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The

Cu~rttc"'mb

ISBN: 975-577-066-6

Editers: IlIustrations: Cover Design: Color Separation: Printed by: Published by:

Elspeth Rawstron - Brian Johnson Bülent Benli Elspeth Rawstron Sürat Visual Arts Center Tayf Matbaasiiistanbul Sürat Basim Yayin Reklamcilik Egitim Araçlari Sanayii ve Ticaret A.s. Kisikli Cad. Kusbakisi Sok. No:3 81190 Altunizade istanbullTURKEY Tel: (+90 216) 391 70 31 Fax: (+90 216) 341 26 30 E-mail: suratelt@turk.net

A bout the authvr:
Ömer Seyfettin was born in Gönen in 1884. Best known for his short and a love Upon

stories, he is one of Turkey's leading authors of the modern era. From his youth, Ömer Seyfettin showed a talent for writing of literature. his graduation military He began publishing student at Istanbul's Imperial Military academy in izmir. He wrote fiction, served as magazine poetry and prose when he was a School in the early 1900s.

in 1903, he became an army lieutenant and taught at a

Ömer Seyfettin left the army in 1913. editor-in-chief of the literary

Türk Sözü, and taught literature at
in

Kabatas High School in Istanbul until his death in 1920. Ömer Seyfettin wrote his stories for the common person, writing direct and simple colloquial experiences, historical Turkish. events, and Turkish traditions. His works were based on his life Many of Ömer reflecting the author's

© 1997 by Sürat Basim Yayin Reklamcilik Egitim
Araçlari Sanayii ve Ticaret A.s.

Seyfettin's stories show a strong spirit of patriotism, deep love of his country.

To the teacher:
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, means, without prior permission from the publisher. by any
The primary vocabulary vocabulary, aim of the Sürat Anatolian skills through Readers is to develop reading for enjoyment. learning, use new The and dictionary

activities are designed

to facilitate vocabulary

and check text comprehension. with the theme of The Currycomb and are included in the You may wish to use them to test the students' vocabulary

Printed and bound in Turkey.

The words printed in darker ink have been carefully chosen in accordance glossary. learning.

To the student:
You will notice as you read The Currycomb printed in darker meaning. ink. Theyare Then check the accuracy that so me words are First try to guess their The
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new vocabulary.

of your guesses in the glossary.

activities will help you remember the new vocabulary.

Before Reading
1. a. Look at all the pictures in the book. What do you think the story
is about?

b. Do you think the story will be:
happy ( ) sad ( ) funny () frightening ( )

2. Look at the words below and check their meanings in your
dictionary.

feedbag trough

oats currycomb

stable stall

saddie hay

shall remember Hasan, was as long as live. and my brother, that summer a year younger thanwas eight years old, me. Every day, we played together in the stableyard und er the shade of the willow trees. Even now, can still he ar the sad sound of the stream which flowed through the soft green meadow nearby. My mother was in Istanbul for the summer, and my father was at work all day, so my brother and I spent all our time with Oadaruh. Oadaruh was the old man who looked after my father's horses. Every morning, Hasan and I ran to the stables. We loved the horses, and we loved playing in the stables with Oadaruh. We enjoyed climbing onto the horses' backs and pretending to ride them. Hasan was afraid to sit on a horse by himself, so Oadaruh used to sit with him in the saddie. My brother and I also liked to mi the horses' feedbags with oats and the ir troughs with hay. We liked to clean ff~"t~

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out the stalls and sweep the stables. These tasks were better than any children's game.

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The only task could not do was to groom the horses. More than anything else, wanted to brush them with the currycomb, but wasn't taii enough. could only just reach their stomachs. My favorite horse was Tosun, my father's chestnut stallion. i use d to watch jealously as Oadaruh groomed him. Tosun seemed to like the regular click, click, click sound of the currycomb. He laid back his ears and swung his taHiike a giant tassel. When Oadaruh finished grooming Tosun, the horse became almost bad-tempered. He didn't want Oadaruh to stop, but the stableman had to groom the other horses too. Every time Oadaruh picked up the currycomb and started to groom Tosun, said, "Let me do it, Oadaruh, please." But he always refused. Then one day, Oadaruh picked me up and put me on Tosun's back. He put the currycomb in my hand and said, "Go on Selim, you do it!"

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rbn:ish;(i Tosun's back with the metal comb, but that was aii could do. could not reach his neck or his head because was too smaii.

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could not make the same rhythmic click, click, click sound that Oadaruh made either. "Ooes Tosun like it?" asked a~xiously. "Is he swinging his tail?" "Yes," said Oadaruh smiling. "Let me see," said excitedly, and leaned back to look. Every day after that, when got to the stables, asked Oadaruh, "Can groom Tosun today?" And every day Oadaruh answered, "No." "Why not?" asked. "Because you' re too smaiL. You can't groom him properiy." "But ni be able to do it one day, won't I?" "One day when you're taiier." "When will I be taii enough?" I persisted. "When you are as taii as the horses," replied Oadaruh. That seemed a long time to wait.

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ne morning, in the home by was alone. could Hasan were by the stream was at meadow. myself. Oadaruh and groom the horses, and no one would know. ran to the stables to find the currycomb. went to Oadaruh's windowless !ittle room in the corner of the stables. looked for the

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currycomb on his shelves. couldn't find it anywhere.

i looked for it between

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the saddles, but

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Then saw a !ittle green box under Oadaruh's bed. opened it, and inside was a brand new silver currycomb! grabbed it and ran to Tosun's stall. was very excited. tried to brush the stallion's stomach, but he wouldn't stand still.

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i it must hurt him, i thought. i looked at the teeth of the shiny new currycomb. They were very sharp, so i rubbed them against the hard stone wall of the stable to dull them a !ittle. Then i tried to brush the other horses, but they didn't !ike it either. i got very angry. Why won't the horses let me groom them? This currycomb is useless, i
thought.

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i picked up a big rock and started to hit the currycomb with it. The teeth broke. In my anger, I threw the currycomb into the water trough. it lay there broken and unused. Later that same day, I was playing in the stables. Hasan was in the house with our maid, Pervin. My father was also in the stables, !ooking at the horses. I saw him walk by the water trough. He looked down, and my heart san k. He picked up the broken currycomb and strode angrily into the stableyard. "Dadaruh come here!" he shouted. I felt very afraid.

Oadaruh was surprised to see the broken currycomb. "Who broke it?" demanded my father. "I don't know," said Oadaruh. My father turned to me, and before he could sayanother word, I said, "Hasan broke it." "Hasan?" he asked in surprise. "Yes. Yesterday, when Oadaruh was sleeping, Hasan went into his room and took the currycomb. Later, he threw it against the stable waii and it broke." . "Why didn't you teii Oadaruh?" "He was sleeping." "Go and teii Hasan to come here immediately!" my father ordered. 8

walked through the Father wants to see you!" shouted. Hasan as could. "Hasan, stableyard gate, and then ran to the house as fast didn't know anything was wrong, so he came running after me quite happily. My father was very strict. One glance from him was enough to frighten us. "Hasan, have something to ask you, and if you He, ni beat you," he said sternly. "I never He," repHed Hasan. "What's wrong?" "Why did you break this currycomb?" Hasan looked with surprise at the comb in Dadaruh's hand. He shook his head. "I didn't break it, Father. I've never see n it before." "Don't He to me, Hasan!" "It wasn't me. 1didn't break it."

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"Teii me the truth," said my father, "and 1won't be angry with you. It's a terrible thing to He." "But Father, it's the truth-I didn't break the currycomb. " My father became more and more angry. "You

shameless Har!" he yeiied, and slapped ~san face. -, ~,p

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"Take him to the house! Don't i ''-. again," my father shouted. "He can sit in the house with Pervin." Dadaruh picked up my crying brother in his arms and carried him to the house.
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From then on, 1 always played by myself in the stables. Hasan was a prisoner in the house. My father never forgave him, not even after my mother came home. He caiied my brother a Har. Hasan started to cry every time he remembered my father's beating. My mother never imagined that 1broke the currycomb and then blamed Hasan for it. She never imagined that 1could teii such a terrible He. "Dadaruh probably let the horses step on it," she said.

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Dadaruh was very quiet, and Pervin began to cry. "Whafs wrong, Pervin?" asked. "Your brother is ill."

The following at home with mother returned to Istanbul, and Hasanin and i stayed summer, my Father. My brother still couldn't play
the stables. Every night in bed, he asked me about the horses. "Did you feed the horses today? How big are the colts now?" Then one day, Hasan got sick, and my father called the doctor. After examining Hasan, the doctor toId us, "Ifs diphtheria."

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"But, he'll get better soon, won't he?" "No, I'm afraid he won't. He's very ill." "Then what will happen to him?" "Your brother's going to die," she sobbed. "He's going to die?" started to cry too. Over the next few days, the house was very quiet. My father didn't leave Hasan's bedside for a moment.

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One night after my brother got sick, {had a terrible nightmare. { saw Hasan in the dream. He was crying and shouting at me, "Uar! L· i" iar. {woke up and ran to Pervin's room. "{ must see Hasan and Father," {told her. "Why?" she asked. "{ have to teii Father something." "What do you have to teii him?" "{ have to teii him about the currycomb." "What currycomb?" "The silver one ... the one Father found in the water trough last summer ... the one { ... " {could not finish the sentence, and { started to cry.

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saw Oadaruh sitting in the hall with the imam. Oadaruh was weeping, and the imam was reading a prayer. was too Iate. My poor innocent brother was dead.

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