering, Steel
Structures, Concrete Structures, Compos-
ite Connection.
Nachry Chadijah (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1988, MT,
FTUI, 1997) Traffc Engineering, Transpor-
tation System & Planning.
Purnomo Margono (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1974) Struc-
tural Planning, Bridge Design, Concrete
Structures.
Ruswan Rasul (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1975) Project
Management, Construction Management.
Setyo Sarwanto Moersidik (Ir, Sanitation En-
gineering, ITB, 1983, DEA. Universitede
Montpellier II, France, 1988, Dr.
Universitede Montpellier I, France, 1992)
Waste Water Processing and Treatment,
Environmental Quality Treatment.
Setyo Suprijadi (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1979, MS, En-
vironment Science, UI, 1997) Structural
Planning, Construction Management,
Project Supervision.
Sigit Pranowo Hadiwardoyo (Ir, Civil, FTUI,
1985, CES. ENTPE Lyon, France, 1988, DEA
Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Dept. Mecanique
des Solides, France, 1989, Dr. Soil Mechan-
ics, 2002) Transportation Engineering, Soil
Mechanics, Road Planning, Transportation
Economics.
Siti Murniningsih (Ir, Civil Engineering, UnDip,
1979, MS, Civil Engineering, ITB, 1983)
Water Resources System & Treatment,
River Engineering.
Sjahril A. Rachim (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1977, M.Eng.
Structural Engineering, Asian Institute
of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand, 1983)
Structural Planning, Steel Constructions,
Concrete Constructions.
Suyono Dikun (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1975, MSc. Uni-
versity of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, 1984,
PhD. University of Wisconsin, USA, 1988)
Urban Transportation Planning, Traffc En-
gineering, Transportation System Manage-
ment.
Tri Tjahjono (Ir. Civil, FTUI, 1981, MSc.,
Transporation Planning & Engineering,
Leeds University, UK, 1987, Dr., Leeds
University, UK, 2004) Transportation/Traf-
fc
Widjojo Adi Prakoso (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1993,
MSc. Cornell University, USA, 1998, PhD,
Cornell University, USA, 2002) Mechanical
Engineering, Soil Mechanics and Geotech-
nical Engineering.
Wiwiek Rahayu (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1992, DEA,
Ecole Centrale de Paris, 1999, Dr. ECP,
2003) Soil Mechanics, Structural Plan-
ning.
Wulan Kajes Kaligis (Ir, Civil, Unsrat, 1988,
MSc., Post Graduate, ITB, 1992) Structural
Mechanics, Steel Structures, Statistics.
Yuskar Lase (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1986, DEA Ecole
Centrale de Lyon, Dept. Mecanique des
Soildes, France, 1988, Dr. Ecole Centrale
de Lyon, Dept, Mecanique des Solide,
France, 1992) Structural Planning, Vibra-
tion Engineering, Civil Engineering Build-
ing Instrumentation.
Yusuf Latief (Ir, Civil, FTUI, 1986, MT, FTUI,
1997, Dr., FTUI, 2006) Mechanical Engi-
neering, Construction Management.
3.1.5. CIVIL ENGINEERING STUDY
PROGRAM CURRICULUM
The curriculum is a frame of reference for or-
ganizers, students and lecturers in conduct-
ing the duties according to each role. Table
3.1 shows course structures of the both Civil
Engineering Study Program in UI and QUT.
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Semester 1 Semester 2
Code Subject Credit
ENG 11001I Calculus 4 ENG 12003I Linear Algebra 4
ENG 11006I Chemistry 3 ENG 12007I Physics Mechanics & Heat 4
3 Communication in English
3 CES 11001I Engineering Drawing
3
CES 12091I Advanced Calculus
3
ENG 22005I 3
19 20
Semester 3 Semester 4
ENG 21008I Physics Elect, Magnet,
Wave & Optics
4
CES 210921I Differential Equation
3
3
CES 22007I Engineering Geology and Solid
Property
3
2
CES 22010I Fluids Mechanics
3
3
CES 22009I Solid Mechanics
3
4
CES 31016I
4
3
CES 22011I Engineering Materials
3
19 19
Semester 1 Semester 2
CEB 317 Professional Studies 4
(Project Documentation &
Roads)
12
Structural Design
12
CES 31013I Civil Engineering System
CEB 320 Teknik Jalan Raya
12
CEB 318
Structural Engineering 2
(Steel Structures)
12
CES 32020I Construction Management
12
CES 31015I
CEB 322 Geotechnical Engineering 2
12
CES 22008I
Water Enginering
Dynamics
12
CEB 321 Water & Wastewater Treatment
MAB 138
Engineering Statistics &
Numerical Methods
12
Semester 1 Semester 2
CEB 409 Professional Studies 6
(Concrete Structure &
Geotechnical Engineering)
12 CEB 413 Structure Engineering 3
(Advanced Structural Enginee-
ring topics)
12
CEB 411 Thesis Project A 12
CEB 414
Professional Studies 7 (Civil
Design Project)
12
CEB 412 Project Engineering 2
Choose One Electives
12
Surveying (2+1) CES 21005I
Material Properties 3
CES 21006I
Credit Code
Year 1
(UI) Year 1 (UI)
Subject
(UI) (UI) Year 2 Year 2
Introduction to Civil Eng. System 3
3
CES 21004I Statics
Numerical Computing
Code Code Subject Subject Credit Credit
Environmental Studies
(QUT)
(QUT)
Structural Analysis
Table 3.1 COURSE STRUCTURE OF CIVIL ENGINEERING
Year 3 Year 3
CEB 319
Code
Subject CP Code Subject CP
CEB 323
Transport Engineering 1
(QUT) (QUT)
Year 4 Year 4
Code
Subject CP Code Subject CP
ELECTIVES ELECTIVES Semester 1 Semester 2
Code Subject CP CP Subject Code
CEB 416
CEB 507
CEB 508
CEB 509
CEB 517
CEB 523
Choose Two Electives
Environmental Law &
Assesment
Finite Element Methods
Transport Engineering1
Project Management &
Administration
Advanced Engineering
Studies
Environmental Geotech-
nology
12
12
12
12
12
12
CEB 418
CEB 513
CEB 514
CEB 516
CEB 517
CEB 518
CEB 522
Waste Resorce Manag.
Adv. Construction Practice
Project Control
Mansory Design
Adv. Engineering Studies
River & Coastal Eng.
Geotechnical & Engineering
Practice
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
with the approval from the Course Coordinator,
student may be permitted to enroll in one
elective unit from other QUT faculties
CP: Credit Point
CES 12002I
ENG 11002I
CES 32018I
19
3.1.6. SUBJECT SYLLABUS
CES 11001I
ENGINEERING DRAWING
3 sks
Study Objectives:
Recognize engineering drawing work as a
means of communication in the design pro-
cess, understanding types of drawing tools
and develop the ability to use drawing tools
manually or by Autocad, ability to read and
make drawing measurements from various
drawing scales which are highly varied.
Syllabus: Scope of the civil engineering
discipline and civil engineering building
construction Engineering drawing as a com-
munication means in the design process.
Types of drawing tools and the use of drawing
tools manually or with Autocad. Reading and
making drawing measurements from vari-
ous drawing scales which are highly varied,
various symbol types, lines and angles (Geo-
metric Construction). Drawing projections or
drawing in perspectives/ three dimensional.
Drawing cross-sections and dimensioning and
tolerance. Drawing Civil Engineering Draw-
ings (foundations, wood constructions, steel
structures, concrete structures, and piping
and welding), draw contour and site planning
or maps, graph and diagrams).
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Giesecke, F.E., dkk., Technical Drawing,
10th ed., Prentice Hall, 1997
2.Subarkah, I., Konstruksi Bangunan Gedung
3.Sugihardjo, Gambar Dasar Ilmu Bangunan
CES 12002I
INTRODUCTION TO CIVL ENGINEERING
SYSTEMS
3 sks
Study Objectives: Provide understandings
to students concerning civil engineering
system (and the environment), and intro-
duce to student concerning the process of
engineering design, including communicating
the results.
Syllabus: Engineering Analysis and Design,
Design Process, Design Documentation, and
construction technology by using the ap-
proach of Case Based Programs, in the form of
the urban settlement environment (develop-
ment of case examples of Eng. Drawing sub-
jects). Content: civil infrastructure system;
Transport, Drainage, Sanitation, Garbage,
Clean Water, Energy & Telecommunications,
Fasos-Fasum (constructions and relevant
facilities, example: education, religious
services, entertainment, government), Open
green areas, Commercial.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.R.S. Narayanan, A.W. Beeby, Introduction to
Design for Civil Engineers, Spon Press, 2000
2.Bughardt, Introduction to Engineering De-
sign and Problem Solving, McGraw Hill, New
Jersey, 1999
3.Mario Salvadori, The Art of Construction:
Projects and Principles for Beginning Engi-
neers and Architects, Independent Publish-
ers Group, 1990
4.Augustine J. Fredrich, Sons of Martha: Civil
Engineering Readings in Modern Literature,
American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE
Press), 1989
5.Matthys Levy and Richard Panchyk, Engi-
neering the City, Independent Publishers
Group, 1990
CES 12091I
ADVANCED CALCULUS
4 sks
Study Objectives:
After following this subject, students will
understand basic calculus concepts, ordinary
differential equations and partial differ-
ential equations and skills to solve applied
problems.
Syllabus: Lines and Lanes, Vector Calculus,
Ordinary Differential Equations, Lap;ace
Transformation, Partial Differential Equa-
tions.
Text Books:
1.Calculus and Analytic Geometry, 9th ed, Ad-
dison- Wesley 1996
2.Calculus, D. Varberg and E.J. Purcell, 7th,
Prentice Hall, 1997
3.Advanced Mathematical Engineering,
E.Kreyzig, John Wiley & Son, 1997
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composition of several forces, force analysis,
force balance using analysis and graphics;
Identifcation of various structure types;
Defnition of force in a structure plane, ana-
lyzing and calculating placement reactions
and internal forces in statically determinate
structures (simple beams, cantilever beams,
beams with changeable positions, Gerber
beams, beam with indirect loads, portals,
three hinged portals, hanging structures
and supports); Analyzing and calculating
truss forces in beam structures and beam
framework spaces.
Description of influential lines for stati-
cally determinate structures; Analyzing and
calculating influential line equations for
placement reactions and internal forces in
a statically determinate structure plane, as
well as calculating maximum value of forces
in a structure plane caused by moving loads
acting upon them.
Text Books:
1. Hibbeler, R.C., Engineering Mechanics Stat-
ics, Prentice Hall, 1998
2. Hibbeler, R.C., Structural Analysis, Pren-
tice Hall, 1998
CES 21005I
SURVEYING
3 sks
Study Objectives: Students are expected to
be able to explain the basic of land survey-
ing, conducting land measurement, and its
calculations as well as apply it into land mea-
surement drawings. surveying procedures,
mapping out survey results as well as utilizing
these methods in general civil engineering
works. Can be able to use measuring instru-
ments in the feld during a practicum and
implement a measurement map to the feld
in civil engineering activities.
Syllabus: Explanation of land surveying con-
cept in civil engineering work and mistake
theory; introduction to distance, angle and
other measuring tools which are usually
used in mapping and civil engineering work,
description of horizontal distance, vertical
distance, and angle measurement methods;
description of basic concepts of mapping,
width measurement, calculation of volume.
4.Elementary Ordinary differential Equations
and Boundary Value Probles, Boyce DiPrima,
Willey, 1992
5.Advanced Mathematical Engineering, C Ray
& Loise C B , Mc Graw Hill, 1998
CES 21092I
DIFFERENSIAL EQUATIONS
3 sks
Study Objectives:
After attending this class, students will be
able to understand basic concepts of ordi-
nary differential equations and partial dif-
ferential equations, be able to solve them
either through exact or numerical solutions
and can apply them in engineering problems
solving.
Syllabus: Solution of Numerical Ordinary
Differential Equations; Modeling Engineer-
ing Problems into Ordinary Differential
Equations; Solutions of Partial Differential
Numerical Equations; Modeling Engineering
Problems into Partial Differential Equations;
Modeling civil engineering problems into
Ordinary Differential Equations.
Text Books :
1. Advanced Mathematical Engineering,
E.Kreyzig, John Wiley & Son, 1997
2. Elementary Ordinary Differential Equa-
tions and Boundary Value Problems, Boyce
DiPrima, Willey, 1992
3. Advanced Mathematical Engineering, C Ray
& Loise C B , Mc Graw Hill, 1998
CES 21004I
STATICS
3 sks
Study Objectives: Students are expected to
be able to understand the basics of mechanics
concerning force, action, reaction, and in-
ternal force in various statically determinate
structures. Able to calculate and construct
internal force diagrams in various statically
determinate structures and able to calculate
and construct infuential lines of statically
determinate structures caused by moving
loads upon them.
Syllabus: General knowledge of forces, force
characteristics; calculating force resultants,
21
Usage of measuring tools, flat sipat and
Theodolite for feld data acquirement and
implementation of measurement results to
the feld in civil engineering activities.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Barry F. Kavanagh, Surveying: with Con-
struction Application, Prentice Hall, New
Jersey, 1997
2.Russel C. Brinker, Paul R. Wolf , Elementary
Surveying, Harper & Row, 1977
3.Sinaga, Indra, Pengukuran dan Pemetaan
Pekerjaan Konstruksi, LP4, Pustaka Sinar
Harapan, 1995
4.Irvine, William, Surveying for Construction,
McGraw-Hill, 1993
CES 21006I
MATERIAL PROPERTIES
3 sks
Study Objectives: Provide understand-
ings concerning important elementary and
practical aspects of materials in the civil
engineering feld.
Syllabus: Particulate Materials, Aggregates,
Portland Cement and Portland Concrete Ce-
ment, Structural Steel, Asphalt Cement and
concrete asphalt, wood, plastic and polymer,
Concrete Fibers.
Requirements: ENG 11006I
Text Books: S. Young, Sidney, The Science
and Technology of Civil Engineering Materials,
Prentice-Hall International Inc., 1998
CES 22007I
ENGINEERING GEOLOGY AND SOIL PROPER-
TIES
3 sks
Study Objectives: Student are expected to
be able to explain the basic understandings
of geology in the scope of civil engineering
applications, understand types of rocks, as
well as read geological and geomorphologic
maps and interpret rock types.
Students recognize characteristics and soil
classifcation and are able to conduct soil
condensation analysis, calculate active and
passive soil pressure using several methods,
soil energy support using several methods,
and describe laboratory tests (physical prop-
erties) as well as their use.
Syllabus: General Introduction to Civil Geol-
ogy & Engineering Geology. Understanding of
geological science, geotechnical engineering
with other disciplines / civil engineering;
Topographic and geomorphologic maps.
Understanding and individual meanings of
topography and its equipment; How to read
and analyze mineralogy, rock types, and stra-
tigraphy, introduction of mineral types which
form igneous rocks. Geological structures and
their types; How to identify and infuence
veneering, strong, fault. Non-Harmonic for
construction; Decay and soil movement.
Introduction to types, processes, and iden-
tifcation of decay. Description of classifca-
tion processes; Geological and Geotechnical
Engineering Maps. Basic topographic map
analysis. Criteria of geological and geotechni-
cal engineering maps.
Soil as a 3 phase material; Condensation
theory and CBR testing; Porosity of ground
water, permeability, fow network; Seepage
theory on turap walls; effective tension theo-
ry, effective tension principles, effective ten-
sion reactions caused by total tension change
of total tension of total and partial saturated
soil; Theories of triaxial shift strength test of
sand and clay, direct shifting, free tension;
Soil energy support: boundary energy sup-
port and allowed energy support of clay and
sand effected by vertical and oblique loads;
allowed energy support in a net condition,
allowed soil energy support at one particular
bevel; Consolidation theory: odometer test,
degradation of one dimension, tension tra-
jectory and critical voltage concept. Elastic
degradation and consolidation.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Burchfel, B.C. & Foster, R.J. et.al., Physical
Geology, Charlec E Merril Publishing Co.,
Colombus Toronto London Sydney, 1986
2.R.F. Craig, Soil Mechanics, (terjemahan oleh
Prof. Dr. Ir. Budi Susilo Soepandji), fourth
edition, Penerbit Erlangga, 1989
3.Cernica, J.N., Soil Mechanics, John Wiley &
Sons, Inc., 1995
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Requirements: CES 21004I
Text Books:
1. Introduction to Mechanics of Solids by Egor
P.Popov, Prentice Hall, New Delhi, 1979
2. Mechanics of Materials by R.C Hibbeler,
Prentice Hall, 2002
CES 22010I
FLUID MECHANICS
3 sks
Study Objectives: Have the basic ability to
understand basic behavior and laws which
apply in fuids especially as well as know
the basic law concepts as well as its ap-
plication.
Syllabus: Relationship between fuid me-
chanics and hydraulics in civil engineering;
defnition of solids, liquid and gas; concept
of continuum mechanics, intensive and ex-
tensive properties. Fluid properties; Kinetic
energy, potential energy, and work through
thermodynamics concepts as well as thermo-
dynamics scale which are relevant with fuid
mechanics. Hydrostatics; formulation of dot
and surface pressure equations as well as
their application. fowing fuid; stream clas-
sifcation; Lagrangian and Eulerian concepts,
fux and control volume. General formulation
of conservation laws of mass, frst law of
thermodynamics, Newtons second law, mo-
ment from momentum with the approach of
volume control in the form of integrals and
differentials. Internal fow; formulation of
speed profle and loss.
Requirements: Physics, ENG 11001I, and
ENG 22005I
Text Books: Mechanics of Fluids, Potter,
M.C., and D.C. Wiggert
CES 22011
ENGINEERING MATERIALS
2 sks
Study Objectives: Provide understandings
concerning important elementary and prac-
tical aspects of materials which concern
CES 22008I
DYNAMICS
3 sks
Study Objectives: Provides basic concepts
concerning kinematics of a particle, rigid
body surface and three dimensions and be
able to use work, energy, momentum and
impulse principles in solving problems of
kinematics as well as calculate vibration
responses from a one degree free system.
Syllabus: Application of Newtons Laws in
kinematics problems; Particle kinematics;
Particle Kinetics; Particle Systems; Rigid Body
Kinematics; Motion of Rigid Body Surfaces;
Mechanic Vibration: Free Vibration, Energy
Methods, Forced Vibration.
Requirements: CES 21004I
Text Books: Engineering Mechanics: Static
and Dynamics by R.C. Hibbeler, Prentice
Hall, USA, 1998
CES 22009I
SOLIDS MECHANICS
3 sks
Study Objectives: By the end of this subject
student are expected to be able to calculate
various internal forces (axial, shear, fexural
moments and torsional forces), stress and
strains occurred due to internal forces of
cross sections of simple elastic member by
considering the characteristics and laws of
mechanical materials and its combination
and be able to calculate beam defections
and column elastic buckling columns.
Syllabus: Material properties; stress and
axial deformation of statically determined
structures; stress and axial deformation of
statically indetermined structures, fexural
stress of beam; stress and torsional defor-
mation of statically indetermine structures;
analysis and design of elastic stress due to
loads combinations; stress and strain trans-
formation; yield criteria and failure criteria
of elastic buckling; beam defection; under-
standing elastic buckling theory and can be
able to use it in steel column design.
23
(Editor), Design and Operation of Civil and
Environmental Engineering Systems, John
Wiley, 1997
CES 31015I
STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS
3 sks
Study Objectives: Analysing statically in-
determined structural responses of truss,
beams and frame affected by external
loads, temperature change and degradation
of placement. Infuence lines of statically
indetermined structures.
Syllabus: Introduction, beam deflection,
statically indetermined structural analyses
of truss, beam and frame using the Consis-
tent Deformation method, Three Moment
Equation method, Slope Defection method,
Moment Distribution method and Slope De-
fection method.
Requirements: CES 22009I
Text Books: Chu Kia Wang, Statistically In-
determinate Structures
CES 31016I
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
3 sks
Study Objectives:
Provides basic principles concerning environ-
mental processing and the meaning of envi-
ronmental development from a continuation
of development activities.
Syllabus: Introduction (basic understand-
ings of ecology, applied ecosystems and
ecology, thermodynamics law I and II) Basic
Principles of Environmental Science (social
systems, ecosystem, built environment;
niche concept, energy support and elasticity)
Life Cycle and System (material and energy
cycle, hydrology cycle, food chain). Agenda
21 and Development with Environmental
Visions (Global/National/Local Agenda, so-
cial-economic pillar and the environment in
development). Development and Conception
of Contamination Control (hierarchy waste
management, pollution and waste support
the relationship of stress-strain, elasticity,
behavior depended on time, adjacent prop-
erties, atomic structures, plasticity, fatigue
criteria, fatique, ductility, and the process
of corrosion.
Syllabus: Material essentials and solids,
micro structures and surface properties;
Material responses towards stresses; Fatigue
and fracture; Rheology from fuids and solids;
Fatigue.
Requirements: CES 21006I
Text Books: S Young, Sidney, The Science and
Technology of Civil Engineering Materials,
Prentice-Hall International Inc., 1998
CES 31013I
CIVIL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS
3sks
Study Objectives: Provides understandings
to students in formulating and searching for
solutions to problems of civil engineering
systems, and introduces to student to quanti-
tative tools used in planning and management
of civil engineering systems.
Syllabus: Main topics include: mathemati-
cal modeling, engineering economy and
optimization. Techniques, covers classical
optimization, linear and nonlinear program-
ming, network theory, critical path methods,
simulation, decision theory, and dynamic
programming which is applied with the
aid of computers to solve problems in the
civil engineering feld. Using the Case Based
Program approach, in urban environmental
settlement (development of case examples
from the Introduction to Civil Engineering
Systems subject). Content: civil infrastruc-
ture systems.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Charles S. Revelle, Earl Whitlatch, and Jeff
Wright, Civil and Environmental Systems
Engineering, 2/E, Prentice Hall, 2003
2.Paul J. Ossenbruggen, Fundamental Prin-
ciples of Systems Analysis and Decision-
Making, John Wiley, 1994
3.Charles ReVelle (Editor), Arthur E. McGarity
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Dep.Pekerjaan Umum ,1991.
2.________________, Tata Cara Perencanaan
Struktur Beton untuk Bangunan Gedung,
Standar, SNI-03-2847-2002, Badan Standari-
sasi Indonesia, 2002
3.________________, Tata Cara Perencanaan
Struktur Beton untuk Bangunan Gedung,
standar, SNI-03-1729-2002, Badan Standari-
sasi Indonesia, 2002
4. Mac Gregor, J.G., Reinforced Concrete:
Mechanics and design, 3rd edition, Prentice
Hall, 1997
5. Segui, William T., LRFD Steel Design, ITP-
PWS Publishing Co., Boston, 1994
6. Wahyudi, Syahril A. Rahim, Struktur Beton
Bertulang, Penerbit Gramedia, 1997
CES 32020I
CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
3 sks
Study Objectives: Provides knowledge and
understandings as well as basic ability in
project construction management, begin-
ning from bidding / auction preparation
until the construction execution and hand
over of work.
Syllabus: Understandings of construction
projects; Preparation of bidding documents;
Legal and contract administration aspects;
Construction planning; Construction execu-
tion; Observation and operation; Manage-
ment Materials; Safety, Health and Environ-
ment; Construction Labor.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Halpin, D. W and WoodHead, R. W., Con-
struction Management, 2nd ed., John Wiley
& Sons Inc., New York, 1998
2.Duffeld, C. F and Trigunarsyah, B., Manaje-
men Proyek dari Konsepsi sampai Peny-
elesaian, Engineering Education Australia,
Melbourne, 1999
3.European Construction Institute, Total
Project Management of Construction Safety,
Health and Environment, Thomas Telford,
London, 1995
4.Clough, R. H., Sears, G. A. and Sears, S. K.,
Construction Project Management, 4th ed.,
John Wiley & Sons Inc., New York, 2000
and environmental accommodation). Tech-
nology (waste minimization, waste processing
and fnal waste disposal). Amdal, ISO 14001.
Laws and Regulations of Environmental Areas.
Environmental Cases.
Requirements: ---
Text Books:
1.Tyller Miller (1992), Living in the the Envi-
ronment, McGraw Hill, Singapore
2.RE Suriatmaja (1992), Ilmu Lingkungan
3.KLH (2000) Agenda 21
4.KLH/PPSML UI (2002), Kumpulan Peraturan
Bidang Lingkungan
CES 32018I
STRUCTURAL DESIGN
4 sks
Study Objectives: After attending this class,
students will understand about design con-
cepts, load applied on structures, structural
systems and be able to design structural
members from reinforced concrete, steel
and wood according to procedures and design
standards.
Syllabus: Introduction to structural system
analysis and design, design steps, LRFD,
reduction factor and allowable stress; Loads
and Loading: Load Forms, load types, loca-
tion of loads, load distribution, load factor
and load combination; Structural systems for
steel, concrete and wood structures; Materi-
als and cutting properties of steel, reinforced
concrete, wood, work load tension, service-
ability structures; Behavior of structural
member with LRFD towards tension, bending
and compression forces, and combination of
bending and tension forces (beam-column,
uniaxial) combination of bending and com-
pression for steel, reinforced concrete and
wood structures, according to standards
which apply; Connections.
Requirements: CES 31015I, CES 22011I
Text Books:
1.________________, Tata Cara Penghitun-
gan Struktur Beton untuk Bangunan Ge-
dung, SKSNI T-15-1991-03, Yayasan Lembaga
Penyelidikan Masalah Bangunan, Bandung,
25
6.Nawi, E. G., Reinforced Concrete: A Fun-
damental Approach, 3rd edition, Prentice-
Hall, 1996

Description of Subjects in QUT
Source : http://www.handbook.qut.edu.
au/synopses/CE.jsp
Year 3 Sem 1
MAB138
Engineering Statistics and Numerical
Methods
Credit Point 12/ week 4
Synopsis: This unit includes: presentation
of data; use of a statistical package; model-
ling data; relationships between variables;
estimation; confdence intervals; hypothesis
testing; ftting and investigating relation-
ships; regression; design of experiments;
introduction to reliability; introduction to
quality and SPC. It also includes numerical
methods; function approximation; polynomi-
al interpolation; cubic splines; power series;
numerical solution of ordinary differential
equations; linear systems.
CEB317
Professional Studies 4 (Project Documenta-
tion & Roads)
Credit Point 12/ week 4
Synopsis: Civil engineers as professionals are
responsible for the delivery of major trans-
port infrastructure items through the stages
of inception, planning, design, development,
maintenance and management. The purpose
of such projects is to improve the quality of
life of the community by offering safe and
effcient access to activity locations and mo-
bility between locations. In delivering such
infrastructure it is imperative that social,
economic, and environmental impacts and
benefts are considered and addressed. This
unit offers students an opportunity to explore
the role of the civil engineer in the prepara-
tion of a feasibility design study for a road as
a major transport infrastructure item.
CES 22012I
INTRODUCTION TO CONCRETE STRUCTURE
3 sks
Study Objectives: Study Objectives: Students
are expected to be able to design reinforced
concrete section by using the elastic method
as well as the limit strength method, caused
by internal force moments, shear, normal,
torsions, and their combinations on beam and
plate according to the SK-SNI-T-15-1991-03
regulation.
Syllabus: Basic concept of reinforced con-
crete; Characteristics of concrete and steel
stresses-strains; Compression strength char-
acteristics of concrete; Evolution of concrete
compression strength; Elasticity concept in
the design of single reinforcement and double
reinforcement of beam cross sections; Limit
strength concept, Simplifcation of Whitney
strength block, balanced failure; Analysis of
single and double reinforcement for simple
beams; Analysis of reinforcement for T beams
caused by bending moment inernal forces;
Analysis of shear reinforcement for beams;
Analyses of shear torsion reinforcement for
beams; Analysis of reinforcement caused by
bending moments and shear for statically
indeterminate beams; Analysis of one way
and two way slab using the moment coef-
fcient method, direct design method, and
equivalent portal method; Analysis of rein-
forcement for columns. Requirements: CES
31015I, CES 22011I
Text Books:
1.________________, Tata Cara Penghitungan
Struktur Beton untuk Bangunan Gedung,
SKSNI T-15-1991-03, Yayasan Lembaga Peny-
elidikan Masalah Bangunan, Bandung, Dep.
Pekerjaan Umum ,1991.
2.________________, Tata Cara Perencanaan
Struktur Beton untuk Bangunan Gedung,
Draft Standar, SKSNI-03-xxxx-2001, Badan
Standarisasi Indonesia, 2001
3.Mac Gregor, J.G., Reinforced Concrete:
Mechanics and design, 3rd edition, Prentice
Hall, 1997
4.Wahyudi , Syahril A.Rahim, Struktur Beton
Bertulang, Penerbit Gramedia, 1997
5.Wang C, K, & Salmon C. G., Reinforced Con-
crete Design, Harper Collins, 1992
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are required for the control of water-born
diseases and the provision of proper sanita-
tion for urban, rural, and recreational areas.
Water and wastewater treatment engineering
is a major feld of civil and environmental
engineering and is manifested by sound
principles and practice in terms of solving
sanitation problems.
CEB322
Geotechnical Engineering 2
Credit Point 12/ week 5
Synopsis: This unit includes: further study
on the behaviour of soil and rocks; determi-
nation of subsurface pressures from surface
loadings; soil settlement including time
related clay consolidation settlement and
immediate settlements on sand and clay as
related to shallow foundations; assessment
of bearing capacity and allowable bearing
pressures under shallow foundations; pile
foundation systems and analysis for capacity
and settlement; rock mass behaviour, clas-
sifcation and joint shear strength applied to
slope stability assessment and stabilisation
measures.
CEB323
Transport Engineering 1
Credit Point / week
Synopsis: The transport system is an essen-
tial part of our physical infrastructure. It is
imperative that civil engineers are able to
undertake typical road and traffc engineer-
ing investigations, analyses and designs.
These require an understanding of the intent
of individual road system elements, how they
operate, and how they are delivered and
managed: this understanding is developed in
this unit. Further, it is important that civil
engineers are able to undertake multi-modal
transport surveys to gain an understanding
of the operation of a particular transport
system.
CEB329
Professional Studies 5 (Steel Design &
Construction)
Credit Point 12/ week 5
CEB318
Structural Engineering 2
Credit Point 12/ week 4
Synopsis: This unit considers the follow-
ing: limit states design of steel structures;
buckling and ultimate strength behaviour
of steel structures; tension members, com-
pression members; local and global buckling
(flexural and flexural torsional buckling
modes) concepts as applied to compression
members and beams; effective lengths of
compression members and beams; design of
beams; effect of lateral restraints on buck-
ling; web stresses including web crippling and
buckling; beam-columns; bolted and welded
connections; unsymmetric bending of beams
including principal second moments of area;
shear stresses in beams of thin-walled open
cross-sections and their shear centres. Most
cold-formed steel sections are unsymmetric
and hence the latter topics are useful in
steel design.
CEB319
Water Engineering
Credit Point 12 / week 4
Synopsis: The main topics to be covered in
this unit follow: the hydrologic cycle and
its application to the estimation of runoff
from small catchments; probability and risk
and the selection of design foods; hydro-
logic data; estimation of peak runoff using
the Rational Formula estimation of runoff
hydrographs using rainfall-runoff routing
models; the hydraulic characteristics of open
channels; uniform fow, gradually varied fow
and rapidly varied fow; the hydraulic charac-
teristics of culverts and retention basins; the
operation of urban drainage systems.
Year 3 Sem 2
CEB321
Water and Wastewater Treatment
Credit Point 12 / week 4
Synopsis: The provision of a safe, wholesome
and adequate supply of water and the proper
treatment, disposal, and reuse of wastewater
are essential for protecting human health and
well-being. Water and wastewater treatment
27
ing of the physical aspect of construction
gained in Project Engineering 1 to develop
the skills needed to manage a project. Fur-
ther studies in estimating, contracts admin-
istration and cost control provide support
for a major computer simulation exercise
based on the construction management of a
complex industrial project. This experiential
component provides a framework for the
exploration of issues in the legal, managerial
and technical areas which form the basis for
the professional presentations that conclude
the unit.
CEB413
Structural Engineering 3
Credit Point 12 / week 4
Synopsis: This unit includes the following:
advanced structural engineering topics:
Space Gas, Microstan, the stiffness meth-
od. This method is developed and illustrated
by application to some structures. Plastic
analysis and the concept of plastic hinge
is introduced and applied. Basic structural
dynamics is introduced and some simple il-
lustrative examples are provided. Principles
of earthquake engineering, aesthetics in
bridge design, load paths in structures, and
approximate methods in the analysis of com-
plex structures are treated.
Year 4 Sem 2
CEB425
Professional Studies 7 (Civil Design Proj-
ect)
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: In their design project, students
should consider a selection of the follow-
ing: development planning and design; site
location; layout; characteristics; client re-
quirements; timetable; consultancy project
planning and costing; development style; site
civil design; transport impact assessment,
network; SIDRA; trip generation; impact
mitigation; intersection design; parking; site
storm water design; wastewater treatment
design; environmental geotechnical design;
contaminated ground; slope stability.
Synopsis: This unit includes the study of
steelwork: design and construction; struc-
tural systems; load paths; rules of thumb;
building layout; function and form; cladding;
element and wind loading evaluation; ideali-
sation, analysis, design action effects; space
gas, columns and rafters; trusses and bracing;
connections; knee ridges; base plate design;
procurement and fabrication; scheduling and
erection.
Year 4 Sem 1
CEB324
Credit Point 12 / NA
Professional Studies 6 (Concrete Structures
& Geotechnical Engineering) NA12
Synopsis: This unit includes studies of
concrete: design and construction; roles
of building professionals; design; current
structures; structural systems; load paths;
rules of thumb; building layout, function and
form, design effects; seismic and element
loads; structural element loading; formwork
and placement constraints; reinforced and
prestressed concrete slabs, beams and col-
umns; architectural changes, connections
and detailing; footings and foundations; bar
scheduling.
CEB411
Thesis Project A
Credit Point 12 / NA
Synopsis: Thesis A is a written report of the
literature on an area of civil engineering
practice where research and development
has been undertaken and reported. Students
demonstrate skills in problem defnition,
work planning, critical analysis of the study
material information retrieval, and appropri-
ate citation procedures. Report writing and
seminar presentation is a major feature.
Guided instruction and exercises are given
on information retrieval and bibliographic
listing and citation.
CEB412
Project Engineering 2
Credit Point 12 / week 4
Synopsis: The unit builds on the understand-
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emphasis on the planning and evaluation of
transport systems. The unit is designed to
highlight the economic, environmental and
social impacts of transportation projects.
The unit complements CEB323 Transport En-
gineering 1, by dealing in-depth with urban
transportation planning and evaluation.
CEB509
Project Management and Administration
Credit Point / week
Synopsis: This unit introduces some of the is-
sues relating to the management of construc-
tion projects from both practical and theo-
retical points of view. Topics covered include
the following: leadership and management
of organisations and people; planning of a
project; engaging of consultants, subcontrac-
tors and suppliers; co-ordination of project
activities; cost control and claims; legal and
insurance issues; information technology
issues; written and verbal communication
skills; problem solving, and managing and
preventing disputes. Assessment is practical
and progressive during the semester and
includes a fnal examination.
CEB517
Advanced Engineering Studies
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: This unit provides an opportunity
for students to learn how practicing engi-
neers design cold-formed steel and composite
structures. The unit has the following aims:
to develop an understanding of the design
process and how it interacts with the funda-
mental knowledge of materials and structural
analysis; to use advanced computer tools
for analysis and design; to work as part of
a design team; to present written reports.
Students in groups of two will participate in
projects to analyse and design cold-formed
steel and composite structures.
CEB523
Environmental Geotechnology
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Electives Sem 1
CEB416
Environmental Law and Assessment
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: The adverse consequences of hu-
man activity have resulted in the adoption
of various international treaties, enactment
of stringent legislative requirements, and a
growing demand for improved management
practices. Engineers need to be aware of the
way in which the law works, to be able to
communicate with lawyers, and to recognise
the legal and political implications of their
projects. An understanding of the local,
state, and federal governments power to
regulate development and the legal and
planning requirements and assessment proce-
dures is essential for professional engineering
practice.
CEB507
Finite Element Methods
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: The Finite Element Method is the
20th centurys solution for treating complex
problems, which had hitherto remained
impossible to solve, in several areas of en-
gineering such as structural, geotechnical,
hydraulic, electrical, heat conduction, etc.
For example the displacements and stresses
in dams, deep beams with openings, shell
structures, soil-anchors, etc, can be obtained
by finite element analysis. Basic theory
and some of the important features of the
method, engineering actions, modelling,
choice of elements, boundary conditions,
input data and interpretation of results are
included in this unit.
CEB508
Transport Engineering 1
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: This is a fnal year elective unit to
prepare students for a career in transporta-
tion engineering, as well as to provide them
with a an understanding of the analytical
processes involved in urban transport plan-
ning. It covers all transport modes and places
29
Synopsis: Graduates may work as part of a
team investigating, designing and construct-
ing solutions to waste containment and soil
and groundwater pollution problems. This
subject prepares them for this work by de-
veloping an understanding of the engineering
concepts and processes and also by intro-
ducing them to specialist techniques, such
as contaminant transport modelling, which
will be used by more specialist members of
these teams. It also prepares students for
further postgraduate study in these special-
ist areas.
Electives Sem 2
CEB418
Waste Resource Management
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: This unit addresses management of
solids and hazardous wastes generated from
domestic, commercial, and industrial sourc-
es. It includes teh following: waste minimisa-
tion; promotion of effcient use of resources;
promotion the use of waste through recycling
and energy production; viewing waste as a
resource; reducing the mass, volume and
toxicity of the waste; disposing of waste in
a socially and environmentally acceptable
manner; waste avoidance; recycling; energy
production; treatment; disposal. Waste man-
agement is an important aspect of civil and
environmental engineering education.
CEB513
Advanced Construction Practice
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: Professional engineers generally
work in a highly stressed commercial envi-
ronment with competing pressures. A student
in fnal year should be exposed to realistic
experiences. This subject integrates what has
already been taught in the specifc civil engi-
neering disciplines and requires the student
to prepare and submit a commercial tender
for a construction project. Teams of students
competitively bid for the project. In addi-
tion, relevant legal and commercial issues
associated with the tender and subsequent
administration of the particular construction
contract are covered so that the student
appreciates the realities associated with a
construction project.
CEB514
Project Control
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: Contemporary engineering de-
mands that the practising engineer needs to
master not only basic design and construc-
tion concepts but also current management
practices. Engineers, whether they are in
construction, design or maintenance need
to understand the effect that economic
decisions made at federal and state level
have on their organisations. They must also
realise that everyone has a different lead-
ership style that must be ftted into the
organisations management structure. The
subject is designed to provide an insight into
the requirements, precepts and problems
of project management of interdisciplinary
projects.
CEB516
Masonry Design
Credit Point / week
Synopsis: A structural engineer must have
the ability to analyse and design engineering
components and systems which use masonry
as load bearing and in-fll non-structural
panels. This course develops a basic under-
standing of Masonry Technology and Design
using the Australian Standard 3700. It pro-
vides an understanding of the differences
in the material properties of clay, concrete,
calcium silicate bricks and blocks. This unit
also provides an understanding of workman-
ship, site practices and construction details
of masonry. Students develop the design
skills needed for the design of masonry walls,
reinforced or un-reinforced and discuss the
difference in design procedures for the dif-
ferent masonry materials.
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CEB517
Advanced Engineering Studies
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: This unit provides an opportunity
for students to learn how practicing engi-
neers design cold-formed steel and composite
structures. The unit has the following aims:
to develop an understanding of the design
process and how it interacts with the funda-
mental knowledge of materials and structural
analysis; to use advanced computer tools
for analysis and design; to work as part of
a design team; to present written reports.
Students in groups of two will participate in
projects to analyse and design cold-formed
steel and composite structures.
CEB518
River and Coastal Engineering
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: Many civil engineers are involved
in the analysis and design of engineering
works in the river and coastal environment.
An understanding of the physical processes
taking place is a fundamental requirement
if engineers are to take an active role in the
management of this dynamic environment.
This unit builds on the fundamental prin-
ciples of fuid behaviour covered in Hydraulic
Engineering CEB217 and Water Engineering
CEB319 and extend these principles to the
river and coastal environment. It relies on a
prior understanding of physics, mathemat-
ics and solid mechanics, and basic hydraulic
engineering principles.
CEB522
Geotechnical Engineering Practice
Credit Point 12 / week NA
Synopsis: This unit considers the use of soil
and/or rock as an engineering material. The
unit includes a wide range of activities such
as: site investigation and design for build-
ing, bridge and other foundations; materials
selection, design and construction control for
dams, road pavements and embankments;
landslide stabilisation and tunnel excavation
and support. Following on from the work done
in Geotechnical Engineering 1 and Geotechni-
cal Engineering 2, this elective strengthens
the understanding of geomechanics, and
develops geotechnical investigation, design
and construction skills. Three case studies
are undertaken, selected from the following:
soil reinforcements; lateral loading on piles;
embankments on soft soil rockslope stabilisa-
tion; house foundations.
31
basic knowledge in Operational and Industrial
Management.
Naval Engineering Study Program emphesize
its education on Naval Design, Naval Produc-
tion Process, Naval Repair and Maintenance,
Naval machinary installations and Maritime
Regulations and also gives basic knowledge
and Management of shipbuilding yard.
The Garduates have dedicated themselves
in various of fields, such as: automotive
industries, maritime industries, petroleum
and gas, heavy machinaries, education in-
stitutions, research institutions and other
industries.
Vission & Mission
Vission of Mechanical Engineering Study
Program:
As an excellent centre of education and
research services in the mechanic engineer-
ing feld.
Mission of Mechanic study Program:
Improving and maintaining ability and compe-
tence of the study program to fulfil the needs
of students, industries and community.
Correspondence:
Department of Mechanic Engineering
Faculty of Engineering University of Indo-
nesia,
Kampus UI, Depok 16424
Tel. (021) 7270032
Fax.(021) 7270033
e-mail : mesin@yexa.eng.ui.ac.id
http://www.eng.ui.ac.id/mesin
3.2. DEPARTMENT OF
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
3.2.1. GENERAL
Objectives
To objective of Mechanical Engineering Study
Program is to produce systematic, logic and
rational graduates having the basic knowl-
edge of engineeing which used to analyze and
synthesize characteristic machinary, able to
design and plan mechanical equipment and
also manage production installation. Other
than that, the students also be able to man-
age a production process, analyze and solve
problems scientifcally, improving his/her
knowledge through research activity.
At the same year, Department of Mechani-
cal Engineering and Engineering Faculty
was offcially established on 27 November
1964 at Salemba, Jakarta. It has been more
than 2000 students are graduated from this
department.
Along with the development of scinece and
technology, at the beginning Mechanical Engi-
neering has 5 study program, i.e: Mechanical
Design and Construction, Energy Conversion,
Industrial Engineering, Naval Engineering and
Manufacture Engineering.
Nevertheless, in line with the standardisation
of Study Program by the Department of Edu-
cation and Culture, therefore all the study
programs were simplifed into Mechanical
Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Naval
Engineering. And since 1998, Industrial Engi-
neering has become one of the department
in the Faculty of Engineering University of
Indonesia.
At this moment, Department of Mechani-
cal Engineering has 2 Study Programs, i.e:
Mechanical Engineering and Naval Engineer-
ing.
Mechanical Engineering Study Program pro-
vides the knowledge which emphasize on
Designing feld, Energy Conversion, Produc-
tion Process and Manufacture and also gives
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Prof. Dr. Ir. I Made Kartika D, Dipl.-Ing
(Ir, FTUI, 1977; Dipl.Ing, Karlsruhe Germa-
ny, 1983; Dr, FTUI 1998) Termodinamika,
Transfer Phenomena, Tribologi.
Prof. Tresna P. Soemardi (Ir, ITB, 1980; SE,
FEUI, 1987; MSi, UI, 1985; Dr. Ecole Cen-
trale de Paris France, 1990) Perancangan
Produk, Mekanika Komposit, Pemilihan
Bahan dan Proses
Prof. Dr. -Ing. Ir. Raldi Artono Koestoer (Ir,
FTUI, 1978; DEA Univ.de Poitier, 1980; Dr,
Univ. Paris XII France, 1984; Prof., 2006)
Heat Transfer, Pool Boiling, Heat Exchanger,
Konversi Energi
Temporary Professor :
Prof. Nakoela Sunarta, Dipl.Ing
(Dipl. Ing, Karlsruhe, Jerman) Teknik Kenda-
raan, Konstruksi Kendaraan, Motor Bakar.
Permanent Lecturers :
Adi Suryo Satyo (Ir, FTUI, 1986; M.Sc. UTM-
Malaysia 1999, Dr. UTM-Malaysia,2002)
Motor Bakar, Gasifkasi Biomas dan Teknik
Pembakaran
Agung Subagio (Ir, FTUI, 1977; Dipl.Ing, Karl-
sruhe Germany, 1982) Teknik Pendingin,
Konversi Energi Turbin
Ahmad Indra Siswantara (Ir, FTUI, 1991; Dr,
UTM Malaysia, 1997) Mekanika Fluida,
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).
Ario Sunar Baskoro (ST, FTUI, 1998; MT,
FTUI,2004; MEng, Keio Univ, Japan, 2006)
Pengukuran Teknik, Mekatronika
Bambang P. Prianto (Ir, FTUI, 1985; M.I.Komp.,
UI, 1989) Teknologi Permesinan, Dasar
Komputer
Bambang Sugiarto (Ir, FTUI, 1985; MEng, Hok-
kaido Univ., 1991; Dr. Eng, Japan, 1994)
Teknik Pembakaran, Motor Pembakaran
Dalam
Budiarso (Ir, FTUI, 1977; M.Eng., NUS-Singa-
pore, 1996, Dr., FTUI, 2005) Mekanika
Fluida, Pompa dan Jet, Drag Reduction
Budihardjo (Ir, FTUI, 1977; Dipl.Ing, Karlsruhe,
1981; Dr, FTUI, 1998) Teknik Pendingin,
Pengering Udara, Termodinamika
Budi Ibrahim (Ir, FTUI, 1987; Dr, TU Berlin
Germany, 1994) CAD/CAM, Sistem Infor-
masi Manajemen
Engkos Achmad Kosasih (Ir, FTUI, 1991; MT,
3.2.2. STAFF
Head of Department :
Ir. Hendri DS Budiono, M.Eng.
Vice Head Department for Academic Affairs:
Ir. Yulianto S.Nugroho, MSc., PhD
Vice Head Department for non-Academic
Affairs:
Dr.Ing. Ir. Nandy Putra
Asisstant of Vice Head Department Academic
Affairs:
Ir. Imansyah Ibnu Hakim, MEng
Asisstant of Vice Head Department Non-aca-
demic Affairs:
Jos Istiyanto, ST, MT
Coord. of Shipping Engineering Study Pro-
gram :
Ir. Sunaryo, PhD
Head of Laboratory
Head of Mechanical Design Laboratory :
Ir. Gatot Prayogo, MEng.
Head of Mechanic Technology Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. R. Danardono A.S
Head of Thermodynamics Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Bambang Sugiarto, M.Eng
Head of Heat Transfer Laboratory :
Dr.-Ing. Ir. Nandy Putra
Head of Mechanical Fluids Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. Harinaldi, M.Eng.
Head of Manufacture Technology
Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Gandjar Kiswanto,M.Eng.
Head of Air-conditioning Engineering
Laboratory:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Bambang Suryawan,M.T.
Head of Shipping Engineering Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Yanuar, MEng., MSc.
Head of Science Group- Kelompok Ilmu (KI)
Head of KI. Energy Conversion :
Dr. Ir. M. Idrus Alhamid
Head of KI. Mechanical Construction Design:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Tresna P. Soemardi
Head of KI. Macufacture Technology:
Dr. Gandjar Kiswanto, MEng.
Permanent Professor:
Prof. Bambang Suryawan (Ir, FTUI, 1972; MT,
FTUI, 1994, Dr, FTUI, 2004) Mesin Konversi
Energi, Sistem Fluida, Pompa dan Kom-
pressor, Teknik Kendaraan.
33
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M.Eng,Yamanashi Univ.,Japan,2002)Sistem
Kontrol
Rusdy Malin (Ir, FTUI, 1980; MME, UTM-Ma-
laysia, 1995) Sistem Mekanikal Gedung,
Sistem Tata Udara
Sunaryo (Ir, FTUI, 1981;Dr, Strathclyde Univ.
- Scotland, 1992) Tata Galangan Kapal,
Teknik Pembangunan Kapal
tris Budiono M, (Ir, FTUI, 1980; MSi, UI, 1996)
Menggambar Mesin, Material Teknik
Wahyu Nirbito, (Ir, FTUI, 1982; MSME, Univ. of
Minessota USA, 1987) Turbin Gas, Motor
Pembakaran Dalam
Warjito (Ir,FTUI, 1988, M.Eng, Hokkaido Univ.
Japan 1999; Dr.Eng, Hokkaido Univ. Ja-
pan, 2002) Mekanika Fluida, Sistem
Pemipaan,Teknik Pemeliharaan.
Yanuar (Ir, FTUI, 1986; MEng. Hiroshima Univ.-
Jepang, 1992; MSc, Tokyo Metropolitan
Univ. 1996; Dr.Eng., Tokyo Metropolitan
Univ. -Japan, 1998) Mekanika Fluida,
Hambatan dan Propulsi Kapal
Yudan Whulanza (ST, UGM, 2000; MSc, FH
Aachen,Germany, 2005) Fuel Cell, Bio
Mechanics, Peralatan Industri.
Yulianto S. Nugroho (Ir, FTUI, 1992; MSc, Leeds
Univ., UK, 1995;Ph.D., Leeds Univ., UK,
2000) Teknik Pembakaran & Energi, Kajian
Batubara, Fire Safety.
ITB, 1996, Dr., FTUI, 2006) Heat and Mass
Transfer, Metode Numerik, Teknik Pen-
gaturan
Gandjar Kiswanto (ST, FTUI, 1995; MEng, KU
Leuven Belgium, 1998; Dr, KU Leuven Bel-
gium, 2003) Teknologi Manufaktur, CAD/
CAM, Robotika
Gatot Prayogo (Ir, FTUI, 1984; MEng, Toyohashi
Univ. of Technology Japan, 1992) Meta-
lurgi Fisik, Kinematika dan Dinamika, Me-
kanika Kekuatan Material
Hadi Tresno Wibowo (Ir, FTUI, 1982) Struktur
Kapal, Proses Permesinan)
Harinaldi (Ir, FTUI, 1992; MEng, Keio Univ.
Japan, 1995, Dr, Keio Univ. Japan, 2001)
Rekayasa Termofuida, Dinamika Fluida
Sistem Bereaksi, Statistika Teknik
Hempi Nartomo Prayudi (Ir. FTUI, 1984; MSc,
Univ. of Michigan USA ; Dr, Waine State
Univ. - USA, 1993) Perancangan Produk,
Proses Pemesinan
Hendri D. S. Budiono (Ir, FTUI, 1985; MEng,
Keio Univ. Japan, 1992) Teknik Manufak-
tur, Elemen Mesin
Henky S. Nugroho (Ir, FTUI, 1987; MT, FTUI,
1998) Manajemen Manufaktur, CAD/CAM
Imansyah Ibnu Hakim (ST, FTUI, 1993; M.Eng,
Univ.Kyushu-Jepang, 2000) Heat Transfer,
Konversi Energi
Jos Istiyanto (ST, FTUI, 1998;MT,FTUI,2004)
Proses Produksi, Metrologi, CAD/CAM,
Perancangan Mekanikal
M. Idrus Alhamid (Ir, FTUI, 1978; Dr, K.U. Leu-
ven-Belgium,1990) Pengeringan, Konversi
Energi, Teknik Pendingin
Marcus Alberth Talahatu, (Ir, Unhas, 1982; MT,
FTUI, 2003) Merancang Kapal, Menggam-
bar Mesin
Nandy Putra (ST, FTUI, 1994; Dr.Ing, Univ.
Bundeswehr, Hamburg - Germany, 2002)
Heat Transfer, Konversi Energi, Thermo
electric
Nasruddin (ST, FTUI, 1995; MEng, KU Leuven
Belgium, 1998, Dr.Ing, RWTH Aachen,
Germany, 2005) Heat Transfer, Konversi
Energi, Teknik Pendingin
R. Danardono Agus S. (Ir, FTUI, 1984; DEA,
Ecole Centrale de Lyon 1989; Dr. Univ.
dOrleans France, 1993) Menggambar
Teknik, Teknik Kendaraan.
R. Yongky Permana (ST, FTUI, 1997;
34
SEMESTER 1(FTUI) SEMESTER 2(FTUI)
CODE SUBJECT CP CP
ENG 12003I Linear Algebra 4
ENG 11010I
Engineering Statistics
2
ENG 12007I Physics Mechanics & Heat 4
ENG 11011I Introduction to Computer
3
ENG 12009I Basic Chemistry 2
ENG 11001I Calculus 4
MES 12002I Mechanical Drawing 3
MES 11001I
Communication Skills in English
2
MES 11003I Engineering Materials 4
MES 11023I
Introduction to Mechanical
Engineering
3
17 17
SEMESTER 3 (FTUI) SEMESTER 4(FTUI)
CODE SUBJECT CP CODE SUBJECT CP
ENG 210012I Engineering Mathematics 4
MES 22006I Kinematic & Dynamics
4
ENG 21008I Physics Elect, Magnet, Wave &
Optics
4
MES 22010I Industrial Metrology 3
2
MES 22012I Electric Power Engineering 2
MES 21005I
Industrial Safety, H & E
6
MES 22025I Fundamentals of Thermofluids Eng.
4
MES 21015I Fundamental of Mechanical Design
3
MCS 22026I Engineering Professional Studies
3
19 19
SEMESTER 5 (QUT) SEMESTER 6 (QUT)
CODE- SUBJECT CP CODE SUBJECT CP
MMB 311 Mechanics 3 12 MGB 007 Engineering Management 12
MMB 352 Fluid Mechanics 12
MMB 351
Thermodynamics 12
MMB 371 Manufacturing Process 12
MMB 382
Design and Maintanance of Mach.
12
MMB 381 Design of Mechanical Corrponent
and Machines
12
MMB 412 Finite Element Analysis
MMB 430 Advanced Materials
12
MMB 450 Air Conditioning
12
SEMESTER 7 (QUT) SEMESTER 8 (QUT)
CODE SUBJECT CP CODE SUBJECT CP
MMB 400 Industry Project or
MEB 470
MEB 470
1 Elective from:
MMB 401/1&2 Project (#) Engineering Asset Management
and Maintenance 3 Elective from:
Operations Management and
Management unit approved by
Course Coordinator
Advance Automatic Control
12
12
12
12
12
12
Industrial Noise and Vib.
Energy Management
Process Systems Design
Table 3.2.1 Course Structure
CODE SUBJECT
Technical Drawing
3
MES 21024I Engineering Measurements MES 22027I Engineering Economy
3
1 Elective from
MMB 353
12
Tribology 12
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
Design for Manufacturing 2
MMB 411
MMB 413
MMB 451
MMB 461
MMB 471
MMB 472
(#) The Student in this course must complete 60
days industrial experienced before graduating
ENG 11002I
35
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand the basic concepts
and methods of statistical data explora-
tion, inference and analysis of data in en-
gineering context
2. Be able to communicate clearly and ef-
fectively about situations involving data
and statistical analysis even when using
standard statistical methods
Syllabi:
Descriptive Statistics: Data collection, data
organization, frequency distribution,
graphic Presentation, Computing measures
of central tendency, Computing measures
of dispersion, moments, skewness, kurtosis
Probability: Basic concept and defnition,
Probability for compound events, random
variable, probability distribution, expected
value
Probability Distribution: Mathematical model
for continue and discreet probability dis-
tribution, histogram, probability density
function for normal distribution, binomial
distribution, Poisson distribution
Sampling: Sampling distribution of Means,
Sampling distribution of proportion
Parameter Estimation: Interval estimation
Estimating population mean, Estimating
population proportion, Estimating popula-
tion variance, Determining sample size to
estimate m or p
Hypothesis-Testing:General procedures of
Hypothesis-Testing, One-sample Hypothesis
Test of means, proportion, Variance and
Standard deviation, Two-sample Hypoth-
esis-Testing of means, proportion, and
Variance
Analysis of Variance:Purpose and procedure,
example of analysis of variance (ANOVA),
ANOVA table
Chi-Square Test: Purpose and procedure,
goodness-of-ft test, contingency table test
Regression and Correlation: Basic concepts,
analysis of simple linear regression, re-
lationship tests and prediction intervals,
correlation analysis
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
3.2.3. SUBJECT SYLLABUS
Calculus
ENG 11001I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand the basic concept of
calculus
2. Be able to solve calculus problems by set-
ting up the appropriate mathematical de-
scription and fnd solutions
Syllabi:
Variables and functions, limit and continuity,
derivatives, differentiation of algebraic func-
tion, differentiation of trigonometric func-
tion, differentiation of inverse trigonometric
function, differentiation of exponential
and logarithmic function, differentiation of
hyperbolic curves, implicit differentiation,
differentiation of indeterminate form, maxi-
mum and minimum values, applied problems
in maxima and minima, curvature, polar
coordinates, fundamental of integration,
integration by parts, trigonometric integrals,
trigonometric substitution, integration by
partial fractions, miscellaneous substitu-
tions, integration of hyperbolic functions, ap-
plication of indefnite integrals, the defnite
integral, plane area by integration, volume
of solids of revolutions, length of arc, area
of surface of revolution, centroids, moment
of inertia
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Purcell, Calculus with Geometric Analytic
7th Ed., 1996
Engineering Statistics
ENG11010I
2 sks
Objectives:
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porting idea of the text.
2. Be able to do a report writing with good
English
Syllabi:
Reading strategies, basic writing techniques,
developing an effective style, planning and
organizing essay, outlining and diagramming,
paragraph analysis and referencing skills
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Cintavhati Poerwoto et. al, Reading
Comprehension for Engineering Students
Technical Drawing
MES 11001I
2 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Be able to read and to transform an en-
gineering drawing based on engineering
drawing principles and ISO standards.
Syllabi:
Standardization of engineering drawing, geo-
metrical construction, visualization drawing,
projection theory, plane view and section
drawing, dimensioning, sketching.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Warren J. Luzadder, Fundamentals of
Engineering Drawing, Prentice Hall Inc.,
1981.
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
MES 11023I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
- Barnes J.W, Statistical Analysis for Engi-
neers and Scientists, a Computer-Based
Approach, McGraw-Hill, 1994
- Donald H.S, Statistics, A First Course (6th
Ed), McGraw-Hill, 2001
Basic Computing
ENG11011I
2 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand basic principles of a
computer operation
2. Be able to develop an algorithm, con-
struct a fowchart and convert it into a
program using statements
3. Be able to develop a program to solve
some simple engineering problems using
a basic programming language
Syllabi:
Introduction to computer, flowcharting,
introduction to programming language,
computer and computational work, computer
architecture, operating system, processing
unit, input, output, data storage, computer
software, computer application, concept of
information system, data communication
and computer networking, internet and
multimedia.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Robert A Szysmanski et al, Computer and
Information Systems, Prentice-Hall Inc..
1995
English
UUI 11001I
2 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Be able to analyze a scientifc text and
show the main idea as well as the sup-
37
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Anton, Howard, Elementary Linear
Algebra 7th Ed., J. Wiley and Sons, New
York, 1996.
Physics 1
ENG 12007I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand concepts and ba-
sic laws in mechanics and be able to ap-
ply them sistematically and scientifcally
in solving the problem of stationary and
moving body behaviors under the infu-
ence of applied forces
2. Know and understand concepts and basic
laws of ideal and real fuids with their cor-
responding energy transfer and be able to
apply them sistematically and scientif-
cally in solving the thermodynamic prob-
lem of heat engines
Syllabi:
Mechanics: physical quantities and units,
kinematics of particle, dynamics of particle,
conservation laws of momentum and energy,
harmonic motions, kinematics and dynamic
of rigid body, elasticity, hydrostatics, hydro-
dynamics, gravitational feld
Heat: Introuction and basic concepts, tem-
perature, pressure and fow, thermal equa-
tion of state, energy and frst law of thermo-
dynamics, entalphy and entropy, appliation
of frst law of thermodynamics in closed and
open system, second law of thermodynam-
ics, properties of pure substance, priciples
of heat transfer.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Halliday, D. and Resnick, R., Physics , J.
Wiley and Sons, New York, 1996.
1. Know and understand the general role,
status and relation of mechanical engi-
neering with other engineering feld
2. Know and understand the mechanical en-
gineering basic principles
Syllabi:
Introduction, the general role of mechani-
cal engineer, the introduction of feld of
specialties and expertise, the status and
relation of mechanical engineering with
other technological feld, engineering basic
principles, some application of mechanical
engineering, basic engineering management
and economics, technological advances in
mechanical engineering feld, function and
ethics of mechanical engineer.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Duderstadt, J., et.al, Principles Engineer-
ing, J. Wiley and Sons, New York, 1982.
Linear Algebra
ENG 12003I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know, understand, be able to explain and
use the principles of linear algebra and
relate this subject with some other engi-
neering subjects.
Syllabi:
Linear equation system, matrix, determinant
and its application (Cramer rule), introduc-
tion to vector, vector in Rn, vector space,
base and dimension in vector space, matrix
operation, equivalence, application of de-
terminant to solve linear equation system,
inverse of a matrix and its application, the
relation between equation system and ma-
trix, application of matrix to fnd the solution
of equation system
Prerequisite :
None
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Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Flin and Trojan, Engineering Materials
and Their Applications, Houghton-Miffin,
1981.
Mechanical Drawing
MES 12002I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Be able to read and to transform a me-
chanical drawing based on engineering
drawing principles and ISO standards.
2. Be able to draw an working model
3. Be able to make a mechanical working
drawing of a model
Syllabi:
Drawing simplification, special drawing,
surface texture, tolerance and drawing of
welding joint
Prerequisite :
MES11001I: Technical Drawing
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Warren J. Luzadder, Fundamentals of
Engineering Drawing, Prentice Hall Inc.,
1981.
- Walter C. Brown, Drafting for Industry,
The Goodheart-Wilcox Company Inc.,
1981
Engineering Mathematics
ENG21012I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Be able to recognise certain differential
equations of frst and second order and
fnd the general solutions to these equa-
Basic Chemistry
ENG12009I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand the basic laws in
chemistry and be able to apply them in
the analytical calculation of chemical re-
action
Syllabi:
Basic laws and stoichiometric, the structure
of atom, periodic system, solution, elec-
trochemistry and reduction and oxidation
reaction, thermochemistry, basic of organic
chemistry
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Breck, W.G., Brown, R.J.C., Chemis-
try for Science and Engineering, SI Ed. ,
Queens University, 1989
Engineering Materials
MES 12003I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand types of engineer-
ing materials, their manufacturing pro-
cess and characteristics
Syllabi:
Overview of the types of engineering ma-
terials, metal materials: types, formation
structures and characteristics, basics of
metallography, heat treatment, metal re-
sponse to mechanical treatment, non-metal
materials: types of non-metal materials in
engineering production, structures and be-
havior to mechanical treatment, composites:
manufacturing, application and characteris-
tics to mechanical treatment.
39
tion of the Laplace Transform, Laplace
Transform of some common functions,
Properties of the Laplace Transform,
Laplace Transform of derivative and in-
tegrals, Inverse Laplace Transform, Using
partial fractions to fnd the inverse Laplace
Transform, Finding the inverse Laplace
Transform using complex numbers,The
convolution theorem, Solving differential
equation using Laplace Transform, Transfer
function, Poles, zeros and s-plane, Laplace
Transforms of some special functions
Numerical Methods: Roots of equation:
bracketing methods, open methods, roots
polynomials, Linear algebraic equations:
Gauss elimination, Gauss-Seidel, LU De-
composition, Numerical differentiation and
integration: Newton-cotes, integration of
equations, integration of equation, numeri-
cal differentiation, Numerical Methods-4
ODE: Runge-Kutta methods, boundary value
problems
Prerequisite :
ENG11001I: Calculus
ENG12001I: Linear Algebra
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Warren J. Luzadder, Fundamentals of
Engineering Drawing, Prentice Hall Inc.,
1981.
Physics 2 (Electricity, Magnetism, Wave,
Optics and Modern)
ENG 12008I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand concepts and ba-
sic laws in electricity and magnetism and
be able to apply them sistematically and
scientifcally in solving the problem of
elictricity and magnetism related to engi-
neering application
2. Know and understand concepts and basic
laws of wave and optics and be able to
apply them sistematically and scientif-
cally in solving the problem of natural, ar-
tifcial wave phenomena and the physical
problems of light and geometrical optics
tions.
2. Know and be able to apply the principles
of vector calculus and other advanced
concepts of integral, in particular, line
integrals
3. Understand the principles of Laplace
Transform methods and be able to use
these methods to a solve a variety of ini-
tial value problems
4. Be able to approximate solutions to typi-
cal engineering mathematical problems
using numerical techniques
Syllabi:
Differential Equation: Introduction and frst
defnition, Modelling via differential equa-
tions, 1st order differential equations:
First order linear equation, Separable
equations, Bernoulli equations, Riccati
equation, homogeneous equations Exact
and non-exact equation, Integrating factor
technique,some appliation: Newton law
of cooling, Orthogonal trajectories, 2nd
order differential equations: Linear second
order differential equations, homogeneous
linear equations, linear independence and
wronskian, Reduction of order technique,
homogeneous linear equations with con-
stant coeffcient, non-homogeneous second
order linear equations, Method of undeter-
mined coeffcient, Method of variation of
parameter,Euler-Cauchy equations, Method
of undetermined coeffcient, Method of
variation of parameter, Introduction to
series solutions, Higher order differential
equations: Higher order linear equations,
Homogeneous linear equation with constant
coeffcient
Vector Calculus: Introduction: some review of
vectors, Partial differentiation of vectors,
Gradient of scalar felds and physical inter-
pretation, Divergence of vector feld and
physical interpretation, Curl of vector feld,
combination of grad, div and curl
Line Integrals: Introduction, Line integrals,
Evaluation of line integrals in two dimen-
sions, Evaluation of line integrals in three
dimensions, Conservative felds and poten-
tial functions, the divergence theorm and
Stokes theorem
Series: Introduction, Power series, Taylor
series, McLaurin Series, Polynomial Series
The Laplace Transform: Introduction, Defni-
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Hazard identifcation and characterization
Consequence of hazard, Safety and hazard
regulation, Environmental regulation
Risk Perception, Assessment and Manage-
ment: Risk perception and assessment,
Risk analysis and management, Fault tree
analysis
Machinery hazards: Life cycle of a machine,
Types of hazards, Machine guarding
Noise hazards: Mechanism of hearing, Hear-
ing disorder, Properties of sound, Measure-
ment of workplace sound, Other vibration
effect
Process safety hazard : Industrial process
design and operation, Mechanical integ-
rity of process equipment, Process hazard
analysis, Hazard analysis technique
Fire and explosion hazard: Fire triangle, Fuel,
Flamability limit and fame, propagation,
Fire and combustion product hazard
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Charles A. Wentz, Safety, Health and Envi-
ronmental Protection, MGH, 1998
Fundamental of Mechanical Design
MES 21005I
6 sks
Objectives:
Syllabi:
Prerequisite :
Resource Materials:
Engineering Measurement
MES 21024I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Know and understand the basic principles
of measurement of physical and mechani-
cal quantities in mechanical engineering
feld
2. Know and understand the application,
characteristics and basic operation of
measurement devices and be able to
choose and to use an appropriate mea-
3. Know and understand concepts and basic
laws of modern physics
Syllabi:
Electricity and Magnetism: electrical
discharge, Coulombs law, static electric
feld, Gauss law, electric potential, electric
potential energy, capacitor, dielectricity,
electric current, electric resistance, dirrect
current, basic of electric circuit, magnetic
feld, electromagnetic induction, Faraday
law, inductance, magnetism in a materi-
als, magnetic circuit, transient circuits,
alternating current
Waves and optics: oscillatory motions, wave
motion, sound wave, superposition and
standing waves, refection, refraction,
dispersion, Huygens principle, image
formation by mirrors and lenses, optical
instruments , interference of light, diffrac-
tion and polarisation.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Halliday, D. and Resnick, R., Physics , J.
Wiley and Sons, New York, 1996.
Industrial Safety, Health and Environment
MES 21015I
2 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Have an awareness of the importance of
safety, industrial health and environmen-
tal protection.
2. Know and understand the legal aspects
and regulations in occupational health
and working place safety, understand of
aspects of risk, recognise the types of
dangerous items in working places, and be
able to analyse the environmental impact
of industrial activities.
Syllabi:
Introduction to Regulation and Standards:
41
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Holowenko, Dynamics of Machinery, John
Wiley and Son, 1955
- Hinkle, Kinematics of Machine, Prentice
Hall, 1960
Industrial Metrology
MES 22010I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. Emphasize manufacturing science in fun-
damentals of engineering metrology.
2. Discuss the measurement processes of di-
mensional metrology and its applications
to quality control.
3. Apply the principles of engineering me-
trology by using the instruments and
equipments.
Syllabi:
Standard & Basics Geometric Specifcations,
Length Metrology, Angle Metrology, Surface
Metrology, Measurement of Form: Circularity,
Cylindricity, Straightness & Flatness, Coor-
dinate Metrology ,Machine Tool Metrology,
Screw Thread & Gear Metrology, Laboratory
Practice, Presentation & Discussion
Prerequisite :
Resource Materials:
Groover, Mikell P., Fundamentals of Modern
Manufacturing, Wiley 2nd edition, 1999.
Kalpakjian, Manufacturing Engineering and
Technology, McGraw Hill 4th edition, 2001.
Jain, RK, Engineering Metrology, Khanna
Publishers, 1979
Electric Power Engineering
MES 22012I
2 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. know and understand the basic principles
of electric power system and electric ma-
chinery
surement devices for a certain applica-
tion
Syllabi:
Basic concepts of measurement, analysis
of experimental data, basic of measuring
electric quantities and sensors, measurement
of area and displacement, pressure measur-
ment, fow measurement, temperature mea-
surement, thermal properties measurement,
force, torque and power measurement,
vibration measurement, data acquisition and
instruments calibration.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Doebelin, EO, Measurement System, Mc-
Graw Hill, 1995
- Beckwith, B, Mechanical Measurement,
McGraw Hill, 1990
- Graaft, H, Measuring Instruments and
Measuring Equipment, McGraw Hill, 1972
Kinematics and Dynamics
MES 22006I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. be able to analyse motion, velocity, ac-
celeration, inertial forces and their bal-
ance
Syllabi:
Velocity, vector analysis, free body diagram,
velocity polygon, velocity of two coincidence
points, acceleration, acceleration of two
coincidence points, Coriolis acceleration,
inertial forces, static forces, balancing of
rotating mass balancing, balancing of re-
ciprocating mass in a plane and in several
planes, fywheel, cams dynamics, gyroscophic
effects.
Prerequisite :
None
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ENG11001I : Calculus
ENG : Engineering Mathemat-
ics
ENG12007I : Physics 1
ENG : Basic Chemistry
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Schmidt , F.W, Introduction to Thermal
Sciences: Thermodynamics, Fluid Dynam-
ics, Heat Transfer 2nd Ed., John Wiley and
Sons, 1993
Engineering Professional Studies
MES 22026I
3 sks
Objectives:
This subject seeks to:
1. introduce students to the concept of pro-
fessionalism and professional practice
2. introduce students to a range of core com-
ponent of professional practice-profes-
sional ethic, personal and interpersonal,
written, oral, and graphic communication
skills dan generic computing skills
Syllabi:
Professional practice: ethics, social, global
and environmental responsibility, legal
issues, problem solving, enterpreneurship,
creativity and innovation
Engineering communication: interpersonal
skills, project management, technical
writing, writing reports, specifcations,
teamwork and the profession, communica-
tion with internet
Generic computing: information retirieval,
researching, information system, offce
software application and management
Engineering graphic: hand sketching and
introduction to CAD
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Eisenberg, Anne, A Beginners Guide to
Technical Communication, McGraw Hill,
2. be able to analyse the performance of
electric systems and components
Syllabi:
Basic concepts of electric power system:
power system elements, power generator,
electric power transmission and distribution
system, electric load and characteristics,
protection, operation and scheduling, trans-
formator, inductin machine, synchronous
machine, DC machine, transmission and
rectifcation component.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Edward Hughes, Electrical Technology
(IBS) 4th Ed.
Fundamentals of Thermofuid Engineering
MES 22025I
4 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. know and understand the basic principles
of thermofuids: conservation of mass,
energy, and momentum, particularly for
control volume analysis.
2. be able to apply the equations of state
and constitutive relationships, entropy,
and the Second Law to formulate solu-
tions, and to apply the dimensional anal-
ysis for analysing experimental data.
Syllabi:
Introduction, Basic principles in thermofuid
science and engineering, thermodynamic
concepts and defnitions, properties of pure
substances, system analyisi-frst and second
laws, control volume analysis, internal fows-
fuid viscous and thermal effects, external
fows-fuid viscous and thermal effects, con-
duction heat transfer, thermal radiation.
Prerequisite :
43
1998
- Smith, Kar A., Project Management and
Teamwork, McGraw Hill, 2000
Engineering Economy
MES 22027I
3 sks
Objectives:
On successful completion of this unit the
student will:
1. be able to use and apply the economic
concepts and analysis tools in evaluating
an engineering project proposals
2. be able to use and apply the economic
concepts and analysis tools in controlling
engineering project costs
Syllabi:
Defnition of cash fow, money concepts, the
change of money value due to time, equiva-
lence concept of money value, indicators
for comparisons of alternatives, decision
making criteria, defnition and application of
MARR, tax infuence on cach fow, substitu-
tion analysis, economic analysis for general
engineering projects
Prerequisite :
None
Resource Materials:
Text:
- Blank, Tarquin, Engineering Economi, Mc-
Graw Hill, 1994
- Grant, Principles of Engineering Economy,
Roland Press, 1994
- Newnan, Engineering Economy Analysis,
Engineering Press, 1990

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to respond to the vast growing engineering
technology development though the support
of excellent educational process, excellent
management and organization, international
standard of competence of the teaching
staff and international reputation in specifc
research activities.
ACADEMICS
Undergraduate Educational Program (S1)
The undergraduate program is aimed to
achieve graduates capable of analyzing
general and specifc problems in the feld
of electrical engineering, propose logical,
systematic and practical solutions, supported
by the right methods.
Five majors are to be selected in the 5th
semester, namely:
1. Power System Engineering.It covers elec-
trical power system, energy conversion/
diversifcation and industrial electro-
technical management.
2. Computer Engineering. It covers computer
interface and its programming, multime-
dia and networking technology.
3. Telecommunication Engineering. It covers
telecommunication system and its man-
agement.
4. Control Engineering It covers control sys-
tem, instrumentation and industrial elec-
tronics.
5. Electronics Engineering. It covers elec-
tronics devices, microelectronics, and in-
dustrial electronics.
3.3.2. LABORATORIES
Laboratory practice is applied to help the
students to learn the practical know-how of
electrical engineering. The study program is
supported by seven laboratories, namely:
1. Electrical and Electronic Measurement
Laboratory:
a. Electrical Circuit 2
b. Measurement of Electrical Units
2. Electrical Machinery Laboratory:
a. Basic of Electrical Power
b. Electrical Machinery 1
c. Electrical Machinery 2
d. Power Electronics
3.3. DEPARTMENT OF
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
3.3.1. INTRODUCTION
The Department of Electrical Engineering
is one of the frst three departments which
established on July 17, 1964, by the decree
of the Minister of Higher Education of Re-
public of Indonesia. In its development the
Electrical Engineering Department has grown
from two majors for the Undergraduate
Educational Program, i.e. Power Engineering
and Electronic & Communication Engineer-
ing, to fve majors for the Undergraduate
Educational Program and seven majors for
the postgraduate program.
The Electrical Engineering Department is
supported by 46 permanent academic staffs,
which are composed of 4 staff holding S1 de-
gree, 20 staff holding S2 degree and 22 staff
holding S3 degree and continually develop
the staffs capability with overseas training
and education. The total student body of the
department is around 1000 composed by the
undergraduate and postgraduates.
In the 1996/1997 academic year, the Electri-
cal Engineering undergraduate curriculum
has been adjusted from 160 credit units (i.e.
Curriculum 91) to 144 credit units (i.e. Cur-
riculum 96) allowing student to graduate in
approximately four years.
The postgraduate education program starts
in the 1992/1993 academic year, with the
opening of Master degree program in Electri-
cal Engineering and followed by opening the
Doctorate degree program on 1999/2000.
VISION AND MISSION
The department has the vision to become
a high standard of excellence in education
and research in the feld of electrical en-
gineering. In order to achieve such vision,
the department has defned its mission to
produce Electrical Engineering graduates
who are able to compete beyond the national
labor market. The graduates will be capable
45
Correspondence:
Department of Electrical
Faculty of Engineering University of Indo-
nesia,
Kampus Baru UI, Depok 16424
Tel.(021) 7270077-78, 78885588
(021) 7270011 ext.51
Fax(021) 7270077, 7270050
Email: elektro@eng.ui.ac.id
Website: http://www.ee.ui.ac.id
Permanent Professor:
Prof. Bagio Budiardjo ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1972;
MSc, Ohio State,USA, 1980; Dr, Elektro
FTUI,2002 ) Arsitektur Komputer, Rekaya
Protokol, Komputasi Pervasif.
Prof. Dr. Ir. Djoko Hartanto, M.Sc.
( Ir, Elektro FTUI; 1971, MSc. University of
Hawaii, USA, 1989, Dr, Elektro FTUI, 1993;
Prof. UI, 1996) Divais Mikroelektronika,
Divais Sensor
Prof. Dr. Ir. Dadang Gunawan (Ir, Elektro
FTUI, 1983; M.Eng., Keio University, 1989,
PhD, Tasmania University, Australia, 1995;
Prof UI, 2004) Teknik Pemrosesan dan
Pemampatan Sinyal, Komunikasi Multimedia
Prof. Dr. Ir. Eko Tjipto Rahardjo ( Ir, Elektro
FTUI, 1981; MSc, University of Hawaii,
1989; Ph.D, Saitama University, Jepang
1996) Elektromagnetik, Antena dan Propa-
gasi Gelombang, Gelombang Mikro
Prof. Ir. Harry Sudibyo S ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1979;
DEA Univ. Paris VI, 1984, Dr. Ing. Univ. Paris
VI, Perancis, 1987 ) Mikroelektronika &
Perancangan Rangkaian Terpadu
Prof. Ir. Rinaldy Dalimi, M.Sc, Ph.D. ( Ir, Elektro
FTUI, 1980; M.Sc. Michigan State Univ.,
USA, 1989; PhD, Virginia Tech., USA, 1992)
Analisis Sistem Tenaga Listrik, Manajemen
Energi
Prof. Dr. Ir. Sar Sardy, MEng.Sc.
( Ir, ITB; MEng.Sc, Elektro FTUI; Dr, Elektro
FTUI; Prof. UI, 1999) Kecerdasan Buatan,
Pengolahan Citra, Computer Vision, Soft-
computing
Prof. Dr. Ir. Zuhal, MSc.EE
( B.Sc., Univ. Tokyo, 1966; MSc.EE, Univ.
of Southern California, 1976; Dr, Elektro
FTUI, 1985; Prof. UI, 1995) Perencanaan &
Pengusahaan Sistem Tenaga Listrik.
3. Electrical Power System Laboratory:
a. Analysis of Electrical Power System
b. Electrical Power Computation
4. Electronic Laboratory:
a. Basic of Electronics
b. Electronics Circuitry
5. Control Laboratory:
a. Control System
b. Digital Control System
6. Digital Laboratory
a. Basic of Digital System
b. Microprocessor
c. CAD-VLSI
d. Algorithm and Programming
7. Telecommunication Laboratory:
a. Basic of Telecommunication
b. Transmission line
c. Radio and Television Engineering
d. Antenna and Propagaion
3.3.3. ACADEMIC STAFF
Head of Department:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Eko Tjipto Rahardjo
Vice Head of Department for Academic Af-
fairs:
Muhammad Salman, ST, M.I.T.
Vice Head of Department for Non-Academic
Affairs:
Aries Subiantoro, ST.,M.Sc.
Head of Elictric Measurements and High Volt-
age Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. Iwa Garniwa M.K.,M.T.
Head of Electricity Energy Conversion
Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Uno Bintang Sudibjo
Head of Electricity Power System
Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Rudy Setiabudy
Head of Electronical Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Nyi Raden Poespawati
Head of Control Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. Ir. Feri Yusivar, M.Eng.
Head of Digital Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. APP Ratna, M.Eng.
Head of Telecommunication Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Gunawan Wibisono, M.Eng.
Head of Computer Network Laboratory :
F. Astha Ekadiyant, ST, M.Sc.
Head of Opto Electronics Laboratory :
Dr. Ir. Doddy Sudiana, M.Eng.
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kasi Gelombang Mikro
Gunawan Wibisono ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1990;
MEng, Keio University, Jepang, 1995; Ph.D
1998) Pengkodean & Telekomunikasi Tanpa
Kabel, Komunikasi Optik
Hartono Haryadi ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1972;
M.Phil., Univ. Stratchclyde, Inggris 1989)
Jaringan Telekomunikasi
Harmein Gani ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1975 ) Ilumi-
nasi, Instalasi Listrik Konsumen
I Made Ardita ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1985, M.T.
FTUI, 2000) Konversi Elektro Mekanik, Per-
encanaan Sistem Tenaga Listrik.
Iwa Garniwa MK ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1987; MT
Elektro FTUI, 1998, Dr, Elektro FTUI, 2003 )
Tegangan dan Arus Tinggi, Material
Kalamullah Ramli ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1993;
M.Eng. Univ. of Wollongong, Australia,
1997, Dr.Ing, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, 2003)
Multimedia, Jaringan Aktif, Komputasi
Pervasif
Martin Roekman ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1984; DEA,
INPG Grenoble, 1989, Dr, INPG Grenoble,
Perancis, 1994 ) Kendali Motor, Elektronika
Daya
Muhammad Asvial ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1993;
M.Eng., Keio Univ., Jepang, 1998; PhD, Sur-
rey Univ. Inggris, 2003)
Spread Spectrum, Komunikasi Bergerak dan
Sistem Multimedia, Komunikasi Satelit
Muhammad Salman (ST, Elektro FTUI, 1995;
M.Info Tech, Monash University, Australia,
2002) Jaringan Komputer, Multimedia
Nji Raden Poespawati ( Ir, Elektro FTUI,
1985, MT. Elektro FTUI, 1997, Dr Elektro
FTUI, 2004) Divais Sel Surya, Laser
Ridwan Gunawan ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1978; MT,
Elektro FTUI, 1994; Dr., FTUI, 2006) Trans-
misi & Keandalan Tenaga Listrik
Riri Fitri Sari ( ST, Elektro FTUI, 1994; MSc.
Sheffeld, 1998; PhD, Leeds Univ. 2004)
Rekayasa Perangkat Lunak, Jaringan Aktif,
Komputasi Pervasif
Rochmah NS ( Ir, ITB; MEng.Sc, UI, 1982 )
Komunikasi Fotonik & Satelit
Rudy Setiabudy ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1982; DEA,
INPG Grenoble, Perancis, 1987; Dr, Mont-
pellier II USTL, Perancis, 1991) Teknologi
Bahan Listrik, Pengukuran Besaran Listrik
Sayyid Kamil ( ST, Elektro FTUI, 1995 )
Elektronika Daya
Sri Redjeki ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1985; Dipl.Ing,
Jerman , 1995) Teknik Tegangan Tinggi
Temporary Professor :
Prof. Ir. Abdul Kadir (Ir. ITB 1955, Prof. UI,
1978) Energi
Prof. Dr. Muhammadi S. (PhD. Polytechnic
Brooklyn, USA, Prof. UI, 1983) Sistem Ken-
dali, Pemodelan&Simulasi
Permanent Lecturers :
Anak Agung Putri Ratna ( Ir, Elektro FTUI,
1986; M. Eng., Waseda University. Jepang.,
1990; Dr., FTUI, 2006 ) Jaringan Komputer,
Sistem Informasi Berbasis Web.
Abdul Muis (ST, Elektro FTUI, 1998; M.Eng,
Keio University, 2005; Dr., Keio University,
2007) Rekayasa Perangkat Lunak Kendali
Agus Rustamadji Utomo ( Ir, Elektro FTUI,
1985 , M.T. FTUI, 2000) Sistem Energi
Agus Santoso Tamsir ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1987;
MT Elektro FTUI, 1996 ) Komunikasi Optik,
III-V Compound Devices,MEMS.
Amien Rahardjo ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1984 ; MT,
Elektro 2004) Elektromagnetik, Konversi
Energi Listrik
Arman Djohan Diponegoro ( Ir, Elektro FTUI ,
1981) Jaringan Telekomunikasi
Arifn Djauhari ( Ir, Elektro, ITB, 1975; MT
FTUI, 1999 ) Regulasi Transmisi Telekomu-
nikasi
Aries Subiantoro (ST,FTUI,1995;M.Sc. Univ.
Karlsruhe, 2001 )Sistem Kendali Cerdas,
Identifkasi Sistem.
Arief Udhiarto (ST, Elektro FTUI, 2001, MT,
Elektro FTUI,2004) Divais Mikroelektronika,
Sel Surya Silikon
Djamhari Sirat ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1972; MSc.
UMIST, PhD, UMIST, Inggris, 1985 ), Regulasi
Telekomunikasi
Dodi Sudiana ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1990, MEng,
Keio University, Jepang, 1996, Ph.D., Chiba
Univ. 2005) Teknologi Pemrosesan Sinyal,
Penginderaan Jauh
Endang Sriningsih ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1976;
MT, Elektro FTUI , 1995), Sistem Dijital,
Jaringan Komputer
F. Astha Ekadiyanto (ST, Elektro FTUI,1995)
Divais Mikroelektronika dan Divais Sensor,
Multimedia, Jaringan Aktif.
Feri Yusivar ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1992; M.Eng.
Waseda University, Jepang, 2000; PhD,
Waseda University, Jepang,2003 ) Pen-
gaturan Sistem, Kendali Motor
Fitri Yuli Zulkifi (ST, Elektro FTUI, 1997; MSc,
Univ.Karlsruhe,2002 ) Antena dan Komuni-
47
Suharwan Argadikusuma ( Ir, Elektro FTUI,
1979; MM, FEUI, 1991 ) Sistem Informasi
Manajemen
Supranyoto ( MSc, Institute Energy Moskwa,
Rusia, 1969) Konversi Elektromekanik,
Teknik Tenaga Air
Uno Bintang Sudibyo ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1972;
DEA, INPG Grenoble, Perancis, 1987; Dr,
Univ. Montpellier II USTL, Perancis, 1991 )
Konversi Energi Listrik
Wahidin Wahab ( Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1978; MSc,
UMIST 1983; PhD, UMIST, 1985 ) Teknologi
Kendali, Otomatisasi & Robotika1985 , M.T.
FTUI, 2000) Sistem Energi
Temporary Lecturers:
Budi Sudiarto (ST, Elektro FTUI, 2001) Tegan-
gan dan Arus Tinggi, Pengukuran
Djoko Prasetyo (Ir, Elektro ITB, 1981, Dr.
Univ.of N.S.W.Australia, 1996) Proteksi
Sistem Tenaga Listrik
Fajardhani (Ir, Elektro FUI, 1989) Manajemen
dan Ekonomi Teknik
Luhur Bayuaji (ST,Elektro FTUI, 2000) Jarin-
gan Komputer, Multimedia
Gunawan Witjaksono (PhD, wisconsins-
Maddi son, USA) Photoni c Devi ce,
Semiconductor
M.Suryanegara (ST, FTUI, 2003; M.Sc.,UCL,
2004) Strategi Telekomunikasi, Wireless,
Pemrosesan Sinyal
Natalia Evianti (ST, Elektro FTUI, 2000) Jarin-
gan Komputer, Sistem Dijital
Purnomo Sidhi (PhD,Texas-Arlington, USA)
Laser, Semiconductor, Photonic, Physics
Riarno Hidayat (Ir, Elektro FTUI,1984) Elek-
tronika
Soegianto ( Drs, Biokimia-UI, 1961, Ir, Elektro
FTUI, 1974 ) Teknologi Kontrol, Elektronika
Kedokteran
Widjanarto (Ir, Elektro FTUI, 1971) Jaringan
Cerdas
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3.3.4. Electric Engineering Study Program Curriculum
Semester 1 (UI) Semester 2 (UI)
Code Subject CP Code Subject CP
4
2
2
2
4
4
3
1
3
Communication Skills in English
Physics Elect, Magnet, Wave
& Optics
Calculus
4
3
2
2


Semester 3 (UI) Semester 4 (UI)
Code Subject CP Code Subject CP


Semester 5 (QUT) Semester 6
Code Subject Code Subject


Semester 7 Semester 8
Code Subject Code Subject

ENG 12011I
TKF 11030I
EEE 11001I
EEE 11002I
Basic Computing & Practice
Fundamental of Electronics
Basic Energy Systems
TKF 22019I
EEE 22014I
TKF 22021I
EEE 31020I
EEE 22017I
EEE 22018I
EEE 31024I
Mathematics 4 (C)
Electric Circuits 2
Numerical Methods
Electromagnetic Field Theory
Information Infrastructure
Fund. of Computer Systems
Fund. of Compluter system Pract.
18
18
ENG 12003I
ENG 12007I
EEE 12003I
EEE 12005I
EEE 12006I
EEE 12004I
Linear Algebra
Physics Mechanic & Heat
Fundamental of Digital Systems
Algorythm & Programming
Electric Units Meas. & Pract.
Fund. of Digital Systems Pract.
4
4
3
3
3
1
18
Mathematics 3 (A3)
Environmental Science
Fund. of Electric Power Eng.
Electronic Circuits
Electric Circuits1
Fund. of Telecommunications
Fund. of Electronics Practice
Electrical Power Eng. Fluid.
Practice
TKE 21014I
TKF 30009I
EEE 21008I
EEE 21009I
EEE 21007I
EEE 21011I
EEE 21010I
EEE 210221
3
2
2
3
4
2
1
1
18
EEB 511
EEB 512
EEB 560
EEB 584
Modern Control & Power Electronics
Industrial Electronics & Digital Design
Digital Communication
Introduction to Design
Software Systems Design
Fields Transmission & Propagatio
Advanced Design
Select one of
Digital Signal Processing
Power Systems Analysis
EEB 612
EEB 641
EEB 684
EEB 640
EEB 650
EEB 781 Professional Studies 2
EEB 889-2 Project
General Elective
Elective Unit-3
Elective Unit-4
Studies in this course must complete days/of industrial experience before graduating
Tabel 3.3.1 Course Structure
ENG 11001I
ENG 11002I
49
3.3.5. SUBJECT DETAILS
at University Indonesia (UI)
EEE 11001I
FUNDAMENTAL OF ELECTRONICS
2 sks
Objectives :
To understand the principle, the work of
electronics component.
Syllabi:
Basic of semiconductor. p-n junction diode.
bipolar transistor . feld effect transistor. Ba-
sic low frequency amplifer. Op-amp charac-
teristic. circuit and power amplifer system
Prerequisite :
None
Resource materials:
jacob Millman and Arvin Grabel, Microelec-
tronics, McGraw-Hill Int, Ist ed., 1998
EEE 11002I
BASIC OF ENERGY SYSTEMS
2 sks
Objectives :
understand various resource of energy, basic
concept of energy technology, transformer
equipments and energy-growth.
Syllabi:
Congeniality of basic of energy, fossil energy,
water energy, nuclear energy, earth heat
energy , solar cell energy, wind energy,
biomass energy, and alternatives technology
of energy, transformer energy equipments
for produce electric power and other ap-
plication.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource materials:
A.Kadir, Energi, UI Press, Jakarta, 1995
EEE 12003I
Fundamental of Digital System
2 sks
Objectives :
comprehending design of circuit system using
digital component
Syllabi:
information representation, number system,
number system. boolean algebra, combina-
tion logic circuit, NAND-NOR, XOR gate, MSI
and LSI sequential circuit and register and
counter, memory and programmable logic
device.
Prerequisite :
None
Resource materials:
Morris Mano and Charles R.Kime, Logic and
Computer Design Fundamentals, Prentice
Hall Inc., New York, 1997.
EEE12004I
Fundamental of Digital System Practice
1 sks
Objectives :
improving the understanding of digital el-
ementary items, principle work of combina-
tion circuit and sequential circuit and also
design and analyse both types of the circuit
above using all related/relevant component
digital.
Syllabi:
combination circuit, start from Boolean
algebra up to digital aritmatics. Sequential
circuit : fip-fop, counter, and register with
shift and parallel operation. Digital circuit
application for combination circuit and se-
quential circuit.
Prerequisite :
EEE12003I
Resource materials:
Buku Panduan Praktikum Laboratorium Dasar
Dijital, 1999
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EEE 21007I
Electric Circuit s1
4 sks
Objective :
Analyze electrical circuit
Syllabi : Defnition and set of electricity
circuit, eksperimental Law, Analysis simple
circuit of Inductance and Capacitance, RL
and RC circuit without Source, RLC circuit,
Sinusoidal Function, Phasor Concept, Sinu-
soida Steady State Response.
Prerequisite :
TKE 11019I
Resource materials:
Hyat, William H. Jr. & Jack E. Kemmerl,
Rangkaian Listrik Jilid 1, ed.4 Erlangga,
Jakarta, 1998
EEE 21008I
Fundamental Electrical Power Engineer-
ing
2 sks
Objective :
Understand basic concept of electrical power
, power plant equipment, distribution and
usage of electrical power.
Syllabi :
principal of basic electrical power , basic
of magnetism and electromagnetism, Pha-
sor and three Phase Circuit, average power
and its calculation, basic and work principal
of transformator, induction motor, shyn-
cronous motor, DC machines, introduce to
power transmission, introduce to power
electronic.
Prerequisite :
TKE 11019
Resource materials:
Zuhal, Dasar Teknik Tenaga Listrik dan Elek-
tronika Daya, P.T. Gramedia Pustaka Utama,
Jakarta, 1992
Chapman, S.J. , Electrical Machins Fund. , 3
ed., McGraw Hill, 1999
EEE 12005I
Algorithm and Programming
3 sks
Objectives :
comprehending elementary algorithm and
advanced algorithm and also can apply the
the algorithm for trouble-shooting by using
programming language
Syllabi:
Development of software, introduce data
structure and abstract data type, modular
programming, array, repository and retriev-
ing process of data from fle, sequence and
searcing of data, stack and queue algorithm,
linked list and Recurssion algorithm
Prerequisite :
TKE 11027I
Resource materials:
Larry Nyhoff & Sanford Leestma, Data Struc-
tures and Program Design in Pascal, MacMil-
lan, Prentice Hall Inc., 1992
Robert Kruse, CL.Tondo, Bruce Leung, Data
Sructures and Program Design in C, 2nd ed.,
1997
EEE12006I
Electrical measurement & Practice
2 sks
Objectives :
Know and understand measurement device ,
measurement part and able to use in electri-
cal power system
Syllabi:
Basic and work principal of measurement
device, work and safety procedure of using
measurement device, AC/DC analog measure-
ment device, oscilloscope, measurement of
resistance, power, and isolation resistance,
measurement of grounding system
Prerequisite :
None
Resource materials:
Stanley Wolf, Guide to Electronic measure-
ment and labolatory practice, Prentice hall
51
EEE 210121
Fundamental of Telecommunication Prac-
tice
1 sks
Objectives :
improving the understanding of materi syl-
labi, have practical knowledge, knowing
componen, equipment and measurement
device which used to,improve the analysis
and synthesis technical matter.
Syllabi:
Microphone and Loudspeaker, PABX, basic
radio connection, attenuation
Prerequisite :
EEE 21011I
Resource materials:
Buku Panduan Praktikum Laboratorium
EEE21010II
Fundamental of Electronic. Practice
1 sks
Objectives :
improving the understanding of basic elc-
tronic dan electronic circuit ,have practical
knowledge of componen, equipment and
measurement device which used to,improve
the analysis and synthesis technical matter.
Syllabi:
According to lecture item of basic electronic
and electronic circuit subject
Prerequisite :
EEE 11011, EEE 210091
Resource materials:
Buku Panduan Praktikum
EEE 22014I
Electric Circuit 2
2 sks
Objectives :
Analyze electrical circuit (advance)
Syllabi:
EEE 21009I
Electronic Circuit
3 sks
Objectives :
Count and Analyze the parameter and per-
formance of electronic circuit
Syllabi:
Amplifer circuit. Amplifer frequency re-
sponse, Feedback Amplifer, Stability and
feedback amplifer frequency response, wave
generator circuit.
Prerequisite :
EEE 11011
Resource materials:
Jacob Millman and Arvin Grebel: Microelec-
tronics, Mc-graw Hill intl. Edition, 1988
Sutanto : Rangkaian Elektronika. Analog dan
Terpadu. UI-Press, 1997
EEE 22017I
Information Infrastructure
4 sks
Objectives :
Understand and analyze infrastructure of
information network generally with telecom-
munication network parameter and Commu-
nication process on Computer network
Syllabi:
General Concept of infrastructure of infor-
mation , PSTN network, Private network,
numbering, routing, charging, Signalling.
syncronisation and transmission. Introduc-
ing network layer, physical layer, data-link
network, sub medium acces network and
others network
Prerequisite:
none
Resource materials:
J.E Flood, Telecommunication switching,
Traffc and Network, Prentice-Hall, Int. Ltd.
, 1994
A. Tanenbaum, Computer Network, 3rd ed.,
Prentice-Hall , 1996
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The unit covers the basics of accounting
practice, types of companies, marketing
principles, business plans, intellectual prop-
erty and statutory obligations on company
managers. There should be adequate skills
for young professional engineers to start
or be an active partner in a small business.
Personnel management skills are developed
including assertion training, interpersonal
relationships, organisational change, profes-
sional ethics and negotiation.
EEB650 Power Systems Analysis
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB511
Synopsis:
Power system economics: costs of losses, tar-
iffs, plant selection, the National Electricity
Market. Power fow calculation algorithms.
Protection systems: transformer protection
motor protection, feeder protection. Setting
of IDMT relays. Quality of electricity supply.
Surge phenomena in lines and machines.
Switching and lightning surges solution by
EMTP. Harmonic analysis of interconnected
networks. Electrical safety: earth electrodes,
evaluation of step and touch potentials.
EEB640 Digital Signal Processing
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB440, MAB135
Synopsis:
The unit comprises the area of Digital Signal
Processing and provides students with the
fundamentals of discrete-time signal process-
ing; discrete Fourier transform; discrete con-
volution; digital flters and spectral estima-
tion, with examples and applications arising
from various disciplines, so as to prepare the
student to solve practical problems.
EEB684 Advanced Design
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB584
Contact hours:
Sinusoidal analysis. Average Power and
Value of RMS. Multi-Phase Circuit. Complex
frequency. Frequency Response. Magnetic
couple circuit., Four Pole Networks
Prerequisite:
EEE 21007I
Resource materials:
Hyatt, william H. Jr. & Jack E. Cammerly,
Rangkaian Listrik Jilid 1 & 2, ed 4. Penerbit
Erlangga, Jakarta 1988
SUBJECT DETAILS
at
Queensland University of Technology
(QUT)
EEB889 Project
Credit points: 24
Prequisite(s):
The student must have completed the frst
three years of the course
Corequisite(s):
This unit must be done in the fnal year of
the course
Synopsis:
This unit is divided into two parts: EEB889-1
and EEB889-2. Students normally complete
part 1 in semester 1 and part 2 in semester
2 in their fnal year of study. An engineering
project on a specifed topic is completed;
the work will require design, computing,
construction, experimental work and practi-
cal testing with the submission of appropri-
ate reports; the topic is selected from any
area which involves electronics, computing,
control, communication, signal processing,
electrical power, or aerospace/avionics. The
project may include programming, circuit
and system design.
EEB781 Professional Studies 2
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): BNB007
Synopsis:
53
Synopsis:
Detailed design and realisation of typical
electronic subsystems used in all areas of
electrical and electronic systems engineer-
ing. The unit enhances the students ability
in solving complex engineering problems. The
design builds on the theoretical knowledge
gained in other units. The student is required
to write a detailed technical report and also
give an oral presentation on her/his design.
EEB641 Fields Transmission and Propaga-
tion
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): MAB135
Synopsis:
Fundamental concepts of static and time
varying electromagnetic felds; Maxwells
equations and the characteristics of their
solution, such as wave equations, losses in
various media and energy fow; numerical
methods; transmission line theory, terminat-
ed line, Smith Circle Chart usage and lattice
diagram; propagation modes in waveguides
and optical fbre; free-space propagation,
refection, refraction, diffraction; basic an-
tenna theories and antenna parameters, Friis
transmission equation, half-wave dipole,
two-element array.
EEB612 Software Systems Design
Credit points: 12
Synopsis:
The unit introduces students to Software
Engineering by considering a whole Soft-
ware Lifecycle. Each step of the lifecycle
is treated in detail, such as concept phase,
requirement defnition, software design, hu-
man-computer interaction, implementation,
audits, and maintenance. Software design
principles and techniques are presented as
well as real-time system design. CASE devel-
opment tools are briefy introduced as well
as object oriented programming for which
a structured Object Oriented Analysis and
Design are considered.
EEB584 Introduction to Design
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB412
Synopsis:
Introduction to general principles of elec-
tronic circuit and electrical equipment design
and realisation; design and implementation
of basic electronic circuits; experience in
undertaking engineering projects, in report
writing, and working in teams. The unit
gives students the opportunity to apply their
theoretical knowledge to real-life engineer-
ing problems.
EEB560 Digital Communications
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB440
Synopsis:
Revolutionary developments in the field
of Digital Communication Technology have
enabled improvement in the characteristics
of communication systems in order to meet
the performance requirements for transmis-
sion of information for private, business
and industrial applications. This unit which
covers Elements of a Digital Communication
System aims at providing the students with an
in-depth understanding of the theory and ap-
plications of digital communication systems
and technology.
EEB512
Industrial Electronics and Digital Design
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB412
Synopsis:
Modules Electronics C and Digital Systems
Design provide a basic understanding of
linear and switch applications in industrial
electronics. Practical knowledge associated
with interfacing and design are developed.
Students will also study the theory and de-
sign of advanced embedded digital systems
and practical implementation. The practi-
cal application of these circuits including
interfacing and environment factors will be
considered.
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EEB511
Modern Control and Power Electronics
Credit points: 12
Prequisite(s): EEB411
Synopsis:
The unit comprises the modules Control
Systems B and Power Electronics. Control
Systems B introduces students to discrete-
time control by extending the conventional
control into the discrete-time domain. As a
second part of Control Systems B, the state
model oriented approach for designing
control systems is introduced. The second
module covers power rectifcation, controlled
rectifcation, inverters, AC and DC drives,
uninterrupted power supplies, power switch-
ing components.
55
Activities
Activities of the department include teach-
ing, research, consulting and assisting with
the continuing needs of industry and the com-
munity. There are 6 laboratories to support
undergraduate teaching: Chemical Metal-
lurgy, Physical Metallurgy, Processing Metal-
lurgy, Mechanical Metallurgy, Corrosion and
Heat Treatment Laboratories. Some advanced
equipment are also available for research,
such as SEM (scanning electron microscope),
XRD (x-ray diffraction), Image analyser, Mag-
netic particle, X-ray radiography, Ultrasonic
testing, Creep testing, Thermal Analysis, and
Atomic Absorption Analysis.
The research activities in the department
cover both fundamental and applied re-
search and have a broad range of interests,
including:
- Alloy design and casting
- Materials processing: hot and cold defor-
mation
- Microstructure and property relationship
- Corrosion and metal protection
- Composite and advanced materials
- Powder metallurgy
The department enjoys a strong cooperation
with industry, such as PT. Krakatau Steel
(steel industry), Toyota Motor Manufacturing,
PT. Timah, Indonesian Power, PT. KHI Pipe,
PT. Natra Raya, PT. Caltex, PT. Teknokraft-
indo. It also has a strong collaboration with
research and government institutions as
well as professional association, such as
LAPAN (Indonesian Space and Aeronautical
Institute), BPPT (Agency for Assessment and
Application of Technology), INAPLAS (The In-
donesian Olefn and Plastic Industry Associa-
tion), API (Indonesian Welding Association).
Collaboration with various research centres
within the Ministry of Industry and Trade is
now underway to support the development
of the new polymer stream. The department
is also delighted with a reasonably high level
of research funding coming from the govern-
ment (Integrated Advanced Research (Riset
Unggulan Terpadu,
3.4. DEPARTMENT OF
METALLURGY & MATERIAL
ENGINEERING
3.4.1. INTRODUCTION
The Department of Metallurgy at the Uni-
versity of Indonesia was established in 1965
as the frst Indonesias department in that
branch of engineering. The founding chair-
man was Dr.Ing Purnomosidhi Hadjisaroso.
The department was started with only 25
students. However, due to lack of academ-
ics and laboratory facilities, the department
was closed down in 1969. It was then opened
again in 1975 with 40 new students. Since
then, the Department has fourished to be-
come one of Indonesias leading metallurgical
engineering departments. Currently, the de-
partment comprised of 26 full-time academic
staff, around 300 undergraduate students
and 20 postgraduate. The department have
~ 1400 graduates, spreading in various feld
of work around the world.
In 2002, the name of the department was
changed into the Department of Metallurgy
and Materials, in order to keep pace with
the development in materials science and
engineering. Alongside, the undergraduate
curriculum is also revised, in which two
streams will be offered in 2004, that is:
- Metallurgy stream
- Polymer stream
Vision and Mission
The vision of the department is to become
a centre of excellence in education and
research in metallurgy and materials in
Indonesia.
One mission of the department in to produce
graduates who are able to select, to process
and to control the properties of materials for
given applications. The graduates are also
prepared to have an ability to analyse failure
of materials during process and operation.
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RUT), Joint Advanced Research (Riset Unggu-
lan Kemitraan) as well as from international
institutions such as the Osaka Gas Foundation
and Toray Foundation Japan.
3.4.2. STAFF
Head of Departement :
Dr. Ir. Dedi Priadi
Vice Head of Department for Academic
Affair:
Ir. Anne Zulfa, M.Phil.Eng, Ph.D.
Vice Head of Department for Non Academic
Affairs:
Dwi Marta Nurjaya, ST, MT
Head of Chemical Metallurgy Laboratory:
Ir. Rini Riastuti, M.Sc.
Head of Physical Metallurgy Laboratory:
Dr. Ir. Sutopo, MSc.
Head of Metallurgy Processing Labora-
tory:
Dr-Ing., Ir. Bambang Suharno.
Head of Mechanical Metallurgy Labora-
tory:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Eddy S. Siradj, M.Sc.
Head of Corrosion Laboratory :
Ir. Andi Rustandi, M.T.
Head of Heat Treatment Laboratory:
Ir. Myrna Ariati Mochtar, M.Si.
Correspondence :
Department of Metallurgy and Materials
Faculty of Engineering
Kampus UI, Depok 16424
Tel. (021) 786 3510
Fax. (021) 787 2350
e-mail : metal@metal.ui.ac.id
http://www.metal.ui.ac.id
Professors:
Prof. Dr. Ir. Eddy Sumarno Siradj, M.Sc (Eng)
(Ir, UI, 1981; M.Sc (Eng), Univ. of Birming-
ham, 1986; Ph.D, Univ. of Sheffeld, 1997;
Profesor, UI, 2003) Metal Forming, Ther-
mo-mechanical Treatment
Full-time Academic Staff:
Akhmad Herman Yuwono (ST, UI; M.Phil.Eng,
University of Cambridge) Material Kom-
posit, Metalurgi Fisik, Polimer
Andi Rustandi (Ir, ITB; MT, ITB) Metalurgi
Ekstraksi, Pengolahan Mineral, Korosi
Anne Zulfa, (Ir, UI; M.Phil.Eng., Univ. of Shef-
feld; Ph.D, University of Sheffeld) Per-
lakuan Panas, Material lanjut dan Kom-
posit
Arief Cahyo Wibowo ( S1,S2, Michigan State
University, East Lansing, MI, USA)
Badrul Munir (ST, UI; M.Sc, Univ.of Chalmers)
Metalurgi Fisik, Material Keramik, Tem-
peratur Tinggi
Bambang Priyono (Ir, UI; MT, UI) Material
Katalis
Bambang Suharno (Ir, UI; Dr-Ing, Technical
University of Aachen) Desain Paduan dan
Pengecoran, Metalurgi Besi Baja
Bondan Tiara Sofyan (Ir, UI; MSi, UI; Ph.D,
Monash University) Material Komposit,
Metalurgi Serbuk, Nanoteknologi
Bustanul Arifn (Ir, UI; M.Phil.Eng, Univer-
sity of Birmingham) Desain Paduan dan
Pengecoran, Metalurgi Besi Baja
D.M.F. Luhulima (Ir, UI; M.Eng., Katholieke
Universiteit Leuven). Korosi, Surface En-
gineering
Dedi Priadi (Ir, UI; D.E.A .& Dr, Ecole des Mines
de Paris) Pengubahan Bentuk Material
Donanta Dhaneswara (Ir, UI; MSi, Dr., UI) De-
sain Paduan dan Pengecoran
Dwi Marta Nurjaya (ST, UI, MT,UI) Mikro-anali-
sis, Non-destruictive test, Komputer
Esa Haruman (Ir, UI ; M.Sc (Eng).Univ.of Bir-
mingham; Ph.D, Univ.of Birmingham) Sur-
face Engineering, Perlakuan Panas
57
Johny Wahyuadi Soedarsono (Ir, UI; D.E.A.&
Dr., Ecole Chimie, Polimere et Materiaux
de Stras bourg) Metalurgi Ekstraksi, Pen-
golahan Mineral, Korosi
Muhammad Anis (Ir, UI; M.Met & PhD, Univer-
sity of Sheffeld) Metalurgi Las dan Meta-
lurgi Fisika
Mochamad Chalid (SSi, UI; MSc, TU-Delf) Kimia
dan Polimer
Myrna Ariati Mochtar (Ir, UI; MS, UI) Perlakuan
Panas, Metalurgi Serbuk
Rahmat Saptono ( Ir, UI; MSc. Tech.,UNSW)
Pengubahan Bentuk
Rini Riastuti (Ir, UI; M.Sc, University of Man-
chester Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy) Korosi
Sari Katili (Dra, UI; MS, UI) Kimia Metalurgi dan
Material
Sotya Astutiningsih (Ir, UI; M.Eng, Katholieke
Universiteit Leuven;Ph.D., University of
Western Australia, Australia) Matelurgi
Mekanik.
Sri Harjanto (Ir, UI, Dr, Tohoku University) Ma-
terial Keramik, Lingkungan dalam Industri
Manufaktur.
Sutopo ( Ir, UI; M.Sc & PhD, University of Wis-
counsin) Komposit Material dan Thermo-
metalurgi
Winarto (Ir, UI; M.Sc(Eng), The Technical Uni-
versity of Denmark; Ph.D., University of
Wales Swansea) Metalurgi Las
Yunita Sadeli (Ir, UI; M.Sc, University of Man-
chester Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy) Korosi
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3.4.3. Metallurgy & Material Engineering Study Program Curriculum
Semester 1 ( Start September ) (UI) Semester 2 ( Start February ) (UI)
Semester 3 ( Start September ) (UI) Semester 4 ( Start February ) (UI)
Semester 5 & 6 ( Start July ) (Monash University) Semester 7 & 8 ( Start July ) (Monash University)-core
Electives, chosen from the following (14 cp)
Code
ENG 11001I
ENG 11002I
ENG 12011I
ENG 41406I
TKE 11027I
TKE 11028I
MTE 11002I
Calculus
Communication Skills in English
Physics Elect, Magnet, Wave & Optics
Basic Chemistry + Prak.
Basic Computer
Computer Lab
Introduction to Engineering Materials
Total
ENG 12003I
ENG 12007I
MTE 12003I
MTE 11001I
MTE 12005I
MTE 12006I
MTE 12007I
TKE 11026I
TKE 12024I
Linear Algebra
Physics (Mechanic & Heat)
Organic Chemistry
Engineering Drawing
Engineering Mechanics
Mineralogy and Crystallography
Analytical Chemistry
Chemistry Lab
Physics Lab.2
Total
4
3
4
3
2
1
3
20
4
4
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
20
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
MTE 31019I
MTE 22017I
MTE 21008I
MTE 31007I
MTE 21010I
MTE 21013I
MTE 21012I
Deformation of Materials
Statistics
Thermodynamic of Materials
Techniques of Microstructural Analysis
Physical Metallurgy
Stregth of Materials
Analytical Chemistry Lab
Total
3
2
3
3
3
3
1
21
TKE 20019I
MTE 220013I
MTE 220014I
MTE 220015I
MTE 220016I
MTE 41126I
MTE 41127I
MTE 41120I
Numerical Methods
Phase Equlibrium
Transport Phenomenon
Material Testing
Principles of Engineering design
Physical Metallurgy Laboratory
Heat Treatment Laboratory
Polymer Technology
Total
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
21
MTE 3502
MTE 3503
MTE 3504
MTE 3505
MTE 3506
MTE 3507
MTE 3508
MTE 3509
MTE 3510
MTE 3511
Physical Metallurgy
Engineering Practice 1
Mech. Properties of Polymers
Fracture and Fracture Mechanics
Plasticity & Metal Shaping
Ceramics
Electrical & Magnetic Materials
Rheology & Polymer Processing
Surfaces
Mech. Behaviour Metals & Alloys
Interfaculty Subject
Total
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
6
4
6
48
MTE 4521
MTE 4522
MTE 4525
MTE 4526
MTE 4560
MTE 4561
MTE 4562
Engineering Practice II
Engineering Design
Project I
Project II
Polymer Engineering
Metallurgical Engineering
Ceramics Engineering
Total
6
4
6
6
4
4
4
34
Code Subject Credit Point
MTE 4531
MTE 4532
MTE 4533
MTE 4534
MTE 4536
MTE 4538
MTE 4539
MTE 4540
MTE 4546
MTE 4550
MTE 4551
MTE 4554
ENE 4506
ENG 4614
Advanced Experimental Tehniques
Numerical Modelling
Alloy Design
Oriented Polymers
Microstructure Development during Metal
Processing
Optoelectronic Materials
Biomaterials
3
3
3
3
4
3
3
Cement and Concrete - Applications to
Reinforced Concrete
Glass & Glass Ceramics
Corrosion and Heat Resistant Alloys
Advanced Materials Syntheses
Thermosetting Polymers & Elastomers
Materials & the Environment
Schools Tech. Studies Project
Total
3
3
3
3
3
4
3
48
59
neering: An Introduction, 6 th ed., Wiley.,
2004
Smallman, R.E and Bishop, R.L, Metal and
Materials, Butterworth Heinemann
Vlack, Van, Elements of Materials Science,
Addison Wesley
Mangonon, P. L, The Principles of Materials
Selection for Engineering Design, Prentice-
Hall
MTE12003 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected to gain a thorough
understanding on the concepts of organic
chemistry in order to predict the chemical
and physical properties of materials.
Syllabus : Basic of organics, structure and
properties. Stereochemistry. Organic com-
pound. Classifcation. Chemical and physical
properties. Reactions of organic compound
(addition and substitutions). Free radicals.
Oxidation and condensations. Introduction to
polymer science (defnition, polymerization
and properties of polymer).
Prerequisites : TKE 11025
Textbooks :
McMurry, J., Organic Chemistry, 5th Edition,
Brooks Cole, Toronto, 2000
Fessenden R.J. and Fessenden K.S., Organic
Chemistry, 5th edition, Brooks/Cole, Pasifc
Grove, California,1994
Morrison R.T, Boyd R.N., Organic Chemistry,
4th Ed., Allyn & Bacon Inc.,1983.
Callister W.D. Jr., Materials Science and
Engineering: an Introduction, 6th ed., John
Wiley & Sons Inc., 2004.
Moore S.R., Kline D.E., Properties and Pro-
cessing of Polymers for Engineers, Society of
Plastics Engineers Inc, 1984.
MTE12005 ENGINEERING MECHANICS
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this sub-
ject, students are expected to understand
the theory and applications of engineering
3.4.4. SUBJECT SYLLABUS
MTE11001 ENGINEERING DRAWING
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected to understand and to
construct engineering drawing according to
basic theory and ISO standard.
Syllabus : Standardization of engineering
drawings. Geometry construction. Projec-
tion theory. View drawing and sectioning.
Presentation of paper size and work piece.
Normalization. Type of materials. Working
signs and accuracy.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Luzadder, Warren J, Menggambar Teknik
(Terj.), Penerbit Airlangga, 1999
Sato, Takeshi G., Menggambar Mesin,
Menurut Standar ISO, PT. Pradnya Paramita,
1997
MTE11002 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING
MATERIALS
3 credit points
Objectives : The subject establishes un-
derstanding on the scope of Metallurgy and
Materials Engineering. It is also intended to
develop:
A basic understanding of the characteris-
tics of materials and how to process them
for engineering application
A basic understanding on the fundamental
concept of material testing.
Syllabus : What is Materials Engineering?,
Types of engineering materials & their ap-
plications, Structures of engineering mate-
rials, Properties of materials: mechanical
properties, physical properties, chemical
properties, Steel and iron: production and
properties, Aluminium: production and prop-
erties, Polymer: characteristics and process-
ing, Ceramic: characteristics and processing,
Composite
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Callister, W.D, Materials Science and Engi-
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mechanic principles (static).
Syllabus : General principle of mechanics.
Vector and forces. Equilibrium points. Resul-
tant of forces. Structure analysis. Central
of gravity and centroid. Moment of inertia.
Internal forces. Friction.
Prerequisites : TKE 11012, TKE 11015,
TKE11020, TKE12013, TKE12016, TKE21014
Textbooks :
Hibbeler, Russell C., Engineering Mechan-
ics, Statics, 8th Ed., Macmillan Publishing
Company, Inc.
Hibbeler, Russell C, Mechanical of Materials,
Prentice Hall International.Inc., 1997
Ferdinand L. Singer, Ilmu Kekuatan Bahan,
Penerbit Erlangga, 1981
G.H.Ryder, Strength of Materials, MacMillan
Press, Ltd.1979.
MTE12006
MINERALOGY AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this sub-
ject, students are expected to understand
the theory of mineral formation and to be
able to select appropriate mineral for vari-
ous engineering applications. Students are
also expected to understand the basic of
crystallography.
Syllabus : Defnition of mineralogy.
Chemistry of mineral. Analysis of mineral
composition. Physical, thermal, optical and
magnetic properties of mineral. Radioactivity
of mineral. Defnition of crystal. Crystalliza-
tion mechanisms. Defects in crystal. Crystal
lattice. Miller indices. Crystal projection.
Symmetry of crystal. Identifcation of crys-
tal.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
McKie, D and C. McKie, Essentials of Crystal-
lography, Blackwell Scientifc, 1986
Borchardt-Ott, W, Crystallography, Springer,
1995. Chapter 3 of Callister, W.D, Materials
Science and Engineering: An Introduction, 6th
ed., Wiley., 2004
H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia, Worked Examples in the
Geometry of Crystals
Carine 4.0 Software.
Sorell, The Rocks and Minerals of the World,
Collins, 1982
Carr., Industrial Minerals and Rocks, Society
for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration: Little-
ton, Colo, 1994
Putnis, Introduction to Mineral Science,
Cambridge University Press: Cambridge
(England), 1992
Deer et al, An Introduction to the Rock-form-
ing Minerals, Wiley, New York, 1992.
MTE12007
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this sub-
ject, students should be able to apply the
concepts of analytical chemistry and to select
the method of analysis suitable to solve the
problem in determining the chemical com-
position of samples.
Syllabus : Introduction to analytical chem-
istry. Basics of quantitative and qualitative
analysis. Systematic of qualitative analyti-
cal method and technique of quantitative
analysis.
Prerequisites : Basic Chemistry
Textbooks :
Svehla G., Buku Text Analisis Anorganik
Kualitatif Makro dan Mikro, Kalman Media
Utama, Jakarta, 1990
Skoog, D.A.; West, D.M.; Holler,F.J. Fun-
damentals of Analytical Chemistry 7th ed.,
Saunders College Publisher, 1996.
Day R. A. and Underwood A.L., Quantitative
Analysis, 6th ed., Prentice Hall International,
1991
MTE20017
Statistics
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected to be able to organise
1
culation, Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1996.
MTE21010
PHYSICAL METALLURGY
3 credit points
Objectives : The subject establishes
knowledge of the structure of solid materials.
In particular, it is intended to develop:
1. A basic understanding of the electronic
structure of solid materials and how it af-
fects properties of materials.
2. A strong grasp of the concept of theory
of dislocation in crystalline materials, and
their infuence on the mechanical proper-
ties of solids.
3. A basic understanding of the applica-
tion of the theory of dislocation on the
strengthening in materials.
Syllabus: Review on crystal structure, Crystal
defects: point defects, line defects, volume
defects, Theory of dislocation: concept,
dislocation origin, energy and movement
of dislocation, dislocations in FCC and HCP
solids, effects of dislocations on properties of
materials, Mechanical properties of materi-
als: fatigue and fracture mechanic, creep,
wear, Strengthening mechanism
Prerequisites: Mineralogy and Crystal-
lography
Textbooks :
Callister, W.D, Materials Science and Engi-
neering: An Introduction, 6 th ed., Wiley.,
2004
Smallman, R.E and Bishop, R.L, Metal and
Materials, Butterworth Heinemann, 1995
Mangonon, P. L, The Principles of Materials
Selection for Engineering Design, Prentice-
Hall
Hull, D and Bacon, D,J, Introduction to Dis-
locations, Pergamon
MTE21011
STRENGTH OF MATERIALS
3 credit points
Objectives : After completing this
course, students should be able to analyze
and to solve problems in mechanics of ma-
raw data collection for a quantitative mea-
surement. Students are also expected to be
able to forecast a condition based on collect-
ed data and relation between variables and
to use them in decision making process.
Syllabus : Defnition and the use of sta-
tistics. Distribution of frequency (data col-
lection, processing and presentation). Mean
value, standard deviation and applications.
Probability theory, random variable, prob-
ability function, binomial distribution, Pois-
son distribution. Draw conclusions through
internal prediction, hypothesis test, regres-
sion and correlation.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Miller, I and Freud, J.E., Probability and
Statistics for engineers,2nd ed, Prentice Hal
Inc, 1985.
Wetherill, G.B. and Brown, D. W. Statistical
Process Control - theory and practice. Chap-
man and Hall, 1991.
MTE21008
THERMODYNAMIC OF MATERIALS
3 credit points
Objectives : After completing this course,
students should understand the basic con-
cepts of thermodynamic and its application
in the feld of metallurgy
Syllabus : Introduction to engineering
technique. The material and energy bal-
ance. Thermodynamic Law (I, II and III).
Auxiliary function. Heat capacity, enthalpy,
entropy. The equilibrium of phase in single
component. Gas behavior. Reaction with gas.
Reaction between purely condensed phase
and gas. Solution behavior. Free energy con-
cept. Composition and binary phase diagram.
Equilibrium reactions in a system consists of
elements in condensed solutions.
Prerequisites : -
Textbooks :
Gaskell, D.R., Introduction to Thermodynam-
ics of Materials, 3rd ed. Taylor and Francis,
Washington, 1995.
Himmelblau, D.M, Chemical Engineering Cal-
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terials. The students should also be able to
design and to analyze various load-bearing
structures.
Syllabus : The concept of stress and strain.
Relation of stress and strain in axial load-
ing. Twisting. Buckling. Transversal loading.
Stress analysis (plane stress and plane strain).
Design of shaft and beam. Beam defection.
Structural joints. Column and thick cylinder.
Energy method.
Prerequisites : TKE11012I, TKE11015I,
TKE12013I, TKE12016I, MTE12005I.
Textbooks :
Hibbeler, R.C., Mechanics of Materials, Pren-
tice Hall, 1997.
Beer, F.P. and Johston, E. R., Mechanics of
Materials, McGraw-Hill, 1983.
Hibbeler, Russell C., Engineering Mechan-
ics, Statics, 8th Ed., Macmillan Publishing
Company, Inc.
MTE22013
PHASE EQUILIBRIUM
3 credit points
Objectives : After completing this course,
students are expected to understand the
basic principle of phase equilibrium and to
understand the binary and ternary phase
diagrams.
Syllabus : The Gibbss rule and equilibrium
of phase. The equilibrium of binary and
ternary phases. Isothermal and isoplethal
section. Cooling system in materials pro-
cessing.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Prince A., Multicomponent Alloy Consti-
tutional Bibliography, The Metals Society,
London, 1978.
West, D.R.F, Ternary Equilibrium Diagrams,
Chapman and Hall, 1982.
Porter, D. A and Easterling, K.E, Phase Trans-
formation in Metals and Alloys, 1992
MTE22014 TRANSPORT PHENOMENON
3 credit points
Objectives : After completing this course,
students are expected to understand the
basic principle of fuids dynamic, heat and
mass transfer including their application in
the feld of metallurgy and materials engi-
neering
Syllabus : The properties and behav-
ior of fuids. Laminar fow and momentum
balance. Turbulence fow and experimental
results. Application of energy balance in
fuids fow. Vacuum pump and production.
Heat transfer and energy equation. Thermal
transfer in solids. Heat transfer in solidifca-
tion. Heat transfer through radiation. Ficks
law. Difussion in solids. Mass transfer be-
tween phases.
Prerequisites : TKE11012, TKE12013,
TKE11025, MTE21008
Textbooks :
Geeger G.H. and Poirer, D. R., Transport
Phenomena in Metallurgy, Addison Wesley,
1980.
Poirer, D.R. and Geiger, G.H. Transport
Phenomena in Material Processing, Addison
Wesley, 1998
Geankoplis, C.J., Transport Processes and
Unit Operation, Prentice Hall Int. Inc.,
1993
Sindokou, Transport Phenomena and Material
Processing, John Wiley, New York, 1996.
MTE22015
MATERIALS TESTING
3 credit points
Objectives : After completing this course,
students should be able to understand the
theoretical concepts of materials testing and
to apply them for practical needs in design
of machinery components and structural
constructions.
Syllabus : Introduction to materials
testing. Review of mechanical behavior of
materials. Data analysis and presentation
of test results. Testing procedures. Testing
machine and instruments. Standardization
of materials testing. Destructive testing (ten-
sile, compression, shear, hardness, impact,
creep, fatigue, stress relaxation and wear).
3
Hill, 1991.
Ashby, M. F, Materials Selection in Mechani-
cal Design, 2nd ed. Cambridge Uni. Press.
1999.
MTE31019
DEFORMATION OF MATERIALS
3 credit points
Objectives : On completion of this sub-
ject, students are expected to understand
the process variables in deformation of
materials and their relation to the design,
processing and tools.
Syllabus : Design principles in manufac-
turing. Deformation processes of metals in
manufacturing process. Classifcation and
characteristics of manufacturing process.
Classifcation and description of metal form-
ing processes. Yield criteria in materials.
Deformation. Plastic plane stress and plane
strain. Pseudo plane stress. Design for forg-
ing, extrusion, rolling, drawing, stamping,
plastic injection and powder metallurgy. Ap-
plications of the fnite element method in the
simulation of materials deformation.
Prerequisites : MTE21010, MTE21011.
Textbooks :
Alton, T, S and Gegel, H, Metal Forming:
Fundamentals and Applications, 1995.
Boothroyd, G, Dewhurst, P and Knight, W,
Product Design for Manufacture and Assem-
bly, Marcell Dekker, 1994
Dieter, G.E, Engineering Design: A Material
and Processing Approach, 1991.

MTE31106
TECHNIQUES OF MICROSTRUCTURAL ANALY-
SIS
3 credit points
Objectives : On completion of this subject,
students are expected to understand the
techniques for observing the microstructures
of materials, including the optical and elec-
tron microscopes and to be able to correlate
the microstructures of materials with their
properties.
Non-destructive testing (visual, penetrant,
ultrasonic, radiography, eddy current and
magnetic particle).
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Davis, H.E., Troxell, G.E. and Hauck, G. F.
W., The Testing of Engineering Materials,
McGraw Hill, 1982.
ASM, Mechanical Testing of Metals 10th ed.,
ASM, 2000.
Cart, L, Non Destructive Testing, ASM,
1995.
B. Raj, T. Jaykumar, and M. Thavasimuthu,
Practical Non-Destructive Testing, 2nd ed.,
ASM International
MTE22016
PRINCIPLE OF ENGINEERING DESIGN
3 credit points
Objectives : On completion of this sub-
ject, students are expected to understand
the basic principles of engineering design
processes and their applications in the feld
of metallurgy and materials engineering.
Syllabus : Introduction to design processes.
Design methods. Simulation and modelling.
Optimization. Materials selection. Materials
interaction. Processes and design. Decision
making in economic view. Cost evalua-
tion. Planning and schedulling. Engineering
statistics. Risk and capability. Quality in
engineering. Source of information. Design
communicating.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Kenneth S. Hurst, Engineering Design Prin-
ciples, Arnold, London, 1999.
Pugh, Stuart, Total Design, Integrated
Methods for Successful Product Engineering,
Addison-Wesley Publishers Ltd., Edinburgh,
1991.
Dym, Clive L. and Patrick Little, Engineering
Design, A Project-Based Introduction, John
Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2000.
Dieter, G. E, Engineering Design, A Material
and Processing Approach, 2nd ed. McGraw
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Syllabus : Techniques of microstructure
analysis. Phase formation and general charac-
teristic of material structures. Microstructure
of steel; stable and metastable phases and
the formation mechanisms. Microstructure of
non-ferrous alloys; aluminium, copper, tita-
nium. Macrostructure. Sampling techniques.
Samples preparation. Observation techniques
with optical and electron microscopes. Spe-
cial measurements; microhardness, coating
thickness, roughness. Quantitative metallog-
raphy; grain size, volume fraction of phases
and precipitates.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Der Voort, V., Metallography Principles and
Practice, McGraw Hill, 1984
Wojnar, Leszek, Image Analysis, Application in
Materials Engineering, CRC Press LLC, 1999.
MTE41120I
HEAT TREATMENT LABORATORY
2 credit points
Objectives : Students mastering sample
preparation processes for optical microscope
and SEM observation. Students are able to
heat treat materials to obtain particular
properties and are able to analyze the
relationship between microstructure and
mechanical properties.
Modules : (1) Sample preparation: grind-
ing, polishing, etching, (2) Microstructural
analysis on Ferrous and Non-Ferrous materi-
als, (3) Jominy test, (4) Heat Treatment of
materials.
Prerequisite: Techniques of Microstructural
Analysis
Textbook:
Laboratory Notes
MTE41112I
PHYSICAL METALLURGY LABORATORY
2 credit points
Objectives : Students mastering the tech-
niques for destructive testing of materials,
including the standard and data analysis to
be able to interpret mechanical properties
of materials.
Modules : (1) Tensile Test, (2) Compressive
Test, (3) Micro and Macro Hardness Test, (4)
Impact Test, (5) Wear Test
Prerequisite : Physics (Mechanics), Physics
(Heat), Physical Metallurgy
Textbook :
Davis, Harmer E; Teoxell, George Earl;
Hauck, George F.W, The Testing of Engin-
ering Materials, 4th edition, McGraw-Hill,
Inc, New-York, 1982.
Laboratory Notes
TKE11012
BASIC MATHEMATICS 1
2 credit points
Objectives : On completion of this subject,
students are expected to consolidate their
knowledge in calculus and to have skills to
solve applied calculus problems.
Syllabus : Mathematics review. Real
number system. Cartesian product. Function
and their graphs. Limit of a function and
continuous function. The derivative theorem
(the chain rule, implicit differentiation,
higher order derivatives and applications of
the derivatives). The integral (the defnite
integral, the indefnite integral, applications
of the integral on the Cartesian coordinates
and polar coordinates).
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Purcell, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 7th
ed., Aplleton-Century-Crofts, 1996

TKE11015 LINEAR ALGEBRA 1
2 credit points
Objectives : The students are expected to
understand and to have skills in linear algebra
and to investigate applications particularly
for use in other engineering subjects.
Syllabus : System of linear equations.
Matrix and type of matrices. Determinant and
its use (Cramers rule). Vector geometry and
vector in Rn space. Vector space. Basis and
5
TKE11025
BASIC CHEMISTRY
2 credit points
Objectives : Students are expected to
understand the basic law of chemical reac-
tion.
Syllabus : The basic law and stoichiometry.
Atomic structure. Periodic system. Solubility.
Reduction and oxidation. Electrochemistry.
Thermochemistry. Basic organic chemistry.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Brady, J.E., General Chemistry, Principles &
Structure, 5th ed., John Wiley & Sons, New
York, 1990.
Chang, R., Chemistry, 5th ed.., WCB/Mc-
Graw-Hill, New York, 1998
Achmad ,H, Seri Penuntun Belajar Kimia
Dasar, Citra Aditya Bakti, Bandung, 1992
R H. Petrucci, W S. Harwood, F. G Herring,
General Chemistry: Principles and Modern
Applications, Eighth Edition, Prentice Hall
Inc., 2001

TKE11027
BASIC COMPUTER
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected (a) to understand the
principle of the operation of computers, (b)
to be able to make algorithm in fow charts
and be able to convert it into a basic pro-
gram language by using statements, and (c)
to understand a computer language to solve
engineering problems.
Syllabus : Introduction to computer. Flow
chart. Introduction to a program language.
Computing and computer. Architecture of
computer. Operational system. Processing
unit. Input. Output. Second deviation. Soft-
ware. Introduction to computer application.
Concept of information system. Data com-
munication and computer network. Internet
and multimedia.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
dimension of a vector space.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Howard, A, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th
ed., John Willey and Sons, 1996

TKE11019
PHYSICS (ELECTRICITY AND MAGNET)
2 credit points
Objectives : Students should understand
the concept of basic physics in electricity
and magnet and to apply the concepts in
daily problems related to electricity and
magnet.
Syllabus : Electric charge and Coulombs
law. The electric feld and Gauss law. Elec-
tric potential and electric potential energy.
Capacitors. Dielectrics. Current and resis-
tance. Direct current circuits and analysis of
circuits. Magnetic feld. Electromagnetic in-
duction. Faradays law. Inductance. Magnetic
properties of materials. Electromagnetic
oscillations. Alternating current circuits.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Halliday, D. and Resnick, R. Physics, 3th ed.,
John Wiley and Sons, 1978

TKE11020
PHYSICS (MECHANICS)
2 credit points
Objectives : Students should understand
the concept of basic physics in mechanics and
to apply the concepts in solving problems re-
lated to force in static and dynamic bodies.
Syllabus : Units. Particle kinematics.
Particle dynamics. Conservation of energy
and linear momentum. Harmonic oscillations.
Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies.
Elasticity. Hydrostatics. Hydrodynamics.
Gravitational feld.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Halliday, D. and Resnick, R. Physics, 3th ed.,
John Wiley and Sons, 1978

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D.M, Computer and Information Systems,
Prentice Hall Inc, 1995

TKE11028
COMPUTER LABORATORY
1 credit points
Objectives : This laboratory class aims (a)
to enhance the understanding of students
on basic computer and (b) to give practical
experience to students on computer, compo-
nents and devices. Students will also learn to
appreciate the need for critical assessment
in solving engineering problems by using
computer output.
Syllabus : Introduction to computer.
Operational system. Elements of program
language. Condition selection. Iteration.
Procedures and function. Arrays and spread-
sheet.
Prerequisites : TKE11027
Textbooks :
Puskom FTUI, Buku Panduan Praktikum Dasar
Komputer, Puskom FTUI, 1999

TKE12013 BASIC MATHEMATICS 2
2 credit points
Objectives : On completion of the sub-
ject, student (a) should understand the basic
concept of functions with two independent
variables, the limit of a function with two
variables, partial and total differential of a
function with two variables; (b) are expected
to understand the concepts of sequences
and series, vector and analytic geometry;
(c) should be able to apply the concepts in
engineering applications.
Syllabus : Variables in a function. Functions
with two independent variables. Limit of a
function at a point. Characteristics of con-
tinuous and discontinuous functions. Partial
derivative at a point. Total differential at
a point and its applications. Maximum and
minimum points of a function and the appli-
cations with Lagrange multipliers. Area and
volume with double integration. Sequences
and series, convergence and power series.
Matrices, matrix operation, equivalent ma-
trix, determinant, inverse of a matrix and
the applications.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Purcell, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 7th
ed., Aplleton-Century-Crofts, 1996

TKE12016
LINEAR ALGEBRA 2
2 credit points
Objectives : On completion of the subject,
students should understand advanced algebra
and explore the applications particularly for
use in other engineering subjects.
Syllabus : Defnition of matrix. Matrix
operation. Row-echelon form. Equivalence of
a matrix. Determinants and the application
in the solution of linear equations. Inverse of
matrices and the application in the solution
of linear equations. Solve equations with
matrices.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Howard, A, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th
ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1996

TKE12022
PHYSICS (HEAT)
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected (a) to understand the
concept of ideal and real fuid and the heat
transfer and (b) to be able to apply the con-
cept in calculating the thermodynamics of
combustion machine and turbine.
Syllabus : Introduction to the basic concept.
Temperature. Pressure and fow. Heat and the
frst law of thermodynamics. Enthalpy and
entropy. Applications of the frst law of ther-
modynamics in closed and open systems. The
second law of thermodynamics. Properties of
pure elements. Basic of heat transfer.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
7
Modelling in Material Science and Engineer-
ing, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2001.
TKE21009
ENGLISH
2 credit points
Objectives : On completion of the sub-
ject, students are expected to be able to
understand English text and to differentiate
the main and supporting ideas. Students are
also expected to be able to write a report
in English.
Syllabus : Reading strategies. Basic
writing techniques. Developing an effective
style of writing. Planning and organising an
essay. Outlining and diagramming. Paragraph
analysis and referencing skills.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Poerwoto, C. et al. Reading Comprehension
for Engineering Students.

TKE21014
ADVANCED MATHEMATICS
3 credit points
Objectives : Students are expected to be
able to use the concept, theorem and meth-
ods to solve problems in mathematics and
engineering.
Syllabus : Vector in Rn space. Properties
of vector. Differential. Tangent to a curve.
Curl and divergence. Line integrals. Sur-
faces. Stokes theorem and the applications.
Ordinary differential equations. Non-linear
differential equations. Non-homogeneous dif-
ferential equations. Method of undetermined
coeffcients, variations of parameters and
differential operators. Solutions of Cauchys
and Legendres differential equations. Solu-
tions of differential equations with variable
coefficients with power series method.
Solutions of differential equations with
matrix and elimination method. Solutions
of differential equations on phase plane and
the applications on engineering problems.
Laplace transforms. Fourier analysis. Fourier
integrals. Fourier transform of a function.
Halliday, D. and Resnick, R. Physics, 3th ed.,
John Wiley and Sons, 1978

TKE12023
PHYSICS (WAVE AND OPTICS)
2 credit points
Objectives : After completing this subject,
students are expected (a) to understand the
concept of wave and optic, and (b) to be
able to apply the concept in solving problems
related to wave, the physical properties of
light waves and geometrical optics.
Syllabus : Waves. Sound. Polarization. Inter-
ference. Diffraction. Geometrical optics.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Halliday, D. and Resnick, R. Physics, 3th ed.,
John Wiley and Sons, 1978

TKE20018
NUMERICAL METHOD
3 credit points
Objectives : Students are expected to have
the ability to solve engineering problems by
using mathematics application in computer.
Students are also expected to be able to
use mathematics as a tool in engineering
research.
Syllabus : Introduction. Modelling and er-
ror analysis. Roots equation. Linear algebra
equations. Numerical integration. Numerical
differential. Ordinary differential equation.
Partial differential equation. Case study.
Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Nakamura, S., Numerical Analysis and
Graphic Visualization with MatLab, 2nd ed.,
Prentice Hall, NY, 2001.
Matthew, J.H and Fink, K.D., Numerical
Method using MatLab, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall,
NY, 1999.
Moaveni, Finite Elements: Theory and Ap-
plications with ANSYS, Prentice Hall, NY,
2000.
Rappa, M, Bellet, M, Doille, M, Numerical
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Prerequisites : none
Textbooks :
Kreyszig, E. Advanced Engineering Mathemat-
ics, John Wiley and Sons, 1995.

MONASH UNIVERSITY
MTE3502 PHYSICAL METALLURGY
4 points + Two lectures per week plus tutori-
als + First semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2501 and MTE2502
Synopsis: Precipitation in Al-based and Ni-
based alloys. Nucleation, metastable phases,
interface structures. Kinetics. Reversion,
precipitate free zones, precipitate distri-
butions. Microstructure control and multi-
stage heat treatments. Thermal stability
of precipitate systems. Particle coarsening.
Martensite: principles and crystallography.
Decomposition of austenite. Order/disorder
transformations. Microstructural engineering
of steels by heat treatment: grain size con-
trol, hardenability, TTT and CCT diagrams.
Alloy steels; quenching and tempering. Mod-
elling microstructural evolution during heat
treatment of non-ferrous alloys and during
thermomechanical processing.
Assessment: Examinations: 60% + Assign-
ments: 20% + Laboratory work: 20%

MTE3503 ENGINEERING PRACTICE 1
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ Second semester + Clayton
Synopsis: Effective communication, prin-
cipled versus positioned negotiation, confict
resolution, public speaking, the dynamics
of groups and teams. Invention and innova-
tion, product life cycles and trend curves.
Principles of project management, GANTT,
PERT and CDM charts.
Assessment: Assignments: 60% + Tutorial
exercises: 40%

MTE3504 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF
POLYMER
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ Second semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2504 or MTE2514
Synopsis: Temperature dependence of
mechanical properties; single relaxation
time model; structural approach to single
relaxation time model; distribution of relax-
ation times; Boltzmann superposition; time-
temperature superposition; vulcanisation
and reinforcement of elastomers; theory of
rubber elasticity; yielding; crazing; polymer
toughening; mechanical properties of com-
posites; strength, modulus and stiffness; rule
of mixtures and orientation dependence;
stress transfer between fbre and matrix;
energy dissipation during fracture; laminate
theory.

MTE3505 FRACTURE AND FRACTURE
MECHANICS
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ First semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2504 or MTE2514
Synopsis: Micromechanics of brittle and
ductile fracture. Void and crack nucleation
and growth. Stress intensity factor. Ther-
modynamic approach to failure. Crack tip
plasticity. Plane stress/plane strain. Fracture
toughness testing in practice: thickness ef-
fects, test-piece geometry, testing proce-
dures; impact testing. Statistical fracture
mechanics. Notch strengthening. Energy
absorption in materials. Design of structures
using fracture toughness. Fractography. De-
formation maps. Creep failure.
Assessment: Practicals: 15% + Tutorials and
case studies: 65% + Assignment: 20%

MTE3506 PLASTICITY AND METAL SHAPING
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ Second semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2504 or MTE2514
Synopsis: Transformation of stress and strain,
invariants; validity of yield criteria; fow
rules; stress-strain relationships; equations
governing elastic-plastic behaviour; solution
of problems using static equilibrium; slip-line
felds and hodographs; upper bounds using
discontinuous velocity felds.
9
ing situations. The effect of processing aids
and fllers. Calculations to predict processing
machinery operating characteristics.
Assessment: Examination: 60% + Assignments:
20% + Laboratory work: 20%

MTE3510 SURFACES
6 points + 3 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ Second semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2503
Synopsis: Corrosion of surfaces: chemical
and electrochemical properties of inter-
faces; localised corrosion; protection of
surfaces; techniques of protection; organic
and inorganic surface treatments; bonding
at surfaces; thermodynamics of surfaces;
thermodynamics of interfaces; adhesion and
mechanical properties.

MTE3511 MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF MET-
ALS AND ALLOYS
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ First semester + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE2501 and MTE2502
Synopsis: Deformation of single crystals:
geometry of slip. Deformation of polycrys-
tals: deformation geometry, deformation
textures, determination of preferred orienta-
tion, effects of crystal structure. Dislocation
dynamics: interactions of dislocations, yield
point phenomena, effects of temperature
and strain rate, theories of work harden-
ing. Strengthening mechanisms: theories of
obstacle hardening. Inhomogeneity of plas-
tic deformation and its consequences. The
tensile test: standards for testing, necking
and plastic instability, constitutive laws for
plastic deformation.
Assessment: Examinations: 60% + Assign-
ments/tests: 30% + Laboratory work: 10%

MTE4521 ENGINEERING PRACTICE II
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ Second semester + Clayton + Prerequisite:
MTE3503
Assessment: Examination: 60% + Assignments:
25% + Laboratory work: 15%

MTE3507 CERAMICS
4 points + 24 lectures plus tutorials + First
semester + Clayton
Synopsis: Classifcation and general proper-
ties of ceramics, crystal structures of ceram-
ics and minerals. Preparation of ceramic
powders, green body shaping, solid state
sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot-press-
ing. Microstructures and grain boundary
engineering. Glass and glass-ceramics. Me-
chanical properties, thermal, electrical and
optical properties.
Assessment: Examinations: 85% + Practical
reports: 15%

MTE3508 ELECTRICAL AND MAGNETIC
MATERIALS
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ First semester + Clayton + Corequisite:
MTE3502
Synopsis: Electrical conductivity and semi-
conductivity: free electron and band theory.
Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors, mi-
croelectronic component manufacture, VLSI
fabrication, bipolar and MOS technologies,
optoelectric devices. Dielectrics: harmonic
and Debye models of polarisation and loss,
optical fbres, dielectric breakdown. Ferro-
electrics, piezoelectricity. Magnetic behav-
iour, domain wall motion and pinning, single
domain particles. Hard and soft magnetic
materials. Superconductivity.

MTE3509 POLYMER RHEOLOGY AND PRO-
CESSING
4 points + 2 lectures per week plus tutorials
+ First semester + Clayton
Synopsis: Newtonian and non-Newtonian fow
of polymer materials. Effects of temperature
and molecular structure on melt properties.
Rheometry. Polymer processing methods and
machinery. Heat transfer applied to process-
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Synopsis: Cost accounting and technology
assessment techniques including fxed and
variable costs, discounted cash fow, nett
present value. Estimating and costing. Total
quality management, ISO 9000, quality assur-
ance, occupational health and safety, work
place relations.

MTE4522 ENGINEERING DESIGN
(ENG)
6 points + 52 lectures and tutorials + First
semester + Clayton
Synopsis: The design task is analysed to pro-
vide insight into the steps to be performed
and to assist creativity. Bases for design (eg
factors of safety, reliability, risk and ftness
for purpose) are discussed, with topics in-
cluding specifcation and selection of materi-
als and costing for design. Computer-aided
drawing, manufacture using professional
packages. Computer numerical control and
robotics. Flexible manufacturing.

MTE4525 PROJECT I
6 points + First/second semester + Clayton
+ Prerequisites: Completion of 120 points or
permission
Synopsis: Project in the materials feld in-
volving a literature survey, experimental or
theoretical program, preparation and an oral
defence of a technical poster.

MTE4526 PROJECT II
6 points + First/second semester + Clayton +
Prerequisites: MTE4525
Synopsis: Project in the materials field
involving a literature survey, experimental
or theoretical program, preparation and
presentation of a technical paper.

MTE4560 POLYMER ENGINEERING
4 points + 26 lectures and 26 tutorial and
laboratory hours + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE3504, MTE3509
Synopsis: Multiphase polymer materials;
properties of polymer blends and foamed
polymers; production and properties of struc-
tural foams; polymer orientation; polymer
composite structures; orthotropic elasticity,
orientation and dependence of strength,
failure criteria, fracture of composites.
Polymer classifcations and applications; de-
sign and materials selection; properties and
applications of thermoplastics, thermosets
and elastomers; design for stiffness/creep
resistance, strength/toughness; thermal de-
pendence of properties in design; properties
important in design: chemical and electrical
factors, friction, wear.
MTE4561 METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
4 points + 26 lectures and 26 tutorial and
laboratory hours + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE3502, MTE3506
Synopsis: Solidifcation processing, (especial-
ly foundry technology and design of castings),
welding and design of weldments, powder
metallurgy (production and characterisa-
tion of powder, design and manufacture,
densifcation, processing methods). Failure
analysis-diagnosis of modes and causes of
failure, remedial action.
MTE4562 CERAMICS ENGINEERING
4 points + 26 lectures and 26 tutorial and
laboratory hours + Clayton + Prerequisites:
MTE3507
Synopsis: Property measurements. Sinter-
ing and microstructure. Alumina ceramics.
Zirconia based ceramics. Non-oxide ceram-
ics, composites. Introduction to functional
ceramics. Ceramics used as capacitors, piezo-
electrics, thermistors and varistors. Optical
fbres. Superconductors. Diamond coatings.
Ceramic gas sensors. General principles of
the problems and solutions used in designing
with brittle materials.

MTE4531 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL TECH-
NIQUES
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton
71
Synopsis: Transmission electron microscopy:
Practical aspects of microscopy, amplitude
and phase contrast imaging, kinematical
theory of image contrast, electron dif-
fraction. Analytical electron microscopy:
X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss
spectroscopy. Image analysis. Techniques of
surface analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance
spectroscopy. Field ion microscopy (FIM) and
atom probe FIM.

MTE4532 NUMERICAL MODELLING
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton + Prerequisites: MTE3506
Synopsis: The bases of fnite difference and
finite element analysis, with application
to heat fow and metal working. Use of a
commercially available package to become
acquainted with the application of numerical
modelling to support industrial and research
activity in materials engineering.

MTE4533 ALLOY DESIGN
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton + Prerequisites: MTE3502
Synopsis: High strength low alloy steels, dual
phase steels, stainless steels, cast irons, cast
and wrought aluminium alloys, titanium al-
loys, magnesium alloys, alloys produced by
non-conventional methods (eg rapidly solidi-
fed alloys), nuclear materials.

MTE4534 ORIENTED AND FOAMED POLY-
MERS
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton + Prerequisites: MTE3504
Synopsis: Anisotropy of synthetic polymer
flms and fbres. Effect of processing on mo-
lecular structure and properties. Structure
and properties of cellulosic and protein-based
fibres. The production of multi-filament
yarns. Polymer foam formulations. Structure
of high and low density foams. Rigid and elas-
tomeric foams. Structural (or integral) foams
as a construction material. Measurements
and characterisation of orientation.

MTE4536 MICROSTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT
DURING METAL PROCESSING
4 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton + Prerequisites: MTE3502,
MTE3506
Synopsis: Modern casting, rolling and ther-
momechanical processing of steel. Modelling
of complex metallurgical processes.

MTE4538 OPTOELECTRONICS MATERIALS
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton + Prerequisites: MTE3508
Synopsis: Optical fbre technology. Light
propagation in optic fbres. Rayleigh scatter-
ing. Material absorption mechanisms. Optical
window. Non-linear optical materials, sensor
applications. Liquid crystals.

MTE4539 BIOMATERIALS
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton
Synopsis: The body environment and biocom-
patibility. Biocompatible materials. Proper-
ties of bone. Soft tissue replacement and
implants. Materials selection, design, per-
formance and degradation. Tissue-polymer
interactions. Materials connected to the body
- artifcial hearts, mechanical circulatory as-
sist devices, heart-lung machines, artifcial
kidneys etc. The monitoring of biomaterials
in vivo.

MTE4540 CEMENT AND CONCRETE - APPLI-
CATIONS TO REINFORCED CONCRETE
3 points + Clayton
Synopsis: The syllabus will be arranged as
the need arises.

MTE4546 GLASS AND GLASS CERAMICS
3 points + 21 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton
Synopsis: Glasses: glass formation, glass
structure, melting process, different glass
systems, properties of glasses, special appli-
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cations for glasses and recent development of
glass science and technology. Glass ceramics:
nucleation agents, phase separation, glass
ceramic process, properties of glass ceramics
and applications of glass ceramics.
Assessment: Examinations: 90% + Assign-
ment: 10%
MTE4550 CORROSION AND HEAT RESISTANT
ALLOYS
3 points + Clayton
Synopsis: The syllabus will be arranged as
the need arises.

MTE4551 Advanced Materials Syntheses
3 points + Clayton
Synopsis: The syllabus will be arranged as
the need arises.

MTE4554 THERMOSETTING POLYMERS AND
ELASTOMERS
3 points + 25 lectures, tutorials and practical
classes + Clayton
Synopsis: Commodity application and
requirements; specialty applications and
requirements; processing with thermosets
and elastomers; interrelationship of network
polymers with other polymers; crosslinking
processes; molecular architecture and gela-
tion; curing kinetics; solidifcation diagram
and the role of vitrifcation; infuence of
crosslinking on Tg, modulus and swelling;
effect of crosslinking on ultimate properties;
monitoring of cure; toughening mechanisms
and improvement of properties.

ENE4506 MATERIALS AND ENVIRONMENT
4 points + 24 lectures and 24 tutorials + First
semester + Clayton + Prerequisites: ENE2503
or MTE2511, MTE2512 and MTE2530
Synopsis: Reclamation of materials (metals,
ceramics, polymers and composites); recycle,
reuse, reduce; choice between energy re-
covery or landfll. Processing properties and
potential end uses of recycled materials.
Politics and local issues of recycling (overseas
and Australian). Biodegradation of materi-
als. Energy by-products and greenhouse gas
load of production and recycling. Economics
of materials production - cradle-to-grave
analysis (dollars, energy, pollution). Market
failure.
Assessment: Examinations: 50% + Assign-
ments: 30% + Oral presentations: 20%

ENG4614 SCHOOLS TECHNOLOGY STUDIES
PROJECT
4 points + First/second semester + Clayton,
Gippsland + Prerequisites: Level-3 core
units
Synopsis: This unit may be taken as a level-
four engineering elective in any department
subject to their approval. Working with a
suitably matched school (technology) class
and teacher, the student will participate as
a volunteer helper; respond constructively to
the needs of both teacher and pupils; who
are regarded as clients; re-examine relevant
aspects of professional knowledge that are
within the parameters of the clients needs;
and practice spoken, written and graphic
communication skills.
Assessment: Reports, seminar presentation
and client feedback: 100%

73
BRIEF HISTORY
There were two programs established
almost concurrently in 1981. Initially, the
Gas Technology Program was founded under
the Department of Metallurgy to fulfll the
national needs of engineers in the feld of gas
liquefaction. Through the cooperation with
PERTAMINA, the Program has obtained some
supports in the forms of limited educational
fund, industrial-experienced teaching staffs,
on-the-job training sites for students, as well
as educational visits to related industries.
In the same year a Chemical Engineering
Program was establ i shed under the
Department of Mechanical Engineering.
This Program was directed to address the
human resource insufficiency related to
the industrial development in Chemical
Engineering feld in Indonesia. In 1985, the
two programs were integrated into the Gas
and Petrochemical Engineering Department,
which offers the chemical engineering
study program with strong points in gas and
petrochemical technology courses.
Starting the academic year of 1985/1986,
the Department of Gas and Petrochemical
Engineering has been admitting students
from the frst semester through the New
Students Admission System (SIPENMARU). The
previous ffth-semester admission program
was continued until the year of 1986.
In 2006, The Department of Gas and
Petrochemical Engineering changed into the
Department of Chemical Engineering.
VISION AND MISSION
Inline with the vision of the University of
Indonesia and the engineering faculty, the
Chemical Engineering Department has a
vision
to become a leading national, regional,
and international Chemical Engineering
Department for education and research in
chemical engineering.
The Chemical Engineering Department as an
integral part of the University of Indonesia is
obligated to carry out the University mission
to educate the nation by developing science,
3.5. DEPARTMENT OF
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3.5.1. GENERAL
THE OBJECTIVE OF EDUCATION
The Objective of the education in The
Department of Chemical Enginering is
to produce highly competent chemical
engineering graduates who are knowledgeable
in basic chemical engineering prior to getting
access to the field of chemical process
technology, who are capable of developing
themselves as planners and managers in
industrial world, and who are capable of
developing related science and technology.
A strategy to attain this objective is by
designing a curriculum which delivers basic
sciences and applied chemical engineering
to students and encourages self-motivation
towards broad-knowledge based insight.
With an outcome-based education method,
each ChED-UI graduates are expected :
To have suffcient fundamental science
and reengineering knowledge, and fun-
damental chemical engineering knowl-
edge; to identify, formulate and to solve
chemical engineering problems.
To have capability to design process
systems and chemical processor systems;
with all of its components to accomplish
certain objectives.
To have capability to cooperate in a
multidisciplinary groups, as a team; and
able to communicate effectively.
To have capability to design as well as
to perform experiments, and data analy-
ses.
To comprehend the chemical engineers
responsibilities and ethic codes, plus
possessing a broad knowledge so as to be
aware of technological impact in local
or global scope.
To have an understanding and capability
to learn as long as he or she lives.
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Head of Laborat or y of Bi opr oces s
Technology:
Dr.-Ing Ir. Misri Gozan, M.Tech.
Head of Laboratory of Fundamental
Chemical Process:
Ir. Rita Arbianti,MSi.
Head of Laboratory of Separation:
Ir. Sutrasno K., M.Sc., PhD.
Head of Laboratory of Chemical Process
System:
Ir. Abdul Wahid, MT
Corresponding Address :
Department of Chemical Engineering
Kampus UI, Depok 16424
Tel. : (021) 7863516
Fax. : (021) 7863515
e-mail:dept@che.ui.edu,
http://www.chemeng.ui.ac.id
Permanent Proffesors :
Prof. Dr. Ir. Roekmiyati Widaningrum
Soemantojo , M.Si (Ir, UGM; MSi, UI;
Dr, IPB, Prof. UI, 2000) Industrial waste
treatment and pollution prevention.
Prof. Dr. Ir. Mohammad Nasikin, M.Eng. (Ir,
ITS; M.Eng, Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Ja-
pan; Dr. UI) Heterogeneous catalysis.
Permanent Lecturers:
Abdul Wahid (Ir., UI, MT, UI) Process systems
and control.
Alibasyah I. Soedjarno (Ir. ITB; SE, UI;
MM, ITB) Industrial management, plant
design.
Andy Noorsaman Sommeng (Ir, UI; DEA, Univ.
de Technologie de Compiegne, France; Dr,
ECP-Paris, France) Process Systems, pro-
cess optimization and simulation, safety
and loss prevention.
Anondho Wijanarko (Ir, UI; MEng, Tokyo Insti-
tute of Technology, Dr, UI) Bioprocesses.
Asep Handaya Saputra (Ir, UI; MEng, Dr.
Tokyo Institute of Technology) Composite
Materials.
Atastina Sri Basuki (Ir,UGM; MSi, UI) Environ-
metal engineering, combustion system.
Bambang Heru (ST, UI) Process Control.
technology, culture and art; and providing
scholars who are faithful and devout,
noble, intelligent, competent, dignified,
stable, autonomous and have high social
responsibility.
The ChED-UI has three primary missions:
instruction, research and service. The
instructional mission is the most important
and complex whereas the Department
seeks to provide the highest quality of
undergraduate and postgraduate education.
The Department will provide a broad-based
education and design experience, enabling
students to address complex chemical
engineering problems with strong point on
gas and petrochemical felds. Furthermore,
the Department will provide students
with fundamental elements to evolve
in the profession in response to rapidly
changing technology and societal needs and
expectations. In research, the Department
seeks to impart the knowledge and provide
the intellectual environment that will foster
the highest level of research and critical-
innovative thinking. And fnally in service,
the Department seeks to assist in solving
the problems facing society. This includes
the obligation to identify new and evolving
societal problems as well as providing the
time and effort needed to address existing
problems.
3.5.2. Staff
Head of Department :
Dr. Ir. Widodo Wahyu Purwanto, DEA.
Vice Head of Department for Academic Af-
fair:
Dr. rer. nat. Ir. Yuswan Muharam, MT.
Vice Head of Department for Non Academic
Affairs :
Ir. Praswasti PDK Wulan, M.T.
Head of Laboratory of Chemical Reaction
Engineering & Natural Gas Conversion:
Ir. Slamet, MT.
Head of Laboratory of Thermodynamics,
Energy & Environment:
Dr. Ir. Anondho Wijanarko, M.Eng.
Head of Laboratory of Unit Operation:
Ir. Sukirno, M.Eng.
75
Dewi Tristantini Budi (Ir, UGM; MT, ITB; Dr.
Chalmers University, Sweden) Enzymatic
catalysis.
Dianursanti (ST, UI, MT, UI) Bioprocesses
Dijan Supramono (Ir, ITB; MSc, University of
Manchester Science and Technology, UK)
Integrated Processes, combustion.
Eva Fathul Karamah (ST, UI; MT, UI) Separa-
tion processes
Heri Hermansyah (ST, UI; MEng and Dr., To-
hoku University,Japan) Bioprocesses
Kamarza Mulia (S. Kimia, ITB; MSc dan Ph.D,
Colorado School of Mines, AS) Phase Equi-
librium, state equations, Problem-based
Learning, Communication Skill
Mahmud Sudibandriyo (Ir, ITB; MSc,PhD,
Oklahoma State University, AS) Thermo-
dynamic, Adsorption.
Misri Gozan (Ir,UI; M.Tech, Massey University,
New Zealand; Dr. Technical University
of Dresden, Germany) Industrial waste
treatment.
Nelson Saksono (Ir, UI; MT, UI) Catalysis,
energy effciency.
Praswasti Pembangun Diah Kencana Wulan
(Ir, UI; MT, UI) Bioprocesses.
Rita Arbianti (ST, UI, MSi, UI) Nature che-
micals.
Setiadi (Ir, ITS; M.Eng., Tokyo Inst. of Techno-
logy, Japan) Catalysis.
Setijo Bismo (Ir, ITB; DEA dan Dr, ENSIGC Tou-
louse, France) Reactor Design, modelling,
simulation and optimization of processes,
production and utilization of ozone.
Slamet (Ir, UGM; MT, UI, Dr,UI) Photocatalysis,
process simulation.
Sukirno (Ir, ITB; M.Eng., Tokyo Inst. of
Technology, Japan) Lubrication technolo-
gies, vegetable oil lubricants.
Sutrasno Kartohardjono (Ir, UI; MSc, UTM-
Malaysia; Ph.D, University of New South
Wales, Australia) Membrane technolo-
gies.
Tania Surya Utami (ST, UI, MT, UI) Biopro-
cesses.
Tilani Hamid Soeryadi (Ir, ITB; MSi, UI) Ma-
terial science and corrosion.
Widodo Wahyu Purwanto (Ir, ITS; DEA and
Dr., ENSIGC-INP Toulouse, France) Energy,
Chemical reaction engineering.
Yuliusman (ST, UI; M.Eng. UTM, Malaysia)
Solid waste treatment.
Yuswan Muharam (Ir, UI; MT, UI; Dr. University
of heidelberg, Germany) Pemodelan dan
Simulasi Proses, Teknik Reaksi Kimia.
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3.5.3. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING STUDY PROGRAM CURRICULUM
Tabel 3.5.1. Course Structure of Chemical Engineering Study Program
Semester 1 ( Start September ) (UI) Semester 2 ( Start February ) (UI)
Semester 3 ( Start September ) (UI) Semester 4 ( Start February/March ) (Univ. of Monash)
Semester 5 ( Start July ) (Univ. of Monash) Semester 6 ( Start February/March ) (Univ. of Monash)
Code
ENG 11001I
ENG 12011I
ENG 11002I
ENG 41406I
TKE 11027I
TKE 11028I
Calculus
Physics Elect, Magnet, Wave & Optics
Communication Skills in English
Basic Chemistry & Lab
Basic Computer
Computer Lab
Statistics
Total
ENG 12003I
ENG 12007I
GPE 12003I
GPE 11001I
GPE 12005I
GPE 21010I
TKE 20019I
Linear Algebra
Physics Mechanic & Heat
Physical Chemistry
Organic Chemistry
Organic Chemistry Lab
Mat. & Energy Balances
Numerical Method
Total
4
4
3
3
2
1
2
19
4
4
3
3
1
3
3
21
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Code
Subject Credit Point
Thermodynamics
Physical Chemistry Lab
CAD for Chemical Engineering
Fluid Mechanics
Transport Phenomena
Heat & Mass Transfer
Engineering Drawing
Chemical Reaction Engineering
Total
3
1
3
3
3
3
2
3
21
CHE 3101
CHE 3102
CHE 3108
CHE 3110
CHE 3115
MAT 3901
Reaction Engineering 1
Heat & Mass Transfer 1
Proc. Design & Operation 1
Transport Phenomena
Thermodynamics 2
Statistical & Integral Transfot for
Engineering
Total
4
4
4
4
4
4
24
Heat & Mass Transfer
Momentum Transfer 2
Process Control
Proc. Design Operation 2
Chem. Eng. Practice 3
Chem. Eng. Computer Applications
Total
4
4
4
4
4
4
24
CHE 4102
CHE 4109
CHE 4110
CHE 4113
CHE 4118
Reaction Engineering 2
Proc. Design & Operation 3
Proc. Simulation & Control
Management
Chemical Engineering Research
Project
Total
4
4
4
4
9
25
Code Subject Credit Point
CHE 4112
CHE 4117
Electives
CHE 4132
CHE 4142
CHE 4152
CHE 4153
Environmental Engineering
Design Project
Electives chosen from the following:
Biochemical Engineering
Pulp & Paper Technology
Cleaner Production Technology
Chemical Engineering Troubleshooting
4
10
9
3
3
3
3
GPE 22011I
GPE 21008I
GPE 31120I
GPE 22013I
CHE 20014I
CHE 21016I
CHE 11002I
CHE 21017I
CHE 3103
CHE 3104
CHE 3107
CHE 3109
CHE 3118
CHE 3130
Semester 7 ( Start July ) (Univ. of Monash)
Code Subject Credit Point
Semester 8 ( Start February ) (UI)
GPE 40029I
GPE 40028I
Electives
GPE 32109I
GPE 32101I
GPE 32111I
GPE 32112I
Seminar
Selected Topics
Electives chosen from the following:
Polymer
Petroleum Processing
Cryogenics
Combustion Engineering
4
4
8
4
9
Or others as specified at that time by Head of Department of
Chem. Eng. Monash Univ.
GPE 32113I Work Safety
GPE 32114I
GPE 32115I
GPE 32116I
GPE 32117I
GPE 32118I
Catalysis
Biotechnology
Plat Maintenance
Project Management
Process System Analysis
77
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ing & structure on physical properties,
electronic structures- activity relationship,
chemical organic reaction
Prerequisite : TKE11025I
Resource materials:
1.Fesseden, alih bahasa: A. Hadiyana Pujat-
maka. Kimia Organik, edisi kedua Erlangga,
1986
2.Morrison, RT and Boyd, RN, Organic Chemis-
try, 3rd ed., Prentice-Hall, 1978
TKE12013I
BASIC MATHEMATICS 2
2 credit points
Objectives: (a) should understand the basic
concept of functions with two independent
variables, the limit of a function with two
variables, partial and total differential of a
function with two variables; (b) are expected
to understand the concepts of sequences
and series, vector and analytic geometry;
(c) should be able to apply the concepts in
engineering applications.
Synopsis: Variables in a function. Functions
with two independent variables. Limit of a
function at a point. Characteristics of con-
tinuous and discontinuous functions. Partial
derivative at a point. Total differential at
a point and its applications. Maximum and
minimum points of a function and the appli-
cations with Lagrange multipliers. Area and
volume with double integration. Sequences
and series, convergence and power series.
Matrices, matrix operation, equivalent ma-
trix, determinant, inverse of a matrix and
the applications.
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
Purcell, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 7th
ed., Aplleton-Century-Crofts, 1996
TKE12016I
LINEAR ALGEBRA 2
2 credit points
Objectives: should understand advanced
algebra and explore the applications particu-
larly for use in other engineering subjects.
3.5.4. COURSE SYLLABI
TKE11012I
BASIC MATHEMATICS 1
2 credit points
Objectives: to be able to consolidate their
knowledge in calculus and to have skills to
solve applied calculus problems.
Synopsis: Mathematics review. Real number
system. Cartesian product. Function and
their graphs. Limit of a function and con-
tinuous function. The derivative theorem
(the chain rule, implicit differentiation,
higher order derivatives and applications of
the derivatives). The integral (the defnite
integral, the indefnite integral, applications
of the integral on the Cartesian coordinates
and polar coordinates).
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
Purcell, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 7th
ed., Aplleton-Century-Crofts, 1996
TKE11015I
LINEAR ALGEBRA 1
2 credit points
Objectives: to understand and to have skills
in linear algebra and to investigate applica-
tions particularly for use in other engineering
subjects.
Synopsis: System of linear equations. Matrix
and type of matrices. Determinant and its
use (Cramers rule). Vector geometry and
vector in Rn space. Vector space. Basis and
dimension of a vector space.
Prerequisites : none
Resource materials:
Howard, A, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th
ed., John Willey and Sons, 1996
TKE11020I
PHYSICS I (MECHANICS, ELECTRICITY &
MAGNETISM)
3 credit point
Objectives: to understand concept of basic
78
Synopsis: Defnition of matrix. Matrix op-
eration. Row-echelon form. Equivalence of
a matrix. Determinants and the application
in the solution of linear equations. Inverse of
matrices and the application in the solution
of linear equations. Solve equations with
matrices.
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
Howard, A, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th
ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1996
TKE12022I
PHYSICS 2 (Heat, Wave & Optics)
3 credit points
Objectives: should able to understand the
concept and basic law of fuids and its ap-
plications
Synopsis: Temperature and its expansion.
Heat and its measurement. Heat Transfer.
Nature of Thermal matter. Thermodynamic
laws.Thermodynamic laws. Nature of mo-
lecular substances. Wave in elasticity media.
Wave in elasticity media. Sonic wave
Prerequisites : none
Resource material: none
GPE12003I
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY
3 credits points
Objectives: The quantitative study of micro-
scopic and macroscopic chemical systems,
covering introductory quantum theory of
atoms and molecules (energy levels and
states), and fundamental thermodynamics,
with applications to chemical reactions and
simple systems
Synopsis: General Thermodynamics: The
Properties of Gases. Intensive and extensive
properties. Standard enthalpy changes.
Standard enthalpy of formation. Second and
Third Laws of Thermodynamics. Entropy. Re-
versible and irreversible processes. Entropy
changes. The Gibbs fundamental equation.
Thermodynamic Potentials. Equilibrium
and Stability. Pure substances. The Gibbs-
Helmholtz equations. Chemical potential.
Extension to multicomponent systems. Partial
molar properties. Applications of Macroscopic
(A) and Microscopic (B) Formalisms: Chemi-
cal Equilibrium. Physical Transformations of
Pure Substances. Simple microscopic mod-
els for liquid-vapor equilibria and adsorp-
tion. Simple Mixtures. Simple microscopic
model for regular solutions. Phase diagrams.
Ideal-Dilute Solutions. Thermodynamics of
Electrolyte Solutions. Quantum Mechanics:
Quantum Theory. Quantum Mechanics of
Simple Systems
Prerequisite : -
Resource materials:
1. Physical Chemistry, 5th Ed., Peter Atkins
and Julio de Paula (W. H. Freeman & Co.,
New York, 2002).
2. Physical Chemistry, 5th Ed., Gordon M.
Barrow, Mc Graw Hill International Edi-
tions)
3. Student Solutions Manual for Physical
Chemistry, Peter Atkins, C. A. Trapp, M. P.
Cady, and C. Giunta, 5th Ed. (W. H. Free-
man & Co., New York, 2002). Optional.
4. Morrison, RT and Boyd, RN, Organic
Chemistry, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall,

GPE12005I
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY
1 credit point
Objectives: to be able to identify and be able
to synthesize organic compound.
Synopsis: Practical experiment on chemical
organic reactions: electroflic substitution,
nucleoflic substitution, adhesion and oxida-
tion reactions, dehydration reaction, hydro-
lysis reaction, crystallization, distillation.
Prerequisite: GPE11001I dan GPE12004I
(bersamaan)
Resource materials:
1. Fesseden, alih bahasa : A. Hadiyana PQjat-
maka, Kimia Organik, edisi kedua Erlangga,
1986
2. Vogel, Practical Organic Chemistry.
3. Fieser, Organic Chemistry
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GPE31107I
COMMUNICATION SKILL
2 credit points
Objectives: By the end of the course, stu-
dents will demonstrate an ability to: identify
the elements of effective oral and written
communication ; fnd any literature in the
library and to develop self-confdence in
critically assessing article, and sythesizing
it.; write clear and accurate summaries of
written materials; write clear and well-devel-
oped critical analyses of written materials;
present purpose clearly and address audience
appropriately both orally and in writing
Synopsis: Introduction and audience analy-
sis; Writing process; Memos writing; Reading
and summary; Report and Abstract writing;
Oral presentation; 5-min presentation and
selecting report topic; writing outline report;
15-min presentation and ; Report preparation
; 15-min presentation; Review on effective
oral presentation.
Prerequisites : none
Resource Materials :
1. Woods, D.R., Communicating effectively,
McMaster University Bookstore, 1996.
2. Galanes, G.J., et al., Communicating in
groups, 4th. edition, McGraw Hill, 2000.
3. Seraydarian, P. E., Writing for Business
Results, The Business Skills Express Series,
Mirror Press,1994.
4. Becker, D. and Becker, P.B., Powerful Pre-
sentation Skills, The Business Skills Ex-
press Series, Mirror Press,1994.
5. Hand out
GPE12006I
MATERIAL SCIENCE AND CORROTION
3 credit points
Objectives : To be able to selecting engineer-
ing materials economically in order to plan-
ning and building chemical process equip-
ment based on physical nature of material
and be able to explain the factors affecting
the production cost.
GPE21010I
MATERIAL & ENERGY BALANCE
3 credit points
Objectives: should able to solve some cases
on material and energy balance by using ap-
plication of conservation of law and degree
of freedom in the process.
Synopsis: Intoduction to chemical calcula-
tion. Equation of chemical and stoikiometry.
Material balance without chemical reaction.
Material balance with chemical reaction.
Energy balance. Combining material and
energy balance.
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
1. Reklaitis G.V. Introduction to Material and
Energy Balances, John Wiley, 1983.
2. Himmelblau D.M. Basic Principles and Cal-
culation in Chemical Engineering, Prentice-
Hall, 1989.
3. Diktat Dasar Proses dan Operasi, 1989.
GPE12004I
BASIC CHEMISTRY 2 AND LABORATORY
4 credit points
Objectives: Understanding basic principles of
chemical reaction & calculation and to apply
its basic principle in laboratory
Synopsis:
1. Lecturing : Basic concept of chemical
bonding, Molecular geometry and bond-
ing theories, Gas, Chemical Equilibrium,
Properties of solutions, chemical kinetic,
chemistry of environment, Modern mate-
rial.
2. Laboratory : consist of six modules:
Physical and chemistry characteristic,
Separation and purifcation substances,
Identifcation of Alkaline metal, Alkaline
earth, and Ammonium ion, Identifcation
of Sulphate ion, Bromide, and Nitrate,
Acid base Titration, Acid Metal reaction
Resource Materials : Chemistry The Central
Science, Brown LeMay Bursten , Eighth Edi-
tion, Prentice all, New Jersey, 2000.
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Synopsis: Crystal: structure and crystal
depect struktur. Properties of mechanical,
physical, and chemical of materials at low
and high temperatures. Phase diagram. Metal
and non-metal Materials. Type of corrosions
and theirs preventions. Economical asfects of
corrosion in chemical process industries.
Prerequisite: -
Resource materials:
1. Element of materials science and engi-
neering, Lawrence H. van Vlack, 5th ed.,
Addison-Wesley Publishing Comp., Read-
ing, Mass USA, 1989
2. Teori bahan dan pengaturan teknik, Ir. Su-
harto, Penerbit Eka cipta Jakarta, 1995
3. Hand out
GPE21008I
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY LAB
1 SKS
Objectives: Students will be able to apply
all the basic physical chemical by experi-
ment subject in the laboratory, be able to
oparated the utilities in the experiment,
also be able to make an explanation of its
phenomenon.
Synopsis: Adsorbsi isothermis. Soluble sub-
stance distribution between two solvent
substance, binary vapor liquid system.
Reaction velocity as a temperature and
concentrate functions.Three component
of liquid substance systems. Solubility as a
temperature functions. Surface voltage. Rise
of boiling point . Heat Solvent.Molal Volume
Partial. Constant Balance. Determination of
Molecule weight.
Prerequisites: GPE12003I dan GPE21007I
(altogether).
Resources Materials:
1.Kwe Fe Tjien (alih bahasa), Penuntun Prak-
tikum Kimia Fisika, Jakarta, Gramedia,
1987.
2. Petunjuk Praktikum Kimia Fisika. TGPE FTUI,
1989.
3.Daniel et al., Experimental Physical Chemis-
try, 7 th ed., McGraw Hill, 1970.
GPE22011I
THERMODYNAMICS
3 credit points
Objectives: should be able to understand and
explain basic concept of thermodynamis and
be able to link them to chemical and physical
phenomena and be able to apply them for
solving simple thermodynamics calculation.
Synopsis: Basic concepts: state function,
equilibrium; 1st thermodynamics law: heat,
work, internal energy, enthalpy, heat capac-
ity; 2nd thermodynamics law: carnot cyclic,
entropy concept and irreversibility; Fluids
properties; Gibbs amd Helmholtz; Ther-
modynamics diagrams; liquid-steam phase
equilibrium; chemical equilibrium.
Prerequisites: GPE21007I
Resource materials:
1. Smith, J. M..and van Ness, Introduction to
Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics,
4th ed., McGraw Hill, 1985.
2. Kyle, B. G, Chemical and Process Thermo-
dynamics, Prentice-Hall, 1992.
GPE22013I
FLUID MECHANICS
3 credit points
Objectives: To understanding momentum
transfer in fow of fuid
To be able to use the principle of fuid me-
chanics in static and dynamic form in fow
of fuid, contact liquid-solid, separate solid
from liquid..
Synopsis: Introduction: Fluid static and
its application; Mass and Energy Balance;
Bernoulli Equation; Friction of fuid on one
dimension steady fow; Momentum Balance;
High Speed Gas fow: One Dimension; Pump,
Compressor and Turbine; Fluid fows through
porous media; Fluidisation and Filtration;
Gas-Liquid fow
Prerequisites: GPE22014I
Resource materials:
1. Coulson dan Richardson, Chemical Engi-
neering Vol. 1 dan 2, Pergamon Press, 3rd
ed.,1978.
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reactions; energy effects - non-isothermal
reactors, multiple steady states in a CSTR;
residence time distributions and models for
non-ideal fow reactors; non-catalytic fuid-
solid reactions.
Prerequisites: CHE2114 or CHE2104 or
CHE2082 or ENE2102
CHE3102
HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER I
4 credit points
Synopsis: Mass transfer theories, diffusivity,
mass transfer coeffcients; continuous and
stage-wise contact of phases for mass trans-
fer - binary and multi-component distillation,
solid-liquid leaching, liquid extraction.
Prerequisites: CHE2114 or CHE2104 or
CHE2082 or ENE2102
CHE3108
PROCESS DESIGN AND OPERATION I
4 credit points
Synopsis: A frst design course covering as-
pects of process design, process fowsheet-
ing, utilities systems, equipment specifca-
tion and materials selection, introduction to
pressure vessel design.
Prerequisites: CHE2100 and CHE2114 (or
CHE2104) and CHE2120 (or CHE2071 and
CHE2082)
CHE3110
TRANSPORT PHENOMENA I
4 credit points
Synopsis: Transfer coeffcients - viscosity,
thermal conductivity and diffusivity. New-
tons law of viscosity, Fouriers law of heat
conduction, Ficks law of diffusion. Analogies
of three transfer processes. Newtonian and
non-Newtonian fluids. Conservation laws
- mass, momentum and energy. Steady state
shell mass, momentum and energy balances
- applications. Derivations of equations of
change for isothermal systems - Cartesian
coordinates. Generalisation of these to
vector/tensor form using arbitrary volume
element. Solutions to multivariable flow
2. McCabe,, W. L. dan Smith, J. C., Unit
Operations of Chemical Engineering, Mc-
Graw-Hill, 3rd., 1976
3. Transport Processes and Unit Operations
Cristie, J Geankoplis, Printice Hall Inc,
3rd., 1993.
GPE22015I
HEAT TRANSFER
3 credit points
Objectives: To understand and to explain the
information about heat transfer system and
also to search/arrange the theory that can
verify about the system.; To solve the heat
transfer problem with several step of prob-
lem solving that including: to identify and
to analysis the problem, to identify existing
and unknown information, to synthesis new
knowledge, to make alternative solution,
to determine problem solving design and to
evaluate fnal result; To develop process skill,
problem solving skill and communication skill
to achieve long life learning skill.momentum,
mass also heat through microscopic and mac-
roscopic balance application.
Synopsis: Conduction; Convection; Radia-
tion; Evaporation; one and multiple steps
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
1. Holman, J.P., Heat Transfer, 6th Ed.,
Mc.Graw-Hill International Book Company
1990.
2. Mc. Adam, W. H., Heat Transmission,
3rd Ed., Mc.Graw-Hill International Book
Company, 1981.
3. Kern, D. Q., Process Heat Transfer,
Mc.Graw-Hill International Book Compa-
ny, 1984.
4. Treybal, R.E., Mass Transfer Operation,
McGraw-Hill International Book Company,
1984.
CHE3101
REACTION ENGINEERING I
4 credit points
Synopsis: Rate data analysis; reaction
mechanisms; chain reactions; isothermal
reactors, mixed reactor systems; multiple
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problems.
Prerequisites: CHE2100 and MAT2901 and
MAT2902
CHE3115
THERMODYNAMICS II
4 credit points
Synopsis: Thermodynamic functions and
chemical potential, the thermodynamics
of gases and solutions, phase equilibria,
chemical equilibria, thermodynamics and
electrochemistry.
Prerequisites: CHE2120 or CHE2071
MAT3901
STATISTICS AND INTEGRAL TRANSFORMS
FOR ENGINEERING
4 credit points
Synopsis: Statistics: probability theory, ran-
dom variables, probability distributions and
density functions, expectation, joint distri-
butions, sampling distributions, statistical
inference, parameter estimates, confdence
limits, hypothesis testing, quality control,
linear regression and correlation. Fourier
transforms, Laplace transforms and inverse
Laplace transforms, Sturm-Liouville theory,
eigenfunctions.
Prerequisites: MAT2901 and MAT2902
CHE3103
HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER II
4 credit points
Synopsis: Heat transfer with phase change -
condensation (pure and multi-component sys-
tems, vapour with non-condensable gases),
boiling; radiation heat transfer, simultaneous
heat and mass transfer - humidifcation, de-
humidifcation, cooling tower, evaporation,
membranes, adsorption and ion-exchange.
Prerequisites: CHE2114 or CHE2104 or
CHE2082 or ENE2102
CHE3104
MOMENTUM TRANSFER II
4 credit points
Synopsis: Particle characterisation; fuid
mechanics of single and multi-particle sys-
tems - sedimentation, centrifugation; fow
through packed beds; particulate fuidisation;
fltration.
Prerequisites: CHE2100 or CHE2082 or
CIV2261
CHE3107
PROCESS CONTROL
4 credit points
Synopsis: Process dynamics in terms of devia-
tion variables. Laplace transform methods
and transfer functions. Characteristic dynam-
ics of selected basic systems. The pervasive-
ness of the negative feedback loop in control.
Regulatory and servo operation; continuous
fow and batch processing. Control loop ele-
ments at the disposal of the control engineer.
Hardware descriptions of current transducers
and fnal control elements relevant to process
control. The possibility of instability and
criteria for detecting system proximity to
this condition. Controller tuning. State space
representation of complex systems.
Prerequisites: CHE2114 (or CHE2104 or
CHE2082) and MAT2901 and MAT2902
CHE3109
PROCESS DESIGN AND OPERATION II
4 credit points
Synopsis: A second design course cover-
ing heat exchanger design, engineering
fowsheeting, technical and occupational
health and safety. An introduction to plant
costing.
Prerequisites: CHE3108
CHE3118
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PRACTICE III
4 credit points
Synopsis: This unit involves laboratory
classes relating to various aspects of chemical
engineering principles and unit operations.
Prerequisites: CHE2100 and CHE2114 or
CHE2104 and CHE2160 (or CHE2082)
83
design of plant and processes.
Prerequisites: CHE3108 and CHE3109
CHE4110
PROCESS SIMULATION AND CONTROL
4 credit points
Synopsis: Process modelling for control
purposes; tuning and design of conventional
control systems for multivariable processes;
limitations of conventional control sys-
tems and introduction to advanced control;
overview of computer based process control
systems and methods.
Prerequisites: CHE3107
CHE4113
MANAGEMENT
4 credit points
Synopsis: Process engineering economics,
project planning, hazard awareness and haz-
ard management, industrial relations, legal
and ethical issues infuencing management
in the process industries.
Prerequisites: CHE3108 and CHE3109
he classes will be lead by experienced en-
gineers from a major chemical engineering
company.
Prerequisites: CHE3103, CHE3107, CHE3108
and CHE3109
CHE4118
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJ-
ECT
9 credit points
Synopsis: Development and conduct of a
specific research project: conceptualisa-
tion, literature survey, experimental design,
equipment design, construction and com-
missioning; experimentation; analysis and
interpretation of results; oral and written
progress reports; writing and oral defence
of a thesis.
Prerequisites: CHE3101, CHE3102, CHE3103,
CHE3104 and CHE3107
CHE3130
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING COMPUTER AP-
PLICATIONS
4 credit points
Synopsis: Advanced application of computer
methods to the solution of chemical engi-
neering problems. Use of HYSIS to simulate
complex fowsheets. Simulation of complex
liquid - vapour equilibrium. Implementation
of distillation and reactor unit operations
in a HYSIS fowsheet. Numerical solution of
partial differential equations characterising
many chemical engineering problems. Clas-
sifcation of equations and representation
in terms of fnite differences and fnite ele-
ments. Incorporation of the boundary condi-
tions into the numerical solution. Computer
packages used to solve complex, realistic
chemical engineering problems in fuid fow
and transport phenomena.
Prerequisites: CHE2150 or CHE2071
CHE4102
REACTION ENGINEERING II
4 credit points
Synopsis: Fundamentals of heterogeneous
catalysis; diffusion and reaction in porous
catalysts; tubular catalytic reactors; ex-
amples of important catalytic reactors such
as steam reforming, ammonia synthesis,
methanol synthesis; introduction to gas-liq-
uid reactions.
Prerequisites: CHE3101
CHE4109
PROCESS DESIGN AND OPERATION III
4 credit points
Synopsis: Mechanical design of pressure
vessels, design of structural supports and
foundations, use of relevant codes; selection
and design of packed and tray columns for
gas - liquid contacting, hydraulics of trays and
packings, specifcation of column internals;
hierarchy of design and heuristic approach to
fowsheet development, sequencing of distil-
lation columns; use of CAD packages such as
PRO/II, ASPEN and HYSIS; heat exchanger
network analysis; plant layout; quantitative
risk assessment for safety hazards; retroft
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CHE4112
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
4 credit points
Synopsis: Environmental issues driving
change in chemical engineering practice.
Greenhouse gas emissions and their con-
sequences. Major air pollutants, sources,
effects and fate. Meteorology and the dis-
persion of gaseous emissions. Alleviation
of air pollution problems. Examination of
water and wastewater; chemical, physical
and microbiological tests; Australian drinking
water guidelines. Wastewater treatment pro-
cesses; activated sludge, trickling fltration,
anaerobic digestion. Solid waste treatment.
Noise pollution.
Prerequisites: CHE3101 and CHE3103
CHE4117
DESIGN PROJECT
10 credit points
Synopsis: A project performed by each
student on the design and evaluation of a
process plant for a specifed duty.
Prerequisites: CHE3101, CHE3102, CHE3103,
CHE3108 and CHE3109
Corequisites: CHE4113
CHE4132
BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING
3 credit points
Synopsis: Aspects of industrial enzymology;
sources, kinetics and applications. Cellular
growth processes; growth kinetics in batch
and continuous culture. Sterilisation of liq-
uids and gases. Biological reactor design;
confgurations, aseptic design, aeration and
agitation, scaleup. Downstream process-
ing; isolation and purifcation of biological
products. Integration of biological processes.
Case studies.
Prerequisites: CHE2121 or BIO1011 and
BIO1022
CHE4142
PULP AND PAPER TECHNOLOGY
3 credit points
Synopsis: Application of chemical engineer-
ing principles in papermaking with topics
selected from mechanical, semi-chemical
and chemical pulping; bleaching; washing;
screening; chemical recovery and chemi-
cal production; stock preparation; wet end
chemistry; forming; drainage; pressing; dry-
ing and coating; environmental and strategic
issues.
CHE4152
CLEANER PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES
3 credit points
Synopsis: Waste minimisation in process
synthesis; process and utility wastes; reac-
tion systems; infuence of basic chemistry
and process control, batch and continuous
systems, materials handling; waste mini-
misation in separation systems. Evaluating
cleaner production performance at design
and operational phases; integrating cleaner
production objectives with economic and
other criteria. Evaluating products and pro-
cessing chains; lifecycle analysis, concepts
and applications; recycling of products and
materials. Case studies in cleaner production
drawn from the process industries.
Prerequisites: CHE3108 and CHE3109
CHE4153
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TROUBLESHOOT-
ING
3 credit points
Synopsis: This unit seeks to develop an
understanding of the troubleshooting tech-
niques used in the chemical and process
industries and an appreciation of the techni-
cal problems that arise from day to day in
these industries. Case studies will be chosen
to suit the students level of experience
and knowledge of material and energy bal-
ances, fuid dynamics, reaction engineering,
heat and mass transfer, process control and
process safety. The classes will be lead by
experienced engineers from a major chemical
engineering company.
Prerequisites: CHE3103, CHE3107, CHE3108
and CHE3109
85
3.6. DEPARTMENT OF
ARCHITECTURE
3.6.1. INTRODUCTION
The international program introduced by the
two institutions, University of Indonesia (UI)
and Queensland University of Technology
(QUT), Australia is designed for domestic
students due to the move towards a global
information society. By participating in this
international program, students will develop
contacts with people from different cultures
and gain opportunities to adequately fulfl
their professional responsibilities from those
in other parts of the world.
The advantage of this joint program between
UI and QUT is principally fnancial. The cost
of study and the cost of living in Australia is
very high, while the willingness of Indonesian
students to study abroad, particularly to
Australia, is relatively high. The arrange-
ment of this two and two-year program
offers opportunities for Indonesian students
to obtain degree from QUT without having
to spend high cost of four full years of study
in Australia.
CAREER OPTIONS
As an architecture graduate you will have the
opportunity to work anywhere in the world.
You may choose to go into general practice
or specialise in commercial, industrial or
institutional developments, historic building
conservation or housing renovation.
3.6.2. CURRICULUM
Students spend the frst and second years
of the program (Semester 1-4) in UI. During
these initial two years the students take
courses at the Department of Architecture
which are approximately 75-80% similar to
courses undertaken by students in the regular
undergraduate program in architecture. All
the courses are conducted in English. At the
end of the second year, there will be an as-
sessment to determine the eligibility of the
students to proceed to the third and fourth
years (Semester 5-8) at the School of Design,
Faculty of Built Environment and Engineer-
ing in QUT. The structure of curriculum of
the proposed program is presented in Table
3.6.1.
Upon successful completion of the fourth
year as determined by QUT requirements,
the students will be awarded Bachelor of
Design from QUT. Holders of this degree are
eligible to enter postgraduate professional
program leading to Master of Architecture
accredited by RAIA. In addition to the degree
from QUT, the students will also be awarded
Sarjana Teknik degree from University of
Indonesia subject to successfully defending
their fnal project to the satisfaction of UI
requirements.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE
The performance of an individual student is
quantifed by the assessment of each course
during each semester. The results of the as-
sessment from all courses during two years
are recorded as students Grade Point Aver-
age (GPA). Students are eligible to proceed to
year three in QUT if they meet the require-
ment of minimum GPA of 2.75. In addition,
they also need to meet the minimum English
entry requirement of QUT, which is either
an IELTS score of 6.0 (with no sub-test lower
than 6.0) or a TOEFL score of 550. The as-
sessment at the end of year two is presented
in Table 3.6.2.
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Category Requirement Desicion
1 GPA 2.75
IELTS 6.0 or TOEFL 550
Student is eligible to proceed to Year 3 in QUT
2
GPA 2.75
IELTS < 6.0 or TOEFL < 550
Student is given a maximum of 2 years to improve
IELTS or TOEFL score. When IELTS 6.0
or TOEFL 550, go to category 1.
3
GPA < 2.75
IELTS 6.0 or TOEFL 550
Student is given a maximum of 2 years to improve
GPA. When GPA 2.75, go to category 1.
4 GPA < 2.75
IELTS < 6.0 or TOEFL < 550
Student is given a maximum of 2 years to improve
GPA and IELTS or TOEFL score. When GPA 2.75
and IELTS 6.0 or TOEFL 550, go to category 1.
Table 3.6.2. Assessment scheme at the end of the second year
3.6.3. ARCHITECTURE STUDY PROGRAM CURRICULUM
Table 3.6.1. Curriculum Structure of Two and Two Year Program leading to dual degree
of Bachelor of Design and Sarjana Arsitektur
Semester I Semester II
Semester III Semester IV
Semester V Semester VI
2
3
4
4
4
4
3
3
6
3
Subject Credit Point Subject Credit Point
Subject Credit Point
Subject Credit Point
Subject Credit Point
Subject Credit Point
Architectural Design I
Design Theories & Methods in
Architecture
History of ArchitectureI
Electives
10
3
3
3
10
3
3
3
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Courses taken at the University of Indonesia:
Introducing Professional Learning *
Communication Skills in English
Calculus
Visual Arts
Digital Design Communication
Linear Algebra
Elementary Physics
Introduction to Architecture
Communication Techniques in
Architecture
Introducing Sustainabiity *
Architectural Design II
Design Theories & Methods in Built
Environment
History of Architecture II
Electives
Courses taken at the Queensland University of Technology:
Intermediate Architectural Design 3
Architecture and the City
Integrated Technologies 2
Minor/Major Unit
Advanced Architectural Design 1
Architectural Technology 2
Collaborative Design
Minor/Major Unit
Semester VII Semester VI
Subject Credit Point Subject Credit Point
Advaced Architectural Design 2
Design and Research
Minor/Major Unit
Minor/Major Unit
12
12
12
12
Advanced Architectural Design 3
Professional Practice
Minor/Major Unit
Minor/Major Unit
12
12
12
12
Code
Code Code
Code
AIS 11006I
ENG 11002I
ENG 11501I
AIS 11005I
AIS 11002I
ENG 12003I
ENG 12023I
AIS 12002I
AIS 12003I
AIS 12004I
AIS 21004I
AIS 21007I
AIS 21006I
AIS 22007I
AIS 22010I
AIS 22009I
87
inverse, linear equation system, vectors in R2
and R2, equation of lines and planes, linear
transformation & space vector.
7. ELEMENTARY PHYSICS 3 credit units
(elective)
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic concepts and laws of mechanic physics
and its systematic applications over forces on
an object, both kinematics and dynamic.
Syllabus: magnitude, kinematics of a point
object, dynamic of a point object, harmonic
motion, gravitation; pressure, thermody-
namic system, energy equilibrium, caloric
transfer, ideal gas, the frst laws of thermo-
dynamics, enthalpy and entropy, application
of the frst laws of thermodynamics for open
and closed systems, the second laws of ther-
modynamics, kinetic theory of ideal gas.
8. INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE 3
credit units, 2nd Semester
Learning objectives: the course is aimed to
provide the new students an awareness of
the discipline of architecture and its related
knowledge: architectural fundamentals, how
we deal with architecture, mission of archi-
tects and what is architecture discipline as
to the others.
By the end the course, the students should
be able to distinguish architecture from
building sciences and engineering, to ex-
plain architects tasks and the scope of
architectural knowledge; to explain what is
the essence of being architectural, and to
demonstrate cases related to its principles
and its elements.
Syllabus: Human beings and their environ-
ment: natural, man-made, built environ-
ments and social environment; their motives
to build shelters. Architects, architecture,
doing architecture, and architectural expe-
riences.
Boundaries/limits, spatial boundaries, build-
ing and builders. Figure-ground, solid-void,
fne-rough, big-small, spacious-cramped and
light-dark. Singular-plural, far-near, arro-
gant-humble. Multi-complexity of functions,
science and design.
3.6.4.SYLLABI 2004 DEPARTMENT OF
ARCHITECTURE
1ST SEMESTER
1. INTRODUCING PROFESIONAL LEARNING
2 credits unit
Learning objectives: this course equips
students with the skills to become lifelong
learner and the ability to apply these skills
during their learning in the university and
through their professional careers.
Syllabus: Introduction to higher education
study skills, critical thinking, reading and
writing skills, learning from experience,
developing portfolio.
2. ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3 credits unit
3. CALCULUS 4 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic calculus and its applications.
Syllabus: numbers, function, limit, differ-
ential, integral.
4. VISUAL ARTS 4 credit units 1st Semes-
ter
Learning objectives: understanding and
exploring the fundamental elements of es-
thetics and visual arts
Syllabus: arts and tectonics, 2D and 3D
aspects of visual arts
5. DIGITAL DESIGN COMMUNICATION - 4
credits unit
Learning objectives: this course introduces
students to the application of digital design
media to communicate architectural ideas.
Syllabus: Introduction to digital photography,
digital image processing, CAD programs,
combining media for presentation.
2ND SEMESTER
6. LINEAR ALGEBRA 4 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
linear algebra and its applications.
Syllabus: matrices: defnition, operation,
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cultural aspects of human activities and
their subsequent spatial implications;
Human living space and its environmen-
tal contexts, such as, private/household
micro/local space; community and its
environment urban/rural);
Design methods
Technical knowledge structure/statics,
tectonics (building material & construc-
tion); environmental comfort (building
physics), and building utilities/services;
Presentation techniques
The architectural design, in the undergradu-
ate program, consists of fve design studio
courses, namely Architectural Design I, II,
III, IV and V.
11. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN I 10 credit
units,3rd Semester
Learning objectives: this course trains stu-
dents abilities to design a living space for a
simply single individual as well as a group of
individuals, such as a family. This is a critical,
preliminary design exercise.
Syllabus: experiencing private, semi-pri-
vate, semi-public and public spaces and their
respective meanings to individuals or groups
of individuals; simple structural forms and
analysis (load, forces, stability etc.); tecton-
ics (construction and joints); environmental
comforts (thermal, ventilation, lighting
etc.); basic services (plumbing, electrical
systems).
Pre-requisites: Introduction to architecture,
communication techniques in architecture,
visual arts.
12. DESIGN THEORIES & METHODS IN ARCHI-
TECTURE 3 credit units, 3rd Semester
Learning objectives: the course introduces
basic ideas and thinking of architectural
design theories and methods; by the end of
the course the students should be able to
explain their design thinking and accordingly
apply any design method both in writing and
graphics.
Syllabus: methods of thought: phenom-
enology, semiotics; theories and methods of
Factual knowledge, understanding problems,
defning problems, solving problems and ex-
plaining works. Engineering and architectural
consultancy, code of practice.
9. COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES IN ARCHI-
TECTURE 6 credit units, 2nd Semester
Learning objectives:
The course is aimed to introduce communica-
tion techniques in architecture and its media.
It is to enhances students senses and ability
to explore ideas and to communicate them
to others through various media,
Syllabus: Technical drawings, axonometric,
perspectives, quick sketches, computer
graphic models, 3 D models, photography.
10. INTRODUCING SUSTAINABILITY- 3 credits
unit
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic principles of sustainability in the con-
text of built environment.
Syllabus: Concepts and issues of sustain-
ability, connection of architecture to envi-
ronmental issues, barriers to and potentials
of sustainable building and living, examples
of sustainable architecture found in the local
and global communities.
3rd SEMESTER
ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (- STUDIO
Architectural design in the new curriculum
2004 is a pre-professional training in the
sense that it put more emphasis on design
thoughts and methods. The studio is both a
system and local for learning. Learning out-
comes and abilities are assessed in students
critical thinking and creative design process,
namely, their thinking, verbal, writing, and
graphic skills.
In this curriculum, the architectural design
studio integrates related knowledge such
as:
Factual knowledge understanding and
formulating design issues which are ab-
stracts, qualitative and concern socio-
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method of a built-environment both in writ-
ing and graphics.
Syllabus: methods of thoughts: axiomatic &
reductive; theories and methods of approach-
ing built-environment problems: observation
of the built-environment and its patterns,
theories and methods of understanding
problems: environmental analysis; theories
and methods of solving problems of built
environment.
17. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE II 3 credit
units, 3rd Semester
Learning objectives: the course introduces
modern architecture in the Indonesia.
Syllabus: Indonesian modern architecture,
the golden-era of the Dutch-Indies 1870-
1990, Dutch modern architecture early the
20th century, early works of the First Genera-
tion of the Dutch and Indonesian architects,
international and regional/local style, archi-
tecture as industry, eclecticism, the works of
Indonesian young architects.
18. ELECTIVES-3 credits unit
ELECTIVES
PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
knowledge related to project management,
fundamentals of building economics, laws &
regulations with regard to project manage-
ment.
Syllabus: project planning and management:
scheduling, CPM, supervision.
BUILDING SERVICES/UTILITIES 3 credit
units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
building system and utilities for a wide-span
and high-rise buildings.
Syllabus: introduction to building and sys-
tems and utilities: plumbing, fre-fghting
system and protection, lighting, electricity
and communication system, transporting
approaching design problems: architectural
observation, design knowledge: factual, de-
ontic, instrumental, black box, clear box;
theories and methods of understanding
problems, analysis, synthesis; theories and
methods of solving problems.
13. HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE I 3 credit
units, 3rd Semester
Learning objectives: the course is aimed at
introducing modern architecture especially
in the West.
Syllabus: Modern architecture, neo-classic,
town planning and urban design, science
and technology, arts & crafts art in modern
architecture, late- and post-modern archi-
tecture.
14. ELECTIVES-3 credits unit
4th SEMESTER
15. ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II 10 credit
units,4th Semester
Learning objectives: this course trains
students abilities to design a living space
for a community in an urban or sub-urban
context.
Syllabus: human condition, dwelling; hu-
man life-cycle space; reading urban text and
context; urban infll; structural forms and
analysis (rigid frames); tectonics (building
materials & construction; art of joining); en-
vironmental comforts (thermal, ventilation,
lighting etc.); building services (plumbing,
electrical systems).
Pre-requisites: architectural design I, archi-
tectural design theories and methods.
16. DESIGN THEORIES AND METHODS IN
BUILT ENVIRONMENT 3 credit units,
4th Semester
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic theories and methods in understand-
ing and solving built-environmental design
problems; by the end of the course the stu-
dents should be able to explain their design
thinking and accordingly apply any design
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student to architectural interior design that
includes building elements, furniture, color
schemes, and comforts (lighting and noise).
Syllabus: design principles in an architec-
tural interior design, circulation, furniture
arrangement and design, fnish materials,
lighting system, environmental condition-
ing.
Pre-requisites:
SITE PLANNING 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic principles of integrated site planning.
Syllabus: basic principles of site planning,
massing, site characteristics, vegetation,
topography, environmental issues, typologi-
cal studies and design methods.
Pre-requisites: -
ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 credit
units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
human behavior to architecture especially
among people involved in design process and
post-occupancy evaluation (designer, user/s
and social environment)
Syllabus: Environmental psychology, human
behavior, culture, perception, crowding and
privacy, territory, impact of colors to human
emotion; research methods.
Pre-requisites:
INTERNSHIP 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
students to professional practices (project
scheduling, construction and evaluation); to
collaborative works among different disci-
plines in practice.
Syllabus: Project management, project re-
ports, presentation, construction methods.
Pre-requisites: -
COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course trains stu-
dent ability to draft, develop virtual model
of architectural design using CAD programs,
system (lift, elevators etc.)
INTELLIGENT BUILDING 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
intelligent building system (IBS) and tech-
nology.
Syllabus: IBS that covers cabling, air condi-
tioning, lighting, telecommunication, build-
ing automation, security system.
REAL ESTATE 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
real estate in connection to architecture, as
a built-environment.
Syllabus: Defnition of RE, planning and
development process of RE, fundamentals of
project cash-fow (short & long term), simple
feasibility study.
Pre-requisites:-
URBAN DESIGN 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic urban design-spatial theories, methods,
inquiry and design research.
Syllabus: 2D, 3D spatial ordering system
(precedence: image, type, scale), urban
public space, elements of urban space, case
studies: basic principles of urban design
inquiry; urban design guidelines.
Pre-requisites: architectural design II, archi-
tectural design theories and methods.
RESEARCH METHODS 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
the fundamentals of architectural research
in limited case of research topics.
Syllabus: domains of science, methods of
research, research questions and problems,
research proposal, research design, data
collecting, analysis and results/findings,
analysis, conclusion, and presentation.
Pre-requisites: -
INTERIOR 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
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to sustainability paradigm; the role of ar-
chitect and other disciplines in shaping the
quality of cities.
Syllabus: human/social interaction, urban
& regional infrastructures, environmental
issues; sustainable development, urbanism,
regionism, hierarchy of spatial planning.
Pre-requisites:
URBAN HOUSING 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
urban housing issues, analysis impacts on a
city as a whole.
Syllabus: urban housing problems/issues,
housing typology, housing technology, hous-
ing planning & design: economic aspects &
management.
Pre-requisites:
CAPITA SELECTA 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
business aspects of design in general
Syllabus: architecturally related design
graphics, product; appropriate technology;
business proposals.
LIFE-CYCLE ENVIRONMENT 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
human life-cycle and its localities (birth, in-
fancy, early childhood, play age, school age,
adolescence, young adulthood, adulthood,
old age, decease places & rites)
Syllabus: introduction to life-cycle environ-
ment; psychology of pregnant mother, birth
environment, house, hospices, & maternity
hospital, infant and his/her parent environ-
ment; sensory development of infant, psy-
chological development of a child; playing
environment and unwritten rules of playing,
home environment , vicinity, and pre-school;
parent and childcare.
URBAN ECOLOGY 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
awareness and understanding about the eco-
logos of urban environment, architectural
such as, AutoCad, Archicad, 3d Viz, Revit
and others.
Syllabus: Preliminary design drafting, model-
ing, working drawings.
ETHNIC ARCHITECTURE 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
architecture that exists in ethnic community
traditions; student should be able to explain,
analyze architectural elements and principles
of certain ethnicities, should be able to
understand the phenomena of ethnic archi-
tecture in general and be able to analyze
particular architectural tradition.
Syllabus: principles and elements of ethnic
architecture, determining factors, symbolic
classifcation, worldviews and cosmology,
space-place-time and meaning, anthropo-
metric, construction process.
Pre-requisites: -
PHOTOGRAPHY 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course trains stu-
dents the abilities to take, develop, print and
present esthetic photographic works and to
use photography as media to communicate
architectural works.
Syllabus: Art and communication in photog-
raphy, methods of taking photograph, indoor
and outdoor photo taking, develop, print;
lighting, color & B/W fgures and portraits;
presentation.
Pre-requisites: -
HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE 3 credit
units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
world architect works in ancient times.
Syllabus: pre-Greek architecture in Mediter-
ranean; Minoa, Mycenea civilization, early
Greek, civilization of sovereign cities, Greek
kingdom and Helenism.
URBAN & REGIONAL PLANNING 3 credit
units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
problems and issues or urban and regional
planning, planning approach, urban & re-
gional development and control with regard
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designs and their impacts to community and
society, holistic views & design approach to
designing a building, or an area in terms of
the environmental sustainability.
Syllabus: ecological functions related to
peoples living environment; water, air pol-
lution, wastes; green space.
ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
laws related to a sustainable development.
Syllabus: ecological balance between human
activities and their environment (physical
and socio-cultural); environmental manage-
ment and laws; analysis of environmental
impacts; land use, environmental protection,
community participation, environmental
conservation.
LABOR AND DEVELOPMENT LAWS (HUKUM
PERATURAN PERBURUHAN DAN PEMBAN-
GUNAN 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
business laws especially in the construction
industry.
Syllabus: labor and development laws and
ethics, contracts; termination of jobs; devel-
opment laws in Indonesia.
BASIC COMPUTING 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course introduces
basic computer knowledge and operating
systems; computer programs and applications
in architecture
Syllabus: software and hardware, multi-
media, power pint, Photoshop, Coreldraw,
Pagemaker, CAD and computer simulation
and modeling
ACOUSTICS 3 credit units
Learning objectives: this course intro-
duces basic principles of acoustics (room
and environment) and acoustics design in
architecture.
Syllabus: sound and noise, acoustic criteria
for a room, sound amplifcation and isolation,
environmental noise.
LIGHTING 3 credits unit
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Code Department
C EE Civil
M EE Mechanical
E EE Electrical
M TE Metallurgy
A RE Architecture
G PE Chemical
I EE Industrial
NAE Ship
The number codes represent:
First digit : Year level of education.
Second digit : Semester in which the
courses offered, i.e.:
0: offered in even and odd semesters,
1: offered in the odd semester,
2: offered in the even semester.
Third digit : Grouping of the courses,
i.e.:
0: compulsory course in the study program,
1 - 9: specifc interest courses or elective
courses.
Last two digits : Series numbers of the
courses.
Examples:
1. TKE20017: STATISTICS & PROBABIL-
ITY Meaning: This course is managed by
Fakulty (TK), offered in the second year
(2), can be taken in the odd and even se-
mesters and is given series number 17.
2. CEE22018: WOOD STRUCTURE
Meaning: This course is managed by De-
partment of Civil Engineering (CE), given
in the second year, offered in the even se-
mester and having series number 18 in the
Departement of Civil engineering.
SUBJECTS BY FACULTY
TKE11012I
BASIC MATHEMATICS 1
2 sks
Objective: after taking this course, the
SYLLABUS OF SUBJECTS
ORGANIZED BY FACULTY
On this 4th chapter, all informations about
the course materials (syllabus) of FTUI cur-
riculum 2004 managed by University and
Faculty is presented.
The information consists of:
Course Code
The information of this syllabus is ar-
ranged based on the order of the course
code. The explanation of codings rule is
explained below.
Name of the Course
Names of the courses are listed according
to the structure of curriculum.
Credit Point
This number represents the length of
times (hours) required by student as
shown in Chapter 2.
Objective of the Course
Explains fnal results want to be achived
for the students.
Course Syllabus
Consists of main materials or topics will
be delivered.
Prerequisites
List of the courses required to be tak-
en prior to take the abovementioned
course.
References
Literature used in the course.
COURSE CODE
The course code consists of three capital
letters and fve numbers.
The letters represents the institution level
who manages such courses (Faculty/Depart-
ment) with the following descriptions:
TKE: Courses managed by Faculty/University
(can be served by other Faculties) which
consist of general courses such as mathemat-
ics, physics, basic chemistry, statistics, basic
computer, law and regulations, and environ-
mental science.
Courses managed by Department use the
following codes:
4. SYLLABUS OF SUBJECTS BY FACULTY
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Basic analysis of structure. Magnetic feld.
Electromagnetic induction, Faraday law
dan inductancy. Magneticity in materials,
magnetic series, trancient series. Rangkaian
Arus Bolak-Balik.
Prerequisite: none.
References: Halliday, D, R. Resnick, Fisika
II, Edisi III, Terjemahan P.Silaban, Penerbit
Erlangga, 1986.
TKE11020I
MECHANIC PHISICS
2 sks
Objectives: to understand concept of basic
laws on mechanic physics and able to system-
atically and scientifcally apply to solve the
problems concerning materials affected by
forces, both for still and moving materials.
Syllabus: Units. Point material kinematics.
Point material dynamics. Conservation of
linear momentum and energy law. Harmonic
movement. Solid material kinematics and
dynamics. Elasticity. Hydrostatic. Hydrody-
namic. Gravitation feld.
Prerequisites: Tidak ada.
References: Halliday, D, R. Resnick, Fisika
I, Edisi III, Terjemahan P.Silaban, Penerbit
Erlangga, 1986.
TKE11025I
BASIC CHEMISTRY
2 sks
Objectives : Understanding basic principles
of chemical reaction & calculation
Syllabus: Introduction: Matter & Measure-
ment. Atoms, Molecules, and Ions. Periodic
Properties of the Elements. Stoichiometry:
Calculation with Chemical Formulas and
Equations . Aqueous Reactions and Solution
Stoichiometry. Aqueous Reactions and Solu-
tion Stoichiometry. Intermolecular Forces,
Liquids and Solids . Properties of Solutions.
Thermochemistry. Chemical Equlibrium.
Electrochemistry
Prerequisites: none
References:
student can consolidate their knowledge in
calculus and to have skills to solve applied
calculus problems.
Syllabus: Mathematics review. Real number
system. Cartesian product. Function and
their graphs. Limit of a function and con-
tinuous function. The derivative theorem
(the chain rule, implicit differentiation,
higher order derivatives and applications of
the derivatives). The integral (the defnite
integral, the indefnite integral, applications
of the integral on the Cartesian coordinates
and polar coordinates).
Prerequisites: none.
References: Purcell, Kalkulus dan Geometri
Analitik, ed. 7, Penerbit, 1996
TKE11015I
LINEAR ALGEBRA 1
2 sks
Objective: to understand, explain and to
have skills in linear algebra and to investi-
gate applications particularly for use in other
engineering subjects.
Syllabus: System of linear equations. Matrix
and type of matrices. Determinant and its
use (Cramers rule). Vector geometry and
vector in Rn space. Vector space. Basis and
dimension of a vector space.
Prerequisites: none
References: Anton, Howard, Elementary
Linear Algebra, 7th edition, John Wiley &
Sons, 1996.
TKE11019I
PHYSICS (ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM)
3 sks
Objectives: to understand concept of basic
laws on electricity and magnetism and able
to systematically and analytically apply those
in their daily life.
Syllabus: Electric charge and Colulomb law.
Electric static feld and Gauss law. Electrical
Potential and Electrical potential energy.
Capacitor. Dielectricum. Electric current
and Resistance. Direct current structure and
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References: Buku Panduan Praktikum Dasar
Komputer, Puskom, FTUI, 1999.
TKE12013I
BASIC MATHEMATICS 2
2 sks
Objectives: (a) should understand the basic
concept of functions with two independent
variables, the limit of a function with two
variables, partial and total differential of a
function with two variables; (b) are expected
to understand the concepts of sequences
and series, vector and analytic geometry;
(c) should be able to apply the concepts in
engineering applications.
Syllabus: Variables in a function. Functions
with two independent variables. Limit of a
function at a point. Characteristics of con-
tinuous and discontinuous functions. Partial
derivative at a point. Total differential at
a point and its applications. Maximum and
minimum points of a function and the appli-
cations with Lagrange multipliers. Area and
volume with double integration. Sequences
and series, convergence and power series.
Matrices, matrix operation, equivalent ma-
trix, determinant, inverse of a matrix and
the applications.
Prerequisites: none
References:
Purcell, Calculus with Analytic Geometry, 7th
ed., Aplleton-Century-Crofts, 1996
TKE12016I
LINEAR ALGEBRA 2
2 sks
Objectives: should understand advanced
algebra and explore the applications particu-
larly for use in other engineering subjects.
Synopsis: Defnition of matrix. Matrix op-
eration. Row-echelon form. Equivalence of
a matrix. Determinants and the application
in the solution of linear equations. Inverse of
matrices and the application in the solution
of linear equations. Solve equations with
matrices.
1. Brown, LeMay dan Bursten. Chemistry the
Central Science. 8th ed. Prentice Hall,
New Jersey, 2000.
2. W.G. Breck and R.J.C. Brown. Chemistry
for Science and Engineering. Queens Uni-
versity, 1989.
TKE11027I
BASIC COMPUTER
3 sks
Objectives: (a) to understand the principle
of the operation of computers, (b) to be able
to make algorithm in fow charts and be able
to convert it into a basic program language
by using statements, and (c) to understand
a computer language to solve engineering
problems.
Syllabus: Introduction to computer. Flow
chart. Introduction to a program language.
Computing and computer. Architecture of
computer. Operational system. Processing
unit. Input. Output. Second deviation. Soft-
ware. Introduction to computer application.
Concept of information system. Data com-
munication and computer network. Internet
and multimedia.
Prerequisites: none
References:
Szymanski, R.A, Szymanski, D.P and Pulschen,
D.M, Computer and Information Systems,
Prentice Hall Inc, 1995
TKE11028I
COMPUTER LABORATORY
3 sks
Objective: to increase understanding on
basic computer materials, obtain practical
knowledge, know computer components,
equipment and measurement tools used,
sharpen analysis and synthesis capability in
solving technical problems.
Sylllabus: Introduction to computer includ-
ing Operating system, Programming language
elements, Conditional selection, Iteration,
Procedure and Function, Matrix and Com-
puter fling.
Prerequisites: Basic Computer
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BASIC PHISICS LABORATORY
1 sks
Objective: to visually observe several physi-
cal phenomena in real action, verivy the fact
of physical law. Qualitatively and quantita-
tively obtain physical constants.
Syllabus: Mechanics : Measurement, Inertia
moment, Percepatan Gravitasi, Kerapatan
Zat CAir, Koefsien Gesek, Tumbukan, Ayunan
Puntir, Viskositas Air, Modulus Young, Vis-
kositas Cairan Newton, Tegang Muka Zar Cair,
Osilasi, Kalor : Koefsien Muai Linier, Daya
Hantar Panas, Kalibrasi Termokopel, Kalo-
rimeter, Konstanta Joule, Konstanta Laplace,
Kolektor Panas, Menentukan Cp/Cv Udara,
Pemuaian Zat Cair dan Anomali Air. Listrik :
Elektrolisis, Jembatan Wheatstone, Hukum
Kirchhoff, Medan Magnet Bumi, Koefsien
Temperatur, Karakteristik Rangkaian Seri
RLC, Hukum Ohm, Transformator. Optik :
Polarimeter, Lensa, Fotometri, Indeks Bias
Prisma, Spektrometer, Kisi Difraksi, Cincin
Newton.
Prerequisites: -
References : Physics, Gian Colli, Tipler,
Holiday, Resnick
TKE20017I
STATISTICS & PROBABILITY
2 sks
Objective: Able to organize raw data col-
lection for quantitative measurement, make
prediction on situation based on available
data and inter-variable correlation, which is
useful in making decision.
Syllabus: Description and the use of fre-
quency distribution statistic involving data
collection, treatment and presentation.
Average, standard deviation and their use.
Probability theory, random variable, prob-
ability function, binomial distribution,
Poisson distribution etc. making conclusion
through internal prediction, hypothesis tests.
Regression and correlation.
Prerequisites: none.
References: Miller I. and Freund, J.E, Prob-
ability and Statistics for Engineers (2nd Ed),
Prerequisites: none
Resource materials:
Howard, A, Elementary Linear Algebra, 7th
ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1996
TKE12022I
HEAT PHYSICS
2 sks
Objective: Understanding the concept and
basic law of ideal and real fuid with its calory
exchange, and be able to systematically and
scientifcally apply the knowledge in the
thermodynamic unit calculation involving
combustion engine and turbine system.
Syllabus: Introduction and basic concept.
Temperature, pressure and fow. Thermis
equation of state. Energy and the frst law
of thermodynamics. Enthalphy and Enthropy
description. Application and process of the
frst law of thermodynamics for close and
open system. Pure component properties.
Heat Exchange principle.
Prerequisites: none.
References: Halliday, D, R. Resnick, Fisika
I, Edisi III, Terjemahan P.Silaban, Penerbit
Erlangga, 1986.
TKE12023I
WAVE AND OPTIC PHYSICS
2 sks
Objective: Understand concept and basic
law in Wave and Optic Physics and be able
to systematically and scientifcally apply the
knowledge in the solving problems concerning
natural wave phenomena and wave created
by technical work, physical properties of light
wave and geometrical optic.
Syllabus: Waves, Sound, Polaritation, Inter-
ferences, Difraction, Geometrical Optic.
Prerequisites: none.
References: Halliday, D, R. Resnick, Fisika
I, Edisi III, Terjemahan P.Silaban, Penerbit
Erlangga, 1986.
TKE12024I
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Prentice-Hall Inc., 1982.
TKE20018I
NUMERICAL METHOD
2 sks
Objective: Students are expected to have
the ability to solve engineering problems by
using mathematics application in computer.
Students are also expected to be able to
use mathematics as a tool in engineering
research.
Silabus: Introduction. Modelling and error
analysis. Roots equation. Linear algebra
equations. Numerical integration. Numerical
differential. Ordinary differential equation.
Partial differential equation. Case study.
Prerequisites: Basic Mathematics, Advanced
Mathematics and Basic Computer
References: Chapra S.C., Canale R.P., Nu-
merical Method for Engineers, 2nd edition,
Mc.Graw Hill, 1989.
TKE20029I
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
2 sks
Objective: To be aware the importance of
environmental support conservation and the
limitation of natural resources in develop-
ment. Understand the role of technology in
the development and environmental man-
agement.
Syllabus: Ecosystem concept: material
cycle, hydrologi cycle, energy fow, enthropy
law, food chain, ecosystem component
interaction, growth pattern and dynamic.
Environmental concept: Physical and social
environment, environmental supports, fex-
ibility and homeostatic of environment and
development. Global environment problems
and problems in Indonesia : population, pov-
erty, natural resources and pollution. Indus-
trial development technology and hazardous
materials. Environmental management: laws
and regulations on environment, standard
quality, recycling process, waste manage-
ment, Analisis Mengenai Dampak Lingkungan
(AMDAL).
Prerequisites: none.
References: Center, Larry W, Environtmental
Impact Assessment, McGraw Hill, NY, 1977
TKE21009I
ENGLISH
2 sks
Objective: Able to analyze a literature (teks)
by explaining its main idea and its supporting
ideas. Able to make technical report (report
writing) using good and correct English.
Syllabus: Reading strategies. Basic writing
techniques. Drills involving : developing an
effective style, planning and organising es-
say, outlining and diagramming, paragraph
analysis and referencing skills.
Prerequisites: none.
References: Cintavhati Poerwoto dkk.,
Reading Comprehension for Engineering
Students.
TKE21014I
ADVANCED MATHEMATICS
3 sks
Objective: students are expected to be able
to use several concept, rules and methods
to solve mathematics and engineering prob-
lems.
Syllabus: Vector in space Rn, vector proper-
ties, differential, gradient curve, curl and
divergence, line integration, surface, stokes
theorem and its application. Ordinary dife-
rential equation, non linear and its solution,
non homogen diferential equation, uncertain
coeffcient method, parameter variation and
diferential operator, PD Cauchy and Legendre
solution, PD coefcient variabel solution us-
ing series method, PD system solution using
matrix and elimination method, PD system
solution on phase plan, and its application
on engineering problems. Laplace Tranform.
Fourier Analysis, Integral Fourier and FFT a
function.
Prerequisites: none.
References: E. Kreyzig, Advanced Math-
ematical Engineering, Penerbit, 1995.
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Nama ............................... Departemen ....................................email
A. Hery Fuad ...................... AIS ................................. hery@cbn.net.id
AAP Ratna M.Eng ................. EES .............................. ratna@eng.ui.ac.id
Abdul Muis ........................ EES ............................... muis@eng.ui.ac.id
Abdul Wahid ...................... CHS .............................. wahid@che.ui.edu
Abimanyu Takdir A ............... AIS ........................... abimata@eng.ui.ac.id
Adi Suryosatyo ................... MCS ........................... adisur@netscape.net
Agung Subagio .................... MCS ............................. agsub@eng.ui.ac.id
Agus Santoso Tamsir ............. EES ............................. tamsir@eng.ui.ac.id
Agus R. Utomo .................... EES ................................. aru@eng.ui.ac.id
Ahmad Indra Siswantara ........ MCS ...........................a_indra@eng.ui.ac.id
Akhmad Herman Y ............... MMS ....................... herman@metal.ui.ac.id
Akhmad Hidayatno ............... IES ........................... akhmad@eng.ui.ac.id
Alan Marino ....................... CES ...................... alanmarino@eng.ui.ac.id
Alvinsyah .......................... CES .............................. alvin@eng.ui.ac.id
Amar Rachman ................... IES ............................. amar@pacifc.net.id
Anne Zulfa S ...................... MMS .......................... anne@metal.ui.ac.id
Andi Rustandi ..................... MMS ...................... rustandi@metal.ui.ac.id
Andy Noorsaman Sommeng ..... CHS .......................... sommeng@che.ui.edu
Antony Sihombing ................ AIS ................................bing@eng.ui.ac.id
Aries Subiantoro .................. EES ...........................biantoro@eng.ui.ac.id
Arief Cahyo Wibowo ............. MMS.........................wibowo@metal.ui.ac.id
Arifn Djauhari .................... EES ...............................arifn@eng.ui.ac.id
Ario Sunar Baskoro ............... MCS ............................... ario@eng.ui.ac.id
Armand Djohan ................... EES ............................armand@eng.ui.ac.id
Azrar Hadi ......................... AIS ...............................azrar@eng.ui.ac.id
A. Amar Moeis......................IES
A. Sadili S. ........................ AIS .............................. sadili@eng.ui.ac.id
Atastina S.B. ...................... CHS ............................atastina@che.ui.edu
Anondho Wijanarko. ............. CHS ........................... anondho@che.ui.edu
Asep Handaya Saputra. ......... CHS ...............................sasep@che.ui.edu
Badrul Munir ...................... MMS ........................bmunir@metal.ui.ac.id
Bagio Budiarjo .................... EES .............................. bbudi@eng.ui.ac.id
Bambang Heru Susanto .......... CHS ......................... b_heru_s@eng.ui.ac.id
Bambang P Prianto .............. MCS ............................. prianto@cbn.net.id
Bambang Sugiarto ................ MCS ......................... bangsugi@eng.ui.ac.id
Bambang Priyono ................. MMS ...................... bpriyono@metal.ui.ac.id
Bambang Suharno ................ MMS ......................... suharno@eng.ui.ac.id
Bambang Suryawan .............. MCS ........................ suryawan@eng.ui.ac.id
Bisanto Kadarisman .............. CES ........................... bisanto@eng.ui.ac.id
Boedi Andari Kristanto .......... CES ............................ andari@eng.ui.ac.id
Bondan Tiara Sofyan ............. MMS ....................... bondan@metal.ui.ac.id
5. EMAIL LISTS
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Boy Nurtjahyo M.................. IES ........................... boymoch@indo.net.id
Budi Ibrahim ..................... MCS ..............................budii@eng.ui.ac.id
Budi Susilo S. ..................... CES ........................... budisus@eng.ui.ac.id
Budiarso ........................... MCS ............................ mftbd@eng.ui.ac.id
Budihardjo ........................ MCS ..............................bho@pacifc.net.id
Bustanul Arifn M. ................ MMS ........................busarif@metal.ui.ac.id
Betrianis ........................... IES ............................... betri@eng.ui.ac.id
Bambang Trigunarsah ............ CES ..........................btriguna@eng.ui.ac.id
Choesnah Idarti Erlangga ....... AIS ................................ ina@hotmail.com
D. Dhaneswara ................... MMS .........................donny@metal.ui.ac.id
D.M.F. Luhulima .................. MMS ........................ desiree@metal.ui.ac.id
Dadang Gunawan ................. EES ............................... guna@eng.ui.ac.id
Damrizal Damoerin .............. CES ......................... damrizal@eng.ui.ac.id
Danardono......................... MMS ....................... danardon@eng.ui.ac.id
Dedi Priadi ........................ MMS ........................... dedi@metal.ui.ac.id
Dewi Tristantini Budi ............ CHS .............................. detris@indo.net.id
Dianursanti ........................ CHS ............................... danti@che.ui.edu
Dita Trisnawan .................... AIS .....................dtrisnawan@bimamail.com
Diyan Supramono................. GPE ............................. dsupra@che.ui.edu
Djoko Hartanto ................... EES .............................. djoko@eng.ui.ac.id
Djoko M.Hartono ................. CES ......................... djokomh@eng.ui.ac.id
Djoko S. Gabriel .................. IES .............................. gabriel@cbn.net.id
Dodi Sudiana ...................... EES ................................dodi@eng.ui.ac.id
Dwi Marta Nurjaya ............... MMS ........................... jaya@metal.ui.ac.id
Dwi Tangoro ....................... AIS ............................ dtango2@yahoo.com
Dwita S.K.Marsudiantoro ........ CES ............................. dwita@eng.ui.ac.id
Dalhar Susantu ................... AIS . .......................... dalhar@eng.ui.ac.id
Eddy S. Siradj ..................... MMS ......................... siradj@metal.ui.ac.id
Eko Tjipto Raharjo ............... EES .................................eko@eng.ui.ac.id
El Khobar M. Nazech ............. CES ......................... elkhobar@eng.ui.ac.id
Ellen S.W. Tangkudung .......... CES ..............................ellen@eng.ui.ac.id
Elly Tjahjono ..................... CES ............................... elly@eng.ui.ac.id
Emirhadi S. ........................ AIS ............................ emirhadi@rad.net.id
Endang Sriningsih ................ EES ........................... endangs@eng.ui.ac.id
Engkos Achmad Kosasih ......... MCS .............................. kosri@eng.ui.ac.id
Erlinda ............................. IES ............................ erlinda@eng.ui.ac.id
Essy Ariyuni ....................... CES ...............................essy@eng.ui.ac.id
Esa Haruman ...................... MMS ............................. esa@metal.ui.ac.id
Eva F Karamah .................... CHS ................................. eva@che.ui.edu
Evawani Ellisa .................... AIS .............................. ellisa@eng.ui.ac.id
F. B. Mewengkang ................ CES .............................boy.m@eng.ui.ac.id
F.Astha Ekadiyanto ............... EES .............................. astha@eng.ui.ac.id
Fitri Yuli Z. ........................ EES ................................ yuli@eng.ui.ac.id
Nama ............................... Departemen ....................................email
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Feri Yusivar ....................... EES ............................ yusivar@eng.ui.ac.id
Ferryanto Chaidir ................ AIS ...........................ferrycha@eng.ui.ac.id
Gandjar kiswanto ............... MCS .............. gandjar_kiswanto@eng.ui.ac.id
Gatot Prayogo .................... MCS ............................. gatot@eng.ui.ac.id
Gunawan Tjahjono ............... AIS ...............................virtue@indo.net.id
Gunawan Wibisono ............... EES .......................... gunawan@eng.ui.ac.id
H. Madsuri ......................... CES .................................uri@eng.ui.ac.id
Harinaldi ......................... MCS .......................... harinald@eng.ui.ac.id
Harry Sudibyo ..................... EES ........................... harisudi@eng.ui.ac.id
Hartono Haryadi .................. EES ........................... hartono@eng.ui.ac.id
Hempi Nartomo .................. MCS ....................... hprajudi@indosat.net.id
Hendri D S Budiono .............. MCS ............................ hendri@eng.ui.ac.id
Henki Wibowo Ashadi ............ CES ............................. henki@eng.ui.ac.id
Henky S. Nugroho ................ MCS .............................gagah@eng.ui.ac.id
Herlily ............................. AIS ............................. herlily@eng.ui.ac.id
Heri Hermansyah ................. CHS .................................heri@che.ui.edu
Herr S. ............................. CES ................................hhs@eng.ui.ac.id
Heru Purnomo .................... CES .......................... herupur@eng.ui.ac.id
Heddy R. Agah .................... CES .............................. agah@eng.ui.ac.id
I. Emir Moeis ...................... IES ............................emirmuis@cbn.net.id
I. Rudy SS. ......................... CES ................................irss@eng.ui.ac.id
Imansyah Ibnu Hakim ........... MCS .........................imansyah@eng.ui.ac.id
I. Made Ardita .................... EES .............................. made@eng.ui.ac.id
Irma Gusniani Sofyan ............ CES .............................. irma@eng.ui.ac.id
Irwan Katili........................ CES ..............................katili@eng.ui.ac.id
Isti Surjandari .................... IES ........................... surjandari.2@osu.edu
Iwa Garniwa MK .................. EES .................................iwa@eng.ui.ac.id
Indira Parastiwi ................... AIS ..............................indira@eng.ui.ac.id
Indreswari Guritno ............... CES ............................ indres@eng.ui.ac.id
Ikhwan ............................. CES ........................... ikhwan@eng.ui.ac.id
Johny Wahyuadi S ................ MMS ........................jwsono@metal.ui.ac.id
Jos Istiyanto ...................... MCS ............................. josist@eng.ui.ac.id
Josia Irwan Rastandi ............. CES ......................... jrastandi@eng.ui.ac.id
Kalamullah Ramli ................ EES ............................ k.ramli@eng.ui.ac.id
Kamarza Mulia .................... CHS ............................. kmulia@che.ui.edu
Kemas Ridwan Kurniawan ....... AIS ...........................r_kemas@yahoo.co.uk
Kuntjoro Sukardi ................. AIS ............................... kuns@eng.ui.ac.id
M. Dachyar ........................ IES ......................... mdachyar@eng.ui.ac.id
M. Idrus Alhamid ................ MCS ............................ mamak@indo.net.id
M. Salman ......................... EES ............................ salman@eng.ui.ac.id
Mahmud Sudibandriyo .......... CHS .............................msudib@che.ui.edu
Martha Leni Siregar .............. CES ............................... leni@eng.ui.ac.id
Marcus Talahatu .................. MCS ............................ marco@eng.ui.ac.id
Nama ............................... Departemen ....................................email
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Misri Gozan ........................ CHS ............................ mgozan@che.ui.edu
Mochamad Chalid ................ MMS .........................chalid@metal.ui.ac.id
Moh. Asvial ........................ EES .............................. asvial@eng.ui.ac.id
Mohammad Nasikin .............. CHS ...........................mnasikin@che.ui.edu
Muhammad Anis .................. MMS ........................... anis@metal.ui.ac.id
Myrna Ariati ....................... MMS .........................myrna@metal.ui.ac.id
Mulia ............................... CES ............................. mulia@eng.ui.ac.id
Nahry .............................. CES ............................. nahry@eng.ui.ac.id
Nandy Putra ...................... MCS ...................... nandyputra@eng.ui.ac.id
Nasruddin ......................... MCS .............................. anas@eng.ui.ac.id
Nelson Saksono ................... CHS ..............................nelson@che.ui.edu
Nji Raden Poespawati ........... EES ............................... pupu@eng.ui.ac.id
Paramita Atmodiwirjo ........... AIS..........................mitayandi@eng.ui.ac.id
Purnomo Margono ................ CES ......................... purnomo@eng.ui.ac.id
Praswati PDK Wulan ............. CHS .............................. wulan@che.ui.edu
R. Jachrizal Sumabrata ......... CES .................................rjs@eng.ui.ac.id
Rahmat Nurcahyo ................ IES .............................rcahyo@eng.ui.ac.id
Rahmat Saptono .................. MMS .......................saptono@metal.ui.ac.id
Raldi A Koestoer .................. MCS ......................... koestoer@eng.ui.ac.id
Ridwan Gunawan ................. EES .............................ridwan@eng.ui.ac.id
Rinaldy D .......................... EES ............................ rinaldy@eng.ui.ac.id
Rini Riastuti ....................... MMS ....................... riastuti@metal.ui.ac.id
Riri Fitri Sari ...................... EES ................................. riri@eng.ui.ac.id
Rita Arbianti ...................... CHS ................................. rita@che.ui.edu
Riarno .............................. EES ...........................riarnohy@eng.ui.ac.id
Rochmah ........................... EES .......................... rochmah@eng.ui.ac.id
Roekmijati W. Soemantojo ..... CHS ........................ roemws@centrin.net.id
Rudy Setiabudi ................... EES ............................... rudy@eng.ui.ac.id
Rusdi Malin ........................ MCS .............................. rusdi@eng.ui.ac.id
Ria Wikantari ..................... AIS .............................wikant@eng.ui.ac.id
Ruswan Rasul ..................... CES ........................... ruswan@eng.ui.ac.id
Sar Sardy .......................... EES .............................. sardy@eng.ui.ac.id
Sari Katili .......................... MMS ............................sari@metal.ui.ac.id
Sayyid Kamil ...................... EES .............................. kamil@eng.ui.ac.id
Setiadi ............................. CHS ............................. hasbila@che.ui.edu
Setijo Bismo ...................... CHS .............................. bismo@che.ui.edu
Setyo Supriyadi ................... CES ..............................setsp@eng.ui.ac.id
Sigit P Hadiwardoyo ............. CES ...............................sigit@eng.ui.ac.id
Slamet ............................. CHS ............................. slamet@che.ui.edu
Sotya Astutiningsih ............... MMS ..........................sotya@metal.ui.ac.id
Sri Bintang P........................IES
Sri Harjanto ....................... MMS ......................harjanto@metal.ui.ac.id
Sri Redjeki ........................ EES ............................ redjeki@eng.ui.ac.id
Nama ............................... Departemen ....................................email
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Sugianto ........................... EES ............................. gianto@eng.ui.ac.id
Sukirno ............................. CHS ............................sukirnos@che.ui.edu
Sulistyoweni W ................... CES ............................s_weni@eng.ui.ac.id
Sunaryo ............................ MCS ............................. naryo@eng.ui.ac.id
Supranyoto ........................ EES .............................. supra@eng.ui.ac.id
Sutanto ............................ EES ............................sutanto@eng.ui.ac.id
Sutanto Soehodho ................ CES ............................. tanto@eng.ui.ac.id
Sutopo ............................. MMS ........................ sutopo@metal.ui.ac.id
Sutrasno ........................... CHS ...............................aryo@eng.ui.ac.id
Syahril A. Rahim .................. CES ............................ syahril@eng.ui.ac.id
Siti Handjarinto .................. AIS ................................. siti@eng.ui.ac.id
Sukisno............................. AIS ...............................kisno@eng.ui.ac.id
Sahrika Kosasih ................... AIS ............................ abahsk@eng.ui.ac.id
Suyono Dikun ..................... CES ........................ sdikun@bappenas.go.id
T. Ilyas ............................. CES ...............................t-ilyas@rad.net.id
T. Yuri M. Zagloel...................IES...........................yuriza@indosat.net.id
Tania Surya Utami ................CHS ................................nana@che.ui.edu
Teguh Utomo Atmoko ............ AIS .................................. tiua@cbn.net.id
Toga H Pandjaitan ................ AIS ................................. tiki@eng.ui.ac.id
Tresna P. Soemardi .............. MCS .............................tresdi@eng.ui.ac.id
Triatno Yudo Harjoko ............ AIS ...............................gotty@eng.ui.ac.id
Tris Budiono M ................... MCS .......................... tribuma@eng.ui.ac.id
Tilani H.S .......................... CHS ............................ tilanihs@che.ui.edu
Uno Bintang Sudibyo ............. EES ................................ uno@eng.ui.ac.id
Veronia Iryanti .................... EES .......................... veronica@eng.ui.ac.id
Wahidin Wahab ................... EES ........................... wahidin@eng.ui.ac.id
Wahyu Nirbito .................... MCS ............................... bito@eng.ui.ac.id
Warjito ........................... MCS ........................... warjito@eng.ui.ac.id
Widodo Wahyu Purwanto... CHS.............................. widodo@che.ui.edu
Winarto ............................ MMS ..........................winarto@eng.ui.ac.id
Wiwik Rahayu ..................... CES ............................. wiwik@eng.ui.ac.id
Wulan K. ........................... CES .......................... wulankk@eng.ui.ac.id
Yanuar ............................. MCS ............................yanuar@eng.ui.ac.id
Yandi Andri Yatmo ............... AIS............................yandiay/2eng.ui.ac.id
Yadrifl ............................. IEE ............................ yadrifl@eng.ui.ac.id
Yazid Amanullah CES .. zid@eng.ui.ac.id
Yongky Permana Ramlan ........ MCS ........................... yongky@eng.ui.ac.id
Yok Setiono ........................ CES ............................ styose@eng.ui.ac.id
Yulianto .......................... MCS .......................... yulianto@eng.ui.ac.id
Yuswan Muharam ................. GPE .......................... muharam@che.ui.edu
Yuskar Lase... CES yuskar@eng.ui.ac.id
Yusuf Latief ....................... CES .......................... latief73@eng.ui.ac.id
Yuliusman ............................CHS............................. usman@che.ui.edu
Yunita Sadeli.................MMS ....................... yunce@metal.ui.ac.id
Nama ............................... Departemen ....................................email