Exercise #4: Straight Alternating Eighths with the Melody as Accents

Melody
5

!# # " "#

"

A

!#! # # $ # $ # & "#! % %
Bright Latin

Mambo Inn
$ # $ # # # # # ## % % ' ## ## ## ' ' ## # # '# % ## ## ## ## # # # # % # # %
1.

# & % #
2.

$ # # # % $ # # # # %

## $ %

#

##

# %

#

$ # $ # $ # % % %

# %

9

" # # ## " ## " ## " # " #

14

B

# # $ # $ # $ # ' % % % % # # ## ## # # ## ## # #

## $ # $ # $ # & % % % # & & ( $ # & % ( #

## ## # # ## ##

18

22

A

# % # %

$ # $ # $ # % % % $ # $ # $ # % % %

#

26

Step 1: Accents Instead of playing the melody exclusively as in exercise #3, here you will play continuous straight eighth notes, accenting only notes from the melody. It is important to maintain a clear distinction between accented and unaccented notes for this exercise to work. Since this song is a famous Latin standard, play

with the snares off and bossa feet just as in exercise #2. Also note that this melody starts at the introduction to the second chorus (at :49 on the recording).

Guide R.H. and L.H.= Straight alternating eighths with the melody as accents R.F. and L.F.= Bossa feet

Example #1
Drum set

$ !# "!#

#
L R

1. R 2. L
3

$ # %
R L

L R

# # &

# #

$ #

# % $ # # &

$ # # & # #

# #

#

# % $ # # &

$ # # & $ # #

# #

$ # $ # %

$ # % # # &

$ # # &

$ " # #

#

$ # %

# # &

$ # #

#

# %

#

# %

#

Step 2: Improvised Call Instead of improvising the response as in exercise #2, this time you will try improvising the call. In other words you will improvise the first two measures of each four bar phrase in the A sections of this song. Just like in exercise #2, stick to one improvised call for each time through the form and try setting the same (or similar) melody notes to your new rhythm.

Guide (A Sections) R.H. and L.H.= Play two bars of improvised call and two bars of the original response using straight eighth notes with the melody as accents R.F. and L.F.= Bossa Feet Guide (B sections)

R.H. and L.H.= Straight alternating eighths with the melody as accents R.F. and L.F.= Bossa feet Example #2
Improvised Call

Drum set

$ !# "!#

#

# % # # & $ # #

$ # # &

# #

#

$ # % $ # # &

# # & # #

# #

#

$ # % $ # # &

# # & $ # #

# # $ #

$ # $ # %

# % # # &

$ # # &

3

$ " # #

Response

#

# %

#

# %

#

# %

Playing Tips: Repetition One important feature of the rhythmic structure of “Mambo Inn”, as well as almost all the other songs in this book, is repetition. Music is just like language, and many of the techniques that people use to speak effectively are identical to musical techniques that composers and soloists use. Repetition is a perfect example of how analogous the relation between music and language is. When somebody takes the time to repeat something they say, it automatically emphasizes their statement and makes it more likely that their audience will absorb and remember it. In “Mambo Inn”, notice how the rhythms of the A section are repeated almost note for note, with only slight variation. This musical repetition has the same effect as repetition in speech in that it emphasizes the music and makes it more likely that an audience will absorb and remember it. Another example of the similarities between music and speech is the call and response technique discussed in exercise #2. The important principle is that repetition is one of the keys to communicating successfully on the drums. So whenever you are playing, don’t avoid repeating yourself for fear of sounding unoriginal. Instead, embrace repetition

and see it as a way to commit to your musical ideas and convey them more effectively to an audience. Papa Jo’s playing is full of examples of this type of repetition, and listening to his playing is one of the best ways to learn how to use this technique.

Suggested Recording Count Basie, “April in Paris” (Sonny Payne on drums)