Architectural Models in Miniature | Arts (General)

Architectural Models in Miniature Author(s): Charles Fabens Kelley Source: Bulletin of the Art Institute of Chicago (1907-1951

), Vol. 31, No. 5, (Sep. - Oct., 1937), pp. 65-68 Published by: The Art Institute of Chicago Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4119283 Accessed: 31/05/2008 03:47
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and has found lish architectwho made a practiceof deit necessaryto look to Europe very fre.BULLETIN OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 65 ARCHITECTURAL MODELS IN MINIATURE the kindness of Mrs.and the eighteenth-century classicism. and of architecturalinteriors of its period than the choicest buildingsin the district date the originalwas when. Mrs. reconditioned the receptionof Queen for James Ward Thorne we are very Elizabethon one of her progressesthrough THROUGH beingable to presentfor the country. the illusion of spacious. and Mrs.followed in all the models.sion. It was designed of and the greater accessibility this gallery. This has no masterpieces required end of patient room is patternedclosely after one of the researchand skilful craftsmanship. occupied the CourtauldInstitute of by account of the great interest manifested the Universityof London. and in all lookedvery muchlike this when gallery is from Wadham College. The little lously exact to periodand accuratein scale. of true Tudor only. where musicians as. CharlesA.but this ideal has been rigidly small rooms. It is still standhabitat of the Children'sMuseum. The rooms shouldnot be confusedwith house. and the portraits on the wall and are but measurement.the very candlesticks just what would have been used in an up-to-date Tudor ness and real size is uncanny.between English and French architecture. located in Gallery I.pleted and furnishedfour years later. In some instancesthe rooms from one of his cartoons and the silver are actual copies of existing examples. on are The rooms are small in actual dimensions eachside of the fireplace. and we are happy to know that the Countess ing over the space for this purpose. about five incheshigh.but the the good Countessswept in to take possesgallery was introducedinto the hall be. but on ing. which is the usual is illustratedon page 66. They are. One of London's most famous houses sense of the word.have was seventyyearsold.scrupu. The roomthereOne of the most distinct architectural fore is moretruly representative the best districtsin Francelies alongthe Loire. Worcester. it was from Francis I who ruled from 1515 to .completelyfurnished. Adam is said to have been the first EngThorne has had a corps of expert craftsmen to carry out her ideas. for one inch represents a foot in design. The room is a true shrine of ham Castle. and this and the sequence development particulargallery is consideredto be the to late is happilyshown.signing all the furnishingsand accessories quently for the type of work that cannot of his houses. handsomerooms on the ground floor. finestexampleof its type. The molded plaster cornice and doll-houses. Par. The walls are ing panels were painted by Angelica fashionedafter a very famous hall. suits of armor. about 1575. by RobertAdamfor the Countessof Home the sponsors of the Children's Museum. It is difficultto find a room fortunatein a periodof six monthsa collectionof archi.Kaufmann. The original furniturewas made by HepLet us take for examplethe Tudor Room plewhitefrom Adam'sdesignsand the ceilillustrated on page 66.nor consideredas toys in any ceiling are unusuallyfine. who gave him the commissionwhen she Mr. to be sure. The exhibitionis almost evenly divided cause it was a customaryfeature called the "minstrel's"gallery. with fine regardfor the spirit of the times.that is furnished exclusively in its own tectural models in miniature that is not period and only with examplesof the best duplicatedelsewhere. It is a collectionof designing. fromearly of sembled to entertain the guests. Oxford. The rug here shownis made be donehere. in chocolate-potson the dumb-waiterby the others they are composites. probability They are both of the same period. constructed fireplacewere executed after his designs. The housewas comgraciouslyconsentedto the Institute'stak. The production of these architectural lived in it for six years after that. in Gloucestershire.

MINIATURE ARCHITECTURAL MODEL BY MRS. THESE ARCHITECTURAL MODELS ARE EXACT IN SCALE AND COMPLETELY FURNISHED WITH REPRODUCTIONS OF FURNITURE AND DECORATION. ROOM OF THE TUDOR PERIOD BY MRS.66 BULLETIN OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO AN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ROOM BY ROBERT ADAM. ONE OF THIRTY SUCH MOIELS ON LOAN FOR SIX MONTHS IN GALLERY I. THORNE. JAMES WARD THORNE. .

BULLETIN OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO 67 AN EMPIRE ROOM. JAMES WARD THORNE. JAMES WARD THORNE INCLUDED IN THE EXHIBITION. MINIATURE ARCHITECTURAL MODEL BY MRS. A FRENCH ROOM FROM THE PERIOD OF FRANCIS I DESIGNED AND CARRIED OUT IN EXACT DETAIL BY MRS. .

PURCHASED FOR THE ALBERT ROULLIER MEMORIAL COLLECTION AND NOW PART OF AN EXHIBITION OF FRENCH LITHOGRAPHS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY CURRENT IN GALLERIES 13 AND 14.68 BULLETIN OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO of the color scheme would have been oppressive were it not for the general simThe plicity of the architectural surfaces. perhaps he was indulging in day dreaming. hoped to have the commission to build it himself at full scale. everything is authentic. but its designer." LITHOGRAPH BY PAUL SIGNAC. imagining himself as a reincarnation of a Roman emperor in the setting of a room which is a brilliant reflection of florid Roman taste. who lived during Napoleon's lifetime. mantel is after the original at the Chateau of Loches. It is a far cry from Francis the First to Napoleon. The Francis I room does not profess to be a copy of any one room in these chateaux of the Loire valley. but they are of equal interest When visiting with those here illustrated. This brilliant and pleasure-loving monarch has given his name to an architectural style which is seen at its best in the chateaux that were built or remodeled during his lifetime or shortly thereafter. Here there is nothing to disturb the charm or break the spell. 1547. but certainly he was able to instill into his design the grandiose aspirations of the emperor. and are certainly out of place in such surroundings. Thorne is the first to build this room. The heavy luxuriance . but it faithfully embodies the spirit of the period. roped-off areas. In other words. and a room such as this would have been exactly the type of bedroom for a prince's mistress. and the furniture was made either after furniture now in the chateaux or from specimens in the Cluny Museum. Chenonceaux and Azay-le-Rideau. when fair ladies and brilliant pageants were of great importance. Lack of space prevents discussion of all the designs. The rug was made by the Needlework and Textile Guild (which has executed all the rugs for these rooms) after a cartoon for a rug which was designed for Napoleon himself. Mrs. It was an age of the court. and the fourth room here illustrated carries us to the beginning of the nineteenth century. Perhaps the scheme was too opulent for the pocketbook of his client. There is much material to choose from The when it comes to Empire furniture. Chambord. This is the sort of room he would have gloried in. 1863-1935. One feels he has each room to himself. or crowds of people who are not really interested in what they see. He left the drawing for it which is now in the Muse des Arts Decoratifs in Paris. CHARLES FABENS KELLEY "WOMAN LOOKING FROM A WINDOW. Fontainebleau and Versailles. His marble bust upon the mantel is a perfect key to the design. originals here followed may be found at Rambouillet. Among the most famous of them we recall Blois. actual historical rooms one is frequently oppressed by ugly cases. So far as we know. FRENCH.

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