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D.I.Y.

Tagtool Mini
What is a Tagtool?
The Tagtool is a live performance instrument for drawing and animation. Its similar to a music instrument, only it plugs into a projector instead of the sound system. It is operated collaboratively by an artist drawing the pictures and an animator adding movement to the artwork with a gamepad.

What is a Tagtool Mini?


The Mini is a separate device with the Tagtool controls that is used together with a computer and a graphics tablet. With this setup, you dont have a compact instrument, but it is nonetheless fully functional. This is recommended for people that dont need a dedicated Tagtool but want to use it with their computer and graphics tablet.

How to use the Tagtool?


Usually it is controlled by two people - an illustrator (who draws and uses the Tagtool controls) and an animator (using the gamepad to move the drawings around). The Tagtool controls consist of 6 faders and a pushbutton. The pushbutton releases a drawing so the animator can move them with the gamepad. Find detailed instructions on how to use the controls on tagtool.org

What else do I need to run a Tagtool Mini?


To play with a Tagtool Mini you also need a graphics tablet, a gamepad and a Windows PC with the open source software Nodekit on the tagtool site. The Tagtool is typically used with a projector, although any monitor will suffice for playing around with it.

Steps: 1 2 3
Materials Tools Base of the box

4 5 6

Top Panel Electronics Schematics

to build This step shows how ol Mini. the case of the Tagto You can choose any size materials any you want. Any us pics anything! Please send into the of you If you are just Tagtool electronic part of the skip to page 13!

NOT

Step 3-4 shows how to build the tagtool case. We are just suggesting. Do your own box in a fake rabbit, an old VHS deck or in your hiking shoe. Don't forget to send us your pics!

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Materials
B D

1 x Arduino Diecimila B 6 x Slide Potentiometers 6 x Slider Knobs D 1 x Pushbutton E Ribbon cable G 1 x Resistor (10k Ohm/ for the F Some stranded wire H Some screws: 3x10mm for the sliders, pushbutton) 3x20mm for the wood I 2 x Spacers for the Arduino board J Plywood board, the measurements we used: 2 pieces - 26 x 20 x 0.5 cm, 2 pieces - 26 x 4 x 0.5 cm, 2 pieces - 19 x 4 x 0.5 cm, + 1 piece for mounting the Arduino (sized to fit the Arduino) K Slats (1x1cm) 4 x 16.7 cm + 4 x 24.6 cm
A C

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2 Tools

L O S

saw M stapler N drill plyer P soldering gun and solder Q screwdriver ruler and pen T glue U shrink tube and lighter

R V

file tape

sandpaper

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3 Base of the Box


What you need: wood, slats, stapler, glue, sanding paper

A sand wood, glue and staple slats


B C

USB port assemble base and drill screw holes

sand wood, glue and staple slats

Sand all measured and cut wooden parts.

Glue and...

... staple the slats to the sideboards.

d Pay attention to the gap of the slats on one of the sidepieces, to accommodate the Arduino (see also Arduino preperation on page 10) p. 4

3 Base of the Box


What you need: wood, slats, file, pen, drill

A sand wood, glue and staple slats B USB port


C

assemble base and drill screw holes

USB port

a Mark the position of the hole for the USB port for the Arduino.

b Cut out (or drill out) a small hole for the plug of the Arduino.

File the hole to make it smooth and suitable for the Arduino port.

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3 Base of the Box


What you need: wood, slats, stapler, glue, pen and ruler, drill
A sand wood, glue and staple slats B USB port C assemble base and drill screw holes

assemble base and drill screw holes

a Glue and staple the bottom board onto the side boards of the box.

b Measure and mark the positions of the screws on the top plate, which will fix it on the base of the box.

c Drill the holes for the screws and widen the opening slighty with a larger drill to make space for the heads of the screws.

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4 Top Panel
What you need: schematics (see page 13), tape, pen and ruler

A mark controll schematics B cut and file C finish the box

mark controll schematics

a Tape the schematics (find it on page 13) for the faders on the top plate.

Mark the position of the screws....

....the faders and the pushbutton.

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4 Top Panel
What you need: saw, file, drill

A mark controll schematics B cut and file C finish the box

cut and file

Cut and ...

... file the slots for the faders.

c Drill the holes for the screws that fix the faders.

d Cut out the hole for the push-button. We used the drill to roughly cut out the hole for the pushbutton. Then file it to make it a nice circle.

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4 Top Panel
What you need: sanding paper, file, pen and ruler, drill, screws, paint
A mark controll schematics B cut and file C finish the box

finish the box

a Fix the top plate with just some of the screws, so you can sand the whole box, but easly remove the plate afterwards to place the electronics.

b Polish things off with a little more sanding and make room for the screw heads.

Make room for the screw heads.

d Paint the box and let it dry for some hours before you move on to the next step.

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Electronics
What you need: arduino, spacers, screws, screwdriver, plyer, arduino-wood piece

A prepare the Arduino B attach components to top panel C solder

prepare the Arduino

Screw the spacers....

...onto the piece of plywood...

....then mount the Arduino on it.

d Pull off the plastic bits off the Arduino contacts so you can directly solder the cables to the pins.

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Electronics
What you need: pushbutton, arduino, faders, screwdriver, glue

A prepare the Arduino B attach components to top panel C solder

attach components to top panel

Remove the top panel...

b ....so you can glue the Arduino on its wooden piece to the top panel.

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c ...and screw the six faders- and the pushbutton to the top panel.

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Electronics
What you need: stranded wire, ribbon cable, resistor, shrinking tubes, lighter, soldering gun, solder
A prepare the Arduino B attach components to top panel C solder

solder

Solder the wires to the connectors according to the solder plan, which shows how to connect the Arduino to the faders and the pushbutton. Note the 10 kOhm/Watt resistor that is added to the connection to the pushbutton. a Solder the six wires of the ribbon cable to the Arduino Analog Ins (use plenty of shrink tube, to lag the solder joint).

b Solder the two prepared strings of stranded wire to the potentiometers and the Arduino. c Solder Ground, Voltage 5V and Digital Input #7 to the Arduino. d Attach Resistor at the 5V wire between Arduino and contact block. e Attach the 5V, the Digital In 7 and the Ground to the Contact block.

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6 Schematics

Note: Double-check if the measurements are exactly right for your faders before you use the schematics.

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