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112 E. Sixth St., PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734 • www.WeeklyChoice.com • (989) 732-8160
Weekly Choice
A Choice Choice Publication
The local experts
at Hamill’s Floor
Covering Inc., located at
2309 N. US 31 in Petoskey,
offer their experience and
extensive product selection
in serving all of their cus-
tomer’s floor covering
needs. Courtesy Photo.
HIDDEN TREASURES
Thanks to the folks
at Pineview
Military Surplus in
Frederic, high quality, military
grade items are available for
campers, hunters, hikers, out-
door enthusiasts, and those
who simply enjoy well-craft-
ed, durable goods.
Photo by Dan Klatt.
Hamill’s Floor
Covering
Positive News,
Sports and
Events
20/20 PROJECT
Thursday, January 26, 2012
The excitement of Michigan on the move was literal-
ly reflected in the largest attendance since 2005 at
this year’s North American International Auto Show
held in Detroit in from January 9th through the 22nd.
People are looking at, and buying American cars
again…and that’s good news for Michigan.
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Covering 40 Towns in Northern Michigan including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Lewiston, Mancelona, Mio, Indian River and surrounding area.
This Friday and Saturday, February 3rd and 4th,
the Pink Ribbon Riders will hold their 6th annual “Snow Run”
event in the Gaylord area. The Snow Run combines the passion
of snowmobiling and the mission to raise funds to help men and
women diagnosed with breast cancer.
Courtesy Photo
Pineview
Military Surplus
Photo Courtesy of rohatynski-harlow PubliC relations, llC
By Jim Akans
Its about people helping people,
and this coming weekend, nearly 200
“Pink Ribbon Riders” will gather in
Gaylord and set out on a snowmo-
bile journey along miles and miles of
trails threading through the gor-
geous northern Michigan scenery.
What sets this particular group of
winter adventurers apart is their
heartfelt and inspiring mission; to
promote breast cancer awareness for
both men and women, while raising
funds for those in need…"Riding in
honor and in memory of those we
love".
“This ride is open to both men and
women,” states event co-founder,
Jody McKay. “Typically, we have
about 180 people participating in
this two-day event, coming from the
local area and throughout Michigan,
and from as far away as Ohio,
Indiana, Illinois and New York state.”
The weekend will kick off with a
dinner and fundraising event at the
Eagles Hall in Gaylord on Friday
evening. The evening will include
live music, light snacks, door prizes,
a silent auction, a very unique ”Bra
Decorating Contest” and an “Ugly
Sweater Contest.” The Snow Run
ride will begin early Saturday morn-
ing, with ride groups following a 60
or 100-mile course, depending on
rider ability. Each group of ten to fif-
teen riders will meet in a staging
area at 8:15 am and the “Sled Send
Off” takes place at 9 am.
The event in Gaylord is one of
By Jim Akans
It’s easy to get caught up in the bad news.
As Michigander’s we have certainly had our
fill of that in the last several years. What isn’t
always as easy to see and hear, however, is the
good news about the progress Michigan has
been making.
To start with, let’s look at the Big Three
automakers…engines that literally drive our
state’s economy. Selling nearly 13 million
vehicles last year, Ford, G.M. and Chrysler all
posted increases to their bottom lines in 2011.
SEE MICHIGAN PAGE 4A
6th Annual Pink
Ribbon Riders
Snowmobile Run
helps those diagnosed with Breast Cancer
Craft &
Flea
M
arket
at Northland Sportsmen's Club
Saturday, Jan. 28
9 am to 4 pm
FREE ADMISSION
Lunch available.
Antiques, Crafts, Garage Sales Items,
Sporting Goods and a whole lot more!
STORY
PAGE 10
By Jim Akans
There’s nothing quite as tantaliz-
ing and scrumptious as a delicious,
expertly prepared homemade
Italian dinner. Next Friday,
February 3rd, set your appetite for
an evening of “Mangia!”, (Italian for
“Eat!”), as the Gaylord Area Council
for the Arts (GACA) serves up a
yummy Italian dinner buffet at St.
Mary Cathedral Parish Hall to ben-
efit GACA’s Performing Arts
Division.
This is mid-winter comfort food
at its finest, with spaghetti, chicken
parmesan and lasagna…with vege-
tarian options available, plus of
course salad, breadsticks, beverage
and enticing desserts. Best of all,
these delights are being created by
local Italian chefs Steve Riozzi,
Charlie Bono and Mary Rocchio
Szymanski.
Inside...
SEE PINK RIBBON PAGE 4A
STORY
PAGE 5
Michigan on the move Michigan on the move
Michigan on the move Michigan on the move
w||| Coupor
GOOD AT ALL 5 LOCATIONS
GAYLORD, GRAYLING, PETOSKEY, EAST JORDAN, BOYNE CITY
ALL STORES NOW OFFERING
CARRYOUT &DELIVERY





S N O I T A C O L 5 L L A T A D O O G
Y T I C E N Y O B , N A D R O J T S A E , YY, E K S O T E P , G N I L Y AAY R G , D R O L Y A G
Y R E VVE I L EEL D & T U O YY R R A CCA C
GG N I R E FFE FFF O W O N S EES RE O TTO S LL LL AA
GAYLORD
1390 Main St. West
989-732-8200
NOW OPEN in Petoskey
1327 Spring St. (in the K-Mart Plaza)
231-348-9600
Scrumptious homemade
Italian Buffet
Fundraiser
on Friday, February 3rd
Steve Riozzi
will once
again
prepare his
famous pasta
sauce for the
Gaylord
Council for
the Arts
Italian Buffet
Dinner
fundraiser, to
be held at St.
Mary
Cathedral
Parish Hall
on Friday,
February 3rd.
SEE ITALIAN BUFFET PAGE 4A
FREE
Expires 2/29/12 Expires 2/29/12
1OO4 W. Main St., Gaylord
Located Inside Petoskey Meijer
1OO4 W. Main St., Gaylord
Located Inside Petoskey Meijer
Courtesy Photo
Page 2 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
By Jason Delong
STAFF WRI TER
Yesterday at the Quality Inn Gaylord, locals lined
up to cash in on their gold and silver, antiques, and
collectibles at the “As seen on TV” THR’s Treasure
Hunters Roadshow. The free event is in Gaylord all
week, buying gold, silver, antiques and collectibles.
One visitor I spoke with yesterday said, “It’s unbe-
lievable, I brought in some old coins that had been
in a little cigar box for years and some old herring-
bone necklaces—in less than fifteen minutes I left
with a check for $700. That stuff has been in my
jewelry box and dresser for at least 20 years.”
THR’S TREASURE HUNTERS ROADSHOW
HAS BEEN TOURING THE WORLD SINCE
2001. THIS YEAR ALONE, THEY WILL VISIT
3,000 CITIES AND OVER HALF A MILLION
PEOPLE WILL CASH IN!
Another gentleman brought in an old Fender
guitar his father had bought years ago. The man
said, “Dad had less than fifty bucks in that guitar.”
The event specialist that assisted him made a few
phone calls and a veterinarian in Seattle, Washing-
ton bought the guitar for $5,700.00. The seller
continued, “I got another $150.00 for a broken
necklace and an old class ring. It’s not every day
that someone comes to town bringing six thousand
dollars with your name on it.”
Jeff Parsons, President of THR’s Treasure Hunt-
ers Roadshow, commented, “Lots of people have
items that they know are val uabl e but just don’t
know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords,
guitars, pocket watches and jewelry are valuable to
collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big
money for those items that they are looking for.”
This week’s event is the best place to get con-
nected with those collectors. The process is free
and anyone can bring items down to the event. If
the specialists find items that collectors are interest-
ed in, offers will be made to purchase them. About
80% of the guests that attend the show end up sell-
ing one or more items at the event.
Antiques and collectibles are not the only items
being purchased. “Gol d and sil ver market s are
soaring,” says Archie Davis, an event representa-
tive. “Broken jewelry and gold and silver coins add
up very quickly. I just finished working with a gen-
tleman that had an old class ring, two bracelets
and a handful of silver dollars. His check was for
over $650.00. I would say that there were well
over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their
scrap gold.”
One gent l eman hol ding his check for over
$1,250 in the lobby of the event yesterday had this
comment: “I am so happy I decided to come. I saw
the newspaper ad for the event and brought in an
old German sword I had brought back from World
War II and some old coins, and here is my check.
What a great thing for our community. I am head-
ing home now to see what else I have that they
might be interested in.”
The event continues today starting at 9am. It is
free and no appointment is needed.
If you go to the event, you can cash-in your
items for competitive prices. Representatives
will be available to assess and purchase
your items at the Quality Inn, this week
through Saturday, in Gaylord.
HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE CASH IN ON
MODERN DAY GOLD RUSH!
Gold and silver pour into yesterday’s event due to highest prices in 40 years.
T RE ASURE HUNT E RSROADSHOW. COM
º Go|hor i|oms ol in|oros| lrom your
o||ic, gorogo, bosomon|, o|c. Thoro is
no limi| |o |ho omoun| ol i|oms you
con bring.
º Mo oppoin|mon| is nocossory.
º ll you docido |o occop| |ho ollor, wo
will poy you on |ho spo| ond ship |ho
i|om |o |ho colloc|or. Tho colloc|or
poys oll shipping ond hondling
chorgos.
º You go| 100° ol |ho ollor wi|h no
hiddon loos.
WE BUY ALL
GOLD & SILVER
JEWELRY
COINS Any and all coins made before
1970: silver and gold coins, dollars, half
dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies.
All conditions wanted!
GOLD & SILVER PRICES AT 40 YEAR
HIGH for platinum, gold and silver during this
event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins,
pocket watches, Krugerrands, gold bars,
Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.
JEWELRY Gold, silver, platinum, diamonds,
rubies, sapphires, all types of stones and
metals, rings, bracelets, necklaces (including
broken jewelry). All costume jewelry wanted.
WRIST & POCKET WATCHES Rolex,
Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier,
Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Elgin, Bunn
Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.
TOYS, TRAINS, DOLLS All makers and
types of toys made before 1965: Hot Wheels,
Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, robots,
battery toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets—Mark-
lin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other
trains (all gauges, accessories, individual cars),
Barbie dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, German.
MILITARY ITEMS & SWORDS
Revolutionary War, Civil War, WWI, WWII,
etc: swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals,
knives, gear, letters. The older the swords, the
better.
GUITARS & OTHER INSTRUMENTS
Fender, Gibson, Martin, Rickenbacker, Gretsch,
new and vintage amps, saxophones, wood
winds, mandolins and all others.
WHAT WE BUY
HOW IT WORKS
PAl D ADVERTl SEMEMT
GOLD & SILVER
EXPRESS PASS
BRING THIS PASS
& BEAT THE LINES
Don’t miss your chance of
cashing in at these Record High
Gold & Silver Prices
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GOLD
IS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS
NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN!
ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED
THR’s Treasure Hunters Roadshow is not
affiliated with or related to the Antiques
Roadshow television series, PBS or WGBH
CHECK IT OUT!
WHO THR’S TREASURE HUNTERS
ROADSHOW
WHAT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO
SELL THEIR ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES
WHERE QUALITY INN GAYLORD
137 WEST ST.
(EXIT 282 OFF I-75)
GAYLORD, MI 49735
WHEN JANUARY 24TH - 28TH
TUES–FRI 9AM–6PM
SATURDAY 9AM–4PM
DIRECTIONS 989.732.7541
INFORMATION 217.787.7767
WE BUY ALL
POCKET & WRIST
WATCHES
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By Jason Delong
AFF WRI TER ST
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on their g up to cash in
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One visitor I spoke with
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COINS Any a
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ters, dimes, nickels and pennies. dollars, quar
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GOLD & SIL
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and all coins made before
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with a check for $700. That stuf
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THR’S TREASURE
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3,000 CITIES AND
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YLO GAAYLORD, MI 49735













































































































TO THE PUBLIC TO
HEIR ANTIQUES &
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YLORD TY INN GA AYLORD
. WEST ST
282 OFF I-75)
ORD, MI 49735













































































































. I j y quickly up ver
tleman that had a
s of a handful and
w I . 0 0 . 0 5 6 $ r e v o
over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their
scrap gold.”
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ust finished working with a gen
n old class ring, two bracelets
check was for dollars. His silver
e r e w e r e h t t a h t y a s d l u o w
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WHEN JANUA
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Y 24TH - 28TH AR
FRI 9AM–6PM
Y 9AM–4PM RDAAY 9AM–4PM
S 989.732.7541
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d a r e p a p s w e n e h t
man sword old Ger
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etc: swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals,
, letters. The older the swords, the knives, gear
. better
ARS & GUITTARS & OTHER INSTRUMENTS
, Gibson, Mar Fender
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January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 3
WEATHER:
Thursday
High 37
Low 28
Friday
High 32
Low 26
Saturday
High 29
Low 16
Sunday
High 18
Low 11
Monday
High 24
Low 20
Tuesday
High 30
Low 23
Wednesday
High 29
Low 21
Records and Normals Temps
Record Normal Record Normal Record Record
Month Day High High Low Low Precip. Snowvall
January 26 53 °F 1973 24 °F -23 °F 1959 9 °F 1.19 in. 1950 9.99 in. 2002
January 27 52 °F 1973 24 °F -26 °F 2005 9 °F 1.06 in. 1974 8 in. 1978
January 28 44 °F 2006 24 °F -21 °F 1986 9 °F 0.6 in. 1988 5.5 in. 1973
January 29 42 °F 2008 24 °F -14 °F 1952 9 °F 0.65 in. 2006 4.5 in. 1975
January 30 45 °F 1974 25 °F -21 °F 1994 9 °F 0.87 in. 1987 9.5 in. 1987
January 31 45 °F 1988 25 °F -15 °F 1994 9 °F 0.42 in. 1988 4.1 in. 1988
February 1 44 °F 1970 25 °F -15 °F 1994 9 °F 0.52 in. 1986 5.5 in. 1986
February 2 42 °F 1952 25 °F -25 °F 1976 9 °F 0.88 in. 1968 7.5 in. 1949
February 3 54 °F 1991 25°F -30 °F 1996 9 °F 0.5 in. 1990 4.5 in. 1977
February 4 51 °F 1991 25 °F -23 °F 1978 9 °F 0.3 in. 1990 5 in. 1972
2010 Amount 2011 Amount 2011-12 Amount
Atlanta 1/25/2010 23.4 1/24/2011 25.4 1/23/2012 19.2
Charlevoix 1/25/2010 53.9 1/24/2011 61.9 1/23/2012 19.5
East Jordan 1/25/2010 60.8 1/24/2011 70.5 1/23/2012 35.8
Gaylord 1/25/2010 61.5 1/24/2011 69.2 1/23/2012 55.9
Mio 1/25/2010 20.5 1/24/2011 18.5 1/23/2012 19.7
Onaway 1/25/2010 49.1 1/24/2011 42.5 1/23/2012 22.1
Petoskey 1/25/2010 66.3 1/24/2011 66 1/23/2012 34.5
Snowfall
totals
Modern day treasure hunters are in
Gaylord this week!
MDOT selected by TIA to produce
distracted driving video
G A Y L O R D
As a way to raise awareness about the risks of
distracted driving, the Michigan Department of
Transportation (MDOT) today announced that its
Video and Photography Services unit was selected
to produce a mock-crash video and 30-second
public service announcement for the Traffic
Improvement Association (TIA).
"Distracted driving is a serious, life-threatening
behavior that steals loved ones from us and puts
innocent drivers and passengers at risk every
day," said Jim Santilli, TIA executive director.
The videos are being developed for the
"Remembering Ally: Distracted Driving Awareness
Campaign" the TIA plans to kick off in late
February. Ally Zimmerman, a 16-year-old Romeo
High School student, was a passenger in a vehicle
hit broadside by a distracted driver. Ally later died
from her injuries.
According to the National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration (NHTSA), nearly 5,500 peo-
ple were killed and almost a half million injured in
distracted driving-related crashes in 2009.
The TIA, in partnership with its corporate spon-
sors and other traffic-safety partners, created the
"Remembering Ally: Distracted Driving Awareness
Campaign" to raise awareness and change dan-
gerous behavior in all drivers in hopes of saving
lives and reducing injuries on Michigan roadways.
MDOT reminds drivers: Snowplows need room
to groom.
www.michigan.gov/drive ,
www.twitter.com/MichiganDOT,
www.facebook.com/MichiganDOT
Published Weekly on Thursday.
Afton, Alanson, Alba, Atlanta, Black Lake, Bliss, Brutus, Burt Lake, Carp Lake,
Cheboygan, Comins, Conway, Cross Village, Elmira, Fairview, Frederic, Gaylord,
Good Hart, Grayling, Harbor Point, Indian River, Johannesburg, Lakes of the
North, Levering, Lewiston, Lovells, Luzerne, Mackinaw City, Mancelona, Mio,
Oden, Onaway, Pellston, Petoskey, Topinabee, Tower, Vanderbilt, Vienna Corners,
Waters, Wolverine
Deadline Monday Noon.
Place Classified ads on-line at
www.WeeklyChoice.com
20 cents/word, $2 minimum.
Notice to Readers: Typically, most advertising is honest and clear about special offers, however, please
be sure to read the contents thoroughly to avoid misrepresentation. Choice Publications does not war-
ranty the accuracy or reliability of content and does not accept any liability for injuries or damages
caused to the reader or advertiser that may result from content contained in this publication. Errors in
advertising should be reported immediately. Damage from
errors will not exceed the cost of the advertisement for one
issue. Choice Publication employees and family members
and listed advertisers’ employees and family members are
not eligible to win. Choice Publications reserves the right to
publish or refuse ads at their discretion.
IFPA AWARD
WINNING PAPER!
Association
of Free Community
Papers
Published by:
Choice Publications, Inc.
112 East Sixth Street, PO Box 382, Gaylord, MI 49734-0382
Phone: 989-732-8160 Fax: 888-854-7441
Publisher:
Dave Baragrey 1
Dave1@WeeklyChoice.com
General Manager:
Dave Baragrey 2
Dave2@WeeklyChoice.com
Cell Phone: 989-350-9233
Web Master:
Chad Baragrey
Chad@WeeklyChoice.com
Sports Editor:
Mike Dunn
Mike@WeeklyChoice.com
Sports:
Jeff Baragrey
Jeff@WeeklyChoice.com
News Editor:
Jim Akans
Jim@WeeklyChoice.com
SALES:
Phone: 989-732-8160
Terry Becks
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
Charles Jarman
Charles@WeeklyChoice.com
989-370-5361
Joan Swan
Swan@WeeklyChoice.com
989-732-2271
Barbara MacLaren
Barb@WeeklyChoice.com
Sharon Gardulski
Sharon@WeeklyChoice.com
989-826-1053
Area residents are urged to check
out this unique opportunity to meet
one-on-one with THR’s Treasure
Hunters Roadshow. Specialists are
on a world-wide treasure hunt and
will be digging in Gaylord this week.
The Roadshow will be held at the
Quality Inn on West Street in Gaylord
through Friday, January 27th, from 9
am until 6 pm, and from 9 am until 4
pm on Saturday, January 28th.
During this free event, 1,200 resi-
dents are expected to bring in their
rare and unusual collectibles! Each
will have a chance to talk to world-
renowned antique and collectible
representatives, and it’s all free!
What kind of treasures will be
revealed during our trip? Let’s find
out together. You or your next-door
neighbor just might be the next to
hit the jackpot. Keep an open mind
when going through your attic and
closets because something invalu-
able to you could turn out to be a
sure novelty piece. A recent find
includes a 1960’s vintage guitar pur-
chased at an event for $100,000!
Gaylord is the current stop on THR’s Treasure Hunters Roadshow world-
wide tour. During this event at the Quality Inn, our specialists are hoping to
see items such as: coins and paper currency issued prior to 1970, toys, dolls,
trains, vintage jewelry, old and modern musical instruments, war memora-
bilia, gold and silver jewelry,
costume jewelry, advertising
memorabilia, swords, knives,
daggers, and the unusual!
THR’s Treasure Hunters
Roadshow is a place where
anyone in the community
can connect with collectors
from around the globe. Our
treasure hunters make offers
based on rarity, collectability,
condition and market value.
If the price is right for you,
THR will pay you on the spot
with no hidden fees!
Don’t have an antique? No
problem, THR’s Treasure
Hunters Roadshow purchas-
es gold items too! If you have
mismatched earrings, bro-
ken necklaces or costume
jewelry, THR representatives
want to see it. We have the
resources to pay top dollar
for your gold and silver
items.
Have fun with your search!
You might be amazed by what you find, and ecstatic with what THR’s
Treasure Hunters Roadshow wants to pay you for it. THR specialists will
assess your items and there are no hidden fees! Make plans now to attend
this event at the Quality Inn.
The free, Treasure Hunters Roadshow will be held at the Quality Inn on West
Street in Gaylord through Friday, January 27th, from 9 am until 6 pm, and from
9 am until 4 pm on Saturday, January 28th.
Courtesy Photo
Courtesy Photo
CALL (989) 732-8160 FAX (888) 854-7441
EMAIL DAVE1@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM
LOCAL NEWS FROM NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Local News
Thursday, January 26, 2012 Local News Line (989) 732-8160
|s |t t|me to re-I|o|sh yo0r o|d pre-I|o|shed I|oors?
989-619-6347 989-732-0403
SAh0|h6 º F|h|Sh|h6 º h£w 08 0L0 º |hSTALLAT|0h º 0£0kS º 00ST 00hTA|hN£hT
Soec|a||z|ng |n |esto|at|on of o|d wood f|oo|s
£-Na||:
sta||ard@12k.com

ANTHONY
DELOHENZO

107 Howard St., Ste. A, Petoskey, MI 49770
(231) 622-7457 or (877) 318-6811
E-Mail: amdplc¸ameritech.net
Bankruptcy - Family Law - Real Estate Law
Probate Law - Estate Planning - Business Law
FREE Consultation
J and R
Snowplowing
989-983-4590
Gaylord, Wolverine &
Vanderbilt areas
24/7 Service
Wink
SaIon
(q8q) ¸¡¡-|¡oo
8±q W. Main · AIpine PIaza · GayIoid
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and speciaI oIIeis!!!
Suite C-2 (Former Diane's Carousel Location)
Page 4 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
seven Pink Ribbon Rides that take place
across the country each winter. Last year,
approximately $374,000 was raised from
these rides, with nearly $50,000 of that com-
ing from the Gaylord event. In the past three
years, over 900 men and women breast can-
cer patients have received assistance
through the efforts of these Pink Ribbon
Rider events. The money raised by Pink
Ribbon Riders goes directly to men and
women breast cancer patients to assist with
their personal bills, such as mortgage, home
energy, or medical bills.
Breast cancer has become the second
leading cancer-related cause of death among
women, and while much less common, men
are also at an increasing risk of contracting
the disease. Founded in 2005 by Jody McKay
and Alia Brown, in memory of their friend
Kelly Shire who passed away from breast
cancer, Pink Ribbon Riders is a multi-state
organization that holds fundraisers designed
to raise breast cancer awareness, and pro-
vide direct assistance to patients facing eco-
nomic challenges resulting from the disease.
Jody McKay notes that Pink Ribbon Riders
are among the top 30 finalists for a $40,000
Pink Well Challenge grant, sponsored by
author and world champion ballroom
dancer Lester Smith and television comedi-
enne Ellen DeGeneres,
both cancer survivors.
“We are competing
with some very large
organizations for this
wonderful grant,” notes
McKay. “We hope we
can encourage many
people to visit our website and cast their
vote for the Pink Ribbon Riders to receive
this grant. It is an opportunity that could do
so much in helping to move our organization
forward in our mission to promote breast
cancer awareness and raising funds for those
in need.”
The cost to attend the Pink Ribbon Riders
dinner and fundraiser this coming Friday
evening at the Eagles Hall in Gaylord is $30
per person. The event will begin at 8 pm
For additional information about the Snow
Run event and the Pink Ribbon Riders
organization, visit
www.pinkribbonriders.com
Italian Dinner continued...
Pink Ribbon continued...
During the
evening, live music
to dine by will be
played by members
of GACA’s
Performing Arts
Division throughout
the evening.
Excellent food and a
musical ambience to
enjoy on a wintry
Friday night…this is an event not to be missed!
The Homemade Italian Buffet Dinner will be held at St.
Mary Cathedral Parish Hall from 5 to7 pm. The price for this
buffet fundraiser is also quite tasty; just $12 for adults, $8 for
children 12 and under, and children 5 and under can eat for
free! Carry out will also be available.
For more information regarding GACA or the Italian
Dinner fundraiser call 732-3242 or visit www.gaylordarts.org.
Michigan Continued...
Chrysler, who in 2008 became the first U.S.
major automaker to file bankruptcy since
Studebaker in the 1930’s, posted the biggest
U.S. sales gain of all at 26 percent. General
Motors, who filed for bankruptcy in 2009,
saw an increase of 13 percent, and Ford, who
hung on during their downturn, was up 11
percent.
Last Friday, Reuter’s news service reported
that G.M. had regained its title as the world’s
top-selling automaker, with former leader,
Toyota, falling to the number three spot. To
accomplish this feat, the automaker sold
over 9 million vehicles worldwide last year.
These gains ultimately translate into jobs,
and The Center for Automotive Research
reports that demand has the current Big
Three workforce at near maximum capacity,
and 36,000 new manufacturing jobs are pre-
dicted to open up over the next three years.
That excitement was recently reflected in
the largest attendance since 2005 at this
year’s North American International Auto
Show held in Detroit from January 9th
through the 22nd. People are looking at, and
buying American cars again…and that’s
good news for Michigan.
The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics report-
ed that the Michigan unemployment rate
had fallen to 9.8-percent in November, the
lowest level in three years, after reaching a
high of 14-percent in July of 2009. Governor
Rick Snyder’s office recently announced that
the job growth in Michigan had outpaced
the national average in 2011, and that the
state anticipates a budget surplus of approxi-
mately $457 million.
Gaylord City Manager, Joseph P. Duff,
notes that business development in the
Gaylord area has been on the rise. “We have
seen marked improvement in our commer-
cial sector; with retailers reclaiming vacant
space with infill development, such as
occurred with Hobby Lobby recently.
Another positive sign is the rebuilding and
expansion of existing businesses, such as
Taco Bell in 2011 and Burger King on Main
Street has extensive construction plans for
2012.”
He adds, “Through our participation with
the Otsego County Economic Alliance we
learned that two businesses in our industrial
park that had experienced severe layoffs in
past years and are now going full ahead. So
there is an up tick in the manufacturing sec-
tor as well.”
Grayling City Manager, Doug Baum,
relates the city is also experiencing growth.
“In 2011 we had five new businesses open
up, and we have a couple new businesses
planning to start construction in the spring.
McDonald’s just went through a complete
interior face-lift and they plan to update the
exterior and landscaping in the spring. We
are also hearing many restaurant businesses
are doing well, and to me that is an indicator
that things are getting better as people tend
to cut back on dining out when the feel
money is tight.”
Governor Snyder’s second State of the
State address on January 18th called for
renewed focus on Michigan’s transportation
systems by investing in roads throughout the
state and regional transit in the southeastern
sector. The address also announced the
launching of Pure Michigan Fit; a collabora-
tive program with Gerber Products,
Michigan Grocers Association and Michigan
Health and Hospital Association, aimed at
providing nutritional information for parents
and caregivers, and the Governor vowed to
continue pursuing tax reform efforts
designed to promote job growth.
Even housing sales in Michigan, a highly
visible barometer of our state’s economic
troubles, are showing encouraging signs.
The Michigan Association of Realtors report-
ed that monthly home sales statistics in 2011
consistently outpaced 2010 levels. In
December, 8,495 single-family homes were
sold in the state, representing a nearly 8.5-
percent increase over December 2010 sales.
The 2011 year to date average sales price
clocked in at $107,568…surpassing both
2009 and 2010 levels.
Here in northern Michigan, sales in
Emmet County were up over 40-percent in
December as compared to December 2010.
For this same period, the Northeastern
Michigan Board of Realtors posted a 32-per-
cent gain in sales volume, the Antrim,
Charlevoix, Kalkaska Association saw a 34-
percent increase, and the Water Wonderland
Board of Realtors reported a 30-percent
increase.
Cheboygan City Manager, Dale A. Stuart,
states, “There are a number of good signs in
the economy and real estate market that
point toward more optimism for businesses
and individuals. There are more opportuni-
ties for entrepreneurs, which will give rise to
more businesses and more jobs in the future.
While the economy won’t turn over immedi-
ately, people are beginning to recognize the
opportunities that exist in our area, and that
leads to tremendous potential here in the
Northern Michigan.”
While these are certainly still tough times,
the boost Michigan is experiencing in the
automotive and housing sectors are pointing
toward a welcome light at the end of a dark
economic tunnel. Michigan may have reluc-
tantly led the journey into that tunnel sever-
al years ago, we may now very well be poised
to lead the way out.
Michigan is on the move.
Courtesy Photo
Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signs the Fiscal Year 2011-12 budget into law as
lawmakers look on. Pictured left to right: state Sens. Darwin Booher, Tonya
Schuitmaker, Bruce Caswell, John Pappageorge, Senate Appropriations Chair
Roger Kahn and Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville.
Kevin
Wescott
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2860 Kassuba Road, Gaylord, MI 49735
Let
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FREE
ESTIMATES
LOCAL NEWS
On-line at www.weeklychoice.com
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 5
By Jim Akans
Built to perform, built to last. It is a quality inherent in the
equipment designed and manufactured for military use.
Thanks to the folks at Pineview Military Surplus in Frederic,
these high quality items are also available for campers,
hunters, hikers, outdoor enthusiasts, and those who simply
enjoy well-crafted, durable goods.
Pineview Military Surplus current owners, Dan and
Christine Klatt, purchased the business back in 1997, after it
had already been in operation for about 17 years. The
approximately 2,000 square foot facility located in Frederic
on Old U.S. 27 North is an amazing wonderland for those
interested in just about any type of military surplus item.
The shop even includes a fascinating military museum, with
collections starting from the Revolutionary War era through
the current conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan
Christine Klatt states, “While the items in our museum
area are not for sale, they are amazing to see. What we do
offer in our store is all the Government Issue military surplus
items that we can find, some authentic new items, and even
some vintage items. Our inventory comes from government
auctions, from people who have retired from the military,
and we also buy new items from the same manufacturers
that supply the government with equipment.”
Highlights of those offerings included clothing and outer-
wear of just about every type; rain gear, head gear, boots,
hats, helmets, even women’s, children’s and infant clothing.
They also stock camping gear, web gear, backpacks, carry
bags, and chemical protection suits (a great alternative to
scent lock suits for hunters). Among the souvenir items in
the shop are military insignia and ribbons, medals, hatpins,
patches, decals, window stickers…the list of items goes on
and on.
The best way to see what is available is to stop by and take
a look! Pineview Military Surplus is located at 7328 Old US
27 North in Frederic. They are open Tuesday through
Sunday from 9 am to 7:30 pm. Check them out on Facebook
at Pineview Military Surplus, or call (989) 348-8300.
“Get your gear on”
at Pineview Military Surplus in Frederic
BOYNE ClTY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o 8esa|e
1158 S. M-75, Boyne City
231-582-5711
www.challengemtn.org
CHARLEvOlX
0oos|go 0es|go
100 Van Pelt Pl., Charlevoix
231-237-9773
www.consigndesign.net
CHARLEvOlX
8ergmaoo 0eoter 8esa|e Shop
8888 Ance Road
Charlevoix
231-547-9624
www.bergmanncenter.org
ke||y's Aot|g0es &
F0ro|t0re 8aro
06176 Old US 31 S.,
Charlevoix
231-547-0133
www.dkellyantiques.com
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
F0ro|t0re & Nore Store
6517 Center St.
Downtown Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
FREDERlC
P|oev|ew N|||tary S0rp|0s
7328 Old 27 North, Frederic
989-348-8300
GAYLORD
A-2-I 8esa|e
1829 Old 27 South, Gaylord
989-732-9500
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1361 Pineview Dr. (near Lowes)
Gaylord
989-705-1747
www.goodwillnmi.org
6reat 8ooms
00a||ty Pre-0woed F0ro|t0re
148 W. Main Street
Gaylord
989-745-5184
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
GAYLORD
Aoge|s at work
8esa|e
1523 S Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
989.448.8615
Veo0s & 8|0e Jeaos
340 West Main St..
Gaylord
989-731-2600
www.venusandbluejeans.com
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hew 8eg|oo|ogs Thr|It Shop
650 W Conway Rd.
Harbor Springs
231-348-2980
hab|tat Ior h0mao|ty 8estore
8460 M-119
Harbor Springs
231-347-8440
MANCELONA
Naoce|ooa Food Paotry
& 8esa|e Shop
201 N. Maple St., Mancelona
231-587-9606
MlO
Strawberry Patch
8eSa|e - 0oos|gomeot
Downtown Mio
989-826-1503
PETOSKEY
Nk8 0oos|gomeots
Clothing, Home
Furnishings, Décor
2010 Harbor-Petoskey Road
Petoskey
231-881-6130
www.MKRConsignments.com
PETOSKEY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o
8esa|e Shop
2429 US31 North,
Petoskey
231-348-3195
www.challengemtn.org
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1600 Anderson Road
Petoskey
231-348-6947
www.goodwillnmi.org
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In the Rough, Professionally Painted
or Completely Restored
Over 7,000 sq. ft. of Furniture, Antiques & Goodies
06176 Old U.S. 31 South, Charlevoix, MI 49720
E-Mail: donkellyantiques@yahoo.com
FURNITURE BARN
(231) 547-0133 • Cell (231) 881-0353
Web: dkellyantiques.com
CUSTOM & ANTIQUE
FURNITURE
H I D D E N T R E A S U R E S
here are
the terrific
kids from
south
Maple
elementary
school for
the week
ending
1-13-12
Back row: Ivan Petrucci, Alex Pelkey, Gary Hall, Sierra McMichael, Abby Bysiorek,
Cameron Cosby. Middle row: Weston Knepper, Will Bethuy, Chloe Boynton, Elise Book,
Zoey Cupps, Taylor Mills, Aden Saleh. Front row: Landon Deardorff, Callie Atkins,
Ryan Kargela, Grace Hall, Kole Putnam
here are
this
weeks
terrific
kids
from
north
ohio
elementary
Front Row: Adam Monusko; MacKenzie Day; Ana Fortier; Meghan Keen;
Nevaeh Millsap; Catrina Johnson; Sierra Keskine; Ethan Murphy;
Rebecca Olds. Back Row: Caleb Clemens; Jarred Young; Paige Ashley; Carter Sanders;
Nastassia Morrow; Anthony Knoellinger; Kelsyn Lundell;
Kiwanian, Mr. Chuck Bump
All kids are terrific and here at South Maple Elementary and North Ohio Elementary we are acknowledging kids for good
character. The Kiwanis club of Otsego County is helping us with this endeavor. Students who exhibit good behavior by fol-
lowing our school rules will be recognized by staff for doing so. One student per class will be selected to receive a “Terrific Kid”
award, button, and pencil. The student names will be announced on our morning announcements. They will also have their
picture taken to hang on our “Terrific Kid” bulletin board. This is an excellent opportunity for staff, students, parents and the
community to connect on a social/emotional level because good character is just as important as good grades!
Thanks to the folks at Pineview Military Surplus in Frederic, high quality, military grade items are available for
campers, hunters, hikers, outdoor enthusiasts, and those who simply enjoy well-crafted, durable goods.
David
Volkenborn,
of Higgins
Lake,
received 5-
year service
award from
Springs
Window
Fashions on
Wednesday.
Courtesy Photo
At an all-associate meeting last week,
plant leaders of Springs Window Fashions
in Grayling presented a service award to
David Volkenborn, for completing five years
at the Grayling window treatment manufac-
turer.
Mr. Volkenborn is a Higgins Lake area res-
ident and began working for the wood pro-
cessing operation in January 2007. He is
one of the plant’s four maintenance techni-
cians.
Plant Manager Dan Heinz congratulated
Volkenborn on reaching his milestone,
“Dave brings some very helpful experience
to our operations, and has been a steady
contributor to the success of our opera-
tions. His reliability and flexibility are
much appreciated. We look forward to his
continued team work as our products com-
pete in the global marketplace.”
Springs Window Fashions, LLC, manufac-
tures and assembles window treatments
and interior shutters under various brand
names, including; Bali, Graber, and Nanik,
in six locations in the U.S. and Mexico. The
Grayling plant produces unfinished wood
window blind and interior shutter compo-
nents with 90 associates.
David Volkenborn
Reaches Five Years at
Springs Window Fashions
Photo by Dan klatt
TERRIFIC
KIDS
Local.
Service-
Minded.
Call today for a FREE
Estimate.
Arrow Sanitation
(989) 732-4243
Page 6 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Advertising funds the Weekly
Choice
We love to run community
announcements and news
releases about all the things
happening in Northern
Michigan in the Weekly
Choice. We help publicize
hundreds of events and
activities all across our area.
Readers love the fact that the
Weekly Choice is distributed
free to hundreds of locations.
However, it is expensive to
publish this newspaper each
week filled with positive
news and sports. Our only
source of revenue comes
from advertising. If your
business or organization has
an advertising budget, be
sure to include the Weekly
Choice in your plans. Our
advertising rates are far less
than most other papers and
your message will reach
readers all across Northern
Michigan. The Weekly Choice
is distributed free of charge
on news stands to 40 towns
including Gaylord, Petoskey,
Cheboygan, Grayling, Indian
River, Onaway, Mio,
Lewiston, Mancelona and all
surrounding towns. Contact
us at
Office@WeeklyChoice.com
or call 989-732-8160.
PETOSKEY
NCMC Family fun
nights
The North Central Michigan
College gym and fitness cen-
ter is offering family fun
nights on Wednesdays,
January 25, February 29 and
March 21 from 5 p.m. until 7
p.m. Dinner and activities
will be in the Student and
Community Resource Center
gymnasium on the Petoskey
campus. Activities will
include soccer, basketball,
volleyball and Eclipse Ball.
There will be appropriate
toys and tumbling mats for
toddlers and an obstacle
course for children ages 7 to
11. The fitness staff will be
available to help parents and
their children with all activi-
ties. Participants should wear
suitable gym clothing and
clean, dry shoes. Cost is $5
per family and includes all
activities and a light dinner
of chili or soup, crackers and
bread, and applesauce. For
families who wish to partici-
pate in games and activities
only, the cost is $3 per family.
Coffee and hot chocolate will
also be for sale. For more
information, call 231-439-
6370.
GAYLORD
Bring a bottle of wine
January 26. Join the Otsego
County United Way at
Treetops Resort from 6-
9:30pm. Bring a bottle of
wine or a 6 pack of craft beer
(microbrew), purchase raffle
tickets at the event and you
may go home with enough
wine to fill a cellar!
CHEBOYGAN
Business After Hours
Join us at Fernelius Toyota
Chrysler Dodge in
Cheboygan for a Business
After Hours on Thursday,
January 26th from 5:30 - 7:30
PM. See the new facility and
showroom and enjoy hors
d'oeuvres, drinks, a 50/50,
door prizes, and networking!
Admission is $5 for Chamber
members, $7 for non-mem-
bers. For more information
or to RSVP, please call the
Chamber at 231-627-7183.
GAYLORD
Bus trip to Detroit
Arts Institute
The Gaylord Area Council for
the Arts will be sponsoring a
one day bus trip to the
Detroit Arts Institute on
January 26. The latest exhibit
at the Detroit Arts Institute is
"Rembrandt and the Face of
Jesus" The cost is $75, which
includes the bus, a lecture
from a museum curator and
lunch at the arts institute. For
more information or to sign
up, call 989-732-3242 or stop
into the GACA building locat-
ed at 125 E. Main Street.
Space is limited.
GRAYLING
Photography Seminar
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center would like to
invite you to a short seminar
in Photographic
Composition. This short
seminar will show you how to
take more interesting photos
no matter what kind of cam-
era you use. Ken Wright will
provide you with suggestions
to help make your photo-
graphic images stand out.
Join us at the Senior Center
on Thursday, January 26 at
1pm for lots of tips and tricks
for taking better photo-
graphs. It is provided free of
charge to all seniors by Main
Branch Gallery Inc. The
Senior Center is located at
308 Lawndale.
GAYLORD
Free Weight Loss
Seminar
If you are serious about los-
ing weight or have concerns
about; Lack of energy, low
metabolism, emotional eat-
ing, sugar addictions, food
allergies, yo-yo dieting, crav-
ings, or you’re just not happy
with your body shape/size,
Then you must attend this
very informative presenta-
tion on Thursday, January
26th from 6:30pm to 7:30pm
at the Gaylord Alpine Lodge
(next to Glen’s
Market).Seating is limited for
this free seminar so, please
call or email to reserve your
spot today!
dave@DTWeberHypnothera
py.com or (989) 619-4395 /
Dr. Noelle Deitz (989) 370-
6204. Drawings for free gifts
will be held after the presen-
tation.
CHEBOYGAN
Humane Society Soup
Supper
Delicious homemade soups,
bread, desserts, and bever-
ages. Inverness Township
Hall, VFW Rd. Jan 27, 4–7pm.
Adults: $7, children 12 and
under $5. Takeouts are avail-
able. For more information,
call (231) 238-8221
GAYLORD
Reach Out
The Blue Devil Hockey
Program REACH OUT
Fundraiser Game is on
Friday, January 27. We are
raising money to help Otsego
Memorial Hospital fund a
new program, the
Mammography Assistance
Fund. All funds raised will be
used to help Otsego County
Women who under or unin-
sured in receiving a mammo-
gram to detect and prevent
breast cancer. I'm hoping
you would be able to add our
information to the Sport sec-
tion as well as write up an
article about our event, when
it gets closer to game day. I
have attached a sponsor
sheet that will give you
details and we can send a
picture of the captains in
their pink sponsor jerseys.
Christie Purdue, OMH
Marketing Director, has been
working to develop the
Mammography Assistance
Fund. She would be the per-
son to talk to for more infor-
mation about this great pro-
gram.
PETOSKEY
Swing Dance Series
with the Up North Big Band
in the North Central
Michigan College Cafeteria
Room. Jan. 27, 7:30pm.
Beginners are welcome.
Instruction starts at 6:45pm.
Dances are $10/ adult, $5 /
Under 18 and free under 5.
INDIAN RIVER
Winterfest
Lots of fun in will take place
January 27th-29th.
CHEBOYGAN
Kiwanis Sport Fishing
Dinner
January 28th at the K of C
Hall in Cheboygan at 5:00
PM. Prime Rib, Chicken, and
Lasagna, and a cash bar.
Over 100 door prizes and a
super raffle prize! Tickets are
$30 each and include a door
prize ticket. Limit 300 tick-
ets. Tickets are available
from any Kiwanis member,
or at Brandt's Sports Center,
BKC Insurance, or by calling
Pete (627-5143), Ben (627-
7451), or Fabian (625-8201).
GAYLORD
Treasure Hunters
roadshow
If you own an antique or col-
lectible and are interested in
selling it, go to Treasure
Hunters roadshow now thru
Jan. 28 at the Quality Inn near
I-75 exit 282. Buyers are anx-
ious to meet with you. Tues.-
Fri. 9-6. Sat. 9-4.
CHARLEVOIX
Winter carnival exhibit
A juried all media exhibit will
open on January 28 and run
through February 29 at the
Charlevoix Circle of Arts at
109 Clinton St. Juror is Nancy
Swan Drew, nationally
known artist who has been
featured on Home and
Garden, Television and
countless magazines and
newspapers. Artists featured
in this exciting show: A few of
the well known artists in this
show include: Sue Bolt,
Kathie Briggs, Linda boss,
Chris Leese, Margie Guyot,
Jeannie Putman, Karen
Kimmel, Mike Schlitt,
Beverly White, Lisa Galloway,
Rob Maxwell, Jay and Glenna
Haney, Jordan Valley
Glassworks. Please join us for
Opening Reception on
January 28 at 5:00 to 7:00 PM
at the Charlevoix Circle of
Arts.109 Clinton Street, 231-
547-3554. Light
Refreshments will be served.
Please join us for this exciting
exhibit. Enjoy the spirit of
Winter Carnival. For addi-
tional information please
check CCA website at
charlevoixcircle.org
ATLANTA
Sno drift Rally
National & Regional
Championship Event
January 28 & 29
INDIAN RIVER
Sprint Sled Dog Race
January 28th and 29th
behind the Hometown Inn.
Sprint Races: 8 Dog - 8.1
miles, 6 Dog -6 dog registered
breed, 6 dog sport-6.1 miles,
4 dog - 4 dog registered
breed, 4 dog sport - 4.1 miles,
3 Dog Junior 4.1 miles, 2 Dog
Junior 1 mile, 1 Dog Junior
100 yards, Skijoring 2 Dog
Skijoring 4.1 miles
GRAYLING
Snowshoe Lacing
Workshops
January 28-29 – 9am-4pm
and February 25-26 – 9am-
4pm at Hartwick Pines State
Park. A 2-day workshop
teaching you how to lace
your own pair of wooden
snowshoes with nylon lacing
(when varnished, the lacing
looks like traditional
rawhide). Fee & registration
required. For more informa-
tion, please call 989-348-
2537 or e-mail Rob Burg at
burgr@michigan.gov to
receive a registration packet.
GAYLORD
Craft show
Charity Event to raise money
for Scholarships for local
youth. Several Vendors fea-
turing Homemade Crafts,
Homemade treats, In-Home
sales, and Flea Market items.
You have to come see it to
believe it. Jan. 28, 9am – 4pm
at the Northland Sportmen’s
Club, Old Alba Road.
GAYLORD
Card Trick Quilt Class
Delphine’s Quilt Shop will
have a Card Trick Quilt Class
January 31 from 10am-1pm;
call 989-732-1252 to register.
PETOSKEY
Cooking class
Tuesdays through March 27,
Crooked Tree Arts Center will
host cooking classes with
chefs from around the area.
As a special treat to start the
culinary arts series, CTAC
board member and art
patron Ermy Bonfield will
demonstrate how to make
her famous Italian Risotto on
January 31. Following in the
culinary series will be the
New York Restaurant on
February 7, Whitecaps on
February 21, Toski Sands on
February 28, Café Santé on
March 6, the Twisted Olive on
March 13, Thai Orchid on
March 20, and wrapping up
the series on March 27 with
Lake Street Market. For more
information on these classes
or other programs offered at
Crooked Tree Art Center go
online to
www.crookedtree.org or call
the arts center at 231-347-
4337.
GAYLORD
Donate personal care
items
When a child is removed
from their home and is
placed in foster care, it is a
difficult and stressful time for
parents, children and case-
workers and often the per-
sonal items that they need
are not gathered. At
Lutheran Child and Service
of Michigan we are currently
receiving donation for per-
sonal items for our foster
children. Items needed are:
shampoo, conditioner,
deodorant, hairbrush, femi-
nine hygiene products,
comb, toothpaste, tooth-
brush, hairspray, make-up
(for teens), diaper wipes(for
babies), socks, undergar-
ments, activity books, mark-
ers, crayons, etc. Items can
be sample size or full sized. If
you would like to donate
please contact Darla at 989-
732-1040 or dedwards@lcfs-
mi.org.
GAYLORD
AlpenFROST
The First Annual
AlpenFROST is scheduled to
take place February 9th –
12th; many local businesses
and organizations are com-
ing together for this event
and there is still time to be a
part of all the fun. Go to
www.gaylordalpenfrost.com
for more information on how
you can help make this event
one to remember!
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Free Safety
Ergonomics Training
Available to Health
Workers
North Central Michigan
College recently received a
grant from the State of
Michigan to provide free
Ergonomics Safety training
to help long-term care facili-
ties in Northern Michigan
improve worker safety and
lower the cost of incidents.
The college will provide free
customized Ergonomic
Safety training at locations
and schedules most conven-
ient to the workers. The col-
lege will bring instructors
and materials to worksites in
Emmet, Charlevoix,
Cheboygan, Otsego and Luce
counties to train more than
300 long-term health care
employees. The program
runs through September
2012 with training scheduled
on demand. There is no
charge to the facility or the
workers for this instruction.
Please call Thomas Nathe,
Director of Corporate and
Community Education (for-
merly Institute for Business &
Industry Training) at 231-
348-6613 or Helen
Leithauser, Business Training
Coordinator, at 231-348-6705
for more information.
GRAYLING
Deliverable Fuels
Assistance
NEMCSA (Northeast
Michigan Community
Service Agency) has money
available to assist low-
income families with the
delivery of fuels such as
propane, fuel oil and fire-
wood. There are guidelines
which must be followed.
Crawford County residents
who think they might qualify
should contact Beth at 1-866-
270-0687 for prescreening. If
applicants meet all eligibility
requirements, an application
will be mailed or faxed at the
customer’s request. All appli-
cations are on a first come-
first served basis.
Ace Hardware
Old 27 South
Gaylord
Johnson Tire Center
502 S. Otsego Ave.
Gaylord • 732-2451
Vanderbilt BP
8371 Mill St.
Vanderbilt





Mary Welsh, Master Stylist
27 years experience
Hours: Tuesday through Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday by Appointment
5517 Old 27 South, Gaylord
989.619.3029
Come see me at
The View Hair Salon
~ SPECIAL ~
Make an appointment with Mary Welsh and
receive $5.00 Off your haircut or
$10.00 off any chemical service.
PATRICK
KWIATKOWSKI
& HESSELINK PLLC
•Appeals
•Criminal
•Family Law
•Personal Injury
•Real Estate Law
•Estate Planning
•Corporate
•Government
1262 S. Otsego Ave. • Gaylord 989-732-5952
www.pklawfirm.com
\\\N


PKH
Law Firm
NEMCSA - TEFAP (The Emergency Food Assistance Program)
USDA is an equal opportunity provider
Distribution: February 15th, 2012
10:30 - 1pm at The United Way Building
Must Have - Michigan Driver’s license or State ID card
with current address
USDA Quarterly Surplus Food Distribution
For Low-Income Families and Seniors
Clients and proxy’s only
need to sign day of pick up.
NEMSCA 989-358-4700
No Need to pre-apply:
Only ONE application per household!
If you have questions, or need more information, please contact:
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 7
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
PETOSKEY
Reader’s Theatre
The Petoskey District Library
will continue to offer its
Reader's Theatre programs
for elementary-aged kids and
teens. The elementary group
will meet from 5:30pm to
6:30pm on Mondays and the
teen group will meet at the
same time on Tuesdays. Both
programs will take place in
the Children’s program room
at the library. Reader’s
Theatre is a legitimate form
of drama with actors using
their voices and upper bod-
ies to convey various roles in
a script through reading to
an audience. It differs from a
play in that parts or roles are
read rather than memorized.
Actors usually stand behind
lecterns or music stands and
use techniques such as vocal
and facial expressions as well
as hand and arm move-
ments. Small hand props
may be used as well. Reader’s
Theater builds reading confi-
dence, helps readers learn to
read with expression, pro-
motes reading fluency, and,
it’s fun.
PETOSKEY
Michigan Global
Awareness
Consortium Lecture
Feb. 2. Beijing and Beyond:
Building Lasting
Connections in China Jim
and Mary Backlund, Gaylord
educators, have visited,
taught, worked, and studied
in Beijing. This spring, they
will return to China to accept
teaching positions and to
work to expand the faculty
and student opportunities in
China. Come and learn about
their experiences in China,
their plans for the future, and
ways you can connect. Jim is
a psychology professor at
Kirtland Community College.
Mary is an author, teacher
and artist working with
North Central Michigan
College. 12:00 p.m. Library
Conference Room 1-2 Free
No reservations required
GAYLORD
Volunteerism
The Otsego County
Commission on Aging is
hosting a breakfast Feb. 2,
9am at the University Center.
Suggested donation, $5.
RSVP to OCCOA, 989-732-1122.
GAYLORD
Good morning Gaylord
Enjoy breakfast & hear about
the Otsego Wildlife Legacy
Society at Good Morning
Gaylord on Feb. 3, 8am at
Wisconsin St. hall, 610 S.
Wisconsin. Admission $10
for chamber members, $15
non-members includes
breakfast buffet.
GAYLORD
Italian Buffet
February 3 the Gaylord Area
Council for the Arts will hold
an Italian Buffet Dinner to
benefit the performing arts
from 5-7pm at the St. Mary’s
Cathedral Parish Hall.
MANCELONA
White Pine Stampede
Skiers get ready, Michigan’s
longest-running point-to-
point cross country ski race,
the White Pine Stampede,
will take place on Saturday,
February 4. The 36th annual
race will feature a 40K, a 20K
and a 10K with all races start-
ing at the Mancelona High
School. The 20K and 10K will
end at Schuss Village and the
40K concludes at the Summit
at Shanty Creek. All races fea-
ture both classic and
freestyle classifications.
NORTHERN MICHIGAN
Call for Artists
VSA Michigan, Northeast is
looking for artists interested
in participating in Artist-In-
Residency programs in the
COP-ESD classrooms. A pro-
fessional training workshop
will be held early in February
(date to be announced), free
of charge to the artists, prior
to scheduling classroom resi-
dencies. Classes will cover
the Cheboygan, Otsego,
Presque School District, K-
12. Any teachers with inclu-
sive classrooms, interested in
participating in the residency
program are also welcome to
contact VSA Michigan,
Northeast, Joann P Leal 231-
436-5626.
CHEBOYGAN
Dad/Daughter dance
On Saturday February 4th
from 6 to 8pm, there will be a
dad-daughter Valentine’s Day
Dance at Bishop Baraga
Catholic School. Admission
is $7 per person in advance,
$8 per person at the door.
Admission includes pizza,
pop, dessert, and a photo-
graph of each “couple”. The
event will feature a DJ pro-
viding music for dancing.
There will also be games. The
event is sponsored by the
School’s sixth grade students
who are raising money for
their trip to Washington, D.C.
Advance tickets can be
obtained from the school
office at 623 W. Lincoln Ave.
in Cheboygan.
PETOSKEY
Old Time Country
Dance
Blissfest Old Time Country
Dance at the Carnegie
Building, Feb. 4, 7:30 pm. The
Country Dance Series is a
great way to experience an
evening of old-Time fun for
the whole family. All dances
are taught and there is a live
band and caller. The Blissfest
Music Organization contin-
ues to present this series as
part of our commitment to
sharing cultural heritage and
providing a great way to
socialize like folks used to do.
INDIAN RIVER
Spaghetti dinner
Feb. 5. Cochran-Roberts VFW
Post7439 is hosting an all you
can eat Spaghetti Dinner at
the VFW Hall. From 5pm -
7pm $7 adults, $5 for stu-
dents, $3 for children ages 6-
12, and children 5 and under
are free. All proceeds go to
the Inland Lakes Band for
new uniforms.
INDIAN RIVER
Pancake breakfast
Feb. 5. Knights of Columbus
All You Can Eat Breakfast.
8am - 12pm at The Cross in
the Woods Family Center.
Breakfast includes: Pancakes,
sausage, ham, hash browns,
eggs, toast, fruit, orange
juice, coffee, tea and milk.
Adults $7.00 Children under
12 $2.00
PETOSKEY
Women's club meet
Michelle Schwartz, Program
Coordinator of the VitalCare
Adult Day Center, joins the
Women’s Club for luncheon
on Feb. 8, for a discussion of
the Center and the services it
provides to its clients and the
community. Now located
across from Northern
Michigan Regional Hospital
at 525 West Mitchell St., the
Center was formerly known
as The Living Room and in
early 2011 came under the
umbrella of VitalCare, an
affiliate of Northern
Michigan Regional Health
System. The luncheon meet-
ing will be held at 11:30am in
The Reycraft Room, Perry
Hotel. Cost of the program
and luncheon is $15. Please
RSVP to Betty Tufts at 231-
347-7433 by Monday, Feb. 6.
GAYLORD
Business after hours
Business After Hours will be
held on Wednesday, February
8th and will be sponsored
and hosted by Dynamic
Physical Therapy. This event
will be held from 5-7pm. The
cost is $5 for Chamber
Members & $10 for non-
members & is a great oppor-
tunity network with fellow
business professionals.
GRAYLING
Pancake breakfast
The Grayling Lions Club
announces that the second
annual Pancake Breakfast
will be held on Saturday,
February 11 at the American
Legion Hall, 106 S. James St.
from 8 am to 1 pm.
Donations accepted at the
door. All funds raised will be
used to support programs in
the community. The menu
includes pancakes, scram-
bled eggs, sausage, coffee,
juice, and milk. A huge silent
auction will be available and
a list of items will be pub-
lished the week prior to the
event. A 50-50 drawing will
be held and door prizes will
be awarded.
PETOSKEY
Nursing info
North Central Michigan
College’s nursing faculty will
hold informational sessions
on Wednesdays, February 15
and March 14, at 4:15 p.m.
until 5:30 p.m. to explain the
process for admission into
the college’s highly competi-
tive nursing program and the
courses that students must
take prior to entry.
GRAYLING
Free Divorce Clinic
The 46th Judicial Circuit Bar
Association, Legal Services of
Northern Michigan and River
House Women’s Shelter will
hold free monthly divorce
clinics open to community
members who cannot afford
to hire an attorney and are
representing themselves.
Clinic locations will alternate
between Otsego and
Crawford Counties. The clin-
ics in Crawford County are
held at the Crawford County
Courthouse on, Feb. 16,
5:30pm.
GRAYLING
S.A.F.E. Series: First
Aid Basics
The Commission on Aging
and Senior Center presents
the second in a series of safe-
ty topics for seniors. Matt
Larson of Mobile Medical
Response presents The
Basics of First Aid. How do
you handle a burn? If some-
one is bleeding, what can I do
to help? Many people are not
certain of what to do in
emergency situations.
Larson has been a paramedic
for 9 years and an Instructor
Coordinator for 5 of those
years. This free presentation
will be on Feb. 16 at 11am at
the Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center, 308 Lawndale
St. Join us for a pork roast
lunch at Noon after the pres-
entation. People 60 and over
eat for a suggested donation
of $2.50. Those under 60 can
eat for a cost of $4.75. For
additional information call
989-348-7123.
GRAYLING
Valentine Dinner
The Community is invited to
attend a Valentine’s Day
Dinner on Feb. 16 from 4-
6pm. Menu includes Baked
Meatloaf, Mashed Potatoes &
Gravy, Succotash Corn Blend,
Pineapple & Cherries and
Strawberry Shortcake. The
meal is only $4.75 per person
with a suggested donation of
$2.50 for people over 60.
Dinner is open to the public
and no reservations are
required. The Crawford
County Commission on
Aging & Senior Center is
located at 308 Lawndale
Street. For more information
call 989-348-7123.
CHEBOYGAN
Walk for Warmth
The need for heating assis-
tance in Cheboygan County
is tremendous! In an effort to
stave off utility shut-off
notices for area residents,
caring members of the com-
munity have participated in
Cheboygan Counties "Walk
for Warmth" for the past two
years, raising more than
$20,000. On Saturday,
February 18th the third
annual walk will take place
from 10am-2pm. The walk
will begin and end at the
Cheboygan Youth Center.
Please consider joining us as
we walk the streets of down-
town Cheboygan. Won't you
experience a little "cold" with
us so that we might stay
"warm"? Please call 231-627-
2288 for more info.
TOPINABEE
Big Chill
Feb. 18. Big Chill in
Topinabee. Family event held
on Mullett Lake. Activities
include: ice skating, food,
children's games, fishing and
snowmobiling.
PETOSKEY
Miss Tess
Miss Tess and the Bon Ton
Parade - Crooked Tree Arts
Center, Feb. 18, 8 pm. Shows
are $15 advance / $10 mem-
bers advance, $20/$15 door,
$20/$15 reserved, students ½
price. Advanced tickets avail-
able at Crooked Tree, Grain
Train, Petoskey Chamber and
Blissfest.
GRAYLING
Protecting Yourself
from Fraud
The Crawford County
Commission on Aging and
Senior Center is hosting an
evening presentation to
assist seniors in protecting
themselves from fraud.
Detective Sgt. John
Wybraniec of the
Roscommon County Sheriff
Department will focus on the
topics of why seniors are tar-
geted, how to recognize sen-
ior scams, how to protect
yourself from fraud and what
to do if you are a victim. This
free presentation will be at
6pm on Feb. 22 at the
Crawford County
Commission on Aging &
Senior Center, 308 Lawndale
St. Join us for a marinated
chicken dinner at 5pm prior
to the presentation. People
60 and over eat for a suggest-
ed donation of $2.50. Those
under 60 can eat for a cost of
$4.75. For additional infor-
mation call 989-348-7123.
GAYLORD
Awards banquet
The Gaylord Area Chamber
of Commerce will hold its
Annual Awards Banquet
February 23, at Otsego Club
& Resort. Over two hundred
people are expected to
attend this popular event
sponsored by Blue Cross Blue
Shield of Michigan. Local
community members, busi-
nesses, and organizations are
celebrated for excellence in
the Gaylord area with the fol-
lowing awards being present-
ed:
* Gordon G. Everett
Memorial Bell Tower Award
* You Made It Happen Award
* Chamber Volunteer of the
Year
* Chamber Ambassador of
the Year Award
* Chairman's Award
* Golden Pineapple Award
* Daune Weiss Memorial -
Businessperson of the Year
Award
Ticket are $30 each and are
available at the Chamber's
Main Street office in Gaylord
or by calling (989) 732-6333
now through February 16,
2012. The event will feature a
hospitality hour sponsored
by Paxton Resources, dinner,
awards banquet sponsored
by Independent Bank and
speaker. For more informa-
tion, please contact the
Gaylord Area Chamber at
989-732-6333.
P.O. Box 1064 · Gaylord, MI 49734
David
Cell (989) 217-1712
Dan
(989) 448-1942
(989) 732-8050
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Where your pet is treated with respect and dignity.
Page 8 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
Preschool recruitment for chil-
dren ages 3-4 for the 2012-2013
school year is underway and sev-
eral agencies have teamed up to
recruit children for free pre-
school programs in the area.
Preschool programs in the area
are available through the
Northwest Michigan Community
Action Agency Head Start, the
Little Traverse Bay Bands of
Odawa Indians Head Start, the
Women’s Resource Center Project
Free, and the Charlevoix-Emmet
ISD Be-Four Programs, Great
Start Readiness Programs and
Preschool Partners.
Studies show that children who
attend preschool programs are
more likely to become better
readers than children who never
attend preschool programs. In
addition, preschool programs
build character in children
through praise and encourage-
ment.
Families with children of all
abilities are urged to apply. To
register for free preschool for
their child, parents must sched-
ule an appointment by calling
1.800.443.5518.
Free preschool
programs available
for 3-4 year olds
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
54 Northern Michigan residents join
“March for Life” in Washington D.C.
NCMC Hosts Community
Financial Aid Night
Fifty-four men, women and students filled
a chartered bus last Sunday afternoon,
departing from the Calvary Baptist Church
parking lot in Gaylord and bound on a “red-
eye” trip to Washington D.C. The group,
comprised of members from the Gaylord
chapter of Right to Life Michigan, as well as
members from surrounding areas, made the
fourteen-hour trek to take part in the 39th
annual March for Life on Monday, January
23rd, the anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade
decision. The Northern Michigan group
joined thousands of pro-life supporters from
across the country for a walk through the
streets of our nation’s capital, ending at the
steps of the Supreme Court building.
Financial aid for college will be the topic of a free pro-
gram at North Central Michigan College on Tuesday,
January 31. North Central’s financial aid office is hosting
the program as a community service for parents and
students attending or planning to attend any college or
university. The program will take place from 7 p.m. until
8:30 p.m. in the college library on the Petoskey campus.
The program will include an explanation of the cate-
gories, types and sources of financial aid, the cost of
attending college, expected family contributions, the
free application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
and scholarship searches.
For more information on the program, contact
Virginia Panoff, North Central’s director of financial
aid at 231-348-6698.
North Central Michigan College is an open-door
community college based in Petoskey. Through its
University Center partnerships, students can take
courses leading to certificates, bachelor’s and mas-
ter’s degrees from participating universities. North
Central’s Corporate and Community Education
offers non-credit job skills training tailored to meet
individual needs. In addition to its main campus in
Petoskey, North Central offers classes, academic
advising, testing and other services in Cheboygan,
Gaylord and East Jordan.
FOCUS ON THE FAMILY
WITHHOLDING DESSERT
WON'T CHANGE
DAUGHTER'S BEHAVIOR
with Jim Daly and Dr. Juli Slattery
Q: We have a 7-year-old daughter
who has started stealing sweets
from the kitchen. This is new
behavior, and we're at a loss about
discipline for her. She's already lost
all of her dessert privileges. What
else can we do?
Juli: One of the things that may be
complicating your response to your
daughter's sweet tooth is that there
are really two different parenting
issues to deal with. The more obvi-
ous issue is your concern about
your daughter's diet. It's natural for
kids to crave sugary snacks. At 7,
your daughter doesn't have the self-
control or maturity to limit her
intake of unhealthy food. I wouldn't
overreact to her desire to eat sweets.
Food can easily become a control
issue, which can become a precur-
sor for disordered eating in the
future. Just be sure that you are
modeling moderation in your own
diet.
The more serious issue involving
your daughter's behavior is trust.
Sneaking is a form of deception.
That's a big deal. Rather than scold-
ing your daughter about the sweets,
I would talk seriously with her about
trust in your relationship. Explain to
her that if she wants something to
eat, all she has to do is ask. Even
though you may sometimes say
"no" when she asks for a doughnut
right before dinner, assure her that
you will be sensitive to her needs.
Instead of disciplining her behav-
ior with no dessert, which empha-
sizes the food issue, consider a con-
sequence that has more to do with
building trust in your relationship.
** ** **
Q: Can you suggest some ways I
can connect with my daughter? It's
one of my goals for the New Year.
She has a good relationship with
her mom because they're interest-
ed in the same "girl stuff." But
she's just about to reach the teen
years, and I want her to have a
strong bond with her dad, too,
especially before she starts dating.
Jim: I can't think of a more worth-
while New Year's resolution! Generally
speaking, the most effective thing you
can do to strengthen ties with your
daughter is to make (BEGIN
ITALS)time(END ITALS) for her -- in
both quality and quantity. According to
my friend, Dr. Kevin Leman, the bond
fathers develop with their daughters
during times of real conversation and
connection can pay huge dividends.
This is especially true for girls in the
"tween" years. Dr. Leman advises that
dads with daughters in this age group
(BEGIN ITALS)date(END ITALS) them
on a regular basis. Showing your daugh-
ter that she's a high priority is essential
for many reasons. For one thing, it will
help her seek out men who will respect
her later in life. Affirming your daugh-
ter's femininity and treating her special
says to her, "Honey, seek out someone
who will treat you right." In other words,
if you can demonstrate for your daugh-
ter what a true gentleman is like --
someone who honors her, respects her
and values her -- she'll be more likely to
gravitate toward men like that when she
enters the dating world.
On a regular basis, make an effort to
take your daughter out to dinner, a
movie, a round of miniature golf -- or
whatever interests her. I know it's tough,
especially when you're likely working
full time and you also need to make
room on your calendar to date your
wife. But it's so important. The invest-
ment you make in your daughter now
will impact her for the rest of
her life.
** ** **
Jim Daly is president of Focus on
the Family, host of the Focus on the
Family radio program, and a hus-
band and father of two.
Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psy-
chologist, co-host of Focus on the
Family, author of several books,
and a wife and mother of three.
Submit your questions to:
ask@FocusOnTheFamily.com
Copyright 2011
Focus on the Family,
Colorado Springs, CO 80995
International Copyright
Secured. All Rights reserved.
Distributed by Universal Uclick
1130 Walnut St.
Kansas City, MO 64106;
(816) 581-7500
This feature may not by repro-
duced or distributed electronically,
in print or otherwise without writ-
ten permission of Focus on the
Family.
This good news for Your family brought to
you by Family Comfort Systems
For more good news about Your family's health contact us.
Kevin Westcott
989-732-8099

Ask about our
Senior Discount
Johannesburg, MI
Ph. 989-732-6122
Cell 989-390-1404
ONLINE:
dowkermech.com
Are you ready
for winter?
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Fall Clean & Check
Maintenance Service!
Clark Dowker
Mechanical Contractor, Boiler Installer
STATE LICENSED & FULLY INSURED
• Weil McLain & Buderus Boilers
• Heil & Fraser-Johnston
High Efficiency Furnaces and AC
• Bosch Geothermal Heat Pumps
Fred Stempky
11512 N. Straits Hwy.
Cheboygan
231-627-9061
fstempk@fbinsmi.com
FarmBureauInsurance.com
Your local agent insures your
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– OPEN TO THE PUBLIC –
S




January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 9
You’ve no doubt heard that “time is
money.” While this expression may be
applicable in many areas of life, it’s
especially relevant for investors —
because the more time you spend not
investing, the less money you are likely
to have when you really need it, such as
during your retirement. That’s why it’s
essential that you don’t wait to start sav-
ing for your days as a retiree.
Many people think it won’t make
much difference if they delay investing
for a few years. As you know, time flies,
and before you know it, “a few years”
turns into a decade — and a decade’s
postponement in saving for retirement
can make an enormous difference in
your life.
How big a difference? Suppose you
plan to retire at age 65. If at age 25, you
began putting $200 a month into a tax-
deferred vehicle, such as a traditional
Individual Retirement Account (IRA),
and your investments inside that IRA
hypothetically earned on average 7% a
year, you would accumulate about
$512,000 after 40 years. However, if you
had waited until you were age 30 to start
saving for retirement, with all else being
equal, you’d end up with only about
$355,000 when you reached 65 —
$157,000 less — due to that five-year
delay. And if you waited 10 years, until
you were 35, you’d end up with about
$243,000 — far less than half of what
you would have accumulated had you
started saving at 25. (Keep in mind that
you will eventually have to pay taxes on
these accumulations, and the actual fig-
ures don’t reflect fees, commissions or
expenses.)
Clearly, the cost of delay can be con-
siderable — which is why you should
consider taking these steps:
* Develop a strategy with your finan-
cial advisor. It’s easier to stick to a strat-
egy if you know where you’re going. Your
financial advisor can help you deter-
mine how much you need to save to
reach the type of retirement you’ve envi-
sioned.
* If you haven’t started saving, begin
now. If you wait until you feel more
financially comfortable before you
invest for retirement, you may never
begin. Even if you can put away only a
small amount, such as $50 per month,
you’ll have made a start.
* To make it easier on yourself, set up
your accounts to automatically move a
set amount each month into your IRA.
As the above examples show, the best
way to build substantial savings is to
start early, but even if you’re in your 30s
or 40s, you can catch up — although
you’ll need to save more to potentially
get to the same level.
* Increase your
investments when
your income rises.
Every time you get
a salary increase,
boost your contri-
butions to your IRA
and your 401(k) or
other employer-
sponsored retire-
ment plan.
* Don’t take a
“timeout” from
investing. Keep on
investing, whether
the “news of the
day” is positive or
negative. The best
investors are those
who follow a con-
sistent strategy and
continue investing,
year in and year
out.
In short, save
early, save often —
and keep investing.
This article was
written by Edward
Jones for use by your local Edward Jones
Financial Advisor.
This article was written by Edward
Jones for use by your local Edward Jones
Financial Advisor.
Philip Hofweber is a Financial
Advisor with Edward Jones Investments
located at 100 West Main Street in
Gaylord. He can be reached at (989)731-
1851, or email him at
phil.hofweber@edwardjones.com. Tune
in Friday Mornings 8:30 am to Eagle
101.5 for Phil Hofweber to hear his week-
ly Financial Focus Topic. Edward Jones,
its financial advisors and employees do
not provide tax or legal advice. You
should consult with a qualified tax or
legal professional for advice on your spe-
cific situation.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.
At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k)
and help you select the one that’s best for you. If you’d
like to roll it over to an Edward Jones Individual Retire-
ment Account (IRA), we can help you do it without
paying taxes or penalties. And you can feel confident
that someone is looking out for you and your 401(k).
To find out why it makes sense to talk with Edward
Jones about your 401(k) options, call or visit your
local financial advisor today.
If You Aren’t at Your Last Job,
Why Is Your 401(k)?
!"#$#%&'&()*+,-,.
!"#$#%"$&'()*"+,-
.
/00'1'2$"#'34
5$6&,-)7'28'9:;<=
:>:?;</?/>=/
FINANCIAL FOCUS
DELAY IN INVESTING COULD
PROVE COSTLY
Philip Hofweber, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones
GAYLORD, (989) 731-1851
1928 S. Otsego Ave.
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Beautiful snow and trail conditions, a single digit tempera-
ture start but sunny skies made the 2012 Mackinaw City
Winterfest a great Up North outdoor event this past week-
end. Organizers of the event extend their thank you to all
community business sponsors and volunteers!
The winning Winterfest button numbers are-
09,16,42,83,97,101,147,164,198,224,271,284,309,326,377,426,4
71,497,506,562,669,681,711,777,833,852, 884,911,936,992,
pick up or call the Mackinaw Chamber office for your win-
ning envelope.
Pepsi International Outhouse race winners- defending
champs- 1st-OReilly's Pot of Gold $1,000, 2nd -Dixie Keg
500.00 and the "Cardboard Box"- 250
Poker Walk winners at Pancake Chef- 1,2,3- Poppy Krause
with a Royal Flush A high , Mikey Murray from Royal Oak,
Bob Egan plus Dan Hood, Debbie Hargraves, Don Bell,
Thomas Emery, James Darga, Sharon Ross, Dakota Moody
plus 6 others and Megan Turner All 23 Stops winner.
Chili Cookoff at JR's- Judges Choice- Fart Willies
Smokehouse Chili, Peoples Choice 1st place Captain Fred's
Corn in the crapper chili, plus best Decor, Peoples #2 PaPa
Gene's award winning Campfire Chili and first year entry
Concho's Mean Green chili with an eye catching table dis-
play.
Games by "Instant Cash Cheboygan"-
Big Stone Bay Frozen Fish Toss- adult winner- Tim La
Joice- St Ignace and son Trevor L Joice 11 was the Jr Winner
Ladder Golf- !St Place Adult- Stephen Lindsay Cheboygan
and Jr winner Dominic Krogel from Rapid City
Frozen Hen Drop: Adult winners : 1st place Dan Gabriel
Burt Lake, 2nd Place Tim Anderson Flint and Jr Dominic
Krogel Rapid City
Euchre Mancino's - TBA
Friends of Paradise Lake- Carp Lake ice fishing results-
(at 6am it was 13 degrees on the ice)
Largest Walleye- wt 2 1/2 lbs and 21" Travis Merchant-
teen
Largest Pike wt 3 1/4 lbs and 27 " Patrick Johnson
Largest Perch St 1/2 lbs and 11 1/2 " Steve McCafferty
Snow Sculptures- display by Mackinaw City School's 5th
grade and parent helpers a helmet, football, fireplace and
ice cream cone.
MAVB awards: 1st place Professional Larry Strouse of Carp
Lake with "Happy Bear on a log"
Honorable Mention-Community family team
Mellish/OBrien from Mackinaw City- "Mackinaw Turtle"
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
By Jim Akans
The 2012 political season challenge is
underway, and approximately 70 people
attended a Michigan Senatorial Candidate
debate and “meet and greet” at Marsh Ridge
Resort this past Monday evening. The event,
sponsored by the Otsego County Tea Party,
organized by Don Koeppen, and hosted by
Marsh Ridge, brought together leading GOP
contenders for Senator Debbie Stabenow’s
seat in the U.S. Senate in this coming
November’s election. Candidates in atten-
dance were Gary Glenn, Scotty Boman, Clark
Durant and Randy Heckman.
During the two-hour session, members of
the audience posed several questions to the
candidates who were each allowed one-
minute to respond. The questions included
concerns about campaign financing, the
influence of PAC
groups in legislative
decision making,
the prospect of the
elimination of the
Federal Reserve
Bank, taxation,
same-sex marriage,
illegal immigration
and the implica-
tions of the
National Defense
Authorization Act in
placing American
citizens vulnerable
to arrest and
detainment without
due process.
Audience members
also asked about
the candidates
plans in securing
votes in Wayne,
Oakland and
Macomb counties, the population centers in
Michigan that greatly affect election out-
comes, and ideas for attracting the interests
and attention of younger voters.
A common thread in the message shared
by the candidates is that the culture of the
U.S. Senate needs to change, government
control of individuals and businesses has
become much too far ranging, and that our
personal liberties and freedoms are in dan-
ger of being compromised.
Following the debate, a meet and greet
was held at Jac’s Place restaurant at Marsh
Ridge, providing attendees with the opportu-
nity for a bit of “one on one” time with the
candidates.
For additional information, please visit the
following websites;
Otsego County Tea Party -
Teapartywire.com/otsegocountyteaparty/
Scotty Boman – boman12.org
Clark Durant – www.clarkdurant.com
Gary Glenn – garyglenn.us/
Randy Hekman – randyhekman2012.com
Michigan Senatorial Candidates held debate
at Marsh Ridge last
Monday evening
Photo by JiM akans
Photo by JiM akans
Last Monday’s GOP Senatorial Debate at Marsh Ridge Resort brought together
candidates (from left) Scotty Boman, Clark Durant, Gary Glenn and Randy
Hekman to offer insights into their campaign positions, and field questions from
the audience.
Approximately 70 people filled the banquet room at Marsh
Ridge to listen to the GOP Senatorial Candidates, and pose
questions to those candidates about their concerns for the
future of our country.
Mackinaw City Winterfest 2012 results are in!
Page 10 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
Trust the
local experts at
By Jim Akans
“We believe and understand
that people want the job done
right the first time,” states Cliff
Hass, owner of Hamill’s Floor
Covering, Inc. in Petoskey.
“Proper installation is an essen-
tial part of achieving that goal.
So we utilize an expert team of
experience, local installers for
every project that we do. That is
a vital part of our company’s suc-
cess.”
And what a long history of suc-
cess Hamill’s has seen. The com-
pany was originally founded in
1957 on the south side of
Petoskey. Hass purchased the
business in 1998, and moved to
the current location on U.S. 31
North in Petoskey in March of
2000. The store’s beautiful show-
room offers customers’ an
impressive display of flooring
samples, highlighting an exten-
sive inventory of products from
leading manufacturers, compris-
ing all types of flooring including
hardwood, vinyl, laminate,
ceramic and vinyl tile and carpet-
ing.
“We offer flooring for residen-
tial, apartment and commercial
applications,” affirms Hass. “We
service customers throughout
Northern Michigan, primarily
within an hour or so of Petoskey.”
He adds, “Our word is our bond.
We take the time to fully under-
stand each job, identify potential
issues with the installation up
front, and stick to the price we
originally quote. That way we
avoid surprises for our customers
with “add on” charges once the
job is underway. People like that
about doing business with us.”
Hass states that he utilizes two
local groups of contractors for
installation work. Brad Piehl,
owner of Terry’s Carpet Service,
has been working with the
Hamill’s since Hass purchased
the business. The second is Mark
Stewart of Mark Stewart Floor
Company, who has been con-
tracting installations with
Hamill’s for the past several years.
“Both are Certified Flooring
Installers,” notes Hass, “and each
has over 20 years of experience in
the industry.”
Hamill’s also offers their cus-
tomers unique services such as
carpet binding, re-stretching, and
even repairing of existing carpets.
The also make custom area rugs,
created to fit the customer’s spe-
cific size and décor needs. They
can also create custom ceramic
tile designs and installations, for
applications such as shower
stalls, tub surrounds, countertop
backsplashes, and more.
Hass started in the flooring
business after working for
Consumers Energy for several
years. He reflects that while he,
his wife Jeanette, and three chil-
dren have lived in several areas of
the country, the opportunity to
establish a home and business in
Petoskey is a dream come true.
“This is such a unique and
wonderful area,” he observes.
“We feel we are extremely fortu-
nate to be able to live and raise
our family here.”
Area residents and businesses
are also fortunate to have access
the expert, local flooring services
of Hamill’s Floor Covering Inc. in
Petoskey. The showroom, located
at 2309 N. US 31, is open from 9
am until 5 pm Monday through
Friday, and from 9 am until 1 pm
on Saturday. For additional infor-
mation, contact Hamill’s Floor
Coveirng at (231) 347-8601.
Courtesy Photo
The local experts at Hamill’s Floor Covering Inc., located at 2309 N. US 31 in Petoskey, offer their experience and exten-
sive product selection in serving all of their customer’s floor covering needs.
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 11
By Dave Baragrey
As we begin a new year you can
make a difference in our local econo-
my. Make a commitment to shop at
stores owned and operated by your
neighbors.
The benefits of shopping at stores
owned by locals are well documented
by research. Studies done by econo-
mists show that:
•When you spend $100 at a locally
owned business $62 stays in our com-
munity.
•When you spend $100 at a national
chain $42 stays in our community.
•When you spend $100 on-line $0
stays in our community.
These figures alone should convince
you of the benefit of shopping at inde-
pendently owned local businesses but
there is so much more. Spending at a
locally owned business leads to better
schools, better roads and local sup-
port of community charities and
fundraisers.
Studies also show that local, inde-
pendently owned businesses paid
higher wages and used more local
goods and services stretching that
local dollar even further.
In yet another reason for consumers
to consider shopping locally, new
research reveals that successful small
businesses are helping bolster sagging
real estate markets in some communi-
ties.
That's the finding of the American
Express Open Independent Retail
Index, which found that neighbor-
hoods with thriving independent
businesses saw home values outper-
form citywide markets by 50 percent
over the last 14 years.
The report specifically studied 27
neighborhoods where small business-
es have thrived in 15 major U.S. cities,
concluding that home values there
outperformed their broader markets.
In addition, when you shop at inde-
pendently owned businesses you will
often deal with the owner of the busi-
ness. Their knowledge of the product
or service and their concern to see
you leave as a happy customer will
usually result in a very pleasant shop-
ping experience.
If consumers would simply look for
the opportunity to shift a portion of
their spending from on-line business-
es to locally owned businesses it could
make a difference in our region of
Northern Michigan.
Make 2012 the year you make the
effort to make a difference. Make the
decision to move 10% of your spend-
ing to independently owned business-
es. The elegance of the 10 percent shift
right now is that it doesn’t ask people
to expand their budgets and spend
more. It asks people to be more con-
scious about where they spend what
they’ve already budgeted for.
Support Local
Businesses in 2012

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102 W. Main, Gaylord
989-705-2733 989-732-1077
208 W. Main St.
(989) 732-5444
220 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
You Are Invited to The Alpine Tavern & Eatery
(formerly The Alpine Oven)
Live Entertainment
Fridays, 7-9 pm
Buy One Dinner Entree
get 50% Off
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We Take Trade-Ins
989-748-4849
148 W. Main St.
Downtown
Gaylord, MI 49735
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989-705-7332
Featuring our Family Sampler:
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1 order of Garlic
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Our pizza’s are extra large
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of our toppings, special
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We bake our bread daily, top
it with hearty portions of meat
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PETOSKEY • 231-347-7530
If you or your business are interested in sponsoring your favorite
non-profit organization, call our office at 989-732-8160 or e-mail us at Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
We have a number of Non-Profit Groups who are waiting for a
sponsor to be a part of the 20/20 Project. Cost to sponsor a
Non-Profit Group is just $25 a month.
Bowl for Kids' Sake
Call to register your team
today
(989) 732-7780
Underwritten by:
Anonymous
Donor
The Friendship Shelter, Inc.
We are a homeless shelter serving the Gaylord area.
In addition to providing food and shelter, a major focus of
The Friendship Shelter's program is training and education designed
to ensure continued success for our clients once they transition to
independent living.
Visit: http://www.thefriendshipshelter.org/needs.html
To find out how you can help
Underwritten by: Anonymous Donor
Curt a. Reppuhn
CPA PPLC
200 S. Court Avenue, Suite 2
Post office Box 1154, Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Phone: 989.448.8828
Fax: 989.448.8829
curt@reppuhncpa.com
St Mary Cathedral School
321 N. otsego, Gaylord, MI 49735 • 989-732-5801
Give online at:
http://www.gaylordstmary.org/about-us/fundraising
Underwritten by:
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(989) 731-1338 • Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Rd., Gaylord, MI 49735
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NMS provides a wide array of services 24 hours a day,
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www.northernmanagement.org
657 Chestnut Ct.
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6374 • 866-486-0712
Community Partners
Nehemiah Project
Offering Shelter to Petoskey
Area Homeless
Underwritten by
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God gave you your teeth...we help you keep them.
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231-347-8980
Gaylord Area Council for the Arts
GACA 2012 CALENDAR
The Gaylord Area Council for the Arts 2012 Calendar is a major
fundraiser for the Arts Council. The theme for this year’s calendar is
“Black and White with a Little Red”; inspired by our annual exhibit in
February of the same name.
Calendars are available for $10.00 at the Community Arts Center,
125 E.Main St., Gaylord, MI,
Hrs: Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Phone: 989-732-3242 • www.gaylordarts.org
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The Health Department of Northwest Michigan is encour-
aging people to take simple and affordable steps to test their
homes for harmful levels of radon gas as part of National
Radon Action Month. Radon is an invisible, odorless, taste-
less radioactive gas that comes from the natural breakdown
of uranium in soil, rock, and water. It causes no immediate
symptoms but is the number one cause of lung cancer
among non-smokers and kills more than 21,000 each year in
the United States.
“Radon is a dangerous health threat to our families and
communities that can be easily avoided through simple test-
ing,” said Scott Kendzierski, Director of Environmental
Health Services. “This month, I urge everyone to test their
homes.”
Nearly one of every 15 homes in the U.S. is estimated to
have elevated radon levels. Simple steps to prevent this
health hazard can be taken:
- Test: EPA and the U.S. Surgeon General recommend that
all homes, both with and without basements, be tested for
radon. Easy, do-it-yourself radon test kits are available at
Health Department offices in Bellaire, Charlevoix,
Petoskey/Harbor Springs and Gaylord for $15. Bring your
property’s tax identification number with you when you pick
one up so the Health Department can map radon readings.
- Fix: EPA recommends taking action to fix radon levels
above 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Addressing high radon
levels often costs the same as other minor home repairs. The
Health Department can help you make a plan to reduce
radon levels.
- Save a Life: By testing and fixing elevated levels of radon
in your home, you can help prevent lung cancer and create a
healthier home and community.
Radon can enter a home through cracks in the foundation
or other openings, such as holes or pipes. Although radon
can enter a home through the water supply, entry through
the soil is a much larger risk. Radon in a home’s water system
is more likely when the home has a ground water source –
such as a private well or public water supply system that
uses ground water.
In addition to testing for radon, there now are safer and
healthier radon-resistant construction techniques that home
buyers can discuss with builders to prevent this health haz-
ard.
In 2011, EPA announced the Federal Radon Action Plan,
along with General Services Administration and the depart-
ments of Agriculture; Defense; Energy; Health and Human
Services; Housing and Urban Development; Interior; and
Veterans Affairs. This action plan will demonstrate the
importance of radon risk reduction, address finance and
incentive issues to drive testing and mitigation, and build
demand for services from industry professionals.
The Health Department of Northwest Michigan is mandat-
ed by the Michigan Public Health Code to promote wellness,
prevent disease, provide quality healthcare, address health
problems of vulnerable populations, and protect the envi-
ronment for the residents and visitors of Antrim, Charlevoix,
Emmet, and Otsego counties for additional information,
contact Scott Johnson, Environmental Health Sanitarian, at
989-732-6863.
Page 12 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
January is National Radon Action Month
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Early Childhood Investment Corporation distributed free
cribs to early learning and care facilities across the state
Catholic
Schools Week
NMCAA Partners
with eHome
America
Planning begins for
PROJECT CONNECT –
your help is needed
More than 900 licensed childcare providers had
opportunity to trade in old cribs for new federally-
approved cribs as part of a free crib exchange in
early January. The exchange is the second of two
such events made possible by American Recovery
and Reinvestment Act funds and involving ECIC
and Lowes.
The first crib exchange in August issued 2,000
new cribs that met federal safety guidelines to
early learning and development programs that
accept children whose families receive subsidized
child care payments from the Michigan
Department of Human Services, as well as Early
Head Start sites/locations.
In January, 3,500 cribs, including over 30 cribs in
Otsego and Cheboygan Counties were given to
early childhood programs and child care providers
were issued to early learning and development
programs that are caring for infants under 1-year
old whose families receive subsidized child care
payments from the Michigan Department of
Human Services. Crib exchanges are taking place
at 18 Lowe’s stores throughout the state of
Michigan. Providers who received a certificate for
the exchange will be able to contact their local
Regional Resource Center to identify the Lowe’s
store where they can pick up their cribs.
Lowe’s partnered with the Early Childhood
Investment Corp. after they heard of the first
Michigan crib exchange. The national home
improvement store does not sell cribs, but had
partnered in a similar crib exchange, also funded
by ARRA dollars, in Indiana.
“Because of their buying power, Lowe’s was able
to get us a good deal and offered their stores for
storage and delivery,” said Mary Luchies, coordina-
tor of the crib exchange for the Early Childhood
Investment Corp.
The exchanges serve a licensing requirement for
licensed and registered providers serving infants.
Infants in care under 1 year of age are required to
sleep in a crib, and National Consumer Product
Safety Commission requires all cribs manufactured
prior to June 30, 2011 to be replaced with cribs
meeting new stricter safety requirements.
Karen Roback, director of Early Learning
Innovation for the Early Childhood Investment
Corporation, said cribs were targeted to the early
learning and development programs serving the
most vulnerable children.
“The purpose of the funds is to improve the
quality of care for the most vulnerable children.
Safe cribs improve the quality of the early learning
and development setting and we know that quality
is critical for childhood development,” Roback
said.
The Early Childhood Investment Corporation is
a public/private organization working to imple-
ment a high quality early learning and develop-
ment system for Michigan as part of its work to
restructure the state’s investment in children from
birth to five through state and local community
efforts. ECIC supports local Great Start
Collaboratives and Parent Coalitions covering the
state.
For more information about the Early Childhood
Investment Corporation and its efforts, go to
www.greatstartforkids.org
Cheboygan - Sunday January 29th marks the
beginning of the 39th Annual Catholic Schools
Week throughout the United States. Catholic
Schools Week is an annual celebration of Catholic
schools and their contributions to their commu-
nities and the nation. Nationwide, over 2 million
students attend almost 7,000 Catholic schools.
The theme of this year’s Catholic Schools Week
observance is “Catholic Schools: Faith.
Academics. Service.” The theme focuses on three
priorities that Catholic schools establish that
make them stand out from other educational
institutions. Children are taught faith – not just
the basics of Christianity, but how to have a rela-
tionship with God. Academics, which in Catholic
schools are held to very high standards, help each
child reach his or her potential. Service, the giving
of one’s time and effort to help others, is taught
both as an expression of faith and good citizen-
ship.
Locally, Bishop Baraga Catholic School in
Cheboygan is celebrating the week with daily
dress up themes, special lunches, a talent show, a
food drive, a dance, and other activities. The high-
light of the week will be a spaghetti dinner hosted
by the Knights of Columbus on Wednesday,
February 1st, from 4:30 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. at the
K of C Hall in Cheboygan. The menu includes all
you can eat spaghetti, homemade sauce, garlic
bread, salad, and dessert. The cost of the dinner is
by donation.
Northwest Michigan Community Action Agency
(NMCAA) has partnered with eHome America, the
nation’s premier online homeownership education
program offering access to quality information
and education for first-time homebuyers.
Traditional classroom is still available as an option
for those wanting face to face education.
eHome America’s web-based class is based on
the NeighborWorks America curricula, “Realizing
the American Dream” with videos to assist learn-
ing. Unlike a classroom environment, eHome
America Homebuyer Education course checks stu-
dent’s learning with frequent feedback through
quizzes and tests. Potential homebuyers learn at
their own pace and are held accountable with the
integrated quizzes and tests. Following the course,
which is designed to take eight hours, in-person or
phone counseling commences prior to the com-
pletion certificate being printed. This course is
available in English or Spanish.
Additionally, the US Department of Agriculture’s
Office of Rural Development announced that
eHome America’s homebuyer education meets the
Agency’s need as a provider for on-line homebuyer
education.
Potential homebuyers can access eHome
America at www.ehomeamerica.org/nmcaa or
contact NMCAA at (231) 947-3780 or (800) 632-
7334. The cost for the eight hour course is $50.
Local human service agencies are
once again joining forces. Planning for
the fifth annual Charlevoix-Emmet
Project Connect has begun. This year
the event will be held on Wednesday,
March 21 from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at
the Community Building at the
Emmet County Fairgrounds in
Petoskey. Project Connect connects
people in need with a range of health
and human services needed to
improve their lives.
“Project Connect provides an all-
inclusive, one day event for people in
Charlevoix and Emmet counties to
access a wide variety of resources and
easily network with others in their
community,” says Kathy Hart, Co-
Chair of the Events Committee of the
Poverty Reduction Initiative, a work-
group of the Charlevoix-Emmet
Human Services Coordinating Body
(HSCB), and Director of the Manna
Food Project. “By bringing together all
of the services to one place on one
day, we can make an immediate dif-
ference in the lives of many.”
The planning team anticipates an
event both bigger and better this year.
Last year the event reached over 800
individuals. All received a wide range
of supportive services. Assistance with
housing, food, tax preparation, health
services, and much more were provid-
ed throughout the day. Free haircuts
and chair massages were available.
Guests received a meal and gifts of
food, personal care and household
items.
“Obviously a project of this size
brings together a huge number of
partners,” says Martha Lancaster, Co-
Chair of the event and Director of
Char-Em United Way. “We are in need
of agencies and businesses to partici-
pate; donations of goods; and funds to
support the event. Individuals and
groups wishing to be involved can
contact the United Way or Manna.”
Individuals or businesses interested
in donating items might consider con-
ducting a drive at their business,
school, or faith community. Lists of
specific food, personal care, house-
hold, or other items that are most
needed are listed on the United Way
website www.charemunitedway.org ,
under Find a Donation Drive.
ANGER MONUMENTS & MARKERS

(231)587-8433
(906)484-1202
Roger Anger, Owner
Mancelona, MI 49659
Cedarville, MI 49719

In home appointments available.
Serving the E.U.P. area & the Northern Lower.
Monumental Sales, Est. 1917
Sunburst Memorials TM
Email: angermonuments@yahoo.com
S0h££8
N0T08S
0ALL T00AY 989-348-5451 º 1-800-968-8848
Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-6pm, Sat 9am-2pm
0.S. 27 h08Th º 68AYL|h6
WWW.ºc|eerro|orº.cor
' 0ller va||d W|||e ºupp||eº |aº| ard pa]rer| |º va||d ||rouç| 1/31/12. 8aºed or approved cred|| ||rouç| A||]
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ur Affordable
take hom
e
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OPEN 7 DAYS
A WEEK
Book your own appointment
on line at www.akhairstudio.com
9 Professionals to choose from!
Privately Owned by: Ann Berry & Kay Smith
or call 989-732-1000
** WE’RE DOING WORK IN YOUR AREA **
Toll Free 866-582-6804
MacNaughton’s Pest Control , Inc.
PROFESSIONAL WILDLIFE & INSECT CONTROL
DON'T YOU WANT TO BE PEST FREE??
FREE
ESTIMATES
ALL TYPES OF INSECTS: Ants • Spiders • Roaches
Ear Wigs • Flies • Termites • Fleas • Bees/Wasps
PESTS AND SMALL CRITTERS: Squirrels • Mice • Skunks
Raccoons • Bats • Moles • Exclusion Work
BOYNE CITY, MI • E-MAIL: SAMACNAUGHTON@OUTDRS.NET
Top Cuoli|y ßo×es & Noving 5upplies lrom U·Houl
Moving Supplies
Call us for all your moving needs
PRO SERVICES
AUTO & TRUCK REPAIR
Gaylord – 989-731-4447
Atlanta – 989-785-4647
Lube, Oil Changes,
Detailing, Trailer Wiring, U-Haul,
Hitches Installed, Moving Supplies & Boxes
In Otsego and
Cheboygan
Counties, over
30 cribs have
been given to
early childhood
programs and
child care
providers
through an
Early
Childhood
Investment
Corporation
program. One
of those recipi-
ents is Alyssa
Barraw, who
operates a
licensed group
child care busi-
ness in her
home, from
Gaylord.
Courtesy Photo
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 13
Inspirational Living
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Christian Cyber Cafe
.GOD
Joy Fellowship
Assembly of God
8600 S. Straits Hwy.
Located between Indian River and Wolverine.
Sunday - Coffee Hour 9 AM
Service - 10 AM including services for children
Wednesday - 6 PM
231-525-8510 Pastor Bob Moody
Bible Based Preaching
traditional Music
Friendly, Casual, atmosphere
Come Just as You are
Sunday School 10:00 • Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Service 6:00 • Wednesday 6:00
alpine Village Baptist Church
158 N. Townline Rd., Gaylord • 989-732-4602
Locuted ín the
South \ísconsín St., Cuyíord, Míchígun
Cer|emjerer¡ ¥t:it eri 'jiri| |illei 'errite
THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH OF GAYLORD
10:00 a.m. Worship &
Sunday School
Reverend Karen Huddelson
513 Charles Brink Rd, Gaylord, MI 49735-8775
(989) 939-8739
website: otsego.org/fpcg Email: gaylordfpc@yahoo.com
PASTOR’S
PERSPECTIVE
Matt Burek
Harbor Light
Community Chapel
Harbor Springs MI
Iß0IAß 8I¥£8 008¡0M L06 ß0M£8
°lf you're not happy...We're NOT Finished!"
00NPL£T£0 0V£8 50 L06 & ST|0k 80|LT h0N£S
º F0|| Log or 1l2 Log S|d|og & 8estorat|oo oo 0|der Log homes.
º 0|eao & Sta|o proveo to |ast Ior years.
6.8. wo|Igram & Soos, |oc.
logs@straitsarea.com
(231} 238-4638
(231} 420-3033
Licensed & Insured
www.indianriverloghomes.com
Friendship Church
415 North Ohio, Gaylord · 989-732-3621
Pastor Steve Datema
A Christian Reformed Ministry
Enjoy the music and message every Sunday morning
at 10:00am. Sunday School at 11:15am
Our Mission: ¨A Spirit filled family of God united in our fear and love of Christ and
committed to the truth of the Bible. A praying church that equips its members to care,
serve and reach out to others with the saving grace of Jesus Christ.'
FREEDOM WORSHIP CENTER
Full Gospel • Non Denominational Church
826-8315
Need Prayer or Ride to Church...Give us a call
• Sunday School - Adults/Kids 9:30 am
• Sunday Worship 10:30 am
• Thursday Back to Basics Bible Study 5 pm
611 Mt. Tom Rd. (M-33)
Mio, Michigan
Daily Word
THURSDAY: Jeremiah 20:9 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 9 But if I say, “I will not remem-
ber Him Or speak anymore in His name,” Then in my heart it becomes like a burning fire
Shut up in my bones; And I am weary of holding it in, And I cannot endure it.
FRIDAY: James 4:15-17 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 15 Instead, you ought to say, “If the
Lord wills, we will live and also do this or that.” 16 But as it is, you boast in your arrogance;
all such boasting is evil. 17 Therefore, to one who knows the right thing to do and does not do
it, to him it is sin.
SATURDAY: 1 Kings 19:3 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 3 And he was afraid and arose and
ran for his life and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah, and left his servant there.
SUNDAY: Jonah 1:10 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 10 Then the men became extremely
frightened and they said to him, “How could you do this?” For the men knew that he was flee-
ing from the presence of the LORD, because he had told them.
MONDAY: 1 Samuel 10:18-19 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 18 and he said to the sons of
Israel, “Thus says the LORD, the God of Israel, ‘I brought Israel up from Egypt, and I deliv-
ered you from the hand of the Egyptians and from the power of all the kingdoms that were
oppressing you.’ 19 But you have today rejected your God, who delivers you from all your
calamities and your distresses; yet you have said, ‘No, but set a king over us!’ Now therefore,
present yourselves before the LORD by your tribes and by your clans.”
TUESDAY: 1 John 2:15-17 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 15 Do not love the world nor the
things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. 16 For all
that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life,
is not from the Father, but is from the world. 17 The world is passing away, and also its lusts;
but the one who does the will of God lives forever.
WEDNESDAY: James 4:1-3 New American Standard Bible (NASB) 1 What is the source of quar-
rels and conflicts among you? Is not the source your pleasures that wage war in your mem-
bers? 2 You lust and do not have; so you commit murder. You are envious and cannot obtain;
so you fight and quarrel. You do not have because you do not ask. 3 You ask and do not
receive, because you ask with wrong motives, so that you may spend it on your pleasures.
A mentor of mine named Jeanne Mayo, recently asked the question “What is your hell bait?”. I first thought
it was a rather unusual question. After some consideration and study I realized it is a question I should be reg-
ularly asking myself and those close to me. I believe that you and I were created with a purpose and plan. The
Bible makes that very clear in Jeremiah 29:11. Not a single person walks this earth as a mistake in the eyes of
God. All throughout Scripture we see a picture of a God who desires to know us and to be known. We see a lov-
ing God willing to go to great lengths so that we can be all that He has created us to be. We see a God who desires
us to live in freedom, true freedom.
Have you ever tried to catch a mouse? First you buy the mouse trap, next you bait the mouse trap, and final-
ly you wait for the mouse to take the bait. The mouse smells the cheese or in my case the peanut butter and
goes in for a quick snack. Because he is unaware that I am trying to kill him, he proceeds with his meal as nor-
mal. Unfortunately for him the bait that he fell for cost him his life.
In our lives we have lots of things that can distract us from all that God has and desires for us. Many times
just like the mouse, we don’t even realize the bait that is being laid out before us. The Bible tells us “Stay alert!
Watch out for your great enemy, the devil. He prowls around like a roaring lion, looking for someone to
devour.” (1 Peter 5:8) The question “What is your hell bait?” is one that asks, what is that thing or things that
the enemy can use to trap you and cause destruction? Sometimes it is blatant sin like lust, pornography, drunk-
enness, or dishonesty. Other times it is more subtle like pride, desire for success, fear , anger, or our temper.
It’s that area of our life that when left unchecked or unaddressed can cause life altering results.
I recently spoke with a friend who was feeling a little cheated and mistreated by some people in his life. These
feelings and emotions left unchecked allowed him to move to anger and a desire for revenge. In a moment of
weakness he went for the bait that was laid out before him and stole some property. Nobody forced him to do
this and he realizes it was a stupid decision, especially now that he is facing felony charges. The question is not
“Do you have a hell bait? “ but rather “What is your hell bait?”. We have a choice to either deal with every
area of our life, good and bad, or it deals with us. When you and I know and are aware of our hell bait it makes
it a lot easier not to fall for the trap.
What is your hell Bait? God desires for you to live in freedom from sin and death. He made it possible
through the work of Christ’s death and resurrection. You can find hope, peace, and freedom in life but not
apart from Jesus Christ. God loves you. If you want to know more about the freedom that he offers, feel free
to contact me or one of the great churches here in northern Michigan.
Self Doubt and I don't see myself with
the royalty of a son of God but I will.
Ron Horning, Alanson
I don't think that God has any expecta-
tions.
Beth Kanoff, Petoskey
Not enough time to go to church. Not enough
time in the day with owning a business and
working. I'd like to do more with the youth
group.
Karen Deisler, Carp Lake
Fear of rejection.
Bob Johnson, Petoskey
Thoughts on...What is your Hell Bait?
What is it that keeps you from being all that God wants you to be?
Page 14 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
Gaylord - The Otsego County Library is
offering another series of free computer
classes. Classes are held at the main Library
at 700 S. Otsego Avenue using the Library's
portable computer lab.
Don't need a class, but would like some
technological help? A new program, "Tech
Time", is offered every Thursday at noon to
give attendees the opportunity to ask ques-
tions about computers and tech-related
problems. The Library's computer classes
are ninety-minutes in length and cover a
variety of computer-related topics. Each
class is scheduled at two different times to
accommodate varying schedules. Anyone
may register for one or all of the classes,
depending on what they wish to learn. Class
sizes are limited, so early registration is rec-
ommended. Stop in at the Library, or call
732-5841.
"Tech Time" is a computer learning ses-
sion with Library staff on hand to assist with
individual, technological issues. These
weekly sessions are free and open to every-
one. For more information about services
and programs at the Otsego County Library,
persons may visit www.otsegocountyli-
brary.org or call 989-732-5841.
Introduction to Computers Monday, January 30 6:7:30 p.m.
Introduction to Computers Thursday, February 2 2-3:30 p.m.
Basic Mouse & Keyboarding Skills Monday, February 13 6:7:30 p.m.
Basic Mouse & Keyboarding Skills Thursday, February 16 2-3:30 p.m.
Basic Web Browsing Monday, February 20 6:7:30 p.m.
Basic Web Browsing Thursday February 23 2-3:30 p.m.
Searching the Web Monday, February 27 6:7:30 p.m.
Searching the Web Thursday, March 1 2-3:30 p.m.
Basic Word 2010 Monday, March 5 6:7:30 p.m.
Basic Word 2010 Thursday, March 8 2-3:30 p.m.
Word 2010 - Beyond Basics Monday, March 12 6:7:30 p.m.
Word 2010 - Beyond Basics Thursday, March 15 2-3:30 p.m.
Basic Excel 2010 Monday, March 19 6:7:30 p.m.
Basic Excel 2010 Thursday, March 22 2-3:30 p.m.
Excel 2010 - Beyond Basics Monday, March 26 6:7:30 p.m.
Excel 2010 - Beyond Basics Thursday, March 29 2-3:30 p.m.
Photo by Jim Akans
There’s an ice rink under construction in downtown Gaylord!
This past Friday, Otsego County workers were busy shoveling snow
and setting up an ice rink on the Courthouse lawn in preparation
for the upcoming Alpenfrost celebration to be held on Saturday,
February 11th. The frame for the rink is scheduled to be flooded
with water this week…now we just need to keep those temperatures
below freezing. This is the first time downtown Gaylord has had an
outdoor rink in several decades, so get those skates sharpened up
and be ready for some open air, family-oriented “ice time” in the
coming weeks ahead.
Our Call for Talent is just that. On
Saturday, February 25, The Opera House will
be presenting a Talent Show featuring ama-
teur performing artists who reside in the
Northern Michigan area. Auditions are open
for all, and there are no limitations in
regards to age. They will be conducted on
Saturday, February 4th on stage at The Opera
House, beginning at 10:00am. Contestants
must provide their own music, the accompa-
nist, and any peripheral equipment and
instrumentation necessary for their act.
Following the auditions, the acts selected
will be notified by mail. There will be a
$25.00 entry fee, paid only by those selected
to participate. From the entry fee, prize
money will be awarded the night of the
Show. Judges will select the winners of the
cash prizes and the audience will have the
opportunity to vote for the “People’s Choice”
award.
Anyone interested in auditioning should
contact the Arts Council Business Office at
231-627-5432 no later than Friday, February
3. All proceeds will benefit the Fine Arts
Scholarship Fund.
The Talent Show will take place on
Saturday, February 25th at 7:30pm. Master of
Ceremonies for the show will be Vic McCarty.
Tickets are now available through The Opera
House Box Office at 403 North Huron Street.
Office hours are 9:30am through 4:30pm,
Tuesday through Friday. Seating is non-
reserved and all tickets are $10.00. Call 231-
627-5841 or 231-627-5432 for tickets and
more information. Tickets may also be pur-
chase through The Opera House web site:
www.theoperahouse.org.
This program is supported in part by the
Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural
Affairs.
Call ahead... Dine in or Carry out Tableside Service
1~ß8ß~T$2~5444 220S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
Ik££ N
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8P|k|T8
Ø£8T Iûû0, Ik|£d08 8 T|M£8
Th|8 8|0£ ûI Th£ 45Th PAkA||£||
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8a0dW|chet, 8o0þt, Ør|tkeft 8 More|
Drop in before or after any sport event
W W W. F A M O U S P O L I S H K I T C H E N . C O M
T R A D I T I O N A L P O L I S H C U I S I N E
At the Polish Kitchen of Harbor Springs, you’ll
savor the flavors of the old country: the rich, earthy
blends of meats and vegetables that are the staples
of Polish home cooking.
Buy the first main dish and
get the 2nd one half off!!
8418 M-119, Harbor Springs
231-838-5377
OPEN 11AM – 8PM, 7 DAYS A WEEK
(LOCATED IN THE HARBOR PLAZA BY THE HARBOR SPRINGS AIRPORT)
- Dine In, Take Out or Delivery-
READ
Recreation, Entertainment, Arts, Dining
Tech Time and Computer Classes
Northern Michigan Has Talent Auditions set
Across
1- Clockmaker Thomas
5- Tartan
10- Dulls
14- 1963 role for Liz
15- Wash lightly
16- Actress McClurg
17- Boxing referee's other job?
19- Crooked
20- Equal-angled shape
21- Ceylon, now
23- Time spans
25- Decree
26- Slender piece of wood
28- Sign up
31- Casual assent
34- Bang-up
36- Nocturnal tropical lizard
37- Sun Devils' sch.
38- Rapid in tempo
40- Atmosphere
41- Attended
43- Be bold
44- "Betsy's Wedding" star
45- Spice
47- Coup ___
49- Brings up
51- Tangible
55- Indecent
58- Eye inflammation
59- Composer Schifrin
60- Catalyst
62- Et ___
63- Valuable collection
64- Actress Sommer
65- Alcoholic drink of fermented
honey
66- Effluent system
67- Medicinal amount
Down
1- Temporary paper currency
2- Beethoven dedicatee
3- Domingo, for one
4- Gluttonous
5- Pertaining to a meal
6- Fleur-de-___
7- Aardvark's prey
8- Grenoble's river
9- Mock
10- Fiasco
11- Alike in every way
12- Lustrous fur
13- Bristle
18- Debatable
22- Jargon
24- Reprimand
27- Mix dough
29- Lose traction
30- When said three times, a
1970 war movie
31- Stretch wide
32- Biblical birthright seller
33- Continent SE of Asia
35- Everglades bird
38- Shed ___
39- Merchant
42- Like a single-celled organism
44- Clad
46- Hulled cracked grain
48- 160 square rods
50- Cafe additive
52- Author Calvino
53- Rings of a chain
54- First name in cosmetics
55- Close with force
56- Racer Yarborough
57- Flat-bottomed boat
61- Holiday start
Go back | Print | Help
BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for January 21, 2012

Across
1- Clockmaker Thomas; 5
- Tartan; 10- Dulls; 14-
1963 role for Liz; 15-
Wash lightly; 16- Actress
McClurg; 17- Boxing
referee's other job?; 19-
Crooked; 20- Equal-
angled shape; 21- Ceylon,
now; 23- Time spans; 25-
Decree; 26- Slender piece
of wood; 28- Sign up; 31-
Casual assent; 34- Bang-
up; 36- Nocturnal tropical
lizard; 37- Sun Devils'
sch.; 38- Rapid in tempo;
40- Atmosphere; 41-
Attended; 43- Be bold; 44-
"Betsy's Wedding" star; 45
- Spice; 47- Coup ___; 49-
Brings up; 51- Tangible;
55- Indecent; 58- Eye
inflammation; 59-
Composer Schifrin; 60-
Catalyst; 62- Et ___; 63-
Valuable collection; 64-
Actress Sommer; 65-
Alcoholic drink of
fermented honey; 66- Effluent system; 67- Medicinal amount;

Down
1- Temporary paper currency; 2- Beethoven dedicatee; 3- Domingo, for one; 4-
Gluttonous; 5- Pertaining to a meal; 6- Fleur-de-___; 7- Aardvark's prey; 8- Grenoble's
river; 9- Mock; 10- Fiasco; 11- Alike in every way; 12- Lustrous fur; 13- Bristle; 18-
Debatable; 22- Jargon; 24- Reprimand; 27- Mix dough; 29- Lose traction; 30- When said
three times, a 1970 war movie; 31- Stretch wide; 32- Biblical birthright seller; 33- Continent
SE of Asia; 35- Everglades bird; 38- Shed ___; 39- Merchant; 42- Like a single-celled
organism; 44- Clad; 46- Hulled cracked grain; 48- 160 square rods; 50- Cafe additive; 52-
Author Calvino; 53- Rings of a chain; 54- First name in cosmetics; 55- Close with force; 56-
Racer Yarborough; 57- Flat-bottomed boat; 61- Holiday start;
Pa e 1 of 1 BestCrosswords.com - Puzzle #1 for Januar 21, 2012
1/22/2012 htt ://www.bestcrosswords.com/bestcrosswords/ rintable/Home, rintable.sdirect?formids...
G o b a c k | P r i n t | H e l p
B e s t C r o s s w o r d s . c o m - P u z z l e # 1 f o r J a n u a r y 2 1 , 2 0 1 2

A c r o s s
1 - C l o c k m a k e r T h o m a s ; 5
- T a r t a n ; 1 0 - D u l l s ; 1 4 -
1 9 6 3 r o l e f o r L i z ; 1 5 -
W a s h l i g h t l y ; 1 6 - A c t r e s s
M c C l u r g ; 1 7 - B o x i n g
r e f e r e e ' s o t h e r j o b ? ; 1 9 -
C r o o k e d ; 2 0 - E q u a l -
a n g l e d s h a p e ; 2 1 - C e y l o n ,
n o w ; 2 3 - T i m e s p a n s ; 2 5 -
D e c r e e ; 2 6 - S l e n d e r p i e c e
o f w o o d ; 2 8 - S i g n u p ; 3 1 -
C a s u a l a s s e n t ; 3 4 - B a n g -
u p ; 3 6 - N o c t u r n a l t r o p i c a l
l i z a r d ; 3 7 - S u n D e v i l s '
s c h . ; 3 8 - R a p i d i n t e m p o ;
4 0 - A t m o s p h e r e ; 4 1 -
A t t e n d e d ; 4 3 - B e b o l d ; 4 4 -
" B e t s y ' s W e d d i n g " s t a r ; 4 5
- S p i c e ; 4 7 - C o u p _ _ _ ; 4 9 -
B r i n g s u p ; 5 1 - T a n g i b l e ;
5 5 - I n d e c e n t ; 5 8 - E y e
i n f l a m m a t i o n ; 5 9 -
C o m p o s e r S c h i f r i n ; 6 0 -
C a t a l y s t ; 6 2 - E t _ _ _ ; 6 3 -
V a l u a b l e c o l l e c t i o n ; 6 4 -
A c t r e s s S o m m e r ; 6 5 -
A l c o h o l i c d r i n k o f
f e r m e n t e d h o n e y ; 6 6 - E f f l u e n t s y s t e m ; 6 7 - M e d i c i n a l a m o u n t ;

D o w n
1 - T e m p o r a r y p a p e r c u r r e n c y ; 2 - B e e t h o v e n d e d i c a t e e ; 3 - D o m i n g o , f o r o n e ; 4 -
G l u t t o n o u s ; 5 - P e r t a i n i n g t o a m e a l ; 6 - F l e u r - d e - _ _ _ ; 7 - A a r d v a r k ' s p r e y ; 8 - G r e n o b l e ' s
r i v e r ; 9 - M o c k ; 1 0 - F i a s c o ; 1 1 - A l i k e i n e v e r y w a y ; 1 2 - L u s t r o u s f u r ; 1 3 - B r i s t l e ; 1 8 -
D e b a t a b l e ; 2 2 - J a r g o n ; 2 4 - R e p r i m a n d ; 2 7 - M i x d o u g h ; 2 9 - L o s e t r a c t i o n ; 3 0 - W h e n s a i d
t h r e e t i m e s , a 1 9 7 0 w a r m o v i e ; 3 1 - S t r e t c h w i d e ; 3 2 - B i b l i c a l b i r t h r i g h t s e l l e r ; 3 3 - C o n t i n e n t
S E o f A s i a ; 3 5 - E v e r g l a d e s b i r d ; 3 8 - S h e d _ _ _ ; 3 9 - M e r c h a n t ; 4 2 - L i k e a s i n g l e - c e l l e d
o r g a n i s m ; 4 4 - C l a d ; 4 6 - H u l l e d c r a c k e d g r a i n ; 4 8 - 1 6 0 s q u a r e r o d s ; 5 0 - C a f e a d d i t i v e ; 5 2 -
A u t h o r C a l v i n o ; 5 3 - R i n g s o f a c h a i n ; 5 4 - F i r s t n a m e i n c o s m e t i c s ; 5 5 - C l o s e w i t h f o r c e ; 5 6 -
R a c e r Y a r b o r o u g h ; 5 7 - F l a t - b o t t o m e d b o a t ; 6 1 - H o l i d a y s t a r t ;
P a e 1 o f 1 B e s t C r o s s w o r d s . c o m - P u z z l e # 1 f o r J a n u a r 2 1 , 2 0 1 2
1 / 2 2 / 2 0 1 2 h t t : / / w w w . b e s t c r o s s w o r d s . c o m / b e s t c r o s s w o r d s / r i n t a b l e / H o m e , r i n t a b l e . s d i r e c t ; s e s s i o n i . . .
County prepares ice
rink for upcoming
Alpenfrost
celebration
Health & Wellness
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 15
ä-:'|ª
SERVICES

ADOPTlON SERvlCES
heaveo Seot
Adopt|oo Serv|ces, |oc
1100 S. Bridge Street
Charlevoix, MI 49720
231-237-9880 Office
877-583-0990 Expectant parents line
www.HeavenSentAdopt.com
BEAUTY SALON
0he||o's Sa|oo & 0ay Spa
126 Main St.
East Jordan
231-536-7764
w|ok Sa|oo
829 West Main
Gaylord
989-731-4300
A To0ch oI 0|ass
105 N. Center
Gaylord
989-732-2654
CHlROPRACTOR
Saks we||oess 0eoter
1447 S. Otsego, Gaylord
989-732-7000
www.sakswellnesscenter.com
COUNSELlNG
0ygoet 0o0ose||og
Downtown Gaylord
989-731-1018
www.cygnetfamilycounseling.com
EYE CARE
6ay|ord £ye 0are 0eoter
829 W. Main, Gaylord
989-732-6261
FlTNESS FAClLlTY
0tsego 0o0oty Sportsp|ex
1250 Gornick Ave.
Gaylord
989-731-3546
www.ocsportsplex.com
0tsego 0o0oty
0omm0o|ty 0eoter
315 S. Center
Gaylord
989-732-6521
www.otsegocountyparksrec.com
Saks we||oess 0eoter
1447 S. Otsego
Gaylord
989-732-5200
www.sakswellnesscenter.com
Powerho0se 6ym
1044 W. main
Gaylord
989-732-0744
www.gaylordsgym.com
HOLlSTlC HEALTH
|hT we||oess Shop
416 W. Main
Gaylord
989-448-4717
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
HOME HEALTH CARE
hea|th 0ept. oI hw N|ch|gao
220 W. Garfield, Charlevoix
231-547-6092
www.nwhealth.org
HOME HEALTH CARE
horthero Naoagemeot Serv|ces
657 Chestnut Ct..Gaylord
989-732-6374
www.northernmanagement.org
HOSPlCE
hosp|ce oI N|ch|gao
1723 W. M-32, Ste. B
Gaylord
888-247-5701
www.hom.org
HOSPlTAL
Nercy hosp|ta|
1100 Michigan Ave., Grayling
989-348-5461
www.mercygrayling.com
0har|evo|x Area hosp|ta|
14700 Lake Shore Dr
Charlevoix
231-547-8630
www.cah.org
HYPNOTHERAPY
0T weber hypootherapy, LL0
114 S. Center
Suite 105, Gaylord
989.619.4395
dave@dtweberhypnotherapy.com
MASSAGE THERAPY
The hat0ra||st
1029 Gornick Ave., Gaylord
989-705-1451
Se|I hea| Nassagel
8ody workl£oergy Ned|c|oe
Cathy Brink NCMP/AMTA,
Reiki Master/Teacher
1029 Gornick Ave.,
Alpine Suite #103
989-619-6282
MONUMENTS
Aoger Noo0meots
7535 US 131, Mancelona
231-587-8433
NUTRlTlON &
SUPPLEMENTS
6eoera| h0tr|t|oo
0eoters
1417 W. Main St.,
Pineridge Square
Gaylord, MI 49735-1755
989-731-6363
|hT we||oess Shop
416 W. Main. Gaylord
989-448-4717
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
Jojo's Narket
1459 S. Otsego, Gaylord
989-705-8500
Fo0r Star h0tr|t|oo
604 W. Main, Gaylord
989-448-8618
www.fourstarnutrition.net
PHYSlCAL THERAPY
Jordao Va||ey
8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
100 Main St # 9, East Jordan
231-536-1451
8oyoe 8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
197 State St, Boyne City
231-582-6365
PODlATRlST
0r Tom 0ekorte 0.P.N.
Podiatric Physician & Surgeon
1404 Bridge St, Charlevoix, MI
231 547 4662
1662 S Otsego Ave, Gaylord
(989) 732-6565
SENlOR ASSlSTANCE
0tsego 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
120 Grandview Blvd.
Gaylord
989-732-1122
www.otsegocountycoa.org
0rawIord 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
308 Lawndale St., Grayling
989-348-8342
www.crawfordcoa.org
Seo|ors he|p|og Seo|ors
221 E. Felshaw St.
Gaylord
989-448-8323
www.seniorshelpingseniors.com/
northernmichigan
l: :JJ j:ª. .ªs.ª-ss ::ª|::| j:ª. s:'-s .-) :. |ë:.' ªs :| 1||.:-ch--t'j|ª:.:-.::¤
By Joe Daniels
You are healthy now and you want to stay
that way. One of the best ways to maintain
good health is to maintain a healthy weight
level.
Eating the right foods, the right amount of
food and incorporating some exercise into
your daily activities can go a long way to
fend off all manners of possible health prob-
lems down the road.
If you are just finishing up a diet that
helped you get to your target weight level,
you may be scared that you'll be stuck diet-
ing forever. Not so, says Amy Weld, a nutri-
tionist at a Detroit area hospital.
"Developing a new plan after the slimming
down portion of the diet is over is just as
important as the diet itself.
While some successful slimmers prefer to
immediately increase their calorie intake,
others prefer to do it in steps. In many ways,
this is a good idea as it helps you to concen-
trate on getting your extra calories by gradu-
ally increasing the portion sizes of the foods
you’re already eating rather than suddenly
adding in chocolate, crisps, booze and take-
aways.
•Build a healthy base by eating vegetables,
fruits, and grains (especially whole grains)
with little added fat or sugar.
•Select sensible portion sizes.
•Get moving. Get regular physical activity
to balance calories from the foods you eat.
•Set a good example for children by prac-
ticing healthy eating habits and enjoying
regular physical activities together.
Keep in mind that even though heredity
and the environment are important influ-
ences, your behaviors help determine your
body weight.
Weld offers a possible five-step plan to
maintain your new healthier weight.
Step 1 - Once you reach target, add 250
calories a day to your existing daily calorie
intake. This means if you’ve been having
1,250 calories each day, you should now have
1,500 calories a day.
Step 2 - After a week, weigh yourself on
your usual scales. You’ll probably have lost a
little more weight. If so, add another 250
calories to last week’s daily allowance. So, if
you were having 1,500 calories a day, now
have 1,750 calories daily.
Step 3 - After another week, weigh yourself
again. If you’ve lost more weight, add an
extra 250 calories to your daily intake, for
example from 1,750 calories to 2,000 calories
each day.
Step 4 - After another week, if your weight
has stabilized that’s the amount of calories
you need each day to keep your new slim
shape. If you’ve gained a tiny amount, drop
your daily calorie intake by 100 calories, for
example, from 2,000 calories to 1,900 calo-
ries daily. After a week, weigh yourself again.
If your weight has stayed the same, that’s the
amount of calories you need each day for
weight maintenance. If your weight has gone
up or down, juggle your daily calorie intake
by 50 calories a day until your weight even-
tually stabilizes.
Step 5 - Weigh yourself once a week on
your usual scales until you are confident that
you’re maintaining your healthy weight.
Weld says as important as eating right is
being active. While regular trips to the gym
are part of daily life for some people, that
doesn't match the lifestyle of others.
Copyright © Publishers-Edge
Classes Available!
Visit
www.gaylordsgym.com
(989) 732-0744
GAYLORD FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
M-32 WEST
BEANERS
PG
D
IC
K
E
R
S
O
N
R
O
A
D
I-
7
5
I-
7
5
#
! Large Free Weight Room
! 2 Racquetball/Wallyball Courts
! Special Student, Senior
and Military Rates
! Trainers on Staff
! Racquetball Leagues
! 8 Different Aerobics Classes
! HEX Tanning Booths
FEATURING
HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 5am - 8pm; Sat. & Sun. 8am - 2pm
1044 W. Main St.
Gaylord
How To Maintain a Healthy Weight
For at least 30 minutes most days of the
week, preferably daily, do any one of the
activities listed below—or combine activities.
Look for additional opportunities among
other activities that you enjoy.
•Walk, wheel, or bike ride more and drive less.
•Walk up stairs instead of taking an elevator.
•Get off the bus a bus stop early and walk or
wheel the remaining distance.
•Mow the lawn with a push mower.
•Rake leaves.
•Garden.
•Push a stroller.
•Clean the house.
•Do exercises or pedal a stationary bike while
watching television.
•Play actively with children.
•Take a brisk 10-minute walk or wheel in the
morning, at lunch, and after dinner.
•As part of your exercise or recreational
routine:
•Walk, wheel, or jog.
•Bicycle or use an arm pedal bicycle.
•Swim or do water aerobics.
•Play racket or wheelchair sports.
•Golf (pull cart or carry clubs).
•Canoe.
•Cross-country ski.
•Play basketball.
•Dance.
•Take part in an exercise program at work,
home, school, or gym.
Copyright © Publishers-Edge
A Nutritionist’s guide of
suggested activities:
Gaylord - Otsego Memorial Hospital’s (OMH) 34-
bed skilled and long term care nursing facility,
McReynolds Hall, was recently ranked in the top
10% of nursing homes throughout the state of
Michigan by the U.S. Centers for Medicare &
Medicaid Services (CMS). Nursing facilities are
ranked by the federal government based on three
years of health inspection data, including the seri-
ousness of violations and how long it takes a facility
to correct a problem.
The statistics released were generated from CMS
inspections between April 2008 and July 2011. Out
of 427 nursing facilities in the state, OMH’s
McReynolds Hall ranked 26th with only 18 viola-
tions, none of which were serious. The average number of
violations for Michigan nursing facilities in a three year
period was 45 total and 2.5 serious violations.
“I’m incredibly proud of our staff at McReynolds Hall,”
said Mary Steele, RN, Director of Nursing for 9 years this
March. “They truly love and care for the residents and
when that guides everything you do, the rest falls into
place.”
McReynolds Hall maintains an overall 5-star rating based
on a number of variables drawn from CMS health inspec-
tions including how well a facility is staffed and information
regarding the residents’ health and well-being. The facility
received its rating by meeting over 180- regulatory stan-
dards designed to protect nursing home residents and pro-
vide standards for care. Staffing also plays a large role in
their successes. Staff- to- resident ratios at McReynolds Hall
provide 30-60 minutes more time spent per resident than
state and national averages.
“The ranking of our facility in the top 10% and our 5-star
rating are just two more examples of Otsego Memorial
Hospital’s dedication to quality and excellence in health-
care,” commented Tom Lemon, Otsego Memorial Hospital’s
chief executive officer. “The staff of McReynolds Hall and
the hospital departments with which they work do a
tremendous job to make sure that all standards are met or
exceeded, and that our residents are comfortable and their
needs are met.”
OMH depends on the hard work of several disciplines to
ensure high ratings for its skilled and long-term facility;
departments like Rehabilitation Services, Environmental
Services, Facilities Management, Dietary Services and
Pharmacy are all part of the outstanding interdisciplinary
team at McReynolds Hall. Disciplines within the depart-
ment such as Activities, Social Services, Infection
Prevention and Restorative Nursing, provide exemplary
services that safeguard residents from illnesses and infec-
tion as well as maintain each resident’s physical, mental,
emotional and spiritual well-being.
Health & Wellness
Specializing in
oncology Massage &
Geriatric & Dementia Massage
Page 16 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012
OMH McReynolds Hall
Ranks in Top 10% of
Michigan Nursing Homes
“YOUR GOOD HEALTH IS OUR BUSINESS”
• Great tasting smoothies
(Breakfast, Lunch or Snacks)
• Full line of Nutritional Products
• Free Consultation & Coaching to help
you reach your goals
• Free Wi-Fi
604 W. Main Street, Gaylord, MI 49735
(989) 448-8618 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7am - 4pm; Sat. 9am - 1pm
Free 16 oz. Healthy Smoothie
Free 16 oz. Energy Drink
with a Free Wellness Profile
Limit one per new customer
www.FourStarNutrition.net
SELF HEAL MASSAGE
BODY WORK/ENERGY MEDICINE
Massage designed to meet client needs
for your over-all well-being.
CATHY BRINK, NCMP/AMTA
Reiki Master/Teacher; Touch for Health Instructor
989-619-6282
1029 Gornick Ave., Alpine Suites #103
Gaylord, MI 49735
Downtown Gaylord · info@cygnetfamilycounseling.com
DT Weber Hypnotherapy, LLC
Weight Loss, Stop Smoking, Phobias, Traumas
Sleep Issues, Anger, Stress, Pain and more.
Call nowto schedule your FREE first session
to see how hypnosis is right for you.
David T. Weber, CMS-CHt.
Certified Clinical Hypnotherapist · Certified Medical Support Adjunct
114 S. Center, Suite 105, Gaylord, MI Phone: 989-619-4395
dave@dtweberhypnotherapy.com Toll Free: 888-732-4409
McReynolds Hall resident, Walter Wiscavage, and his wife Frances
play bingo in the newly refinished Activity Room at McReynolds Hall.
Residents participate in a variety of activities, theme parties,
barbeques and other special events throughout the year.
January 26, 2012 Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! • Page 17
Page 18 • Choice Publications ... The Best Choice! January 26, 2012













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