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The County Times

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Taylor Sparks Hornets Past Pumas
By Chris Stevens Staff Writer GREAT MILLS – Late in last Wednesday night’s non-conference high school girls basketball matchup between Great Mills High School and Dr. Henry Wise, Jr. High (Upper Marlboro), a foul was called underneath the basket in favor of Hornets junior center Shawnese Taylor. Upon this rare development during the course of the game, Hornets head Coach Brian Weisner clapped and showed surprise that Taylor actually drew a foul. “It’s unfair that because of how strong she is she doesn’t get the foul calls that smaller players get,” Weisner said after Taylor’s 18 points and 20 rebounds off the bench led the defending SMAC champions to a 6648 victory over the Pumas at Great Mills High. “She gets fouled just as hard as anybody else out there. She doesn’t get those calls because she can take a hit.” Weisner raved about Taylor’s strength, excellent footwork, and soft shot, as evidenced by clutch See Hornets Basketball page B-3

Leonardtown Survives Hornets’ Furious Rally

Ashley Lindsey prepares to take a shot.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Photo By Chris Stevens

Leonardtown’s Eric Wettingel is pressured by the Hornets’ Andre Butler in the first half of Friday’s night game.

St. Mary’s Chosen for Maryland Awards
St. Mary’s County was well represented at the Special Olympics Maryland Awards Banquet this past November. Angela Pitts of Leonardtown was chosen as the Female Athlete of the Year, Gwen Guy of St. Inigoes was selected as Coach of the Year, TJ Parkes was chosen as the Volunteer of the Year and the St. Mary’s County Sailing/Kayaking Team was recognized for the Annual Regatta. Pitts is described as a woman “who works hard, plays fair, is quiet and patient and is always looking for ways to please her coaches and teammates.” Guy is a certified Special Olympics coach in aquatics, snowshoeing, golf, and kayaking. As the aquatics coach this year, she coordinated the beginners program for more than 50 athletes, then the training for about 25 intermediate athletes; 12 of whom traveled to the state competition, and she was also the first coach See Special Olympics page B-3

By Chris Stevens Staff Writer GREAT MILLS – Friday Night’s much-anticipated boys’ basketball match-up between Leonardtown High and Great Mills did not start off as one for the ages, but it certainly ended that way. After trailing by a high of 19 points, the Hornets fought back late, but the Raiders held on for a 50-47

win in a Southern Maryland Athletic Conference game at Great Mills High. “I’m proud of the kids, we really worked hard for this win,” said Raiders coach Jake Heibel, who picked up his first victory against his former school since he took over as Leonardtown head coach three seasons ago. “I coached here for 12 years and I know how great the fans are, so I told the guys to beat Great Mills See Leonardtown Hoops page B-2

Seahawks Just Miss Upset
By Chris Stevens Staff Writer ST. MARY’S CITY – The St. Mary’s College women’s basketball team gave nationally-ranked Messiah College (Pa.) its best shot Saturday afternoon, but came up short, losing 82-77 in a non-conference match-up at the Athletics and Recreation Center Arena. Senior Forward Allie Scott led all scorers with 25 points, including a three-point play with 46 seconds remaining in the game to bring the Seahawks (6-2 overall, 3-1 Capital Athletic Conference) within three points. However, the Falcons (9-1 overall, 0-0 Middle Atlantic Conference and ranked #4 in NCAA Division III) hit four free-throws and forced a key turnover down the stretch to hold off the upset-minded Hawks. “We haven’t faced this level of competition except maybe once this year,” said Seahawks head coach Barb Bausch. “They’re a very composed team and we’re getting to that point. This was a good opportunity for us to find out how good we can be.” The Falcons jumped out to an 18-7 lead before the Hawks rallied and Scott sank a long three-pointer from the left corner to slice Messiah’s lead to three (42-39) at halftime. The Falcons continued to keep the Seahawks at arms length in the second half, leading by as much as 10 with 3:14 to go after two free throws by senior guard Nikki Lobach, who led five Falcons in double figure scoring with 22 points, including cashing in on 13 of 14 free-throw attempts. See Women’s Basketball page B-2

The Seahawks’ Megan Uglik passes the ball in Saturday’s non-conference women’s basketball matchup.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Section B - 

The County Times

Thursday, December 0, 007

Hornets-Raiders Game Proves To Be Worthy Initiation
By Chris Stevens Staff Writer As I drove to Great Mills High School Friday Night, I had a feeling that getting there early would be in my best interests because of the county and conference bragging rights this game would hold. What I was not aware of that the officials at the high school would be turning people away from the gym….before the Junior Varsity game was halfway over. Apparently I picked a perfect Friday night public school match-up to cover for the County Times and St. Mary’s County. Thank you, thank you, you’re far too kind! From the time the starting line-ups were announced, you could not hear yourself think until the game ended and the gym full of patrons made their

way to the exits. In that time period, I saw everything that is great about high school athletics here in the County. I must confess that coming from a sports-psychotic state such as Delaware, I didn’t know what to expect once winter sports season began. Now I know, and I’m better for it. While Leonardtown jumped ahead by 19 points well into the third quarter and the Raider faithful were loud and proud, the home fans continued to support their team after giving encouraging cheers that eventually turned into raucous, ear-splitting roars of “oh yeah, we’re coming back” with each passing bucket the Hornets swished.

Aside from the stirring action on the floor (players diving for loose balls, hustling to take away easy baskets), the coaches made this game very enjoyable as well. There’s Great Mills’ Frank Peck, a calm and affable gentleman off the court who transforms into a war general that will not hesitate to light a fire under his players’ rear ends when they’re not doing well and is quick to praise them when they succeed. During one fourth quarter stretch when the Hornets were scoring points with ease and flying all over the court making clutch defensive plays that were missing earlier in the game, Peck danced a jig of wonderment and excite-

Women’s Basketball
Continued from page B- St. Mary’s refused to quit, outscoring Messiah 11-4 over the next 2:28, ending in Scott’s methodical drive to the hoop and shot that drew the foul on Katie Kalb. Scott made the free throw and after a Messiah turnover, the Hawks had a chance to tie the game. However, Steph Saint-Aubin’s lay-up attempted rolled in and out of the basket and Lobach and Amy Reed made two foul shots apiece for the final margin. Tiara Hurte contributed 16 points and 11 rebounds for St. Mary’s, the freshman center’s fourth double-double this year. Saint-Aubin scored 13 and four steals, and junior guard Kiely Murphy added 11 for the Seahawks.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Steph Saint-Aubin and Tiara Hurte of St. Mary’s monitor Messiah’s Ashley Brooks.

Nikki Lobach of Messiah College makes a move to the basket as St. Mary’s Allie Scott defends.

Photo By Chris Stevens

ment that the late host of Family Feud, Ray Combs would heartily approve of. On the other sideline was Leonardtown’s Jake Heibel, who coached at Great Mills for 12 years before taking on the challenge of rebuilding the Raiders’ basketball program three years ago. Not as loud as Peck, but just as animated, Heibel would show his disgust at an official’s call with a strong two-fisted wave of his hands, and a time-out call that Ray Charles and Stevie Wonder could see from a mile away. Heibel’s voice was pretty much gone by the time I spoke with him after the game, but he was courteous and nice enough to give me his thoughts on the game in the most audible way possible. And then, there were the fans and cheerleaders who took every stoppage of play to shout their team’s favorite cheer. For the record, “Clap your hands! Stomp your feet,” makes the most noise I’ve heard anywhere in quite sometime, high school or college level. As far as the game goes, Leonardtown looked to establish itself as a player in the SMAC title race this season, and there’s no better way to announce your arrival than taking the fight to the defending conference champions and then surviving their best shot in the final quarter and a half. With their disciplined defensive scheme and opportunistic fast break offense, the Raiders should be taken seriously as a contender this season. The Hornets, inexperienced as they may be, showed that laying down is not in their vocabulary and while they may struggle in the early going this season, the chemistry that they are building will thrust them into the race for the SMAC title as well. If it all sounds a bit hyperbolic, especially for a mid-December game, feel free to pardon my excitement. Competition brings out the best in everybody, from the players and the coaches, to the fans and media covering the game. If Friday night was any indication, I should be prepared for a lot of excitement this season.

Leonardtown Hoops
Continued from page B- on a Friday night in this gym is very special.” What turned out to be a close game started off as an absolute breakaway for the Raiders. After a tense first quarter that ended tied at seven, Leonardtown went on a 25-6 run that spanned the second quarter and the first half of

the third quarter, ending on a fast-break lay-up by senior forward Eric Chase that opened up a 32-13 lead with 4:15 to go. “We were just cutting back door and looking to get some easy baskets,” Chase said. “We rebounded the ball well, made some plays offensively, and Great Mills had a little trouble scoring,” Heibel explained. “At that point, it becomes a game of heart and character,” said Great Mills head coach Frank Peck. “I told our guys, ‘either we can

Moe Stone of Leonardtown reacts to seeing Great Mills’ John Dickerson (32) in his path Friday Night.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Donald Williams of Great Mills inbounds the ball.

Photo By Chris Stevens

sulk about where we are, or let’s see if we can put a run together.’” The defending SMAC champions chose the second option. Behind the trio of Darrian Johnson, John Dickerson and Zack Sawyer, who led Great Mills with 14 points, the Hornets ate away at the Leonardtown lead until it was down to two (48-46) with 17 seconds left. With the opportunity to tie the game up, Donald Williams stood at the free throw line after a foul was called while he went up for a shot. Williams made his first attempt, but missed the second and the Raiders got an uncontested lay-up to stretch the lead to three points.

Dickerson’s long shot from the corner bounced off the side of the rim and the Raiders pulled off the biggest win Leonardtown has had in quite some time. “Give Great Mills credit for erasing our lead,” Heibel said. “The one thing I told our guys was to be persistent for 32 minutes or however long it would take to get the win.” Chase, who led all scorers with 17 points, felt the win “boosts our confidence way high. I think we have a chance to be one of the top three or four teams in the SMAC this year.” Heibel said the win “brings us closer together as a team and it makes us better.”

Thursday, December 20, 2007

The County Times

Section B - 

Hornets Basketball
Continued from page B- baskets that kept Great Mills ahead by sizeable margins when the Pumas appeared to be closing the gap. “She

does a real nice job for us,” he added. The Hornets did lead throughout most of the game, with an advantage as large as 19 points after junior guard

Tyneshia Baker scored on a lay-up that made the score 4526 with just under two minutes left in the third quarter. Wise (which led at times during a back-and-forth first quarter) then went on a 14-2 scoring burst that shrunk the Hornets’ lead to seven points, but behind Taylor, senior guard Megan Matheny (who scored 14 points) and Baker (eight points), Great Mills

extended the lead back to 19 and were never seriously challenged the rest of the way. “We hope not to see their kind of size again this year,” Weisner said of the Pumas’ intimidating frontline of Morgan Addison, Briann Gibson and Erica Reed. “We wanted to play a team that was going to push us defensively, and that’s what they did.” The Hornets cashed in on

a huge advantage at the freethrow line, converting 21 of their 37 attempts, with Taylor making six-of-seven attempts and Matheny sinking fiveof-eight. Shamara Adams, Cordela Naylor and Ashley Lindsey each added seven points for Great Mills. Leslie Slagton scored nine points to lead the Pumas, who made just two of their 18 free throw attempts.

Tyneshia Baker brings the ball up the court.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Great Mills’ Ryshawn Butler prepares to pass as Wise’s Erica Reed defends.

Photo By Chris Stevens

Special Olympics
Continued from page B-
Photo By Chris Stevens

Tyneshia Baker of Great Mills looks for an open teammate.

Lesesne Selected as St. Mary’s November Athlete-of-the-Month
St. Mary’s City, Md. – Tyson Lesesne (Edgewood, Md.) of the men’s basketball team was selected by the St. Mary’s College of Maryland Department of Athletics and Recreation as the November Athlete-of-the-Month. Lesesne is a 6’-0”, senior guard who helped the Seahawks to a 5-1 overall record in November, including a 1-0 mark in Capital Athletic Conference (CAC) action. The Edgewood High School product led St. Mary’s with a 19.7 scoring average, an .893 free throw percentage and five blocks. Lesesne was also second with a .549 field goal percentage, a .441 three-point field goal percentage and 23 assists, while being fourth with six steals. He scored in double digits in all but one contest, including three 20+ games. He started the month with a season-high 27 points in the Seahawks’ season-opening victory (102-65) over Mitchell College at the 27th Annual Eastern Connecticut State University (ECSU) Tip-Off Tournament Nov. 16. Lesesne added 23 points as he connected on a season-high five three-pointers in the team’s 94-81 victory over Salisbury University in the third-place game of the Provident Bank Pride of Maryland Division III Men’s Basketball Scholarship Tournament Nov. 25. He dished out a career-high nine assists and hauled in a season-best eight rebounds in St. Mary’s 90-79 win over CAC newcomer, Villa Julie College, Nov. 28 to end the month. Lesesne also matched his career-high for the fourth time with a pair of blocks against the Mustangs. Lesesne was named the tournament MVP of the ECSU Tournament while also earning a spot on the All-Tournament Team. He also represented SMCM on the Pride of Maryland All-Tournament Team. On Nov. 18, Lesesne was named the CAC Player-of-the-Week after averaging 21.5 points, 3.0 rebounds and 2.0 assists and finishing with a .560 field goal percentage in a pair of games. Courtesy of St. Mary’s College Sports Information Department

for the county’s first season of snowshoeing. Parkes performs many functions for the County’s Special Olympics Office. She is the head coach for kayaking and has been a Ski coach and partner for an athlete with a sit ski for about 10 years. During the past two years, she has organized a team of volunteers who used wagons during a craft fair to sell bottled water, and also performs seamstress duties.

SPECIALOLYMPICSTOHOSTNOLIMIT TEXAS HOLDEM’ TOURNAMENT The Special Olympics Center For Life Enrichment will host a No Limit Texas Holdem’ poker tournament Jan. 19 at the Center for Life Enrichment in Hollywood at 2 p.m. with sign-up starting at 1 p.m. There will be a $150 buy-in with a projected $4,000 going to the winner of the tournament. For more information, contact Jim Bucci at 240-431-1664, or you can register by calling 301-373-8100. Courtesy of St. Mary’s County Special Olympics Office

Photo Courtesy of Mary Lou Bucci

The St. Mary’s County Special Olympics representatives are all smiles after winning several awards at the State’s Awards Banquet last month.

MIDDAY Date:

Pick 3 Pick 4

EVENING
Pick 3 Pick 4

BONUS MATCH 5
07.08.12.24.38 14 18.22.27.28.39 20 11.13.14.21.36 17 03.06.12.14.23 18 14.26.31.33.39 19 02.18.20.27.31 29 01.05.07.15.37 20

12/11/07 588

5712

372 960 283 042 514 311 056

9389

12/12/07 049 12/13/07 404 12/14/07 712 12/15/07 189 12/16/07 107 12/17/07 642

7151 6809 0678 9332 2224 1710

4959 9186 9769 6577 5646 8245

The County Times

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Heritage Project Grant Applications Now Available In Southern Maryland
The Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium announces that applications for funding from the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority (MHAA) are available to all qualified applicants. This program specifically funds both capital and non-capital projects for sites that will support heritage cultural activities in the three-county region – Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s. The Southern Maryland Heritage Area will be accepting the applications at their office in Hughesville. The grants are for projects slated to begin in fiscal year 2009 (begins July 1, 2008) and all potential applicants must file an “Intent to Apply” form with the Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium, (SMHAC.) This simple one page form, along with a page of information about the grants is both available from the SMHAC office and on the web at www.SouthernMDisFun. com. Click on “Heritage News” and find the link there. Eligible applicants will include non-profit organizations and government agencies that support the mission of heritage tourism in Southern Maryland. The Non-capital Project Grants awards are for a maximum of $50,000 and the Capital Project Grants are for a maximum of $100,000. Applicants must be able to provide dollar for dollar matching funds for all grants. In order to qualify for a Capital Grant the project must be within one of the Targeted Investment Zones identified in the Consortium’s Management Plan. For an on-line version of the Management Plan, see the website www. SouthernMDisFun. The Intent to Apply form is due by end of day on February 1, and is available on the website listed above, or the form can be emailed or sent to any interested party. Please contact Heritage Area Director Roz Racanello by email to receive the forms at: SoMdHeritage@tccsmd. org or call 301-274-4083, for more information. Office hours are Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The full application forms for the Project Grants are on the web, at www.marylandhistoricaltrust.net under “Forms and Documents” but all potential applicants must work through the Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium office. See Project Grants page B-7

Photo courtesy of GTSphotos

St. Mary’s College of Maryland sailors won the ICSA National Sloop title. From left to right are Valen Smith, Derick Vranizan and John Loe.

Sailing Team Wins National Sloop Title
St. Mary’s College of Maryland’s (SMCM) sailing team is putting another trophy on the shelf after winning the Intercollegiate College Sailing Association’s (ICSA) Sloop National Championship in Fort Worth, Texas, in November. The team beat Boston College, Navy, and Texas A&M-Galveston on a J-22 with a crew of three. They brought home the Cornelius Shields Jr. Trophy. The team was skippered by John Loe, a senior from New Orleans, Louisiana, and crewed by Valen Smith, a senior, from Wilmette/Chicago, Illinois, and Derick Vranizan, a junior, from Seattle, Washington. Loe said he felt relief more than excitement with the win after three years of consecutively competing and qualifying. The College team placed ninth in 2005 and second in 2006. “I think we are the only team to qualify three years in a row for the sloop championship,” he said. “It was a really small lake and we had varied conditions,” said Loe. “We had a spectacular broach and wipeout just after the finish line in one race.” See Sloop Title page B-5

St. Mary’s County Library Awarded Gates Foundation Grant
St. Mary’s County Library Director Kathleen Reif announces that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has awarded St. Mary’s County Library one of the new “Opportunity Online” Hardware Grants in the amount of $18,200, with the challenge that it be matched by $10,400 in local funds. St. Mary’s County Library is one of 18 library systems in Maryland to receive a grant. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation recognizes the vital role libraries play in providing equal access of technology services to all people as well as the importance of libraries providing adequate, upto-date technology services. This “Opportunity Online” grant is designed to help libraries maintain and improve their technology services by using the Foundation’s grant dollars to acquire additional funding locally. The timeline for the library to raise the local funds is $3900 by June 2008 and $6500 by June 2009. According to Reif the funds will provide for the purchase of new computers as well as the necessary software, furniture and network equipment for all three of the library’s branches: Charlotte Hall, Leonardtown and Lexington Park. Last year, the library’s computers had over 150,000 uses, which was a 16% increase over the previous year. Everyday, people walk into one of the three St. Mary’s County Library branches to use the computer for a variety of reasons: looking for jobs, accessing government services, completing school assignments, or connecting with family and friends. “I am grateful that Bill & Melinda Gates value the role played by libraries in helping our county residents stay on the Information Highway,” states Reif. “And I am confident that many local businesses and individuals will be eager to partner with them so that our community does not miss out on this special See Grant Awarded page B-5

New Explorations in Learning Program Open to the Community – Seniors Welcome
Starting in January, the Office of Lifelong Learning & Professional Programs at St. Mary’s College of Maryland will offer a new program of non-credit classes at Wildewood Village Community Center in California, Maryland. Courses on art, presidential politics, and Chinese culture will be offered for a fee of $75 per class. The courses are open to the public and scheduled for both day and evening sessions. The timing and level of the classes are tailored to appeal to senior adults. To register, call 240-895-2200, e-mail kjgrimes@smcm.edu, or download the brochure and application at www.smcm.edu. The courses will focus on contemporary issues and follow the successful programs done at Asbury Solomon retirement community in Solomons, Maryland. The Wildewood courses will be open to the entire Southern Maryland Community. Lectures will be presented by College faculty. (Listed below is the course schedule.) The program is named in honor of Grace and John Horton, whose tireless efforts were crucial to the creation and success of the College’s pilot program at Asbury. John Horton, who died last June, moved with his family to St. Mary’s County in the late ’70s after a long career in the Central Intelligence Agency where his last position was chief of the Soviet Division. After building a house near Sotterley, the Hortons became active in the local community. Grace Horton was a charter member of the SMC League of Women Voters and served two terms as president. She was appointed by the County Commissioners to the Human Relations Board and later to the Affordable Housing Study group. She was a founding member of Health Share and a trustee of Sotterley. John Horton’s interests and expertise led him to environmental matters. He was active in the local Sierra Club and a member of the Elms Board. In the ’90s he was instrumental in getting the state of Maryland and St. Mary’s County to designate as wild lands 2000 acres on the St. Mary’s River. In l996, he became the second recipient of the Sierra Club’s Bernie Fowler Award. Throughout this period, he wrote three espionage See New Explorations page B-7

Frank van Aalst, SMCM Professor of World History, with China’s terra cotta soldiers in Xi’an. Van Aalst will teach two courses on China at Wildewood’s Community Center beginning Jan. 23, as part of St. Mary’s College of Maryland’s new Grace and John Horton Explorations in Learning program.

Thursday, December 20, 2007

The County Times

Section B - 

Taking the Mystery Out of Gifts for Men Sloop Title
If men are from Mars and women from Venus, then it stands to be that choosing gifts for each other might be a bit of a logistics challenge. Does he really think she wants a 50-piece ratchet set? Does she believe he wants to take ballroom dancing lessons? If men and women agree to be different, how will choosing holiday gifts be possible? The primary rule of gifting men is to think about what they want, not necessarily what they need. Sure, a package of boxer briefs may be practical, but they shouldn’t be the stocking-stuffer of choice. Now is the time to indulge men with some items on their wish lists and with other items that pamper. Here are some ideas to get you started. Go with creature comforts in clothing: In your eyes a cashmere mock turtleneck sweater and trousers may be what you want to see your man wearing, but is he more of a ribbed henley and jeans sort of guy? Don’t try to play dress-up around the holidays. He’ll be less likely to look for a gift receipt for gift returns if you choose items he’ll actually wear. There will be plenty of other opportunities to suggest a new wardrobe, perhaps when you’re on a shopping spree together. Electronics are a can’tmiss: What guy doesn’t go ga-ga over gadgets? Chances are if you wrap up one of the latest flat-screen high-definition televisions you’ll be put up on a pedestal. Whether the man in your life likes watching sports, is a movie buff, or tunes into those animal channel documentaries, a new TV will help him enjoy his hobbies even more. If a TV is a budget-buster, think of other “toys” he might enjoy: a navigation system for the car, MP3 player, PDA, or a video-game system, are all good choices. ‘Scent’sational options: Even if they don’t want to admit it, most men know that smelling good definitely makes them more attractive to women. That’s why a gift of cologne, scented shower gels and more will be appreciated. For years BRUT® has been one of the best-selling and most popular fragrances on the market. For the holidays, they offer a series of gift packages perfect for the man in your life. These fresh, masculine collections feature must-have wearable classics for men. Choose from the original fragrance, blending confident notes of lemon, anise, basil and lavender, among others. Or try BRUT Revolution’s crisp citrus and cypress scents. To learn more, visit, www.brutworld.com or www. brutrevolution.com . Embrace his hobbies: Tickets to a game for the sports fan; knives or lures for the outdoorsman; new computer equipment for the techy — keep hobbies in mind when selecting gifts. They’ll make finding something he’ll love that much easier. Steer clear of “project-related” gifts that imply you want something done around the house. Tools are good for the handyman if working on “stuff” is his idea of a good time. But giving a circular saw because you want an addition built onto the house, may be sending the wrong holiday message. Gifting men doesn’t have to be a mystery. Just keep in mind his likes and interests and you’ll achieve success. Continued from page B- The team was coached by Bill Ward, SMCM assistant sailing coach. Ward said, “One of the best ways to determine a true champion is to test them in a variety of conditions.” The Sloop National Championship is a series of ten races over three days on 22’ sloops. The College win came on the last day in light air when they eliminated Navy and Boston College. To train for the race, the team practiced on a Colgate 26’ owned by Mike O’Brien (Class of ’68) of Solomons, Maryland who is an alumnus

and trustee of the College. The team perfected their skills on a J-22 in Annapolis on a boat made available to them by SMCM alum Scott Nixon (’92) who works for Quantum Sail. The last time the College won this trophy was in 1993 in Gull Lake, Michigan, when the event was hosted by Western Michigan University. The sloop championship continues the dominance SMCM commands on the water. Last spring the College won the Women’s and Team sailing championships. This championship makes the 13th national sailing title at SMC since 1993.

Grant Awarded
Continued from page B- funding opportunity.” Reif is also pleased to announce that BAE SYSTEMS has committed $1000 towards the matching funds. For further information, and to become part of this unique partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation contact Kathleen Reif at 301-475-2846 ext. 1013 or kreif@ stmalib.org.

Singers Needed
St. Maries Musica, long-standing choral group in St. Mary’s County, is seeking one man and one woman to join for our spring concert season. So if you enjoy singing acapella music, show tunes, and if you read music we invite you contact Barb Lorton 30l-373-8181 to arrange an audition.

Library Director appointed to newly formed Superintendent’s Council on Library Services for People with Disabilities.
State Superintendent of Schools Nancy Grasmick recently appointed Kathleen Reif, Director of St. Mary’s County Library, to serve as a member of the Superintendent’s Council on Library Services for People with Disabilities. This newly formed council will serve in an advisory capacity to the Maryland State Department of Education on issues of library service for Maryland’s citizens who are blind and physically handicapped. “This is quite an honor for Ms. Reif and our library system,” states Board of Library Trustees President Joseph B. Bush. “Not only is it recognition of her leadership and experience, but more importantly her sensitivity to the needs of people with disabilities.” “I am honored to accept this appointment,” states Ms. Reif, “and eager to hear about new ideas which I can bring back to St. Mary’s County to make our library even more excellent!”

Drive Thru Chicken Dinners
The Ridge Volunteer Fire Department Auxiliary will be holding a Drive Thru Chicken Dinner on Sunday, December 30, 2007 from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Firehouse in Ridge. Dinners are $8 and will include 1/2 Fried Chicken, Parsley Potatoes, Vegetable, Cole Slaw, and a Roll. Come and support a worthy cause. For more information, 301-8725047 or 301-872-5671. See You There!

Personal grooming items, like cologne, are a good gift idea for men who seem hard to buy for.

Bretons Bay Cell Site:
Verizon Wireless proposes to construct an approximately 199-foot tall antenna support monopole (including the height of the lightning rod), an equipment shelter, and an associated equipment compound located at 21911 Rosebank Court, in the Leonardtown area of St. Mary’s County, Maryland. Verizon Wireless invites comments from interested parties on the impact of the monopole on properties that are listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Comments may be sent to Venable LLP, Attn: Mr. Thomas Lingan, Two Hopkins Plaza, Suite 1800, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-2978 or submitted by telephone to Mr. Lingan at (410) 2447820. Comments must be received by January 24, 2008.

Finally Awake Winter Tour- Jan. 5th

With bands: Seventh Day Slumber Maniac Drive After Edmund Jackson Waters The 7:30 Club 28297 Old Village Rd Mechanicsville, MD 20659 info: 301-884-0147 www.freewebs.com/seventhirtyclub free pizza and soda all evening door prizes

Section B - 

The County Times

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Holiday Baking Recipes
Poinsettia Cookies
From foodnetwork.com Ingredients 3/4 cup butter, softened 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 egg, separated 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder Parchment paper 30 wooden Popsicle sticks 1 cup red sugar 30 green M &M candies Directions 1. With a paddle attachment beat butter, cream cheese and egg yolk until smooth, reserving the white for later. Stir in flour and baking powder. Mix until stiff dough forms. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour. Lightly beat egg white and set aside. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. 2. On lightly floured surface, roll dough, 1/2 at a time, into a 15 by 9-inch rectangle. With sharp knife, cut dough into 3-inch squares. Place 3 inches apart on ungreased, parchment-lined cookie sheets. 3. Brush with egg white. Lightly press about 1 1/2 inches of wooden stick into bottom center of each dough square. With sharp knife, cut the dough diagonally from each corner to within 1/2-inch of center of each square.

Holiday Cheesecake Presents
From kraftfoods.com Ingredients 1-1/2 cups HONEY MAID Graham Cracker Crumbs 1/3 cup butter, melted 3 Tbsp. sugar 3 pkg. (8 oz. each) PHILADELPHIA Cream Cheese, softened 3/4 cup sugar 1 tsp. vanilla 3 eggs decorating gels Colored sprinkles Directions 1. PREHEAT oven to 350°F. Mix crumbs, butter and 3 Tbsp. sugar; press firmly onto bottom of 13x9-inch baking pan. 2. BEAT cream cheese, 3/4 cup sugar and vanilla with electric mixer on medium speed Sprinkle about 1 teaspoon red sugar over each square. Fold alternate corners of the square to the center to form pinwheel, overlapping the dough at the center pushing down gently to seal in center. Press one M & M in center of each pinwheel. 4. Bake for 9 to 12 minutes or until set. Using spatula, immediately remove from cookie sheets. until well blended. Add eggs; mix just until blended. Pour over crust. 3. BAKE 30 min. or until center is almost set. Cool. Refrigerate 3 hours or overnight. Cut into 32 bars. Decorate with gels and sprinkles to resemble “presents.” Store leftover bars in refrigerator.

Homemade Ho-Hos
From foodnetwork.com Ingredients The cake is a classic French Biscuit au Beurre made with “Dutched” cocoa powder, drizzling in the clarified butter at the end for a unique delicious flavor. The filling used in the commercial version of this is probably made with whipped shortening rather than butter but I just can’t bring myself to write a recipe with that ingredient as a filling. I did eat these for a year straight when I was about 12 and hung out at my friend Jenny Marshall’s house. Her mom bought them but mine didn’t. So I had to get my fill while playing at her house. Cake: 5 eggs 2 yolks 3/4 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 6 tablespoons Dutch-processed cocoa powder 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 cup clarified butter, warm Filling: 3 cups confectioners’ sugar 1 cup butter 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 to 2 tablespoons heavy cream Glaze: 12 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped 2 ounces cocoa butter or 1/4 cup vegetable oil Equipment: 2 half sheet pans with sides Directions 1. To make the Cake: Butter the jelly roll pan and line it with parchment paper; then butter the paper to assure release. 2. Bring a saucepan of water to a simmer. 3. In the bowl from a standing mixer, combine the eggs, yolks, sugar, vanilla in a bowl and whisk briefly. Set the bowl over the simmering water and stir until warm and the sugar looks dissolved. Attach the bowl to the standing mixer fitted with a whisk, and whip until light and fluffy, about 6 minutes. 4. Meanwhile, sift together the flour, cocoa, and baking powder 3 times. 5. Remove the bowl from the mixer and, while folding the egg mixture, sift in the flour mixture, little by little, until incorporated. Drizzle in the clarified butter, while folding the batter. 6. Immediately pour the batter into the prepared pans dividing equally and smooth

Apple Pecan Pie
From kraftfoods.com Ingredients 1/2 cup seedless raisins 2 Tbsp. bourbon 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) margarine or butter, softened 1 cup PLANTERS Pecan Halves 1/2 cup firmly packed light brown sugar pastry for 2-crust 9-inch pie 7 cups peeled sliced apples 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. flour 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/4 tsp. salt 1 cup thawed COOL WHIP Whipped Topping Directions 1, PREHEAT oven to 450°F. Mix raisins and bourbon; set aside. Spread all of the margarine onto bottom and up side of 9-inch pie plate. Press pecans, top sides down, in margarine; pat brown sugar evenly over pecans. Divide pastry in half; roll out one half to 10-inch circle on lightly floured surface. Place over brown sugar in pie plate. 2, DRAIN raisins; discard liquid. Toss raisins with apples, granulated sugar, lemon juice, flour, cinnamon and salt. Spoon over pie crust in pie plate. Roll out remaining pastry to 10inch circle. Place over apple mixture; crimp edges of pastry together to seal. Prick top crust with fork to allow steam to vent. 3. BAKE 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350°F. Bake an additional 45 minutes or until top crust is lightly browned. Cool on wire rack 5 minutes or until filling stops bubbling. Place serving plate over pie; carefully invert pie onto plate. Remove pie plate. Cool completely. Serve topped with whipped topping.

Light Pumpkin Cheesecake
From eatbetteramerica.com Ingredients Crust 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons graham cracker crumbs 3 tablespoons apple jelly Filling 4 packages (8 oz each) fat-free cream cheese, softened 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar 2/3 cup sugar 5 eggs ¼ cup all-purpose flour 2 to 3 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 2 tablespoons brandy, if desired 1 can (15 oz) pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) 1 cup frozen (thawed) fat-free whipped topping, if desired Ground nutmeg, if desired Directions 1. Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 9-inch springform pan with cooking spray. Coat sides only with 2 tablespoons of the graham cracker crumbs. In medium bowl, mix remaining 1 cup graham cracker crumbs and the apple jelly. Press in bottom of pan. 2. Bake 8 to 10 minutes or until set. Cool 5 minutes. Refrigerate 5 minutes or until completely cooled. 3. Meanwhile, in large bowl, beat cream cheese with electric mixer on medium speed until smooth and creamy. Gradually beat in brown sugar and sugar until smooth. On low speed, add eggs 1 at a time, beating just until blended. 4. In small bowl, mix flour, pumpkin pie spice, brandy and pumpkin. Gradually add to

the tops with a spatula. Bake until lightly browned and it starts to pull away from the edges of the pan, about 14 to 16 minutes. 7. Remove the cakes from the oven and let sit in the pan for 1 minute. Run a knife along the edge to release the cake then flip it out onto parchment paper. Brush the paper (the one you lined the pan with) with water and let soak for 2 minutes. Peel it off the cake. Trim dry edges from the cake. Let cool covered with plastic wrap. 8. To make the Filling: In the bowl of a standing mixer, combine the sugar and butter and mix on low speed until well blended; then increase speed to medium and beat for another 3 minutes. Add vanilla and cream and continue to beat on medium speed for 1 minute more, adding more cream for spreading consistency, if needed. 9. Spread the sponge cakes with a thin layer of the filling, leaving a 1/4-inch space at the far edge. Roll the cake tightly on the long side until you have rolled a 1 1/2-inch thick log. Cut the log off from the remaining sheet of cake and place seam side-down. Repeat with remaining cake. Chill the logs for 30 minutes; then cut into 2 1/2-inch sections. 10. To make the Glaze: Melt the 2 ingredients together in the top of a double boiler or a bowl set over barely simmering water, stirring occasionally. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick baking mat. One at a time, gently drop the cake rolls into the hot chocolate. Lift out with a fork and let excess chocolate drip back into the bowl. Place on the cookie sheet and let set at room temperature until the coating is firm, about 1 to 2 hours.

Peppermint Chocolate Pudding Pie
From kraftfoods.com Ingredients 2 cups cold milk 2 pkg. (4-serving size each) JELL-O Chocolate Flavor Instant Pudding & Pie Filling 1 HONEY MAID Graham Pie Crust (6 oz.) 1 cup JET-PUFFED Miniature Marshmallows 1 tub (8 oz.) COOL WHIP Whipped Topping, thawed, divided 2 squares BAKER’S Semi-Sweet Baking Chocolate 1/4 cup crushed candy canes Directions 1. POUR cold milk into large bowl. Add dry pudding mixes. Beat with wire whisk 2 min. or until well blended. (Mixture will be thick.) 2. SPOON 1-1/2 cups of the pudding into pie crust. Top with marshmallows. Gently stir 1-1/2 cups of the whipped topping into remaining pudding; spoon over pie. Refrigerate 3 hours.

cream cheese mixture, beating until smooth. Pour over partially baked crust. 5. Bake 1 hour 20 minutes to 1 hour 30 minutes or until center is set. Cool in pan on cooling rack 30 minutes. With sharp knife, loosen cheesecake from side of pan. Cover cheesecake; refrigerate at least 8 hours. 6. Run knife around edge of pan to loosen cheesecake again; carefully remove side of pan. Cut cheesecake into wedges; place on individual dessert plates. Top each wedge with 1 tablespoon whipped topping; lightly sprinkle with nutmeg. Cover and refrigerate any remaining cheesecake.

3. MEANWHILE, microwave chocolate in small microwaveable bowl on HIGH 1 min. Stir until melted. Cool slightly. Place melted chocolate in resealable plastic bag. Snip off small piece from one of the bottom corners of bag; squeeze chocolate into 10 desired shapes on wax paper-covered baking sheet. Refrigerate until firm. 4. TOP pie with remaining whipped topping just before serving. Garnish with crushed candy canes. Serve each slice with a chocolate decoration.

Thursday, December 20, 2007

The County Times

Section B - 7

Project Grants
Continued from page B- No applications may be filed independently. Completed grant application packages for those who have filed the Intent to Apply will be due to the Heritage Area office in March. The MHAA awards for fiscal year 2009 will be announced during the summer of 2008. Past recipients of the MHAA Project Grants in the Southern Maryland Heritage Area include: The Old Wallville School, Piney Point Lighthouse Museum and Park in St. Mary’s County, the Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum, Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum,

Charles County and the Town of Port Tobacco, Historic St. Mary’s City, Greenwell Park, the Calvert Marine Museum, the Beach Business Group, the St. Leonard’s Vision Group and the Chesapeake Bay Field Lab. The mission of the Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium (SMHAC) is to enhance the economic activity of Southern Maryland through combining quality heritage tourism and small business development with preservation, cultural and natural resource conservation and education. Contact the Consortium at 301-274-4083, or by email, SoMdHeritage@tccsmd.org.

New Explorations
Continued from page B- novels and a war memoir. The courses scheduled for the spring semester are: Understanding China I: Cultural History Frank van Aalst, Professor of World History It is increasingly important, as China’s economic and political power increases in the world, that Americans understand the people with whom we interact in the workplace, in the marketplace and at the bargaining table. This course will address the diversity, which the Chinese inherit from their cultural history. Topics will include Land and People, Grand Public Works, System of Government, the Arts, Science and Technology, and Social Stability. Professor van Aalst has recently returned from leading a group on China’s Silk Road. January 23 – February 28 Two sessions available: Wednesdays 7– 9 p.m. or Thursdays 10 a.m. – Noon What Is Art; What Is Beauty? Alan Paskow, Professor of Philosophy When we look at a work of art, what do we contact beside the material object?

Pets Looking For Loving Homes

Does it tell us something about what is important about the world, or is it only pleasing to our senses? What is the best way to understand the effect that art has on us? How is it to be interpreted? How is it to be evaluated? What role do historical conventions play in our experience of artworks? We will take examples primarily from painting as bases for our reflections and discussion. This is not a course in art history or criticism. We will deal instead with issues that are foundational to these disciplines. January 24 – February 28 Thursdays 7- 9 p.m. Understanding China II: Entering the Modern World Frank van Aalst, Professor of World History China’s history during the time that Europe became modern is a dramatic account of success and failure pre-dating the contemporary success that places it in the ranks of the superpowers. This course will consider that history, including topics such as China’s Response to the West, Attempts at Reform, the Communist Experiment, After Mao, America’s Workshop, and Current Conditions. Professor van Aalst has recently returned from leading a group along China’s Silk Road, including its modern locations of Beijing, Suzhou and

Shanghai. March 12 – April 17 Two sessions available: Wednesdays 7 – 9 p.m. or Thursdays 10 a.m. – Noon The U.S. Presidency Professors Tom Stevens (History), and Todd Eberly and Michael Cain (Political Science) The executive branch of the federal government as it exists today is a combination of the definition contained in the U.S. Constitution and the experience acquired in the nation’s history since 1789. This course will begin with a consideration of the constitutional provisions establishing the presidency and will proceed on a historical journey to examine how the exercise of presidential responsibilities through time has further shaped the nature of the office, as we perceive it in our own time. In considering this issue, we will focus on the major forces influencing presidential leadership – politics, economics, personality, foreign affairs, etc. The first segment will focus on the intentions of the founding fathers and the first presidents; the second will focus on the 20th century; and the final session will consider the issues in the current campaign. March 13 – April 17 Thursdays 7– 9 p.m.

Camden Parlett from Town Creek, just 21 months old, says hello to Alex, a friendly dog who was up for adoption Dec. 15 at Petco courtesy of the St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League.

Photo By Guy Leonard

Critter Corner
Plan For Pet Emergencies Before They Happen
It’s evening, the kids are playing with the family pet, and the pet slips and sustains an injury. Or, without warning, your pet becomes extremely ill on a Sunday. Who should you call? Where do you go? The Tri-County Animal Shelter offers the following advice on emergencies: it’s in your best interest, as well as your pet’s, to develop an emergency care plan now so precious moments aren’t wasted on the phone searching for someone to help. Check with your regular veterinarian first to see if they offer emergency services outside of regular business hours. Find out what days of the week and what hours they are available for emergencies. If your regular veterinarian does not offer after-hour emergency services, ask where they recommend you take your pet. Find out if they have any personal experience with the emergency facility they are referring you to, or if they’ve had any feedback from clients who may have utilized this service. After learning where to take your pet in case of an after-hour emergency, write down the name, address and directions of the facility and place it where everyone in the household has instant access to it, such as on the refrigerator. Include the phone number of the facility so you can call and let them know you are coming in case your pet requires emergency treatment. If you are referred to another facility and you are not familiar with that area, you should consider making a practice run. During an emergency, you will be upset and you may possibly be driving at night, so you don’t want to get lost on the way to the emergency animal hospital if you’ve never been there before. Keep in mind that pet emergency services are similar to emergency rooms at a hospital. Fees will likely be higher than services during a routine office visit, and payment is expected at the time of service. If your pet ingests a substance, bring the container with you so the veterinarian can properly and promptly treat your pet. Now is the time to develop an emergency plan for your pet. Ensure that everyone in the household is aware of the plan and ready to take action. Your pet’s life may depend o n it!

Campbell Jameson, 4, of Hollywood gets better acquainted with Holly, a confident little cat, looking to be adopted from SMAWL

Photo By Guy Leonard

Grant Gass, 8, of Leonardtown tries to get the attention of Romeo, a big male cat hanging out at Petco in California but looking for a permanent home.

Photo By Guy Leonard

Detectives arrest burglary suspect

St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations detectives arrested a second person in connection with the November 28, 2007 burglary at Russell’s Store in Valley Lee, the November 28, 2007 burglary at Charlie’s Deli in Lexington Park, the November 28, 2007 attempted burglary at St. James Store and Pub, and the December 4, 2007 burglary at the First Pentecostal Church in Lexington Park. On December 12, 2007 at approximately 6:30 p.m., detectives charged Gary Andrew Quade, 32, of no fixed address, and incarcerated him at the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Deputy William Watters responded to the Wal-Mart in California for the report of a shoplifter. Investigation revealed the suspect, Jacob Steven Traas, age 22 of Ridge, was observed by Wal-Mart loss prevention officers allegedly attempting to steal a digital camera by concealing it in his clothing. The camera was recovered and Traas was placed under arrest and charged with theft under $100. He was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center pending a bond hearing before the District Court Commissioner.

investigation revealed the suspect, Sylbl Margarette Scott, 36, of Patuxent River, allegedly attempted to use a forged prescription to obtain lortab, a Schedule III controlled substance. She was arrested and charged with one count of attempting to obtain a controlled dangerous substance (Schedule III) by forging a prescription. She was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center pending a bond hearing before the District Court Commissioner.

items. Sheriff’s Office deputies and Maryland State Police troopers responded and obtained a description of Foy and his vehicle. They apprehended the suspect as he traveled from the scene on Route 235 in Hollywood. St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Detectives charged Foy with first degree burglary, theft over $500, and property destruction. He was incarcerated at the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Man charged in burglary case

Detectives investigate stabbing

residence he allegedly began assaulting occupants of the house. Herbert’s assault on one of the occupants, Brandon J. Smith, age 19 of Leonardtown, continued into the kitchen where Smith obtained a kitchen knife and stabbed Herbert twice. Herbert was flown to Prince George’s Shock Trauma with nonlife threatening injuries. No charges have been placed and St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Detectives continue their investigation into the incident.

Deputy investigates suspected fraud

Man arrested on theft charges

On December 10, 2007,

On December 10, 2007, Deputy First Class John Kirkner responded to the CVS Pharmacy in California for a reported fraud incident. His

On December 12, 2007 at approximately 5p.m., Kenneth R. Foy, 46, of Mechanicsville, allegedly burglarized a residence on Old Village Road in Mechanicsville. He ransacked the home and fled with a variety of household

On December 12, 2007 at approximately 8:30 a.m., Aloysius S. Herbert, 42, of no fixed address, returned to a residence on Blake Creek Road in Leonardtown after being told to leave earlier due to a verbal altercation. After forcing his way into the

Narcotics arrests

Detectives from the St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Vice/ Narcotics Division indicted and charged Wesley Leonard Morris, 28, of Avenue. Suspect Morris was charged with distribution of a controlled prescription medication

(hydrocodone). Detectives from the St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Vice/ Narcotics Division served a search and seizure warrant on the home and person of James Sheehan, age 20 of Callaway. Sheehan was allegedly found to be in possession of a handgun that was obtained through street contacts in Lexington Park. Suspect Sheehan was arrested and charged with two handgun violations to include firearm unlawful sale transfer and regulated firearm possession by a habitual user of marijuana In the last 90 days, Vice/ Narcotics detectives have recovered eight long guns and five handguns during drug operations and warrant executions.

Section B - 

The County Times

Thursday, December 20, 2007

The Munching Bunch: The Creatures That Call Your Body Home
By Theresa Morr
Guess what? Right now, lots of creepy crawlers are pigging out on you. You’re like a McDonald’s, only better. For the tiny creatures that call your body home, it’s picnic time from the top of your yummy head, down to your tasty toes, and all those scrumptious places in between. But don’t freak out. It’s normal! According to Iowa botanist Roger Knutson, there are four basic kinds of very small creatures that leap, cling, hop, and latch onto you just to have a meal. Knutson calls them Visitors, Neighbors, Residents, and the Way Too Small to See. Some familiar Visitors are ticks, mosquitoes, and chiggers. Ticks are sneaky little critters that like to latch onto your arm or leg for a daytime blood snack. But to a mosquito, you’re more delectable at night, especially when you’re in bed and easy to find. Chiggers, also called baby mites, snuggle in for a quick bite where your skin and clothes meet, like waistbands and socks. You’ve probably heard your parents say, “Sleep tight and don’t let the bedbugs bite.” Well, Neighbors include common bedbugs, human fleas, and dust mites. Do you know why you hardly ever see these tiny rascals? These guys are pretty smart. Bedbugs and fleas wait until you turn out the light, then leap onto you for a tasty meal of blood as you snooze. And when not dining on you, bedbugs hide in your mattress, bed sheets and pillow cases, curtains, rugs, and elsewhere. Dust mites are really good Neighbors. Like microscopic vacuum cleaners, they gobble up your dead skin cells and fallen hairs for their dining pleasure. However, the flea gang prefers to sip your blood, but will settle for a quick meal from cats, dogs, and other animals, if you’re not handy. The Resident creepy crawlers really call your body home. Some set up housekeeping in warm hairy places, while others find your face and head a cool place to hang out. In fact, head lice adore squeaky-clean heads, not dirty ones as is often thought. For face and follicle mites, your follicles and facial pores are so yummy that these mites rarely come out to check to see what’s happening on your skin’s surface. And when they do, look out! These dudes may reproduce right there on your face. Yuck! But there’s more: The next time you get a zit on your face, that eruption is probably an over-crowded pore --- too many Residents feasting on one meal. The fungi and bacteria belong to the Way to Small to See bunch and have their home outdoors. If you’re in a warm, moist place, most likely they’ll find you because this hungry group thrives on dead skin and hair that falls on the ground from humans and animals. Botanist Knutson says we humans are the perfect habitat for the tiny creatures that share our world. And since we can’t make them go away, we just have to learn to live with them. If you’re itching to know more about bedbugs, check out this website for info and pictures: http://www.uos.harvard.edu/ehs/pes_bedbug. shtml.

Sudoku

Here’s How It Works: Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!

Kids Corner

Crossword

CLUES ACROSS
1. British thermal unit 4. Slightly open 8. Ultrahigh frequency 11. Rendered hog fat 13. Compositions for one voice 15. Bird beak 16. Narrow headband 18. Article of bedding 19. Grand __, vintage 20. Loud warning sound 22. Whale ship captain 24. Clearly delineated 25. Chart of Earth’s surface 26. Canadian province 28. Occupational safety and health act 30. Mister 31. Scandinavian nomad 33. Charge for borrowing money 38. Hemingway novel 42. Slender tubes of pasta 43. Somalian shilling 44. A rare earth 45. A domed or vaulted recess 48. An individual’s microprocessor 49. Madagascar franc 50. Weighing device 53. a.k.a. Bhulan dolphin 54. Pertaining to eggs

55. Baglike structure in a plant 56. Concerning 59. Bleated 63. Exclamation: yuck! 64. Bread fungus 65. Netherlands river 66. More (Spanish) 67. Used to carry food for serving 68. A monotonous routine

CLUES DOWN
1. Bacon-lettuce-tomato sandwich 2. ___-kwon-do 3. Large pot for making coffee 4. Judge the worth of something 5. The march king 6. Brew 7. Eggs of a female fish 8. Remove lid 9. Plant lacking a permanent woody stem 10. Burundi franc 12. A flat circular plate 14. Speak haltingly 17. Atmosphere 21. Former Brazilian capital 23. 1st Albus Dumbledore

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions

26. Ryukyu Islands City 27. Detailed description of design criteria 29. ___sel Adams: photographer 31. Source of remembered information 32. Old Testament book 34. In the direction of 35. Employee stock ownership plan 36. Site Evaluation Steering Committee 37. Hormone that stimulates the thyroid gland 39. South American nation 40. Negative response 41. Santa ___ winds 46. Beam me up, __! 47. Take in solid food 49. Klaus __, physicist spy 51. Women’s ___ movement 52. Mild yellow Dutch cheese made in balls 53. Narrative adventure story 55. A quantity obtained by addition 57. Stake 58. Paddle 60. Swiss river 61. Cologne 62. Spring clocks ahead (abbr.)

TEL: 301-373-4125 • FAX: 301-373-4128 • classifieds@countytimes.net

CLASSIFIEDS
Thursday December 20, 2007

The County Times

Days lication Pub

shed publi es is Tim esounty re Tu The C hursday. nes a noon li T Dead at 12 : each day hours are ay ffice thr u Frid O day Mon am - 4pm 8

REAL ESTATE RENTALS
Gorgeous upscale 3 bedroom ranch home with open architecture. Perfect for entertaining. 2 full baths, wood burning stove, Jennaire range, Corian countertops, cherry cabinets, breakfast bar, sunroom, deck with retractable awning, patio. Water views throughout the home. Deluxe Master bath has bay window and a UltraBath for 2 with double sinks and separate shower. 2 car garage, fenced side yard, dock with boat lift. Additional 900 sqft provide a heated workshop and separate guest cottage (or office). Gorgeous sunsets, 4’ deep water on Southern Prong of St. Jeromes Creek. 10 minutes to Bay. Just 20 minutes south of Lexington Park. 4+ acres, woods, field, marsh – nature lover’s paradise. NO pets. Credit check required. Price: $2100. Call J. Sharp at 240 431-1081. Mobile home on private lot with fenced yard,in the Wildwood area. No pets. A credit check is required. Price: $900. Call 301 373-2720. Secluded brick home on farm. Paved driveway, parquet wood floors, 2BR 1 bath, W/D, oil heat, central A/C, 1 car garage, small deck. Professional person(s) - no section 8. 301 373-5461 or 301 3735616. Price: $1,100.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED
The County Times, a community-based newspaper in Southern Maryland, has an immediate opening for government and education reporters to work for one of the fastest growing papers in the region. The ideal candidate is aggressive, organized, an effective communicator, works well with people and is able to come up with his or her own story ideas in addition to carrying out assigned stories. Interested candidates should send resume, cover letter, references, work samples and salary requirements to The County Times Attn: Tobie Pulliam P. O. Box 250 Hollywood, MD 20636 or fax to 301-373-4128 or email tobiepulliam@countytimes.net. Please include in the cover letter why you want to work for The County Times and what you can bring to the paper.

Em Now tyti ail yo Acce Fax mes.n ur ad pt Cr edit to: artw: 30 et or the ork o 1-373 Call: classifi Card line r s -412 s! pla p 8 301- eds@ w or y Ads ith th ecial t . Line 373-41 counwit specia (Ad e 4 li ype) r Ad 25 o par h the l type s withne min Charg s (No r ty a 2 i e ) ds m nch Char artw imum. d by D ust min ged ork, be p imu by l isaid m. A the ogos, befo ll in re a priva ch d is te r un .

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The County Times is looking for Part-time Government & Education Reporters!

VEHICLES
2004 Ford Explorer. Inspected with 4 new tires, new brake rotors, oil change and winter service. This truck is loaded. Has running boards, towing package, two tone paint, and third seat. Must sell before Christmas. Buying son a small car for college. Price: 10,500.00 OBO. 2005 Honda 250 f. Call 240 298 2153. 2800. 1955 Ford F100 original 239 OHV, 3 speed on column, in good shape, drivable, road ready. Metallic Green. Engine rebuilt inframe at 49100. Any questions or offers please call ED at (301) 343-5125. Thanks. Price: 12500 or OBO. 1973 Nova - 350 motor, shift kit, new B&M Shifter, new windshield, weld wheels, new 2”cowl induction hood (NOT PIN ON) Runs good, needs some body work, has rust- great project car- Got a new one, so Im selling this one. Serious inquiries only- Call to come see it. 240-9256729 ask for Paul. Price: $2800. 2004 White Ford Mustang Mach 1. Only 7,900 miles on powertrain. The vehicle has received aftermarket headers, exhaust, and tuned chip change. Auto Trans. Fully loaded with leather, traction control, and power everything. The vehicle is regularly kept under cover, and is only driven on the weekends occasionally. Serious inquiries only please. This vehicle would be ideal for any Mustang enthusiast because of it’s low mileage and excellent condition. Pics available upon request. Price: $19,500. Call Michael Collier 301-872-5211. 68 Ford Torino GT Fastback. 2-dr ht, 302 cubic inch bored .030 over, automatic, new radiator, new starter, mag wheels, needs battery, needs brake work, body good condition, no rust, interior fair/good. Good restoration project. Call Skip Adams 301-997-1160 or 301-481-0248. Price: 3500.

The Cou sponsiblenty Times will reason. for any ads not be held re o right to The County Tim mitted for an not mee edit or reject a es reserves th y ti Times. It ng the standard ny classified a e d the ad o is your respo s of The County us if a mn its first pub nsiblity to chec rect you istake is foun lication and ca k first dayr ad only if n d. We will co ll roti of the first pu fied after the blication ran.

Important Information

VEHICLES
1977 Chevrolet. This vehicle was converted into a truck (from a blazer) by the original owner who sold it to me. The motor is in good shape, but the truck has a number of things that need repair. It presently runs and can be used right now, as is. Has good tires. No inspection necessary. Call for more info. and appointment. 301-475-5029. Price: $800. 1994 Ford Box Van E350. 14 foot. Clean work van. Runs good. New tires and other maintence. Price: $5000. Call Mary Brady 301-274-5569. 1991 Honda Accord, auto, power everything, 157k. Runs and drives great, gets between 26-30 mpg highway. Warm heat and cold A\C, comes with a kenwood CD player installed. (301) 904-8915. Has a crack in the windshield on passenger side from a rock chip. Price: $2300. 1991 Pontiac Sunbird Decent car that has been reliable for me. Do not need it anymore, just sits in the driveway after buying a new truck. No A/C, or radio. Please call Mike @ 301-904-6711 if you want to see it. Price: $750. 1994 Silverado pickup for sale, 5.7L, automatic, pw/pl, cruise control, A/C, extended cab, bedliner, tow package, runs well. Selling well below blue book value @ 2500/ OBO, PLEASE CALL 301-862-3177 1996 Ford RANGER. MD INSPECTED. Price: $2900. If interested, please call 240-412-0916.

CHILD CARE
Immediate Infant Opening for 12 mos and older. Located off Rt 242 in Clements in the Dynard Elementary District. I am CPR/First Aid certified and non-smoker. Large private yard for walks and playtime. We have school time, reading, dancing and educational activities. Small group setting with individual attention. Please call for an interview or questions @ 301-769-2288. We look forward to meeting you. Two immediate INFANT Openings in Northern Calvert. Call/Email for more information! Thank You! (301) 812-1297, msmitty68@aol.com.

REAL ESTATE
Newly remodeled 3 bedroom, 1 bath, rambler on 1/2 acre, level treed lot near the main entrance to the Chesapeake Ranch Estates. Has new windows, doors, sheetrock, kitchen/bath cabinets, whirlpool bath, all new carpet, water heater, electric heat units, breaker panel, sheetrock roof sheathing/shingles, new baseboard trim, stackable washer/dryer and appliances!!! The house is currently rented by a single adult who has kept the property in immaculate condition. It is like new (remodeled in ‘07) and would make an excellant first home or rental unit. It is extremely efficient on utilities, and has a beautiful yard located less than 1/4 mile from the elementary school, shopping, dining, and post office!!! A single person’s dream or great for the young couple looking for an excellant investment. We are very flexible on conditions for sale and would help with closing and financing needs. Please call 301-475-8986 after 5 p.m.. Viewing by Appt. only!! Thanks!! Price: $190,000. Beautiful home located in Victoria’s Grant Subdivision. Master suite with large walk-in closet. Master bathroom has large soaking tub and separate shower. (14X24 bdrm over the garage), 2 full baths and 2 half baths. Pergo flooring in foyer, hall and kitchen. New carpeting in Living and Dining room. Fully finished basement with home theater system, entertainment area and 1/2 bath. Laundry room in basement. Two car garage, fenced in back yard. A 14X16 Wood Deck. Brick front and vinyl siding on sides and back. Oak cabinets in kitchen. If interested, please call today to schedule an appointment or for any further information. Call Oscar Castillo at 301-8621097. Price: $400,000. Beautiful 2 Story Colonial, full unfinished basement with rough-ins in place; “gunstock” oak floors in Powder Room, DR, LR, Kitchen, Foyer; upgraded GE Appliance; side-by-side refrig/freezer; chest freezer in basement; 12’x20’ Amish Style Shed with electric; 4 ACRE LOT, most private in neighborhood; house in middle of wooded lot providing peaceful, relaxing atmosphere; alarm; wood fireplace; $10,000 CLOSING HELP; short drive to boat ramps and parks; If interested please contact via email: mhmudd@ aol.com or call: 240-6825284 or 301-751-5365; shown by appt. only. Price: $464,900.

REAL ESTATE
BEAUTIFUL one bedroom condo - TOP level - SKY light ...New carpet, new paint, walking distance to shopping centers and restaurants. Wooded neighborhood - very quiet, clean and serene. Sellers will pay $1500 towards closing costs. This condo is a must-see ready to move in today. Call DALE - Cell - 443-6243357; Work - 301-7579980! Price: $157,500. 6 acres Leonardtown school district, large newly renovated home with basement, huge deck, renovations to include, roof, siding, windows, doors, HVAC,kitchen cabinets, appliances, bathroom, fixtures, lighting fixtures, carpet, flooring. and much more. Ready to move in. Will consider rent option for right person. Call 304-475-3349. Price: $429,000.

301-373-4125
PO Box 250 · 43251 Rescue Lane Hollywood, Md 20636 countytimes.somd.com

Busy real-estate team in Waldorf, MD needs administrative support, high attention to detail, ability to work within tight deadlines, computer skills necessary, and flexibility needed. Please email resume and salary history to chris@guldirealestate.com school Bus Driver. Competitive Salary, Benefits available, CDL & certification req. Call 301-373-5004. Greenfield Engineering has an immediate opening for a junior software engineer. Position will develop and maintain various military embedded systems. Successful candidate will have a Bachelors degree in an Engineering Field and minimum 1 year experience in C/ C++ programming. Preferred candidate will have CombatID, Air Traffic Control or Avionics experience. Candidate must have a BS degree, US citizen and capable of obtaining a security clearance. Greenfield Engineering is a locally owned small business with excellent benefits. Salary commiserate with experience. Call Lisa Weston 301-475-5305. We are looking for an enthusiastic team player to join our professional Dental Front Desk Administrative Staff in our St. Mary’s and Calvert Offices. 4 days per week. Computer experience a must! Accounts Receivable exp. a plus, as well as Eagle Soft Dental Program. If you are not currently employed in another dental office, we may be looking for you. Exc. benefits include: 401-K plan, pension plan, health insurance, vacation. e-mail resume to pcopsey@md.metrocast. net fax 301-862-3385.

The County Times Is Looking For A Advertising Sales Representative To Join Our Team!
Person Must Be Responsible, Dependable, and Willing To Work Hard!

GeneRal MeRCHanDIse
Meyers snow plow mount for 1998 Dodge 2500 4X4. Mount and headlight wire adaptors only. Meyers quick mount. Please e-mail for information if interested. danandcin@md.metrocast. net $200 Wood burning fire place insert. Needs new ceramic bricks but everything else works great. All steel construction and very heavy. Could be used as a free standing fire box. Must go need the garage space! Asking $300.00 or best offer. Please call 240-377-8083 in the evening. Ask for John or Jaime or leave us a message and we will get back to you as soon as we can.

aPaRtMent Rentals
Large 1 bedroom apt. available immediately. No Pets. Private. Perfect for 1 person or couple. Utilities included except phone and cable. Please call 301-373-3080 for appt. Price: $975. One bedroom apartment available for immediate occupancy. Very private, wooded setting on Tippett Road near Spring Ridge Middle School. Occupancy limited to two people. No pets. Apartment on ground floor, end unit with pull up parking for 2 cars. Gas heat, water and stove. Looking for tenant to fit in with three other long term tenants in units on site. Call 310862-2609. Price: $675.

Real estate Rentals
3 bedroom 2 bath split level home for rent in the Chesapeake Ranch Estates. Home has a 2 car garage paved driveway level fenced in back yard with kids play set. Partially finished basement newly remodeled kitchen and new carpet throughout home. Price: $1500. If interested, and for any fruther information, please call Stephanie Gosnell 410-326-0108.

Resumes And Questions Can Also Be Emailed To tobiepulliam@countytimes.net

301-373-4125
PO Box 250 · 43251 Rescue Lane Hollywood, Md 20636 countytimes.somd.com

spring Valley apartments
46533 Valley Court 301-863-2239 (p) 301-863-6905 (f) springleasing@humphreycompanies.com Two bedrooms available 805-1103 Sq. ft. $893-$945 *1st month rent free * No application fee *limited time/units available
Nice townhouse for rent with large master bedroon suite upstairs with full bath, jetted garden tub, separate shower and walk in closet. Downstairs bedroom has 2 closets and a full bath. Livingroom with bay window, dining room, half bath, kitchen with breakfast bar, utility closet with washer, dryer and refrigerator supplied. Nice den with woodburning fireplace, back door to patio. Some storage outside. Perfect for a roommate situation. Parking on street in front of home and nice yard space. If interested, please call Nancy Bowers at (804) 370-1025 for more information or to schedule a viewing. Price: $1250. Newly refurbished 2-bedroom, 1-bath apartment located in Valley Lee. All new floor coverings. Oil Heat. Eat-in kitchen, washer and dryer. . No pets. No Lease required. Available immediately at $900 per month, plus a $900 security deposit. Good credit and good reference from previous landlord required. Located in rural area. Approximately 15 minutes from Pax River NAS, Lexington Park, and Leonardtown. If interested, and for any further information please call 301-475-5641 during the day or call 301-863-5329 during evening hours. Apartment Price is $900 a month.

Looking for Managers & Regular Staff for a store in St. Mary’s. Part & Full-time positions available, flexible hrs. and competitive pay. Call 732-651-0033 or 302-376-5245 Henry Chiropractic and Wellness Center, Wanted: A physically fit person for full time position in a busy chiropractic office. No experience necessary, will train. Wages are $8.50-$12.00 depending on experience. Please apply in person.

Smiley Faces Early Learning Center in Huntingtown is looking for Teachers who are Senior Staff qualified to work in our friendly and loving day care center. Our center provides care for children ages 6 weeks up to 15 years of age. Our staff members are energetic and enjoy planning activities that are ageappropriate and fun! If interested, please call Director Catherine Regan, at 410-535-4299 to schedule an interview or you may stop by our center to fill out an application. Please make sure you have your Senior Staff Qualification Card with you when you apply. We are located at 20 Sheckells Road in Huntingtown, MD. We look forward to meeting you! Small finance company needs collection clerk. Must be able to work some evenings until 7 and weekends. Must be word and excel proficient. Our hours are M-F 9-7 and Saturday 9-5. If interested, and for more info please call Susan @ 301-737-6400 or email resume or fax to 301-737-4602.

We Now Have 5 Great Locations To Serve The Good Folks In St. Mary’s County And Beyond!
Various Positions Are Available In Our Stores.

McKay’s Fine Foods & Pharmacy Has Grown!
Leonardtown
r Cha lo t
Ho

Got Something For Sale? Advertise With The County Times Classifieds!

• Management & Management Trainees lyw ood • Pharmacists • Meat Cutters • Grocery & Perishable Stockers • Food Service Associates • Cashiers • Courtesy Clerks Applications Are Available At All Locations. Interviews Are Held At Mckays Office Bldg At Route 235 And Rescue Lane In Hollywood. Seniors & Retirees Are Mondays Encouraged To Apply And, As 11:00am - 1:00pm Always, We Are An Equal Wednesdays Opportunity Employer. 4:00pm - 6:00pm
H te
l

all

301-373-4125

Call Now To Place Your Ad.

For more information, call Luann at 301-373-5848

PO Box 250 · 43251 Rescue Lane • Hollywood, Md 20636 countytimes.somd.com

Come Grow With Us!

Section B - 10

The County Times

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Announcin
ree ! It’s F
Display your happiness to everyone by announcing your Engagement or Wedding in The County Times!
301-373-4125
CALL NOW!

Issued Marri

Engagement & Wedding Announcements

November 1, 2007
Jeffrey Scott Carbone 24 LaPlata, MD Jessica Deneen Halloran 21 LaPlata, MD

VA David Russell Spence 22 Lexington Park, MD Marinita Lashee Holland 22 Lexington Park, MD Jordan Michael Davis Leonardtown, MD Erin Chrystal McIntyre Baltimore, MD 23 25

Michael William Weed 18 Lexington Park, MD Allison Marie Rice 19 Lexington Park, MD

November 21, 2007
Charles D’Shaun McDade 25 Great Mills, MD Tiffany Marie Green 24 Great Mills, MD Justin Michael Anderson Mechanicsville, MD Denise Marie Miller Mechanicsville, MD 23 25

November 14, 2007
Jesse James Parks, Jr. 28 Lexington Park, MD Monica Michelle Hawkins 28 Lexington Park, MD Shawn Christopher Henderson 26 Great Mills, MD Denise Terrall Jordan 23 Great Mills, MD Joshua Timothy Snyder Lexington Park, MD Michelle Marie Maggio Lexington Park, MD 30 36

November 2, 2007
Francis Leroy Johnson, Jr. 48 Waldorf, MD Janice Marie Curtis 49 Waldorf, MD Francis Xavier Russell, III 20 Hollywood, MD Katlyn Nicole Knott 20 Hollywood, MD Joseph Picklak Robert 51 Great Mills, MD Karen Lynn Boone 50 Great Mills, MD Adrian Eugen Johnson 29 Lexington Park, MD Yvette Marie Carter 25 Great Mills, MD Willard Preston Jones 45 Park Hall, MD Carol Alicia Cledenin 44 Park, Hall, MD Sean Alexander Sabo 24 MT. Holly, NC Elizabeth Kateri Spelz 23 Saint Inigoes, MD John Allan Ward 62 Valley Lee, MD Carol Avis Keen 61 Valley Lee, MD

James Richard Baker 38 Lexington Park, MD JoAnn Elizabeth Robinson 23 Lexington Park, MD

November 26, 2007
Andrew Gehman Stauffer Homer City, PA Nancy Sensenig Stauffer Loveville, MD 22 21

November 7, 2007
Amos Yoder Stoltzfus 23 Mechanicsville, MD Ruth Elma Fisher 19 Mechanicsville, MD Solomon Benjamin Byler Mechanicsville, MD Sarah Swarey Fisher Mechanicsville, MD 21 20

Angel Manuel Dejesus, II 32 Lexington Park, MD Mandy Susanne Rhodes 31 Lexington Park, MD

Charles Anthony Clements 56 Hollywood, MD Janet Lee Thompson 47 Hollywood, MD

November 27, 2007
Ryan Lee Fickes 26 Hollywood, MD Jieli Tan 28 Hollywood, MD

Scott Anthony Long 37 Hollywood, MD Michelle Ann Alvey 36 Hollywood, MD

November 16, 2007
Jesse James Fleury, III Lexington Park, MD Susan Elizbeth Kessler Lexington Park, MD 58 50

November 9, 2007
Kevin Tennyson Duffy, Sr. 25 Lexington Park Tyiesha Renee Brooks 19 Lexington Park, MD Steven Todd Coryell 40 Leonardtown, MD Tammy Lynn Fay 49 California, MD Maximillian Mikhailovich Koutouzov 23 Patuxent River, MD Montreece Dionshawnea Mitchell 21 St. Inigoes, MD

Michael Steven Montgomery 27 Mechanicsville, MD Megan Marie McDonald 24 Mechanicsville, MD Antoine Eugene Evans, Jr. 33 Saint Leonard, MD Danielle Rena Jerew 25 Saint Leonard, MD

November 19, 2007
Brandon Ryan Bachman Hollywood, MD Allyson Marie Weeks Hollywood, MD Kenneth Phillip Oliver Mechanicsville, MD Yvonne Denise Thomas Mechanicsville, MD 21 20

52 40

November 28, 2007
William Clarence Morgan 89 Leonardtown, MD Barbara Jane Lilley 74 Leonardtown, MD

November 5, 2007
Linward Lee Webb 40 Lexington Park, MD Kimberly Michelle Walker 32 Waldorf, MD David Michael Guy Mechanicsville, MD Natasha Lynn Harding Mechanicsville, MD 27 26

November 20, 2007
Jeremy True Kowalski 29 Glendale, AZ Megan Eileen Boswell 24 Lusby, MD Cuauhtemoc Amezcua Mechanicsville, MD Cynthia Ann Sirk Mechanicsville, MD 38 37
Henry Shawn Schwamp 37 Lexington Park, MD Stacy Lee Baldwin 34 Lexington Park, MD

November 29, 2007
Eric Allen Variz 22 Mechanicsville, MD Amanda Lauren Wood 22 Mechanicsville, MD

November 13, 2007
Ting Yan Zeng 29 Lexington Park, MD Xiu Qing Liu 28 Lexington Park, MD Hong Ku Kim 46 Leonardtown, MD Hyeryun Suh 47 Leonardtown, MD

November 6, 2007
David Anthony Kelley 27 Richmond, VA Amberly Lynn Kelley 27 Richmond,

November

2007

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Thursday, December 20, 2007

The County Times

Section B - 7

Project Grants
Continued from page B- No applications may be filed independently. Completed grant application packages for those who have filed the Intent to Apply will be due to the Heritage Area office in March. The MHAA awards for fiscal year 2009 will be announced during the summer of 2008. Past recipients of the MHAA Project Grants in the Southern Maryland Heritage Area include: The Old Wallville School, Piney Point Lighthouse Museum and Park in St. Mary’s County, the Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum, Jefferson Patterson Park & Museum,

Charles County and the Town of Port Tobacco, Historic St. Mary’s City, Greenwell Park, the Calvert Marine Museum, the Beach Business Group, the St. Leonard’s Vision Group and the Chesapeake Bay Field Lab. The mission of the Southern Maryland Heritage Area Consortium (SMHAC) is to enhance the economic activity of Southern Maryland through combining quality heritage tourism and small business development with preservation, cultural and natural resource conservation and education. Contact the Consortium at 301-274-4083, or by email, SoMdHeritage@tccsmd.org.

New Explorations
Continued from page B- novels and a war memoir. The courses scheduled for the spring semester are: Understanding China I: Cultural History Frank van Aalst, Professor of World History It is increasingly important, as China’s economic and political power increases in the world, that Americans understand the people with whom we interact in the workplace, in the marketplace and at the bargaining table. This course will address the diversity, which the Chinese inherit from their cultural history. Topics will include Land and People, Grand Public Works, System of Government, the Arts, Science and Technology, and Social Stability. Professor van Aalst has recently returned from leading a group on China’s Silk Road. January 23 – February 28 Two sessions available: Wednesdays 7– 9 p.m. or Thursdays 10 a.m. – Noon What Is Art; What Is Beauty? Alan Paskow, Professor of Philosophy When we look at a work of art, what do we contact beside the material object?

Pets Looking For Loving Homes

Does it tell us something about what is important about the world, or is it only pleasing to our senses? What is the best way to understand the effect that art has on us? How is it to be interpreted? How is it to be evaluated? What role do historical conventions play in our experience of artworks? We will take examples primarily from painting as bases for our reflections and discussion. This is not a course in art history or criticism. We will deal instead with issues that are foundational to these disciplines. January 24 – February 28 Thursdays 7- 9 p.m. Understanding China II: Entering the Modern World Frank van Aalst, Professor of World History China’s history during the time that Europe became modern is a dramatic account of success and failure pre-dating the contemporary success that places it in the ranks of the superpowers. This course will consider that history, including topics such as China’s Response to the West, Attempts at Reform, the Communist Experiment, After Mao, America’s Workshop, and Current Conditions. Professor van Aalst has recently returned from leading a group along China’s Silk Road, including its modern locations of Beijing, Suzhou and

Shanghai. March 12 – April 17 Two sessions available: Wednesdays 7 – 9 p.m. or Thursdays 10 a.m. – Noon The U.S. Presidency Professors Tom Stevens (History), and Todd Eberly and Michael Cain (Political Science) The executive branch of the federal government as it exists today is a combination of the definition contained in the U.S. Constitution and the experience acquired in the nation’s history since 1789. This course will begin with a consideration of the constitutional provisions establishing the presidency and will proceed on a historical journey to examine how the exercise of presidential responsibilities through time has further shaped the nature of the office, as we perceive it in our own time. In considering this issue, we will focus on the major forces influencing presidential leadership – politics, economics, personality, foreign affairs, etc. The first segment will focus on the intentions of the founding fathers and the first presidents; the second will focus on the 20th century; and the final session will consider the issues in the current campaign. March 13 – April 17 Thursdays 7– 9 p.m.

Camden Parlett from Town Creek, just 21 months old, says hello to Alex, a friendly dog who was up for adoption Dec. 15 at Petco courtesy of the St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League.

Photo By Guy Leonard

Critter Corner
Plan For Pet Emergencies Before They Happen
It’s evening, the kids are playing with the family pet, and the pet slips and sustains an injury. Or, without warning, your pet becomes extremely ill on a Sunday. Who should you call? Where do you go? The Tri-County Animal Shelter offers the following advice on emergencies: it’s in your best interest, as well as your pet’s, to develop an emergency care plan now so precious moments aren’t wasted on the phone searching for someone to help. Check with your regular veterinarian first to see if they offer emergency services outside of regular business hours. Find out what days of the week and what hours they are available for emergencies. If your regular veterinarian does not offer after-hour emergency services, ask where they recommend you take your pet. Find out if they have any personal experience with the emergency facility they are referring you to, or if they’ve had any feedback from clients who may have utilized this service. After learning where to take your pet in case of an after-hour emergency, write down the name, address and directions of the facility and place it where everyone in the household has instant access to it, such as on the refrigerator. Include the phone number of the facility so you can call and let them know you are coming in case your pet requires emergency treatment. If you are referred to another facility and you are not familiar with that area, you should consider making a practice run. During an emergency, you will be upset and you may possibly be driving at night, so you don’t want to get lost on the way to the emergency animal hospital if you’ve never been there before. Keep in mind that pet emergency services are similar to emergency rooms at a hospital. Fees will likely be higher than services during a routine office visit, and payment is expected at the time of service. If your pet ingests a substance, bring the container with you so the veterinarian can properly and promptly treat your pet. Now is the time to develop an emergency plan for your pet. Ensure that everyone in the household is aware of the plan and ready to take action. Your pet’s life may depend o n it!

Campbell Jameson, 4, of Hollywood gets better acquainted with Holly, a confident little cat, looking to be adopted from SMAWL

Photo By Guy Leonard

Grant Gass, 8, of Leonardtown tries to get the attention of Romeo, a big male cat hanging out at Petco in California but looking for a permanent home.

Photo By Guy Leonard

Detectives arrest burglary suspect

St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations detectives arrested a second person in connection with the November 28, 2007 burglary at Russell’s Store in Valley Lee, the November 28, 2007 burglary at Charlie’s Deli in Lexington Park, the November 28, 2007 attempted burglary at St. James Store and Pub, and the December 4, 2007 burglary at the First Pentecostal Church in Lexington Park. On December 12, 2007 at approximately 6:30 p.m., detectives charged Gary Andrew Quade, 32, of no fixed address, and incarcerated him at the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Deputy William Watters responded to the Wal-Mart in California for the report of a shoplifter. Investigation revealed the suspect, Jacob Steven Traas, age 22 of Ridge, was observed by Wal-Mart loss prevention officers allegedly attempting to steal a digital camera by concealing it in his clothing. The camera was recovered and Traas was placed under arrest and charged with theft under $100. He was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center pending a bond hearing before the District Court Commissioner.

investigation revealed the suspect, Sylbl Margarette Scott, 36, of Patuxent River, allegedly attempted to use a forged prescription to obtain lortab, a Schedule III controlled substance. She was arrested and charged with one count of attempting to obtain a controlled dangerous substance (Schedule III) by forging a prescription. She was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center pending a bond hearing before the District Court Commissioner.

items. Sheriff’s Office deputies and Maryland State Police troopers responded and obtained a description of Foy and his vehicle. They apprehended the suspect as he traveled from the scene on Route 235 in Hollywood. St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Detectives charged Foy with first degree burglary, theft over $500, and property destruction. He was incarcerated at the St. Mary’s County Detention Center.

Man charged in burglary case

Detectives investigate stabbing

residence he allegedly began assaulting occupants of the house. Herbert’s assault on one of the occupants, Brandon J. Smith, age 19 of Leonardtown, continued into the kitchen where Smith obtained a kitchen knife and stabbed Herbert twice. Herbert was flown to Prince George’s Shock Trauma with nonlife threatening injuries. No charges have been placed and St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Detectives continue their investigation into the incident.

Deputy investigates suspected fraud

Man arrested on theft charges

On December 10, 2007,

On December 10, 2007, Deputy First Class John Kirkner responded to the CVS Pharmacy in California for a reported fraud incident. His

On December 12, 2007 at approximately 5p.m., Kenneth R. Foy, 46, of Mechanicsville, allegedly burglarized a residence on Old Village Road in Mechanicsville. He ransacked the home and fled with a variety of household

On December 12, 2007 at approximately 8:30 a.m., Aloysius S. Herbert, 42, of no fixed address, returned to a residence on Blake Creek Road in Leonardtown after being told to leave earlier due to a verbal altercation. After forcing his way into the

Narcotics arrests

Detectives from the St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Vice/ Narcotics Division indicted and charged Wesley Leonard Morris, 28, of Avenue. Suspect Morris was charged with distribution of a controlled prescription medication

(hydrocodone). Detectives from the St. Mary’s County Bureau of Criminal Investigations Vice/ Narcotics Division served a search and seizure warrant on the home and person of James Sheehan, age 20 of Callaway. Sheehan was allegedly found to be in possession of a handgun that was obtained through street contacts in Lexington Park. Suspect Sheehan was arrested and charged with two handgun violations to include firearm unlawful sale transfer and regulated firearm possession by a habitual user of marijuana In the last 90 days, Vice/ Narcotics detectives have recovered eight long guns and five handguns during drug operations and warrant executions.