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Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding Francy Riano Olarte LaGuardia Community College, Long Island City, N.Y. Labor and Delivery SCR 270 Clinical March 18, 2010

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

Data Which Supports Teaching The patient, Mrs. F., for the clinical on March 18, 2010, was a nineteen year old female Hispanic in the post partum area day one. The patient is a prima-para and has no experience with breastfeeding. Patient stated she wants to breastfeed but was unsure as to how to do it and she is concerned about not being successful. Parent separated from child due to Urinary Track Infection during last part of pregnancy both mother and child receiving antibiotics child in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, mother on the post-partum floor. Nursing Diagnosis Interrupted Breastfeeding r/t maternal illness, AEB separation mother infant, due to Urinary Track Infection during last part of pregnancy both mother and child receiving antibiotics child in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, mother on the post-partum floor. Expected Outcomes At the end of the teaching session the patient will be able to: The patient will verbalize/demonstrate techniques to manage breastfeeding problems (C). The patient will demonstrate effective methods of breastfeeding collection and storage (P). The patient will verbalize positive self-esteem in relation to the breastfeeding experience (A). Teaching Plan People who were taught: The patient Mrs. F. and her husband were explained the process of breastfeeding and what it involves. These are the people present during the teaching session at the hospital. This plan could also include her mother and anyone who will be with the patient for the next few months. Since both of the parents have no experience or knowledge of breastfeeding, the student will include pamphlets with pictures showing proper procedure how to hold the baby during breast-feeding as

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

well as a list of websites that could be accessed from home to re-enforce the content of the teaching session. Furthermore, these websites can also answer any question that may arise in the future. The student will also reinforce the need to keep open communication with doctor. The patient and her husband can call the doctor if they need additional help with breastfeeding. Teaching Session Content y I assessed the level of understanding and knowledge of both parents about breastfeeding and breast care. y I showed and gave the patient and husband Pamphlets with illustrations about the importance of and process of breast feeding, different ways to hold the baby, cues that might signal that the baby is hungry. y I also explained how to prevent injury to nipples and proper procedure for baby latching onto nipple. y y I instructed the mother the importance of wearing good supportive bra, and breast care. I listened and answered any questions from the parents and evaluate if outcomes were met. After talking with the new parents I learned that they are both high school graduates and that they do not have a clear idea in the differences between breast milk and formula. Mrs. F. wants to breastfeed but is not sure on the procedure and anxious that she might fail. The husband is supportive on what ever she chooses because she is the primary care taker. The patient is receptive to the teaching she was watching the newborn channel and was trying to get as much information as possible on how to take care of her daughter. I inquired about access to the internet, the client replied that she has access and she is familiar with the internet.

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

I began by telling the new parents the benefits and differences between breast milk and formula, Breast milk has disease-fighting cells called antibodies that help protect infants from germs, illness, and even SIDS. Infant formula cannot match the chemical make up of human milk, especially the cells, hormones, and antibodies that fight disease.(Womens health.gov 2009). Furthermore most babies digest breast milk easier than formula. Breastfeeding is not only good for the new born but also for the mother it helps the mother get to her normal weigh a lot faster than if she did not breast feed. It also allows time for bonding with the new baby. Most mothers benefit from breastfeeding a very unique experience. It is recommended that at least the first six months of life the baby be breastfed, but breastfeeding can be continued as long as the mother feels comfortable or can do it. Following I handed each the patient and her husband pamphlets that contain illustrations with the different ways to hold the baby while breastfeeding, as well as to how to hold the breast to get a good latch. I allowed enough time for both parents to look over the pamphlets and ask questions. Mrs. F. wanted to know if it was painful. I explained to her that if her technique was correct it would prevent cracking of the nipples which could be very painful and could discourage the new mother to continue breastfeeding. The patient was also reminded that the more times the child spends feeding the more milk that will be produced. As with most new task patience and perseverance its the key to achieving a positive outcome. The mother was explained that proper latching of the baby onto the nipple requires that the baby grabs as much of the areola as possible to prevent cracking and nipple injury. Next, I asked the parents to demonstrate how to hold the baby by using a pillow.

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

The next thing I did was explain the rooting reflex, which all children have. This reflex can be obtained by stimulating the childs cheek with either the fingers or the mothers nipples. The child will respond by opening the mouth and looking for something to suck on. The best time to start is when the baby is calmed. It is recommended that the baby be hold skin to skin up against bare chest and use a blanket to cover both the mother and child. While the baby is awake, the mother can use the root reflex to get the child to latch onto nipple. I explained to the new mother that it is important to support the babys head and use proper technique for holding the baby. The proper way to guide the nipple onto the childs mouth is to hold the breast like making a C with the hand, and having the nipple in the middle. The best time to introduce the breast onto the babys mouth is when it is open the widest so that proper latching can take place. During this time the mother can talk and bond with her daughter. The mother asked me if just breast milk is enough to help her daughter grow healthy. I explained that yes, breast milk has all the nutrients necessary for a healthy development. I showed the new parents the chart on expected diapers per day and its relation to a well nourish baby. The chart explained the amount and color of babys bowel movements, they start with dark green and become yellow as times goes by. These bowel movements change within a week the child should have more than six wet diapers changed per day to indicate proper hydration (Womenshealth.gov 2009). Also most babies usually wake up every two to three hours to eat in the first twenty four fours and then go back to sleep. So the parents can expect to feed the baby every couple of hours or eight to twelve feedings per day. Babies signal that they are hungry by a quiet alert state, rooting, sucking, hand-to-mouth activity) (Ackley 2006). The baby will show proper growth and development for age the student also reinstated the importance to keep

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

asking questions to the babys pediatrician and that they should both keep the pediatricians number at hand. I explained that during breastfeeding the mother should let the baby feed for fifteen minutes then burp the baby should be switch to the other breast to feed for another fifteen minutes. Then which ever breast is last used for feeding will be used again next time the baby is hungry. The mother was also explained that wearing a good supportive bra its best while breastfeeding due to the milk they will become fuller and heavier and she needs to wear proper bra support. Breast milk storage is in one of the pamphlets this one contains a chart as a guide for storage of pumped milk and how long it can last depending on storage. The next thing I explained to the new parents was breast milk storage. The first thing the mother needs to do is wash her hands and rinse her breast with warm water. Then make sure that all other supplies being used are clean and ready, the pump the storage bags and containers to be stored in the fridge. After each pumping the mother can refrigerate the milk. It is best to refrigerate the milk right after expressing, label and date and always use the older milk first. Freeze in small amounts of two to four ounces (Womens health.gov 2009). Milk can be stored in the refrigerator for five to eight days or in the freezer and it can last up to a year stored there. In detail information was given to the new parents. The patient and husband were also explained that she needs to maintain her caloric intake similar to while she was pregnant. The client needs to increase her normal caloric intake by five hundred calories per day and needs to make sure these calories come from nutritional foods.

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

Both parents were given information on the food pyramid, pamphlets and website address where they can get additional information about proper nutrition. Evaluation of teaching session once it is completed using your expected outcomes Outcome one: The patient will verbalize/demonstrate techniques to manage breastfeeding problems (C). The client was able to ask question about how much and how to store the milk and how to know if the child was getting proper nutrition from breast milk. She was able to anticipate any other questions and to refer back to websites or the information given to the parents. Outcome two: The patient will demonstrate effective methods of breastfeeding collection and storage (P). Objective two was met the mother was able to express a little colostrum using the electrical pump at the hospital. Outcome three: The patient will verbalize positive self-esteem in relation to the breastfeeding experience (A). Learning objective was met and the client decided that breast feeding was the option that wanted to go with and stated that it the information was very helpful she felt more confident to achieve this goal. I evaluated how much the parents learned during this session by having them explain how they will handle the breastfeeding when they are able to be with their daughter. After having the parents do this they both seem a lot more confident and Mrs. F. states feeling more prepare for the experience. She verbalizes being more confident about asking for help now and hopes to be successful.

Teaching Plan Breast Feeding

References Ladewig, P.W, London, M.L, Moberly, S, Olds, S.B (2002) Contemporary maternal

newborn nursing care. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Breastfeeding guide. Elmhurst Hospital Center, Broadway, New York.

U.S. Department Health and Human Services. 2009. The Federal Government Source for

Womens Health Information: Breastfeeding (2009). Retrieved March 17, 2010, from http://www.womensheath.gov/breastfeeding.

(2009). My Pyramid.Gov. USDA United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved March, 17, 2010, From USDA .gov full text data base.