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2241 Russel l St r eet

Ber k el ey , CA 94705
( 510) 644- 6290
www. l econt eonl i ne. or g
PANDA PRESS LeCont e School Newsl et t er
Though there will always be room for
improvement, our school is doing a much
better job at serving all students because of
you---our families and staff. We have a very
talented staff of teachers and instructional
specialists who collaborate beyond the
school hours and are committed to taking on
the responsibility of educating and
supporting all students. Several parents and
guardians have created structures to improve
student engagement, safety, and supervision.
We also have families who donate hours of
their artistic talents to create and decorate our
school for special events, such as the recent
Latino Heritage Celebration. Appreciations
are listed on the last page of this newsletter;
however, it’s really important to recognize
up front the incredible work that families and
students put into presenting the outstanding
performances on December 16
th
!!! The
attached photos tell some of the story but
what’s crucial to acknowledge is the
dedication you all bring to our school. In
addition to the number of people who always
volunteer, we have some new families who
are taking on leadership roles within our
PTA, SGC, ELAC, and COFAAS
committees. I’m hoping that this new energy
and expertise will not only improve our
school’s culture but also achievement. We
have everything in place to attain the State
WELCOME TO 2012!!!
A Year of Promise and Success
Updates and Support Needed Now
Kindergarten Information Night: Thurs.,
Jan. 12, 7:00-Please attend to answer
questions and welcome new families to BUSD.
School Closed: Mon., Jan. 16 Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Birthday Holiday; Mon., Jan.
30, Staff Professional Development day
Spelling Bee: All 2
nd
- 5th students should be
practicing spelling words from a list they
received last year. They will be taking a
written test in class to determine finalists who
will participate in final contest on Thurs.,
Jan.19
th
, 6:30PM. See www.myspellit.com for
activities. Judges are needed-please contact or
JANUARY EVENTS:
Meetings:
Wed., 1/4, School Governance
Council (SGC) 6:30PM, Library
Tues., 1/17, PTA, 5:45PM dinner
6:00PM meeting, Cafeteria

Thurs., 1/19, Coalition of
Families, (CFAAS) 6:00PM,
Library

Fri., 1/20, English Learner
Advisory Committee (ELAC)
6:00PM, Room 106

Special Events:
NO SCHOOL, 1/16 & 1/30

Thurs., 1/19, Spelling Bee

Thurs., 1/26, Family Literacy
Night, 6:00PM, Auditorium

Fri., 1/27, Celebrate LeConte
Assembly, 8:15AM

Academic Performance Index required
rating of 800. As we go forward with the
New Year, I’m asking all families to
continue to support our school wide
events while also making a stronger
commitment to getting children to school
on time, making sure they read EVERY
night and complete homework as
required. The staff and I are available to
meet with you to provide resources and
answer any questions you have related to
supporting your child’s social and
academic success. Attached, you will find
information to assist you with
understanding your child’s reading level,
exactly what it means to be at Level A or
H. A summary of the third through fifth
grade students’ responses to the bullying
survey is also attached. What appears to
be most crucial toward addressing the
issues is not only more trained
supervision and playground activities but
social skills training and anger
management. The staff and I will be
taking on a more focused and daily role
toward teaching conflict resolution skills
and acceptance. Outside resources are
also being sought to assist with
developing action steps to decrease
aggressive and inappropriate behaviors.
—Principal Wilson
leave a message for Principal Wilson.
Family Literacy Night: Thurs., Jan. 26,
6:00PM. The evening will include activities
that you can use at home to encourage your
child to read, light refreshments, and
prizes!!!
Disaster Preparedness: Plastic bags were
sent home with instructions requesting that
you use the bag to create a survival kit for
your child. The kit is needed to help our
school make sure all students have
nonperishable food items should they be
trapped in a classroom during an emergency.
Please return the bag ASAP.
Cher y l Wi l son, Pr i nci pal , cher y l wi l son@ber k el ey . or g
Cal Col l i er , PTA Pr esi dent , cal col l i er @y ahoo. com
J anuar y 2012
Attachments
 Reading Levels
 Math Self-
Assessments
 Bullying Survey
comments
 Photos


Last month, all LeConte teachers new to the district
visited model classrooms to observe strategies used to
implement our district adopted reading and writing
program. This is one aspect of the training they needed
to improve their ability to implement the program and
develop lesson plans with their colleagues. All
teachers are assigned to one or two of the following
school-wide teams, Leadership, Instructional
Leadership, Positive Behavior/Intervention Support,
Response to Intervention, and School Culture. The
teams are in the process of writing measurable goals
related to the function of the team. For example, the
Teachers/Classroom focus for the month January
The focus continues to be on improvement of
mathematics instruction and achievement and safety.
During last month’s mathematics workshop session,
three teachers shared practices designed improve
engagement and understanding of mathematics. As a
result all teachers agreed to make sure the lesson
objectives and mathematics vocabulary are clearly
explained so that students can state what they are
learning and monitor their understanding. Students will
also be asked to weekly create, illustrate, and write
mathematics problems and create problems for their
peers to solve. To assist teachers and students with
progress monitoring, mathematics assessments are
being developed by Principal Wilson for grades 2
nd

through 5
th
.
Principal’s focus for the month of January
School-wide Committees – Brief Summaries of Meetings
Page 2 of 4
LeConte Newsletter
Instructional Leadership Team is committed to helping all
teachers collaborate and implement the reading/writing and
mathematics curriculum with the expectation that at least 75-
80% of the students will achieve proficiency by May 2012. To
achieve this goal, teachers will be observing one another,
planning lessons together, sharing feedback about their ability
to differentiate instruction and meet with students who need
more time to learn on a regular basis, and will administer
complete common assessments to monitor students’ progress.
The teams will work with our PTA to present at least three
workshops about the progress of our school.
The goal is to have a record of the number sense standards
students have achieved and will be expected to achieve before
the end of the year. An example of the third grade self-
assessment is attached. Also attached is a list of student
behaviors and book characteristics that are aligned with the
district reading levels. The lists are included to help clarify the
meaning of the reading level letter your child receives on his/her
report card. This letter is used to identify the level of reading
proficiency. Also, see “Student News” for a summary of the
bullying survey. One immediate step staff and Principal Wilson
will be taking to decrease incidents on the yard will be to
facilitate proactive problem solving meetings with role plays
and practice before students are dismissed for recess.


School-Wide & Committee Updates

PTA: The PTA did not meet in December. During the January
meeting participants will be determining a date to practice and
prepare for a school-wide earthquake drill and will be
discussing the proposed TWI Consolidation at one school site.
As of this date, the consolidated school will be Rosa Parks or
LeConte and is tentatively scheduled to open 2013. It’s really
important to get as much feedback about your concerns,
suggestions, and ideas so that Principal Wilson take your
feedback to the next BUSD TWI Consolidation meeting on
Tues., Jan. 10
th
. Next PTA meeting: Tues., Jan. 17, 5:45PM.
English Learner Advisory Committee: Most of the meetings
in December were devoted to planning the Latino Heritage
Celebration. The group also discussed issues and concerns
related to the TWI Consolidation; however, the participants
did not feel that they had enough information to adequately
voice an opinion. They are planning to invite a district
representative who may be able to explain the reasons for
consolidation, background and research, the pros and cons, or
consequences. During the January meeting, participants will
be discussing the Latino Heritage Celebration, what went well
and what may need to be different next year. Next meeting
date is tentatively scheduled: Fri., Jan. 20, 6:00PM
School Governance Council: In response to the
concerns about recess supervision, a representative
from Playworks (formerly Sports for Kids) gave an
overview of the structure, activities, and support the
organization offers to improve student interaction and
supervision during recess. SGC is considering hiring
Playworks to provide immediate training to recess
supervisors and a possibly contracting them for full
services next year. SGC members are preparing the
next Parent/Guardian Survey. The TWI Consolidation
will also be discussed during the next meeting and
Ms. Katz, our literacy coach will present about her
role and the support she provides for teachers. Next
meeting: Wed., Jan. 4, 6:30PM
Coalition of Families for African-American
Students: The group did not meet in December.
Members will be making plans for the upcoming
African /Black American Heritage event scheduled for
Friday, February 24, 6:00PM. Support will be needed
to decorate, set up, and clean up after the potluck and
student performances. Next meeting: Thurs., Jan.
19, 6:00PM

LeConte Newsletter Page 3 of 4 Student News & Appreciations
One of our initial steps toward developing a school-
wide bullying policy has been to survey third through
fifth grade students. For your information, a copy of
the survey was attached to the November newsletter.
The following is a summary of results received from
58% of the students. Of the 94 surveys, 50
respondents were girls and 44 were boys. The results
from the remaining students and next steps will be
included in the February newsletter. Fourth grade was
the only grade level with an imbalance of boy (13)
and girl (20) respondents. Since some of the students
did not respond to all 12 questions, the answers do not
always reflect the experiences of the entire group.
Results from (19) 3
rd
graders: 7 students stated that
someone was mean during recess; 9 stated this
occurred in the classroom; 12 told an adult or peer
about being bullied, 1 did not; after reporting bullying
4 stated it stopped, 7 stated it did not stop; 3 stated
bullying got worse, 8 stated it did not; 3 have bullied
someone else; 1stated that s/he is bullying someone
now.
Results from (33) 4
th
graders: 11 girls and 5 boys
stated that someone was mean in the classroom; 9 girls
and 5 boys stated that this occurred during recess; 1 to
5 students were bullied during lunch, in the halls and
restroom; 11 students told an adult or peer about being
bullied while 17 did not; after reporting bullying, 8
stated it stopped, 7 stated it did not; 3 stated bullying
got worse, 12 stated that it did not; 3 have bullied
someone else.
Results from (42) 5
th
graders: 10 girls and 1 boy
stated someone was mean in the classroom; 8 girls and
4 boys stated this occurred during recess; 5 to 7 girls
stated students were mean during lunch, in the halls,
and in the restrooms; 14 students told an adult or peer
about being bullied, 5 did not; after reporting bullying,
8 stated it stopped, 12 stated it did not; 7 stated
bullying got worse, 4 stated it did not; 12 have bullied
someone else. All surveys showed that most boys are
bullied by other boys, most girls are bullied by both
boys and girls, a few students have been bullied by
whole groups of students. See examples of the
students’ written comments attached.

Latino Heritage Celebration: The event was spectacular
and so well received. Thanks to all parents who met
numerous Friday nights to organize the event and all the
helpers who cooked the food, taught the dances to the
students, ironed the costumes, set up, cleaned up, designed
and sold representations of Latino culture, and created the
artistic set design and decorations in the hallways. Thanks
to the students who rapidly swayed, swirled, and danced to
the music and the students who sang in Spanish!!! Thanks
to our art teacher, Ms. Zamarra for teaching students about
art related to Latino culture and instructing them to produce
brilliantly colorful selections that are displayed in the
hallways and auditorium. Finally, thanks to the staff
members who helped students get dressed and the two
teachers, Ms. Perez and Mr. Henderson, who introduced the
program. Attached is a list of all event coordinators and
assistants. Thanks so much to all of you---you help make
our school a great place to be for students and families!
Kindergarten Tours: Thanks to all of the parents who
have led a tour and a special thanks to the students who
assisted Mr. Aulette with leading a tour. Mr. Aulette is not
only one of our fifth grade teachers but also a member of
our School Governance Council along with kindergarten
teacher, Ms. Bull, and first grade teacher, Ms. Barer.



Student News – First Draft of Bullying Survey Results
More volunteers are needed to lead the tours. They are held
every Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 to 10:00AM until Feb.
2. Please contact Marie, our school secretary to let her know the
date you can help out.
LeConte Authors: Thanks to Heather Mackey, August Fern,
and Jessica Fiedler for coordinating our first school-wide
writing contest. A total of 32 students submitted work from
kindergarten through fifth grade. Heather developed an
information sheet with a list of instructions to assist students
with writing their stories, and she supported their progress by
meeting with students after school. Jessica read all of their
work and typed pieces that were hand-written so that all of the
writing could be compiled in one booklet. August created
professional certificates and ordered pens for each student.
That’s dedication to our school---one of the many reasons this
is a year of promise and success. Thanks again to the LeConte
students who took the challenge and successfully demonstrated
your creativity and skill as authors.
Great American Catalogue Fundraiser: Thanks again to
Corynne Escalante for coordinating this event and for making
sure all buyers received their orders!!! Corynne is a new parent
here at LeConte. If she had not agreed to take on this task we
would still have several boxes of brochures stacked in our
office. This fundraiser was supposed to be coordinated by
someone else who could no longer accept the responsibility so
we are very grateful to Corynne for taking on this role.


Appreciations



General Information









Family vacations/absences from school: Please note that our
school is able to receive daily attendance funds for four to five
days when students are absent because of a family vacation or
emergency. If you plan to take your child out of school for 4-5
days, please notify the teacher at least three days in advance so
that an Independent Study Contract can be completed. This
contract is used as a record specifying the numbers of days of
absence and serves as an agreement for homework that will be
completed while the student is absent. The contract must be for
4 to 5 days only. Students who have a contract but are absent
more than five days will be counted as truant unless the student
is ill or hospitalized.

BUSD TWI Task Force. The next meeting will be Tuesday,
Jan. 10th at 6:30PM, 1720 Oregon Street. For information
about this committee, please visit Bilingual Program and other
services for English Language Learners section of the BUSD
website: http://www.berkeleyschools.net/superintendents-two-
way-immersion-task-force/

Attachments:
Reading Levels –Student Behaviors & Book
Characteristics
Mathematics Self-Assessment
Bullying Survey Comments
Various Photos
PTA Membership: Please join or renew your
LeConte PTA membership for 2011-2012! Online
forms are available for download on our school
website, including the PTA membership form. The
suggested donation is $10 per family - half of which
goes to the umbrella organization of the Peralta
District PTA. The form is available on our website:
http://www.leconteonline.com/default/index.cfm/pare
nt-groups/pta/joinpta/ If you have already donated,
but were unable to include a form, please take the
time and fill out a form and return to Marie at the
front desk as confirmation.
Lunch Balances: Unless you have received a letter
from our district nutrition office stating that your
child qualifies for free lunch, you must pay the
reduced or full price. You can write a check payable
to BUSD and give it to our cafeteria clerk, Ahlam or
you can pay online any time of day throughout the
year. You can pay for meals, view cafeteria
purchases, track meal account balances, schedule
recurring payments, etc. Visit
www.mySchoolBucks.com to create your account.
You can call Marni Posey or Sara Leon at (510) 644-
6200 if you have any questions.

Page 4 of 4 LeConte Newsletter

Calendario de LeConte
Enero1 – Enero 31, 2012
Calendario y Noticias Actualizadas en: www.leconteonline.org
Dom. Lun. Mar. Mier. Juev. Vier. Sab.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
! FELIZ
AÑO
NUEVO!!!
Regresan los
estudiantes a
clase
Reunión del
Consejo
Escolar
6:30PM
Biblioteca



8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Reunión sobre
la
Consolidación
de TWI,
6:30PM
1720 Oregon St.

Noche de
Información
para nuevas
familias de
Kínder,
7:00PM
Room 109

15 16 17 18 19 20 21
ESCUELA
CERRADA
Cumpleaños
del Dr. Martin
Luther King
Jr.
Reunion del
PTA
5:45-cena
6:00-reunion
Cafeteria



Coalicion de
Familias
Afroamericanas
6:00PM
Biblioteca

Concurso de
Ortografía,
6:30PM
Auditorio
Reunión del
Comité Asesor
del Aprendizaje
del Ingles
(ELAC) 5:30,
Salón106

22 23 24 25 26 27 28
Family Literacy
Night,
6:00PM
Auditorium
Asamblea
Celebremos
LeConte,
8:15AM
Vístete como tu
personaje
favorito

29 30
NO HAY
CLASES
para
estudiantes
31

THANKS to all of you for supporting the LATINO HERITAGE CELEBRATION!!!

We would like to thank the following people for all their help and support: Principal Wilson, Ms. Perez and Mr.
Henderson for doing such a great job as MCs, Ms. Aguas for her excellent timing as Stage Manager, all LeConte teachers,
parents, and the PTA, for helping make this event possible. We could not have done it without you!
A special thanks to students of LeConte Community Kidz, Elena Topete & the PTA Afterschool Visual Arts class, Ms.
Lynn Zamarra (LeConte Art teacher), Mr. Argueta, Mr. Auletta, & Mr. Hendersons students for helping make decorations
and arts and crafts for this event, or for writing reports on different Latin American countries or famous Latin Americans.
Thank you also to Ms. Aguas, Ms. Bernal/Donaldson-Fletcher, Ms. Torres, Ms. Bull, Ms. Diebel, and Ms. Sisneros for
your support and letting us use your classrooms and the library.
We especially thank Graciela Hernandez (Dance Instructor) and Gazel Valdez her assistant for teaching the
students all the dances and doing such a great job with that.
Thank you to the following people who helped with decorations and in making arts and crafts for the event:
Antonia Alba, Fabiola Muñoz, Ivette García, Estela Pérez, Adela Merlos, Elvia Orozco, Paola Torres, Carol Padilla,
Brisa Guzmán, Stefani Guzmán, Maricruz, Irene Leja, Maria Felix, Araceli Salgado and daughter.
Thanks to the following people that cooked the delicious food or drinks for the event: Yasmin Carretero, Antonia
Alba, Graciela Hernandez, Lorena Cach, Alicia Villanueva, Guadalupe Guerrero, Guadalupe Cardenas, Luis (Boris)
Martinez, Maria Felix, Adelina Vasquez, Jason & Genevieve Negrón, Gazel Valdez, Araceli Salgado, Ricardo Salinas,
Leticia Gonzales, Tania, Ivette García, and Elena Topete. Thanks also to Catarina Negrin and Luis Huerta for getting
food and bread donations from restaurants and bakeries.
Thanks to Jose Valencia, Rafael Canales, Luis Huerta and the other parents who contributed for the Mariachi.
Thank you also for the many volunteers that helped with selling tickets & arts and crafts, serving food, setup, clean
up, and in the dressing rooms: José Valencia, Elena Topete, Luis Huerta, Cesar & Carol Pérez, Araceli Salgado, Rafael
Canales, Francie Maguire, Maria Ibarra, Ma. Belén Aceves, Cathleen Richmond, Ethan Daniels, Fabiola Muñoz, Ivette
Garcia, Denise Montgomery, Estela Pérez, Karen Meckstroth, Guillermo Clavería, Charlie Huizenga, Jason Negrón, Sian
Shumway, Verónica, Mayra, Thelma Wheller, Jocelyn Bale-Glickman, Mia, Ila Deiss, C. Waters, Minerva Tirado, Ann
Sperske, Jessica Fiedler, Ces Rosales, Mauricio Espíritu, Basia Lubicz, Paz Melélendez-Canales, Catarina Negrin, Gazel
Valdez, Graciela G. Hernandez, Irene Leja, Juan García, and everyone else who helped that day.
We also thank Catarina Negrin for helping to recruit volunteers, and for writing an article about the event that
will help with publicity in the future.
A very special thanks to the organizers for this event:
General Coordination:  Paz A. Meléndez-Canales 
Donations & Publicity: Paz Meléndez-Canales & Carol Perez
Performances: Graciela Hernandez & Gazel Valdez
Food Preparation: Yasmin Carretero & Lupe Cardenas
Costumnes Preparation: Angélica Gonzales, Gazel Valdez, & Graciela Guadalupe Hernandez
Decorations: Elena Topete & José Valencia
Sales: Rafael Canales & Araceli Salgado
Arts and Crafts: Elena Topete
Volunteer Coordination: Carol Pérez
Set-up: Cesar Pérez
Clean-up: Luis Huerta
We thank the following local businesses for their support for this event: Alicia’s Tamales Los Mayas, Cancún
Taquería, Mi Tierra Foods, Picante, Picoso, Semifreddi’s, Tacubaya, and Whole Foods

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LeCONTE NEWSLETTER
ATTACHMENTS- JANUARY 2012
1) Reading Levels (Student behaviors and Book Characteristics)
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2) Student Mathematics Self-Assessment, Third Grade example
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;\._ 3) Bullying Survey- Students' comments


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4) Photos - Latino Heritage Celebration

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Preconventional Readers and Book Characteristics
Student Behaviors Book Characteristics
• Begins to choose reading materials • Illustrations provide strong support.
(e.g., books, magazines, and charts) • Some texts are wordless.
and has favorites. • Some texts have 1-2 words per page.
• Shows interest in reading signs, • Some texts have one line of print per
labels, and logos (environmental page.
print). • Illustrations appear on every page.
• Recognizes own name in print. • Illustrations closely match the text.
• Holds book and turns pages correctly. • Illustrations often sho'v concrete
• Shows beginning/ end of book or and familiar objects or actions.
story. • Print placement is consistent.
• Knows some letter names. • Simple text follows consistent
• Listens and responds to literature. structure.
• Comments on illustrations in books. • Text includes clear spacing between
• Participates in group reading (books, words.
rhymes, poems, and songs). • Print is lar e and clear.
Fountas and Pinnell Guided R e a d ~
Leveling SystemTM: A ~
,.
Emerging Readers and Book Characteristics
Student Behaviors
• Memorizes pattern books, poems,
and familiar books.
• Begins to read signs, labels, and
logos (environmental print).
• Demonstrates eagerness to read.
• Pretends to read.
• Uses illustrations to tell stories.
• Reads top to bottom, left to right,
and front to back with guidance.
• Knows most letter names and some
letter sounds.
• Recognizes some names and words
in context.
• Makes meaningful predictions with
guidance.
Book Characteristics
• Rhymes and plays with words.
• Participates in reading of familiar
books and poems.
• Connects books !ead aloud to own
experiences with guidance.
• Texts reflect common experiences,
familiar objects and actions.
• Some texts include repetition of one
or two sentence patterns.
• Patterns change only slightly
(1-2 words change).
• Texts include 1-3lines of print per page.
• Texts include memorable, repetitive
language patterns.
• Texts include an increasing number
of high frequency words.
• Some texts are based on familiar
rhymes and songs.
• Some texts include varied opening
I and sentences:
• Texts mclude predormnantly oral
!
language structures.
• Illustrations appear on every page.
• Illustrations clearly support the text.
• Print placement is consistent.
• Adequate spacing appears between
words.
• Early books are usually 8-10 pages. 1
• Later books are 10-20 a es. I
Fountas and Pinnell Guided
Leveling System TM: A B C D ! )
.,.
,,_
Developing Readers and Book Characteristics (Early)
Student Behaviors Book Characteristics
• Reads books with simple patterns. • Texts reflect common experiences.
• Begins to read own writing. • Texts include conventional story
• Begins to read independently for structure.
short periods (5-10 minutes). o Some texts include simple patterns.
• Discusses favorite reading material • Some texts include varied sentence
with others. patterns or repetition of two or more
• Relies on illustrations and print. sentence patterns.
• Uses finger-print-voice matching. 1.'1 Vocabulary reappears throughout
• Knows most letter sounds and letter text.
clusters. • Illustrations appear on every page.
• Recognizes simple words. • Illustrations provide strong support.
• Uses growing awareness of sound " Texts include straightforward and
segments (e.g., phonemes, syllables, simple vocabulary.
rhymes) to read words. o Print placement varies.
• Begins to make meaningful • Texts usually include 2-4lines of
predictions. print per page.
• Identifies titles and authors in o Texts are usually 10-20 pages.
literature (text features).
Pinnell • Retells main event or idea in literature(
• Participates in guided literature Leveling System TM: E F
discussions.
'-----
• Sees self as reader.
• Explains why literature is liked/
I
disliked during class discussions
;
with guidance.
I
- --
--

'"
Developing Readers and Book Characteristics (Later)
Student Behaviors
• Reads books with simple patterns.
• Begins to read own writing.
• Begins to read independently for
short periods (5-10 minutes).
• Discusses favorite reading material
with others.
• Relies on illustrations and print.
• Knows most letter sounds and letter
clusters.
• Recognizes simple words.
• Uses growing awareness of sound
segments (e.g., phonemes, syllables,
rhymes) to read words.
• Begins to make meaningful
predictions.
• Identifies titles and authors in
literature (text features).
• Retells main event or idea in
literature.
• Participates in guided literature
discussions.
• Sees self as reader.
• Explains why literature is liked/
disliked during class discussions
with guidance.
Book Characteristics
• Texts reflect common experiences.
• Texts include conventional story
structure.
• Text is less predictable.
• Some texts include varied sentence
patterns or repetition of three or
more sentence patterns.
• Vocabulary reappears throughout
text.
• Illustrations provide support for text.
• Illustrations appear on every page.
• Texts include straightforward and
simple vocabulary.
• Print size and placement vary.
• Texts usually include 2-4 lines of
print per page.
• Texts are usually 10-32 pages.
' " " ' ~ ~ ountas and Pinnell Guided
Reading Leveling System™: F G. ·
..
11 •
Beginning Readers and Book Characteristics (Early)
Student Behaviors Book Characteristics
• Reads simple early-reader books. • Fewer texts provide rhyme and
• Reads and follows simple written repetition as support
directions with guidance. • Many books contain simple story
• Identifies basic genres (e.g., fiction, line with a few repeated phrases.
nonfiction, and poetry). • Fairy /folk tales are retold using
• Uses basic punctuation when simpler vocabulary and language
reading orally. structure.
• Reads independently (10-15 minutes). • Texts may include literary language
• Chooses reading materials (more formal).
independently. • Text includes some descriptive
• Learns and shares information language and details.
from reading. • Texts include simple plots and only
• Uses meaning cues (context). a few characters.
• Uses sentence cues (grammar). • Illustrations on every page provide
• Uses letter I sound cues and support.
patterns (phonics). • Illustrations often represent
• Recognizes word endings, common sequence of events.
contractions, and many high • Vocabulary primarily consists of
frequency words. familiar words.
• Begins to self-correct. • Print size and placement vary.
• Retells beginning, middle, and end • Text is often double-spaced and does
with guidance. not always run to right margin.
• Discusses characters and story • Texts are usually 10-50 pages.
events with guidance. • Nonfiction texts are often shorter.
• Identifies own reading behaviors
with guidance. Fountas and Pinnell Guided
Reading Leveling SystemTM: HI J
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.'i .
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3eginning Readers and Book Characteristics (Later)
Student Behaviors
• Reads fiarder early-reader books.
• Reads and follows simple written
directions with guidance.
• Identifies basic genres (e.g., fiction,
nonfiction, and poetry).
• Uses basic punctuation when
reading orally.
• Reads independently (10-15
minutes).
• Chooses reading materials
independently.
• Learns and shares information
from reading.
• Uses meaning cues (context).
• Uses sentence cues (grammar).
• Uses letter I sound cues and
patterns (phonics).
• Recognizes word endings, common
contractions, and many high
frequency words.
• Begins to self-correct.
• Retells beginning, middle, and end
with guidance.
• Discusses characters and story
events with guidance.
• Identifies own reading behaviors
with guidance.
Book Characteristics
• Many books are part of a series.
• Books include a developed story
line with little or no use of pattern.
• Plots often include a series of events.
• Fairy I folk tales are retold using
simpler vocabulary and language
structure.
• Simple historical fiction and
biographies do not require
background knowledge.
• Texts may include literary language
(more formal).
• Texts include some challenging
vocabulary.
• Text often includes dialogue.
• Text includes some descriptive
language and details.
• Texts include simple plots and only
a few characters.
• Illustrations appear on every page
or two and provide less support.
• Illustrations often reflect a sequence
of events.
• Vocabulary primarily consists of
familiar words.
• Texts include some challenging
vocabulary.
• Text is often double-spaced and does
not always run to right margin.
• Many books are divided into
sections with page numbers and
table of contents.
• Length is usually 20-75 pages.
Fountas and Pinnell Guided
Reading Leveling System ™: J K L
'1-
Expanding Readers and Book Characteristics (Early)
Student Behaviors
• Reads easy chapter books.
• Chooses, reads, and finishes a
variety of materials at appropriate
level with guidance.
• Begins to read aloud with fluency.
• Reads silently for increasingly
longer periods (15-30 minutes).
• Uses reading strategies appropriately,
depending on the text and purpose.
• Uses word structure cues (e.g., root
words, prefixes, suffixes, word
chunks) when encountering
unknown words.
• Increases vocabulary by using
meaning cues (context).
• Self-corrects for meaning.
• Follows written directions.
• Identifies chapter titles and
of contents (text organizers). .
• Sumtnarizes and retells story events
in sequential order.
• Responds to and makes personal
connections with facts, characters,
and situations in literature.
• Compares and contrasts characters
and story events.
Book Characteristics
• Many books are part of a series.
• Plots often include a series of events.
• Fiction often includes the everyday
events and problems that children
encounter.
• Fiction includes a few developed
characters.
• Nonfiction texts include clear facts
and information.
• Texts include some challenging
vocabulary.
• Texts include descriptive language
and details.
• Illustrations provide minimal
support and can occur once every
2-6 pages.
• Illustrations often depict characters
and settings and may convey mood.
• Text may include vocabulary specific
to genre or topic.
• Text in easy chapter books is often
double spaced and does not always
run to right margin.
• Books often contain page numbers,
table of contents, and chapter
numbers and/ or titles.
• Length is usually 60-75 pages. • "Reads between the lines" with
guidance.
• Identifies own reading strategies
and sets goals with guidance.
and Pinnell
\t_ Reading Leveling System ™: L M N .
---- __./
Expanding Readers and Book Characteristics (Later)
Student Behaviors Book Characteristics
• Reads easy chapter books. l• Many books are part of a series. I
• Chooses, reads, and finishes a · • Texts include developed plots. 1
variety of materials at appropriate • Fiction often includes the everyday j
level with guidance. events and problems that children ·
• Begins to read aloud with fluency. encounter.
• Reads silently for increasingly longer • Fiction includes a few developed
periods (15-30 minutes). characters.
• Uses reading strategies appropriately, • Nonfiction texts include clear facts.
depending on the text and purpose. • Texts include some challenging .
• Uses word structure cues (e.g., root vocabulary. I
words, prefixes, suffixes, word • Texts include descriptive language
1
chunks) when encountering and details.
unknown words.
• Increases vocabulary by using
meaning cues (context).
• Self-corrects for meaning.
• Follows written directions.
• Identifies chapter titles and table of
contents (text organizers).
• Summarizes and retells story events
in sequential order.
• Responds to and makes personal
connections with facts, characters,
and situations in literature.
• Compares and contrasts characters
• Illustrations provide minimal
support and can occur once or
twice in a chapter.
• Text is single-spaced.
• Illustrations often depict characters
and settings and may convey mood.
• Texts may include vocabulary .
specific to genre or topic.
• Nonfiction texts may include page
numbers, table of contents, captions,
chapter headings, and an index.
• Length is usually 75-100 pages.
and story events. ountas and Pinnell Guided
• uReads between the lines" with Reading Leveling System ™: M N 0
guidance.
• Identifies own reading strategies
and sets goals with guidance.

Bridging Readers and Book Characteristics (Early)
Student Behaviors Book Characteristics
• Reads medium level chapter books. • Series books contain familiar format,
• Chooses reading rna terials at story structures, and characters.
appropriate level. • Texts include fully developed plots.
• Expands knowledge of different • Fiction includes series of episodes,
genres (e.g., realistic fiction, historical problems, and solutions.
fiction, and fantasy). • Fiction includes fully developed
• Reads aloud with expression. characters.
• Uses resources (e.g., encyclopedias, • Nonfiction texts present simple facts
CD-ROMs, and nonfiction texts) to
I
in an organized structure.
locate and sort information with • Texts include challenging and
guidance. content- specific vocabulary.
• Gathers information by using the • Authors use descriptive and
table of contents, captions, index, memorable language.
and glossary (text organizers) with • Some books include occasional
guidance. illustrations (usually 1-2 per
• Gathers and uses information from chapter).
graphs, charts, tables, and maps • Fiction may include chapter titles
with guidance. and table of contents.
• Increases vocabulary by using • Nonfiction may include table of
context cues, other reading strategies contents, captions, a glossary, and
and resources (e.g., dictionary and index.
thesaurus) with guidance. • Text runs margin to margin with a
• Demonstrates understanding of the more dense print format.
difference between fact and opinion. • Length is usually 75-200 pages.
• Follows multi-step written .
directions independently. Fountas and Pinnefi G u i d e ~
• Discusses setting, plot, characters, Reading Leveling System™: 0 P Q
and point of view (literary __/
elements) with guidance.
• Responds to issues and ideas in
literature as well as facts or story
events.
• Makes connections to other authors,
books, and perspectives.
• Participates in small group literature
discussions with guidance.
• Uses reasons and examples to
support ideas and opinions with
guidance.

l
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Bridging Readers and Book Characteristics (Later)
Student Behaviors
Book Characteristics
• Reads medium level chapter books. • Series books contain familiar format,
• Chooses reading materials at story structures and characters.
appropriate level. • Texts include fully developed plots.
• Expands knowledge of different j • Fiction includes series of episodes,
genres (e.g., realistic fiction, historical problems, and solutions.
fiction, and fantasy). • Fiction includes fully developed
• Reads aloud with expression. characters.
• Uses resources (e.g., encyclopedias, • Books at this level include poetry,
CD-ROMs, and nonfiction texts) to straightforward fantasy, sports sto-
locate and sort information with ries, nonfiction, and simple histori-
guidance. cal fiction.
• Gathers information by using the • Nonfiction texts present simple facts
table of contents, captions, index, in an organized structure.
and glossary (text organizers) with • Nonfiction may include table of con-
guidance. tents, captions, a glossary, and index.
• Gathers and uses information from • Texts include challenging and con-
graphs, charts, tables, and maps tent-specific vocabulary.
with guidance. • Authors use descriptive and memo-
• Uses context cues, other reading rable language.
strategies and resources (e.g., • Some books include occasional illus-
dictionary and thesaurus) to increase trations (usually 1-2 per chapter).
vocabulary with guidance. • Some books have no illustrations.
• Demonstrates understanding of the · • Text runs margin to margin with a
difference betwee:a.fact and opinion. more dense print format.
• Follows multi-step written directions • Length is usually 100-200 pages.
independently.
• Discusses setting, plot, characters, ountas and Pinnell Guided
and point of view (literary elements) Reading Leveling System™: P Q R
with guidance.
• Responds to issues and ideas in I
literature as well as facts or story /-----
events.
• Makes connections to other authors,
books, and perspectives.
• Participates in small group literature
discussions with guidance.
• Uses reasons and examples to
support ideas and opinions with
guidance.
~ -
I
! i'tuent and Book Characteristics (Later)
I '
\ i Student Behaviors Hook Characteristics
I l' Reads challenging children's • include fully developed plots,
I literature. otten around a central theme.
• Selects, reads, and finishes a wide • Plots in fiction include climax and
variety of genres with guidance. resolution.
• Begins to develop strategies and • Books touch upon challenging
criteria for selecting reading issues (e.g., animal rights, death,
materials. ---__./· .1buse, divorce).
• Reads aloud with fluency, • Fiction includes multiple fully-
expression, and confidence. developed characters.
• Reads silently for extended periods • Books at this level may include
(30-40 min.). poetry, fantasy, humor, historical
• Begins to use resources (e.g., fiction, animal stories, and
encyclopedias, articles, Internet, and adventure as well as nonfiction.
nonfiction texts) to locate • Nonfiction texts present many facts
. information. in an organized structure.
,
1
1
• Gathers information using the table • Nonfiction includes table of
·
1
of contents, captions, glossary, and contents, captions, a glossary, and
i ! index (text organizers) index.
I
. independently. • Nonfiction texts may include tables,
• Begins to use resources (e.g., graphs, maps, and charts.
I
dictionary and thesaurus) to increase • Illustrations, photographs, and
l
vocabulary in different subject areas. captions support text in nonfiction
• Begins to discuss literature with materials.
reference to setting, plot, characters, • Texts include more challenging
and theme (literary elements), and vocabulary.
author's craft. • Authors use vivid descriptive and.
I
• Generates thoughtful oral and memorable language.
written responses in small group • Fiction includes few, if any
I literature discussions with guidance. illustrations.
I • Begins to use new vocabulary in • Print size is smaller.
I different subjects and in oral and • Text difficulty determined more by
' written response to literature. content than by length.
/ • Begins to gain deeper meaning by
"reading between the lines." Fountas and PinneJl Guided
• Begins to set goals and identifies Reading Leveling System ™: R S T U
strategies to improve reading.
'1·
I
Proficient Readers and Book Characteristics
I
Student Behaviors
• Reads complex children's literature.
• Reads and understands informa-
tional texts (e.g., want ads, bro-
chures, schedules, catalogs,
manuals) with guidance.
• Develops strategies and criteria for
selecting reading materials inde-
pendently.
• Uses resources (e.g., encyclopedias,
articles, Internet, and nonfiction
texts) to locate information inde-
pendently.
• Gathers and analyzes information
from graphs, charts, tables, and
maps with guidance.
• Integrates information from mul-
tiple nonfiction sources to deepen
understanding of a topic with
guidance.
. • Uses resources (e.g., dictionary and
I
thesaurus) to increase vocabulary
independently.
• Identifies literary devices (e.g.,
similes, metaphors, personification,
and foreshadowing).
• Discusses literature with reference
to theme, author's purpose and
style (literary elements), and
author's craft.
• Begins to generate in-depth re-
sponses in small group literature
discussions.
• Begins to generate in-depth written
responses to literature.
• Uses increasingly complex vocabu-
lary in different subjects and in oral
and written response to literature.
• Uses reasons and examples to
. support ideas and conclusions.
! • Probes for deeper meaning by
J "reading between the lines" in
/ response to literature.
i i
Book Characteristics
• Texts include fully-developed plots,
often touching upon complex issues
such as death, prejudice, poverty, or
war.
• Settings are often in other time
periods or unfamiliar locations.
• Books at this level include an
increasing variety of genres (e.g.,
survival stories, nonfiction,
mysteries, more complex fantasy,
biographies, and historical fiction).
• Texts begin to include multiple
perspectives on an issue.
• Texts include complex sentence
structure and literary devices (e.g.,
metaphor, simile).
• Well-developed characters face
complex issues and challenges.
• Texts include sophisticated
language intended to communicate
mood, emotion, and atmosphere.
• Nonfiction texts include substantial
amount of information and detail.
• Nonfiction includes table of
contents; captions, a glossary, and
index.
• Nonfiction texts may include tables,
graphs, maps, and charts.
• Illustrations, pho!ggraphs, and
captions support text in nonfiction
materials.
• Nonfiction texts may include
newspapers, magazines, and
· manuals.
• Texts often include specialized
vocabulary.
~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ~
~
Connecting Readers and Book Characteristics
Student Behaviors I Book Characteristics
• Reads complex children's literature
and young adult literature.
• Selects, reads, and finishes a wide
variety of genres independently.
• Begins to choose challenging
reading materials and projects.
• Integrates nonfiction information to
develop deeper understanding of a
topic independently.
• Begins to gather, analyze, and use
information from graphs, charts,
tables, and maps.
• Generates in-depth responses and
sustains small group literature
discussions.
• Generates in-depth written
responses to literature.
• Begins to evaluate, interpret, and
analyze reading content critically.
• Begins to develop criteria for
evaluating literature.
• Seeks recommendations and
opinions about literature from
others.
• Sets reading challenges and goals
independently.
• Fiction includes fully developed
plots, often around complex issue
such as freedom, truth, goodness and
evil, and human rights.
• Books include a variety of genres
(realistic fiction, biography, fantasy,
survival stories, historical fiction, and
nonfiction).
• Settings are often in other time
periods or unfamiliar locations that
require some background knowledge.
• Texts include multiple perspectives
that reflect the multifaceted
complexity of an issue.
• Texts include literary devices (e.g.,
metaphor, simile) and some imagery
and symbolism.
• Characters face complex issues and
challenges.
• Texts include sophisticated language
intended ~ o communicate mood,
emotion, and atmosphere.
• Nonfiction texts include substantial
amount of information and detail.
• Nonfiction texts include table of
contents, captions, a glossary, and
index.
• Nonfiction texts include tables,
graphs, maps, and charts.
(1Fountas and Pinnell Guided ~
~ a d i n g Leveling System™: V W X Y)
7
Independent Readers and Book Characteristics
Student Behaviors
• Reads young adult and adult
liter a ture.
• Chooses and comprehends a wide
variety of sophisticated materials
with ease (e.g., newspapers,
magazines, manuals, novels, and
poetry).
• Reads and understands
informational texts (i.e., manuals,
consumer reports, applications, and
forms).
• Reads challenging material for
pleasure independently.
• Reads challenging material for
information and to solve problems
independent! y.
• Perseveres through complex
I
reading tasks.
.
• Gathers, analyzes, and uses
· information graphs, charts,
tables, and maps independently.
• Analyzes literary devices (e.g.,
metaphors, imagery, irony, and
satire).
• Contributes unique insights and
supports opinions in complex
literature discussions.
• Adds depth to responses to
j literature by making insightful
I
to other reading and
expenences.
I • Evaluates, interprets, and analyzef;
I r('ading content
! • Develops and articulates criteria for
I
' evaluating literature.
• Pursues a widening community of
I readers independently.
j I I
--
Book Characteristics
• Some texts focus on complex and
controversial issues.
• Settings may require an
understanding of other cultures and
perspectives.
• Texts sometimes include complex
structure such as flashbacks or time
travel.
• Texts include sophisticated language,
imagery, and symbolism.
• Texts may promote specific
ideologies or biases.
• Adolescent and young adult
characters often confront challenges
and issues.
• Texts may contain ambiguity,
requiring students to make
inferences, and read for deeper
meaning.
• Texts may contain multiple layers of
meaning, facts, and concepts.
• Nonfiction texts include substantial
information and details that require
background knowledge and deeper
level understanding of a topic.
Fountas and Pinnell Guided
Reading Leveling SystemTM: X Y Z
I
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Student Mathematics Self-Assessment- What I am learning to do and what I can do ...
Name Third Grade Number Sense 1.0 page 1
Date lam I can Understanding place Example that shows what I CAN do
learning value
to ••• (ones, tens, ••• ) of whole
numbers
(0, 1, 2, 3, ••• )
Count, read, and write (write eighty-nine thousand seventy one)
whole number to 10,000
Put numbers in order from (put these numbers in order from least to greatest--
least to greatest and use 6,804 10,010 10,110 8,604)
these signs to show equal
to, less than, and greater
than
(>, =, >)
(write the correct sign on the blank line->,=,>)
6,904 6,409 10,119 10,109
Identity the place value of (write the place value of the 1 in this number 61,458)
each digit in numbers to
10,000
(write the place value of the 6 in this number 61,458)
I
Date lam I can Understanding place Number Sense 1.0 page2
learning value ... Example that shows what I CAN do
to ..•
Round numbers to the (round this number to the nearest hundred, 5,175)
nearest ten, hundred, and
thousand
(round this number to the nearest thousand, 1 ,345)
i
Use expanded notation to (write this number in expanded notation, 8,439)
represent numbers (205 =
200 + 5)
(write this number in standard form, 3000 + 300 + 1)
-
Date lam lean Solve addition, subtraction, Number Sense 2.0
page3
learning multiplication, and division Example that shows what I CAN do
to ... problems
Find the sum (add) or Solve these problems:
difference (subtract) of two 6,623 + 987 10,076-4,997
whole numbers between 0 &
10,000
Say and write the Solve these problems:
multiplication facts between
1 & 10 3x6= 3x8= 4x7=
7x8= 6x9= 8x8=
7x7= 9x4= 4x8=
Use multiplication facts to Solve these problems:
I
solve division facts.
x5 =30 30+5 =
Use mental math to multiply Solve these problems:
and divide numbers by 0 and
1 1x9= 12 + = 1
Ox89= 170 + =0
-
-
Date lam I can Solve addition, subtraction, Number Sense 2.0 page4
learning multiplication, and division Example that shows what I CAN do
to ... problems
Multiply a four digit number Solve this problem:
by a one digit number 2,426 X 3 =
Divide a four digit number Solve this problem:
by a one digit number 3369 7 3 =
without a remainder
Figure out the cost of some Solve this problem:
items (4 cookies) when I You want to buy 8 slices of frozen pizza. The pizzas come in
I
know the cost of one item packages of 4 per package and each package cost $3.00. How
($2.00) much will you have to pay to buy 8 slices of frozen pizza? i
'
Date lam I can Understand the Number Sense 3.0
page 5
learning relationship and difference Example that shows what I CAN do
to ... between whole numbers,
simple fractions, and
decimal
Identify fractions Write the fractional part that is shaded in the figure below.
-
I I
Compare the amount or size Draw a fraction below that shows 112.
of a simple fraction
Draw a fraction that is equal to or the same size as 112. I
Add and subtract simple Solve these problems:
fractions
1/8 + 3/8 =
3/4-2/4 =
--
Date lam I Can Understand the Number Sense 3.0 page6
learning relationship and difference Example that shows what I CAN do
to .... between whole numbers,
simple fractions, and
decimal
Add and subtract problems You earned $34.50 from selling wrapping paper. You received
involving money amounts $9.85 for helping clean up your home. How much money do you
have now?
You bought a package of pencils that cost $3.78. You have the
sales clerk $5.00 to pay for the pencils. What is the total amount of
change you received?
I
I
i
Multiply and divide You want to buy three soccer balls. The soccer balls cost $4.99
' I
problems involving money each. How much money will you need to buy the soccer balls?
amounts
i
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LeConte Elementary, Survey 12.2011
Bullying Survey- Examples of Students' Comments
Third Grade
I) Is anyone mean to you •••
"say mean words, push, " "call me names, pull my hair, " "make fun of me, humiliate me in front of the whole
class, " "boss me around, " "steals the trolley from me, " "deliberately tagging only me"
2) Who did you tell •••
"parents and teachers, " "all the teachers at LeConte, " "yard monitor, " "my friends"
3) What did the person do to help you •••
"tried to help us work it out with words, gave her a time out, " "tell the person to stop, " "he said to ignore
them, " "they put them on a time-out but after they put them on a time-out, they kept bullying me "
Fourth Grade
1) Is anyone mean to you ...
"they tell me it is weird to be Asian, " "they tell me stuff, like mean stuff, " "they will tell me that my work is
wrong ... " "they tell me I am weak, " "they say bod words, " "they use bad words and sometimes their fists, "
"they push your books on the ground, " "some shove me and say move it punk, " "called me dumb, lazy, stupid, "
"they hit and bother me, " "there are some people who say they don 't want me to play, " "they yell at me, " "say
rude things or hit or push me" "they get in my face" "they get in my space" "tease me a little because I'm
weird"
2) Who did you tell •••
"a teacher, " "my brother, " "another student, " "told Ms. Wilson," "a teacher and a couple of .friends who have
experienced it too, "
3) Why didn't you tell someone •••
"because I am scared, " "because they get revenge on me, " "because some people won't believe me and it makes
me upset, " "because I fee/like if I do then they might be more mean"
4) What did the person do to help you •••
"to ignore that person, " "talk to him (bully)," "they talked to the principal, " "we talked to the bully and tried to
get better, " "made me feel better (after talking to another student), "told me try to avoid them, " "they try to stop
them" "they have not done anything yet that works"
Fifth Grade
1) Is anyone mean to you •••
"they don't want me to sit next to them, " "being racist talking about my family, " "they say I am dumb, " "not
really, they just call me darkness," "they talk about me," "they call me names and make fun of me," "they
call me names, tease me, spread rumors about me, " "they gossip about me, " "told me to shut up, said I was
ugly, " "they steal my stuff, they yell at me, and kick and hit me on purpose, "
2) Who did you tell •••
"I think I told. " "my parents" "the teacher, " (various teachers and after school stqfj)
3) Why didn't you tell someone •••
"they're going to think I'm a snitch," "because I'm shy to tell and sometimes I tell but they do nothing about
it, " "because I can handle it, " "because they will say I'm the one who did it, " "that would be tattle telling, "
4) What did the person do to help you •••
"she gave me some solutions" "help me by telling them to stop, " "they told the person to stop bullying me, "
"they calm me down and let me forget (parents) " "solved it by getting me and the person who bullied and
tried for us to solve it, " "nothing"