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JANUARY 25-31, 2012
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Business of the year
Pennington-based company
receives 2012 honor. PAGE 3
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Valley Regional
Board of Education may have its
final four choices for a before- and
after-school program provider
soon.
Assistant Superintendent of
Schools Richard Lang said Jan. 17
that a representative committee
of parents, teachers and adminis-
trators is in the process of nar-
rowing the eight candidate ven-
dors to four, and may present its
recommendations to the board by
Feb. 4.
The district sent out requests
for proposals, including to the
non-profit Hopewell Valley After
School Program and the
Hopewell Valley YMCA, which
provides after-school care at Tim-
berlane Middle School from 2:45
to 6 p.m. Those bids were due
back by Dec. 16.
We have parents whose ability
to make a choice for their child-
care provider will be taken away,
and they are also concerned that
an outside, for-profit organization
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
The Pennington Presbyterian
Church is giving its congregation
a chance to not only hear Marks
Gospel during worship Jan. 29,
but to live it.
The church is hosting former
soap-opera actor
Frank Runyeon in
a one-man play
called Afraid!
The Gospel of
Mark.
Imagine the
floor under your
feet is dirt, reads
the promos for the
play. The only light is coming
from candles. Were in the cata-
combs underneath Rome.
The plays text is taken from
Marks Gospel, translated into
contemporary American speech.
As characters and settings and
lights constantly shift, the Gospel
engages the audiences imagina-
tions and surprises them with
flashes of humor.
Its been great, the Hopewell
native Runyeon said of his plays.
It was a little unusual when I
first started doing it, but its be-
come more commonplace over
the last 20 years.
Runyeon has gained national
acclaim in recent years as a trans-
lator and performer of Biblical
texts. He has performed the
Gospel for thousands of people in
almost every state in America.
Being a man of faith, its
something Ive always been inter-
ested in, he said. I always
thought theres a little more
going on here. What I want to do
is use my artistic talents to give a
RUNYEON
Runyeons
one-man
show
Pennington Presbyterian Church hosts
Frank Runyeon in the play Afraid! The
Gospel of Mark on Jan. 29
please see ACTOR, page 2
Special to The Sun
Assemblywoman Bonnie Watson Coleman leads a lesson in December holidays with Janet Coles second-
grade class at Stony Brook Elementary School in Pennington. Read the story inside on page 7.
please see SMITH, page 4
Then there were four
Hopewell Valley Board of Education has narrowed its
search for school program provider to four
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better sense that this was a life-
changing event, not just some
great English text. If you really
listen to it, study it and rely on
your faith, you discover why this
is so powerful.
Sunday morning is its own
challenge, he said. The settings
are expected. Things can be a lit-
tle bland or predictable, but peo-
ple need to be surprised. Its been
quite exciting, and things have
happened over the years that re-
assure me this is the right thing
to do.
Runyeon is still best known,
however, from his many years on
television. He played Steve An-
dropoulos opposite Meg Ryans
Betsy Stewart on As the World
Turns in the mid-1980s, played
Father Michael Donnelly on the
Emmy Award-winning Santa
Barbara, and was tycoon Simon
Romero on General Hospital,
opposite Emma Samms.
He also has guest-starred in re-
curring roles on L.A. Law, as
talk show host Brooks Tapman,
on Falcon Crest, as chess ge-
nius Jovan Dmytryk, on Melrose
Place, as Father Tom and on All
My Children, as Forrest
Williams.
He also starred in the feature
film Dark Streets.
Soap operas, he said, deal with
questions of life, but not at the
level Runyeon is trying to accom-
plish.
My dad was a doctor, he said.
So, there were always questions
about life. Why do people die?
Why this? Why that? So it was in-
evitable that I would come back
and address these questions.
Runyeon received his bache-
lors degree in religion from
Princeton University, and after
ACTOR
Continued from page 1
please see RUNYEON, page 3
Actor known for work
on As the World Turns
JANUARY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
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studying acting in New York and
Los Angeles for 15 years, he at-
tended Fuller Seminary in prepa-
ration for the writing and per-
formance of Afraid, which is
his first one-man play.
He continued his studies at
Yale Divinity School and General
Theological Seminary, from
which he received his masters
degree, with honors, in 1994. He
work-shopped his first produc-
tions in cooperation with the fac-
ulty of Holy Cross College in
Worcester, Mass., and the Univer-
sity of Dayton. He continues his
studies toward a doctorate while
touring his current five produc-
tions: The Gospel of Mark:
Afraid, Sermon on the Mount,
The 3 Stories of Christmas,
The Gospel of John: Signs,
and Salt & Light, a comedy for
kids.
I think he does like coming to
this area, coming home for a
visit, said Debbie Ryan, a mem-
ber of the churchs worship and
music committee.
The church music director Bill
Alford, she said, saw one of Run-
yeons plays through his work at
the Pennington School and highly
recommended it.
We picked Afraid! because it
is about the Gospel of Mark,
which happens to fit in with our
Bible readings for this year,
Ryan said.
Afraid! is evangelism, pro-
motions for the play state. Every
Christian has wondered what it
would have been like: to have
been there, in Galilee, and (to
have) met Jesus. Afraid! is an ef-
fort to help those in the audience
have that encounter by doing ex-
actly what the evangelist Mark
did: telling the story in the here
and now, from beginning to end,
in everyday language and by
making the audience members
part of the action.
My job is to be the storyteller,
Runyeon said, explaining text
could tend to be dry or boring,
but, If we listen to what this is
saying, then well understand
why it is so powerful. There really
is a deeper story going on here.
RUNYEON
Continued from page 2
Runyeon: my job is to be
the storyteller
The Pennington Borough Eco-
nomic Development Commission
recently awarded its 2012
Business of the Year Award to
The Front Porch, located on
South Main Street, in the down-
town business district of Pen-
nington.
The award is designed to high-
light a business found successful
in the eyes of its community and
to recognize its significant contri-
butions as a driver of economic
growth.
The EDC will host its Second-
Annual Business of the Year So-
cial honoring Chris Murphy and
The Front Porch on Jan. 25 from 6
to 8 p.m. at Sun National Bank,
on North Main Street in Penning-
ton. Hors doeurves will be pro-
vided and refreshments will be
served.
If you are interested in attend-
ing this event, please contact the
EDC at EDC@pennigntonboro.org
or call (609) 737-6480.
The Front Porch named business of the year
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 25-31, 2012
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could come in, said HVASP co-
director Karen Sharpe.
Lang said the candidate ven-
dors are from both in and out of
state.
Superintendent of Schools
Thomas Smith, responding to
concerns of parents, said the pur-
pose of the RFP was to ensure
that students are getting the best
services possible at a reasonable
cost. The result may be that one of
the current providers remains or
even both, should they choose to
combine.
Smith also said the district
wants oversight over the before-
and after-school programs.
While these programs use dis-
trict facilities and district stu-
dents, they operate completely
autonomously from the district,
he said. We have no control or
knowledge of the curriculum,
staffing requirements, training,
etc., that they use. In this era of
accountability, it is imperative for
a program that works with dis-
trict students in district spaces to
have some level of accountability
and oversight by the school dis-
trict.
Although Sharpe previously
said: We were shocked to get the
RFP in an email, with no notice
and only a 30-day turnaround
time, board of education presi-
dent Lisa Wolff said: One can
rest assured that all board mem-
bers were aware of the RFP. Prior
to approval, it was vetted through
three board committees and dis-
cussed at public board meetings.
HVASP was incorporated in
1993 by a concerned group of par-
ents searching for quality child-
care for their elementary-school
age children, and it provides be-
fore- and after-school care to be-
tween 200 and 250 children a day
at the four elementary schools in
the Hopewell Valley.
Before-school care is offered to
all K-5 students for an hour and
15 minutes before school starts
at 8:35 a.m. at Toll Gate Grammar
School and Hopewell Elementary
School, as well as the HVASP
kindergarten room in Penning-
ton for kindergarten students
attending the morning
kindergarten enrichment pro-
gram.
Activities include last-minute
homework help, and indoor and
outdoor play for students whose
parents have to drop them off be-
fore going to work.
After-school care is provided
by the YMCA at Bear Tavern,
Hopewell, Stony Brook and Toll
Gate schools from 3:35 to 6 p.m.,
and includes daily snacks and
outdoor activities such as play
time on playground equipment
and non-competitive sports. In-
door activities include quiet time
for homework, crafts, games and
exercise in the gym.
The cost of the before-school
care is $95 a month and the cost
for the after-school care, which in-
cludes coverage on half-day ses-
sions, is $195 per month.
Sharpe said the kindergarten-
enrichment program is designed
to enhance the kindergarten ex-
perience, not duplicate it.
The programs include begin-
ner math and reading, along with
hands-on activities such as caring
for animals, and planting an herb
garden.
SMITH
Continued from page 1
Smith: district wants
oversight over programs
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The following are reports from
the Hopewell police department:
The purse of a Hopewell Town-
ship resident was reported stolen
from the Shop Rite on Route 31
on Jan. 9 at about 7:30 p.m. The
resident told police she acciden-
tally left her purse in a
shopping cart, and when she re-
turned to the store, the purse and
its belongings were gone. The
loss was estimated at
$150.
Sometime between Dec. 21 and
Jan. 1, someone entered a Tyburn
Lane home and took a GPS unit
and jewelry. There were no signs
of forced entry. The loss was esti-
mated at $300.
A 27-year-old Pennington
woman was charged with driving
on a suspended license and driv-
ing with a suspended vehicle reg-
istration after being pulled over
on Interstate 95 Jan. 11 at 10:57
a.m. Police said a computer check
revealed the registration for the
car was suspended on Jan. 11.
Police also discovered there
were outstanding arrest warrants
for the driver out of Hopewell
Township, West Windsor and
Lawrence Township.
The driver was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters for processing. She
was later released after posting
bail for the outstanding warrants.
An 89-year-old Hopewell man
was charged with failure to stop
for a pedestrian after striking a
pedestrian in a crosswalk on
Model Avenue Jan. 15 at 11:47
a.m., police said. Police said he
was driving a 2002 Honda Accord
near North Greenwood Avenue
when he failed to stop for the
pedestrian, who was attempting
to cross Model Avenue in a
marked crosswalk.
The Honda struck the pedestri-
an, knocking him to the ground.
The pedestrian was transported
to a local hospital by the Hopewell
First Aid Squad, where he was
treated for minor injuries. He was
released from the hospital later
that day. The driver was unin-
jured. This case will be heard in
municipal court.
POLICE REPORT
Colins Kids, Inc., is hosting a
ladies luncheon fundraiser on
Feb. 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
at Trenton Country Club in
Ewing. The event will raise
awareness of heart health in
recognition of National Womens
Heart Week (Feb. 1-7) and Congen-
ital Heart Defect Awareness Week
(Feb. 7-14). Tickets are $55 per per-
son or $100 for two.
To purchase tickets, contact
Nancy at 609-466-7669. Or, send
email to king@colinskids.org for a
registration form.
To donate or to learn more
about Colins Kids, visit
www.ColinsKids.org.
Colins Kids, Inc. hosting fundraiser at Trenton Country Club
in our opinion
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JANUARY 25-31, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
Posted on sun news
Crime, crime and... oh look... more crime
Attempted murder upheld
for former Army psychiatrist
The conviction of a former Army psy-
chiatrist for trying to kill her former
boyfriends wife in Ocean Township has
been upheld, according to the Asbury Park
Press. A Superior Court judge in Freehold
said the victims testimony was not com-
promised when her husband helped her
identify the suspect through the Internet.
Dr. Cecilia X. Chen, 36, of Silver Spring,
Md., was convicted in 2006 of the Jan. 26,
2005, attack on Helen Kim.
Posing as a stranded driver, Chen en-
tered the Ocean Township home that Kim
shared with her husband Johann Chris-
tian. She then stabbed Helen Kim with a
kitchen knife. Kim and her unborn child
survived.
The victim not only gave police a de-
scription of her attacker, but also drew a
picture. Noticing that the drawing looked
like Chen his ex-girlfriend who had unex-
pectedly called him days earlier Johann
Christian had his wife look at photos on a
website, but did not tell her his suspicions.
Helen Kim identified Chen from a pic-
ture online. She was only slightly unsure
because her attacker had worn glasses, and
Chen did not in the photo. But Kim was
certain once her sister drew glasses on the
picture.
Barry Lank
Man accused of having pot as
he walked into courthouse
Its like a new lyric for the old song: I
was gonna check my pockets for pot before
I went to court, but then I got high.
A Middletown man was arrested at the
Municipal Court in Keansburg when he
tried to get through the contraband-and-
weapon security check while allegedly car-
rying marijuana, according to the Asbury
Park Press.
Joseph Szoludko of Middletowns
Belford section, was coming to court on a
separate matter, and removed all the con-
tents from his coat at the checkpoint, plac-
ing them on a table in front of the court-
room security detail.
An officer allegedly found pot in one of
the items. Szoludko was charged with pos-
session of less than 50 grams of marijua-
na.
Barry Lank
Lawrence man stabbed twice
in huge street brawl in Ewing
A huge brawl broke out in the street in
Ewing recently, leaving one man stabbed
twice in the back, according to The Times
of Trenton.
Police broke up the 20-person melee on
the 300 block of Hillcrest Avenue at around
12:30 a.m. after responding to a report of
shots fired. Officers cleared people out, and
on the corner of Hillcrest and Homan av-
enues, they found Curtis T. Johnson, 30, of
Lawrence, who was injured from the knife
wounds.
Barry Lank
Dont miss a thing!
This is a sampling of what you can find
everyday on The Central Jersey Sun,
online at http://cj.sunne.ws.
G
ov. Christie last week signed
into law a bill that gives local
communities the option of
moving school elections from April to
November.
This is a move that is long, long
overdue.
It is right on so many levels: The
cost of holding an election is April is
saved. More people will show up at the
polls. It just makes sense to gather as
many elections as possible together on
the same day. Fire elections should be
moved to November as well.
As an incentive, if communities
make the switch, school budgets that
dont exceed the 2 percent increase cap
wont have to get the OK from voters.
Now, that might upset some people.
School elections are one way for voters
to express their outrage at high taxes.
But, when you look at it, the vote is
largely symbolic.
A defeated budget goes to the local
municipal governing body. Indeed,
some changes often are made (its op-
tional), but those changes usually
dont make a dramatic impact. Its not
like a rejected budget gets reworked
and resubmitted for voter approval.
Also, the budget vote gave school
board members an escape hatch. They
are charged with putting the budget
together (with the help of administra-
tors, of course). School board mem-
bers should be held accountable for
the budget. Their jobs should be on the
line.
So, if you dont like the budgets
being presented, fire the school board
members. Vote them out of office and
elect people who will build a budget
you can support. Dont direct all of
your attention to what is essentially a
meaningless vote on a budget.
Communities should jump at the
chance to move school elections to No-
vember. They should save tax dollars
and make it easier on voters to partici-
pate in the democratic process.
This change has been long overdue.
Now that its available, dont waste
time in doing the right thing.
Common sense prevails
Moving school elections to November is an overdue no-brainer
Move the election
Moving school elections to November
saves money, makes it easier on vot-
ers and puts the responsibility for
crafting the document where it
belongs on the shoulders of school
board members.
JANUARY 25-31, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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By ALICIA BROOKS WALTMAN
Special to The Sun
One day last month, state Sen.
Linda Greenstein, D-14, joined
Timberlane Middle School sci-
ence teacher Nancy Greeners
class in dissecting lumps of com-
post.
I didnt put my hands in there,
the students dissected the com-
post, said Greenstein, who came
to the classroom as part of an
event called Teacher for the
Day. But Mrs. Greener dove
into the dissection with gusto.
Teachers are not like they were in
the old days, when I went to
school, and they stood at the front
of the classroom. Today, teachers
are really engaged, and this expe-
riential learning is something the
kids will really remember. I was
also surprised at how teaching
has become so physically de-
manding.
Hopewell teachers are hopeful
Greenstein will remember her ex-
perience, too, when she returns to
work in the Senate, which will no
doubt be considering education
legislation this term.
Showing lawmakers what
teachers do every day was the
idea behind Teacher for the
Day, which was organized by the
Hopewell Valley Education Asso-
ciation, the district teachers
union.
Education is in the forefront
of many conversations and deci-
sions, said Heidi Olson, a special
education teacher at Hopewell El-
ementary School and president of
the HVEA. We believe that for
people to make valid decisions
that affect our schools, they
should have the knowledge and
current understanding of the
achievements and challenges of
todays classrooms. By inviting
decision makers into our classes,
we can provide them with that
knowledge. We also wanted to re-
mind legislators about all of the
wonderful things that happen in
our classrooms and of how hard
our teachers and students work.
The idea was enthusiastically
backed by HVRSD Superintend-
ent Thomas A. Smith.
I support anything that brings
together the two worlds of educa-
tion and government, Smith
said. We need each other now
more than ever, and Teacher for
the Day is a great way to share
our experiences and points of
view.
The Hopewell event, which
placed four state legislators in
classrooms around the district, is
part of a statewide effort being
led by the New Jersey Education
Association, the statewide teach-
ers union. Hopewells event was
the first in the state this academic
year.
At Stony Brook Elementary
School, Assemblywoman Bonnie
Watson Coleman, D-15, which in-
cludes Hopewell, led second-
graders in Janet Coles class in a
please see GREENSTEIN, page 8
Sen. Greenstein
makes a trip into
the classroom
WEDNESDAY
January 25
FOR ALL
Board of Health Advisory Meeting:
7 p.m. at Municipal Building.
Deer Management Advisory Com-
mittee: 7:30 p.m. at Municipal Build-
ing.
Book Sale: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at
the Hopewell Branch Library.
THURSDAY
January 26
FOR ALL
Hopewell Valley Municipal Alliance
Executive Committee: 8 a.m. at
Municipal Building.
Hopewell Fire District No. 1 Meet-
ing: 7 p.m. at Municipal Services
Building.
Book Sale: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at
the Hopewell Branch Library.
NJ State Chambers 75th Annual
Walk to Washington: Prices start at
$100. Contact Jillian Stengel at
(609) 689-9960 ext. 24.
www.mercerchamber.org.
FRIDAY
January 27
FOR ALL
Book Sale: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at
the Hopewell Branch Library.
NJ State Chambers 75th Annual
Walk to Washington: Prices start at
$100. Contact Jillian Stengel at
(609) 689-9960 ext. 24.
www.mercerchamber.org.
SATURDAY
January 28
FOR ALL
Book Sale: 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. at
the Hopewell Branch Library.
SUNDAY
January 29
FOR ALL
Book Sale Bag Day: 1-4 p.m. at the
Hopewell Branch Library.
MONDAY
January 30
FOR ALL
Township Committee Meeting: 7
p.m. at Municipal Building.
Yoga: 5:30-6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library.
TUESDAY
January 31
FOR ALL
Juvenile Conference Committee:
6:30 p.m. at Municipal Building.
Yoga: 5-6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library.
Reiki Guided Meditation: 7 to
8 p.m. at the Hopewell Branch
Library.
calendar PAGE 8 JANUARY 25-31, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 103
Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. Or by email:
calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
discussion about all of the De-
cember holidays that different
cultures celebrate.
At Central High School, As-
semblyman Daniel R. Benson, D-
14, who represents parts of Mer-
cer and Middlesex counties,
taught world history lessons for
the day with teachers Jeff Neu-
man and Dan Balog. And at
Hopewell Elementary, Assembly-
man Reed Gusciora worked side
by side on mathematics with Kym
Harjes second-grade class.
It was a great opportunity to
see first-hand the teaching that
goes into helping students pre-
pare for a global economy, said
Assemblyman Gusciora, D-15, an
attorney. Were preparing them
for a complex world, and teachers
are on the front lines of this,
demonstrating hard work and
dedication.
It was a great opportunity to
see how bright the children are
and how hard the teachers work,
Watson Coleman said. And Ben-
son said hell use his day in the
classroom as a reference point
when at work in the Legislature.
This will help us, when work-
ing with our fellow legislators, in
breaking down any misconcep-
tions they may have about educa-
tion, he said.
Its always good to have a re-
minder of all the good things hap-
pening in our schools, Green-
stein said.
GREENSTEIN
Continued from page 7
Greenstein: its good
to be reminded of the
good things happening
in our schools
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
COVERED
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T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JANUARY 25-31, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
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