DRAFT

USAR
SMALL ARMS READINESS GROUP (SARG)

General Small Arms Tasks
Wearing and Adjustment of Individual Equipment, Carrying Configurations, Firing Positions, Bringing Small Arms into Action, & Combat Cleaning

16 October 2001

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DRAFT
GENERAL SMALL ARMS TASKS

SARG - GSAT

SECTION I. INTRODUCTION 1. This guide outlines how individual soldiers can increase their combat readiness and ability to react to a threat condition. Safety is stressed through out the guide since it pretains to combat or threat situations just as much as to qualification range firing. Two of the most important safety items are to know your target and keep your finger off the trigger until ready to engage the target. a. Many of these tasks are excellent Value Added Training (VAT) tasks. That is these tasks take very little if any time or resources but greatly enhance the small arm preliminary marksmanship instruction (PMI). For example the proper adjustment of the soldier’s LCE and helmet so that it does not interfere with the employment of their small arm. In addition loading the small arm from different carrying configurations and from the ammunition pouches. b. Other tasks are excellent for concurrent or hip pocket training. Practicing to react to a threat condition by seeking cover and drawing their pistol from a holster will increase the soldiers survivability skills and self confidence. 2. Members of the United States Army Reserve Command (USARC) Small Arms Readiness Group (SARG) prepared this guide. Members of the All Army Reserve Marksmanship Training or Competitive Teams, reviewed the document and provided in-put. It reflects their interpretation of the current Army doctrine in small arms training. This marksmanship pamphlet is a working document that will improve with user’s suggestions. Send comments and specific suggestions for improvement to: Commander, USAR Small Arms Readiness Group (SARG) 4950 South 2nd Street Building 307-A, Fort Gillem Forrest Park, GA 30297-5137

GSAT-1

16 October 2001

SARG - GSAT SECTION II. PRESENTATION The following tasks have been developed to increase the soldier’s survivability skills with their assigned individual weapon. The tasks for the M16 Rifle apply to the M4 Carbine and the M9 pistol tasks apply to the M11 Pistols unless otherwise noted,. Weapons Safety Adjust LCE and helmet Load an M16 Rifle or M4 Carbine Load an M9/M11 Pistol Firing Positions Assume a defensive posture with the M16 rifle from sling arms Presentation of the M9 Pistol from the holster Combat cleaning an M16 Rifle Night vision tasks with an M16 Rifle Operate Night Vision Sight AN/PVS-4 (071-315-0003) Inspect AN/PVS-4 for Serviceability, Mount and Remove AN/PVS-4 from an M16 Rifle. Boresight AN/PVS-4 to an M16 Rifle Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M16 rifle, Using the Laser BoreSighting Method. Engage Targets with an M16 Rifle using a Night Vision Sight AN/PVS-4 (071-315-2308) Mount and Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M249 Automatic Rifle, Night Fire

GSAT-2

17 June 2001

Keep your finger off the trigger until you are pointed in the target area and ready to fire. 4. Time: 1 minute. 2. BATTLE FOCUS: Individual weapon safety is a major concern of all soldiers. CONDITION: Given a weapon in a classroom or on a range. 3. Verify all small arms are clear at the beginning of training. Each soldier is responsible for his own safety and those around him. Clear the weapon as the first action when you receive it and always know the condition of your weapon. GSAT-3 17 June 2001 . Note: Everyone will observe these rules while training with weapons. 5. The safety information and procedures you will review or learn today are very important especially in combat or other threat situations. Verify that no live ammunition is present. 3.SARG . Designate a down range area for the training. Always wear hearing protection and appropriate safety equipment on firing ranges. Be sure of your target and the area behind it. STANDARD: Each soldier will discuss weapons safety and safe weapons handling. Prior to the safety briefing the instructor will: 1. Five General Safety Rules: 1. 2. 4. Have soldiers ground weapons pointed down range. Many times in high stress situations soldiers have had their finger on the trigger of their weapon and inadvertently jerked it shooting their fellow soldier.GSAT TASK: Weapons Safety. Any soldier is authorized to make an immediate on-the-spot correction of an unsafe act. Do not point the weapon at anything you are not willing to destroy or fire on. Violations of weapons safety can cause injury and death. Always assume and handle weapons as if they were loaded. Note: Instructor should become familiar with and read word for word the five general safety rules that apply to all range activities and most training and combat situations.

The soldier will adjust the helmet so that it does not interfere with the sighting of the weapon or require further adjustment when assuming the prone.30 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. (2) Locate on pistol belt where the right and left side of the abdomen comes in contact with ground. Peer Coach. pistol. Locate area for magazine pouches. FM 23-9. Time: 20 . helmet. Demonstrate loading from both magazine pouches while in each of the firing positions. holster and magazines if applicable. Properly adjusted LCE and helmet will allow the soldier to assume the prone. 2. a. sitting. w/holster and magazines if applicable.SARG . By-The-Numbers. BATTLE FOCUS: An improperly adjusted helmet or LCE may cause a life threatening delay in combat when a soldier is required to return fire. b. (1) Lay in the prone position. and standing firing positions. The soldier is instructed how to assemble and adjust the LCE and helmet so that they do not interfere with the operation or employment their weapon. GSAT-4 17 June 2001 . Individual Weapon (rifle. FM 23-35 TRAINING AND EVALUATION 1. sitting. Helmet. FM 23-14. kneeling. STANDARD: 1. Assemble and adjust web belt.GSAT TASK: Adjust individual load carrying equipment (LCE) and helmet. and suspenders. M203 or M249). Adjust web belt to attain a comfortable fit. FM 23-31. magazine pouches. individual weapon. and standing positions with unobstructed vision while engaging targets. kneeling. The soldier will adjust the LCE so that it does not interfere with the prone. sitting. Reference: FM 21-15. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: LCE. CONDITION: Soldier is given issued LCE. or standing firing positions. kneeling.

b. d. GSAT-5 17 June 2001 .GSAT (3) Attach magazine pouches on the belt to the sides of the area were abdomen contacts ground. and tighten just enough to the hold helmet in place. Ensure that LCE does not bind or interfere with the firing positions. Assume the prone firing position. (4) Fill magazine pouches. e. c. Note: Place charged rifle magazines open end down and empty magazines open end up in the magazine pouches. Assemble and adjust the helmet. Adjust the chin strap so that it is centered on the chin. Adjust the headband so that it is snug but comfortable. (7) Adjust magazine pouch location if necessary c. Check fit: a. Adjust the suspension straps to allow helmet to ride on head at a height that elevates the helmets brim to the center of forehead.SARG . c. (6) Check for ease of access to magazine pouches. Make adjustments as necessary and recheck. This will keep the helmet from shifting and obscuring the sights when assuming firing positions. Ensure that the magazine pouches are not under the abdomen in prone position. 2. a. Attach and adjust suspenders so that there is no pressure on the back of the neck. 3. (5) Assume a prone position and check that the magazine pouches are not under the abdomen. Ensure that the helmet does not obstruct the sights. At a glance or by feel the soldier can determine which magazines are charged by the flat surface of the magazine bottom. b. This will avoid a rolling action of the helmet when the soldier is on the move.

GSAT 4. GSAT-6 17 June 2001 . 5. Remove a magazine from the magazine pouch and insert into the weapon.SARG . the soldier may have to rotate the magazine 180 degrees depending on how they grasp the magazine so that the bullets are facing forward. d. Remove the magazine and repeat loading from the other magazine pouch. Insure that no ammunition is present. c. Repeat step 4 in the sitting. Note: When removing the magazine from the magazine pouch. Load the individual weapon from the magazine pouches. b. e. if applicable: a. Assume the prone firing position. kneeling and standing firing positions. Point the weapon in the designated down range direction.

During peace keeping operations or operations other than war. helmet and LCE. smoke and under stress. TM 9-1005-317-10. ensure that a round is chambered and the selector or safety is not in the SAFE position. selector on SAFE. bolt forward. Each soldier must know the load configuration of their rifle at all time and be prepared to engage a threat whatever and where ever it might be to be able to survive the situation. These configurations are: 1. STANDARD: From whatever carrying configuration the small arm is in. bolt forward. task 071-311-2027. the Theater Commander will dictate the carrying configuration depending on the threat situation. charged magazine locked. Loading should become automatic. with a magazine charged with dummy ammunition. Dummy Ammunition Reference: STP 21-1-SMTC. By-The-Numbers.GSAT TASK: Load an M16A1/M16A2 Rifle or M4/M4A1 Carbine CONDITION: Given an unloaded M16A1/M16A2 rifle or M4/M4A1 carbine. selector on SAFE. FM 23-9. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: M16 Rifle or M4 Carbine. no magazine locked. Empty chamber. (071-004-0003) GSAT-7 17 June 2001 . Round in the chamber. Magazines. selector on SAFE. A very important caution.SARG . Time: 10 . LCE. Each soldier is responsible for their own safety and for the safety of those around them. 3. BATTLE FOCUS: Loading a small arm is a skill that must be mastered by the soldier to increase his chances of survivability in combat. Empty chamber. You will have to load quickly in conditions of nighttime. do not place your finger on the trigger of your rifle until you are prepared to engage the target or threat. and prepare to engage the target or threat.15 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. Many soldiers in peace keeping operations have been wounded by fellow soldiers who have had their finger on the trigger and in a threat or stress situation inadvertently pulled the trigger. charged magazine locked. Peer Coach. 2.

Medium Threat Configuration – Empty chamber. Replace the empty stripper clip with a full one and continue to charge the magazine until the desired number of rounds have been charged. b. selector on safe. High Threat Configuration – Round chambered. When deployed there will be no loading station to supply you with charged magazines like at most qualification ranges. a. 2. Point the rifle muzzle in a safe direction or toward the threat. b. c.56mm ammunition into the small end of the speed loader. e. b. Pull the charging handle to the rear and release. Prepare to engage target. whichever is most convenient to the soldier.SARG . f. Charge the magazine by pushing the rounds into the magazine. attach the speed loader to an empty magazine. Each soldier issued a rifle should be issued an ammunition speed loader and a black safety pin. a. magazine locked. g. Insert a stripper clip of ten rounds of 5. d. Place the selector on SEMI. Point the rifle muzzle in a safe direction or toward the threat.GSAT Charging rifle magazines: a. Load an M16 Rifle or M4 Carbine 1. c. selector on safe. Attach the speed loader to the LCE either on the lower front suspender or to one of the magazine pouches.56mm ammunition contains one speed loader and one safety pin. GSAT-8 17 June 2001 . Note: Charging a magazine is an individual soldier responsibility. Each bandoleer of 5. Repeat the process until all magazines have been charged. Without detaching the speed loader from the LCE. Soldiers must be able to quickly and efficiently charge their own magazines.

selector on safe. f. pushing it upward until the magazine catch engages and holds the magazine. Never “ride” the charging handle forward. Tap the forward assist assembly to ensure bolt is fully forward and locked. GSAT-9 17 June 2001 . Let the bolt slam into battery.GSAT c. c. Tap the forward assist assembly to ensure bolt is fully forward and locked. d. e. b. h. Insert the magazine. d. WARNING DO NOT PLACE YOUR FINGER ON THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOU ARE READY TO ENGAGE THE TARGET OR THREAT WARNING RIFLE IS NOW LOADED. Pull the charging handle to the rear and release. Never “ride” the charging handle forward.SARG . Let the bolt slam into battery. close ejection port cover. Note: If rifle is not to be fired immediately. Place the selector on SEMI. e. g. no magazine locked. Prepare to engage target. f. Tap upward on the bottom of the magazine to ensure it is seated. a. Prepare to engage target. place the selector back to SAFE. Point the rifle muzzle in a safe direction or toward the threat. Place the selector on SEMI. Low Threat Configuration – Empty chamber. 3. ENSURE IT IS POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION Note: When the treat situation decreases.

Insert the magazine. Preparation. Reload rifle from magazine pouch. Open magazine pouch and grasp the bottom of a magazine. It is the soldiers preference as to whether the bullets are pointed away from the body or toward the body depending on how they grasp the magazine. Point the rifle muzzle in a safe direction or toward the threat. Tap upward on the bottom of the magazine to ensure it is seated.GSAT 4. g. d. f. a.SARG . This must be done when the magazine is empty or could be dune during a lull in the situation and the soldier knows the magazine is almost empty. Depending on the grasp and the direction of the bullets in the magazine. place charged magazines in the pouches with the open end pointed down. pushing it upward until the magazine catch engages and holds the magazine. e. GSAT-10 17 June 2001 . Remove the magazine and rotate the open end upward. a. When returning fire during an ambush or a combat situation. At a glance or by feel the soldier can find the smooth bottom surface of a magazine and know that it is a charged. Replace empty magazines in the pouch with the open end facing up. the soldier may have to turn the magazine 180 degrees so that the bullets are pointed away from the body. c. the soldier will at some point have to reload their rifle.

Time: 10 . selector on SAFE. selector on SAFE. Magazine. and prepare to engage the target or threat. Empty chamber. the Theater Commander will dictate the carrying configuration depending on the threat situation. do not place your finger on the trigger of your small arm until you are prepared to engage the target or threat.SARG . Many soldiers in peace keeping operations have been wounded by fellow soldiers who have had their finger on the trigger and in a threat or stress situation inadvertently pulled the trigger. Round in the chamber. slide forward. Dummy Ammunition Reference: FM 23-35. You will have to load in conditions of nighttime. helmet and LCE. Each soldier must know the load configuration of their small arm at all time and be prepared to engage a threat whatever and where ever it might be to be able to survive the situation. STANDARD: From whatever carrying configuration the small arm is in. because you will not always have the luxury of loading in a training environment. magazine locked. Loading should become automatic. no magazine locked. GSAT-11 17 June 2001 . 2. slide forward. By-The-Numbers. During peace keeping operations or operations other than war. Each soldier is responsible for his own safety and for the safety of those around him. selector on SAFE. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: M9/M11 Pistol. smoke and under stress. ensure that a round is chambered and the selector or safety is not in the SAFE position. BATTLE FOCUS: Loading a small arm is a skill that must be mastered by the soldier to increase his chances of survivability in combat. 3. A very important caution.15 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. Empty chamber. These configurations are: 1.GSAT TASK: Load an M9/M11 Pistol CONDITION: Given an unloaded M9/M11 pistol with a magazine charged with dummy ammunition. Peer Coach.

Release the slide to chamber a round. Point the pistol in a safe direction or toward the threat. decocking/safety lever in the SAFE position. Point the pistol in a safe direction or toward the threat. d. e. Place the decocking/safety lever is in the FIRE position. c. c. a. magazine locked. d. slide forward. High Threat Configuration – Round chambered.SARG . Place the decocking/safety lever is in the FIRE position. 2. a. 3. Medium Threat Configuration – Empty chamber. GSAT-12 17 June 2001 . c. Release the slide to chamber a round. decocking/safety lever in the SAFE position. no magazine locked. Point the pistol in a safe direction or toward the threat. Grasp the serrated portion of the slide and retract the slide to the rear. Low Threat Configuration – Empty chamber. Prepare to engage target. decocking/safety lever in the SAFE position. slide forward. e. a. b. Prepare to engage target. Insert the magazine fully into the magazine well of the pistol.GSAT Load an M9/M11 Pistol 1. Place the decocking/safety lever is in the FIRE position. b. e. Grasp the serrated portion of the slide and retract the slide to the rear. b. Prepare to engage target.

place the decocking/safety lever is in the SAFE position. ENSURE IT IS POINTED IN A SAFE DIRECTION Note: When the treat situation decreases. GSAT-13 17 June 2001 .GSAT WARNING DO NOT PLACE YOUR FINGER ON THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOU ARE READY TO ENGAGE THE TARGET OR THREAT WARNING PISTOL IS NOW LOADED.SARG .

etc will require adapting the kneeling or standing positions. These positions can be support by leaning the rifle against the object being used as cover. vehicles.SARG . brick fences. During peace keeping operations or operations other than war will require using firing positions other than prone or from a foxhole. if so refer to Adjustment of Equipment task. Instructor to soldier ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: M16 Rifle. helmet Reference: FM 23-9 GSAT-14 17 June 2001 . When assuming a supported standing or kneeling position. trees. the soldier’s equipment and helmet must not interfere with acquiring the target. LCE.GSAT TASK: Firing Positions BATTLE FOCUS: Combat Service and Combat Service Support units train positions almost exclusively for rifle qualification. magazine.10 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration and Peer Coach. Time: 5 . Firing from cover in urban or MOUT environments such as behind building walls.

kneeling supported and standing supported behind cover ie trees. buildings.SARG . etc). GSAT-15 17 June 2001 . wall.GSAT (Insert pictures of prone supported.

pistol grip forward. load the rifle. TM 9-1005-249-23+P Performance Steps: 1. BATTLE FOCUS: During peace keeping operations or operations other than war. b. slide carrying strap off the shoulder while the firing hand rotates the rifle barrel forward and up as the butt stock is brought into the firing shoulder. Depending on the cover available. or standing firing position. kneeling.SARG . and helmet. on the soldier’s firing shoulder. a. While seeking cover remove the rifle from the shoulder. NOTE: If the LCE interferes with the firing position or the helmet hinders the aiming refer to the Adjust Individual LCE and Helmet task to correct the problems. It is recommended that a plastic muzzle cap be used to prevent dirt being ground into the muzzle when carried in the barrel down position.GSAT TASK: Assume a defensive posture with the M16 rifle from sling arms. With the non-firing hand. dummy ammunition (to substitute for dummy ammunition. by rotating it palm outward and grasping the pistol grip. Time: 15 to 30 minutes. and prepare to engage the target. Type of Instruction: Demonstration / Hands On References: FM 23-9. with the barrel down. Reverse firing hand. LCE. 4. 2. and safety on. the soldier assumes the prone. insert a penny in the magazine follower to simulate a charged magazine). CONDITION: Given an M16 Rifle. carrying a rifle slung over the shoulder with the muzzle down is a non-threatening posture. react to a threat condition. GSAT-16 17 June 2001 . React to a threat by quickly taking cover or lower profile. STANDARD: From sling arms with the M16 Rifle muzzle pointed down. During these type operations soldiers maybe faced with threatening situations or ambushes and must be able to react in a timely manner to survive. magazine. Carry the M16 Rifle at sling arms. 3.

Load the rifle from each of the three carrying configurations. (1) Pull the charging handle to the rear and release. Round in the chamber. bolt forward. (2) Never “ride” the charging handle forward. Let the bolt slam into battery. (7) Never “ride” the charging handle forward. 7. (4) Remove the magazine and rotate the open end upward. magazine locked. (3) To load.GSAT 5. c. (5) Insert the magazine. a. pushing it upward until the magazine catch engages and holds the magazine. Empty chamber.SARG . open magazine pouch and grasp the bottom of a magazine. Depending on the grasp and the direction of the bullets in the magazine. Let the bolt slam into battery. selector on SAFE. (1) Load from the magazine pouch. Prepare to engage the target. GSAT-17 17 June 2001 . Empty chamber. (2) Place charged magazines open end down and empty magazines open end up in the magazine pouches. selector on SAFE. Keep the selector lever on safe and finger off the trigger until required to fire on the target. 8. bolt forward. Refer to the five general safety rules that apply to all range activities and most combat situations. Many soldiers in peacekeeping operations have been wounded by fellow soldiers who have had their finger on the trigger and in a threat or stress situation inadvertently pulled the trigger. The carrying configuration will be dictated by the theater rules of engagement. b. At a glance or by feel the soldier can determine which magazines are charged by the flat surface of the magazine bottom. selector on SAFE. the soldier may have to turn the magazine 180 degrees so that the bullets are pointed away from the body. CAUTION: Do not place the finger on the trigger of the rifle until ready to engage the target. no magazine locked. (6) Pull the charging handle to the rear and release.

Quickly take cover or lower profile. Depending on the theater rules of engagement.GSAT Performance Steps 1. 7. Prepare to engage the target. 2. on soldiers firing shoulder. Reverse firing hand. 4. or standing position. with barrel down. the rifle may have to be loaded. GSAT-18 17 June 2001 . 6. then place the selector lever on semi. pistol grip forward. by rotating it palm outward and grasping the pistol grip. kneeling. and safety on. Preparation: M16 Rifle carried at sling arms. slide carrying strap off the shoulder while the firing hand rotates the rifle outward as it is brought into the firing shoulder. At the same time the soldier goes to a prone. With the non-firing hand.SARG . 3. 5.

Install top carry sling adapter (NSN 1005-00-406-1570. Note: When installed. the rifle can be slung over either shoulder. muzzle down.SARG . GSAT-19 17 June 2001 . It is recommended that a plastic muzzle cap be used to prevent dirt being ground into the muzzle when carried in the barrel down position. PN 8448471). See installation steps on the following page.GSAT ALTERNATE METHOD USING THE TOP SLING ADAPTER Installation of top sling adapter. The rifle can be trained on a target and charged very rapidly without removing the sling from the shoulder.

GSAT QUICK FIRE FROM SLING ARMS USING THE TOP SLING ADAPTER. WARNING DO NOT PLACE FINGER ON THE TRIGGER UNTIL READY TO ENGAGE THE TARGET. Load Configuration. raise the rifle muzzle to the target with the firing hand. 3. While raising the rifle. 4. To engage the target. GSAT-20 17 June 2001 . 4. magazine locked. place the selector on SEMI using the thumb of the firing hand for a right handed shooter or the index finger for a left handed shooter. finger off the trigger. 2. grasp the hand guards with the non-firing hand. sling arms on shoulder of firing hand. grasp the charging handle with the non-firing hand. finger off the trigger. Initial position. Load Configuration. Engage targets. rifle muzzle pointed down. Engage targets. 1. B. Grasp the hand guards with the non-firing hand. While raising the rifle. sling arms on shoulder of firing hand.SARG . pull back and release. 2. rifle muzzle pointed down. A. 3. empty chamber. selector on SAFE. round in the chamber. selector on SAFE. firing hand on pistol grip. Initial position. raise the rifle muzzle to the target with the firing hand. While raising the rifle. To engage the target. 1. 6. firing hand on pistol grip. 5. place the selector on SEMI using the thumb of the firing hand for a right handed shooter or the index finger for a left handed shooter.

Pistol drawing technique. LCE and helmet Reference: USMC FMFM 0-8 Instructional Lead-In: This task is intended as a supplement to the Primary Marksmanship Instruction included in the main body of this manual. Familiarization with equipment and technique are imperative to this end. BATTLE FOCUS: The ability to quickly deploy your weapon during combat is a matter of survival on the battlefield. Holster should be on the pistol belt located on the firing side of the soldier. GSAT-21 17 June 2001 . The combination of primary marksmanship ability with combat handling techniques is the final step necessary prior to deployment with any weapon system. Hands on Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: M9 / M11 Pistol. The preferred method is to wear the pistol belt over other garments. soldier should practice quickly clearing any obstruction to gain access to the weapon. CONDITIONS: Given an M9 or M11 Pistol.GSAT TASK: Presentation of the M9 / M11 Pistol from the Holster. LCE and helmet STANDARDS: Each soldier will demonstrate proper pistol drawing sequence from the holster and holster the weapon after completion of the task. holster. Pistol Presentation Equipment Setup The soldier's equipment should be setup as follows: 1. If coat or poncho is to be worn. Time: 20 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. holster. The importance of this task lends itself to the Battle Focus aspect of pistol marksmanship.SARG . Attention should be given to prevent obstruction to pistol access by other equipment.

3. 1. 5. place the pistol on safe. SAFE . Training may progress to live fire under proper range fire conditions. Keep the finger out of the trigger guard.Break the two handed grip. as competence with the technique grows. NOTE: These sequences should be practiced by the numbers initially.Punch both arms and the pistol straight to the target.SARG . SECURE . Avoid covering any part of your body with the pistol! 3. speed may be introduced.With the firing hand "pop" open the holster flap and grip the pistol. ACQUIRE .GSAT 2. Pistol Holstering Technique 1.Decock. Move the safety from the safe to the fire position. Location should provide easy access and manipulation by the non-firing hand of the soldier. Access and hold open the holster flap with the non-firing hand. Lower the pistol to the holster with the firing hand. LOWER . 2. ENGAGE . 4.Acquire a good sight picture and engage the target if warranted. Do not cover the non-firing hand or any other body part while lowering the pistol to the holster. GSAT-22 17 June 2001 . Magazine pouches should be located on the front of the pistol belt. Keep your finger out of the trigger guard. Location should be unobstructed by other equipment.Lower the pistol into the holster and secure the flap with the firing hand. This should be a quick and forceful move locking the soldier into a strong firing position. NOTE: Train the soldier to keep the finger out of the trigger guard at all times until they are on target and have made the conscious decision to fire. Achieve a good twohanded grip with the non-firing hand.Complete the grip of the pistol at waist level close to the body. CLEAR . Keep the elbow of the firing arm close to the body. Keep the weapon pointed in a safe direction. GRIP . Practice is the only method of becoming familiar with and proficient with a quick effective pistol drawing technique. Pistol Drawing Technique: NOTE: This task should be initially trained in a dry fire environment with no ammunition present. PRESS .Lift the pistol straight up out of the holster. 2.

pipe cleaners.GSAT TASK: Combat Clean an M16A1 or M16A2 Rifle (071-311-2025) in Field Conditions. M16A2 1. GSAT-23 17 June 2001 . cleaning will assure long and reliable service. TM 9-1005-249-10. using improper cleaning agents. or disassembling the rifles farther than authorized or needed. small arms maintenance equipment case and lubricating instructions. and dust are acceptable as long as it does not interfere with the functioning of the rifle. More rifles are damaged by improper cleaning than by actual use. Some carbon. magazines. INTRODUCTION: Done right. and CLP Reference: STP 21-1-SMTC. This procedure should protect the rifle until it can be detail cleaned. 2. M16A1. Equipment maintenance case w/ swabs. cleaning will damage a rifle and shorten its life. It should assure that the rifle is capable of immediate use when required. COMBAT CLEAN: The first priority of rifle maintenance to protect it until time is available for detail cleaning. and to assure reliable function if the rifle is needed soon. Time: 10 . The amount of lubrication on the rifle is dependent on the environmental conditions but generally excess lubrication is acceptable. Sometimes there just isn't time to perform detail cleaning immediately after firing. Magazines. BATTLE FOCUS: Proper maintenance is important because your life and the lives of others depend on your rifle functioning properly. Done poorly. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Training Aids: M16 Rifle. It's far better to do just a minimal job of lubricating a rifle to prevent rust or other damage than to damage it by over zealous cleaning. STANDARD: Clean. task 071-311-2025. using a variety of homemade scrapers. inspect and lubricate the rifle and magazines so that they function correctly. CONDITION: Given an M16A1 or M16A2 rifle. dirt. The soldiers who are held to the spotless cleaning standards invent shortcuts than damage rifles: cleaning rifles in the shower.SARG .20 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. The emphasis in combat cleaning is to keep the rifle serviceable with a minimal amount of time and effort. TM 9-1005-319-10. By-The-Numbers. Hands-On.

or other contaminants and lubricate it inside and out. 3. g. spare magazine protective bags and overall rifle protective cover. however. Wipe down exposed surfaces with a slightly oily cloth or patch. a. Dry Climates . 2) Corrosion is less likely to form on metal parts in a dry climate. therefore. Wipe the rifle clear of obvious dirt. e.Desert: 1) Dust and sand will get into the rifle and will cause malfunctions and excessive wear on component working surfaces through abrasive action during the firing operations. Lubricate the carrier group normally. Note: Remove protective cap before firing. Run an oily patch through the bore. b. As a minimum effort to keep dust and sand out of the rifle.GSAT a. d. Hot. keep the ejection port cover closed. Do not lubricate external parts of the rifle and internal components of the magazines. it is not dangerous to fire the rifle with the protective cap on. and a muzzle cap on the muzzle. OPERATION UNDER UNUSUAL CONDITIONS: Unusual conditions are defined as any climatic condition requiring special maintenance of the rifle. sand. a cartridge magazine in the rifle. Pull the bolt to its forward position in the carrier and place a drop of CLP in each of the vent holes of the carrier (the two vertically placed holes in the dished cut). This AAL equipment includes protective cap. Wipe out the fowling in the upper receiver with the oily rag or patch. Use a cleaning brush to sweep the fouling and traces of brass from the extractor hook and bolt face. 3) Using Additional Authorization List (AAL) equipment will help keep dust and sand from getting into the rifle.SARG . Wipe the carrier with an oily cloth or patch to get the worst of the fouling off it. f. b. and reassemble the rifle. lubricate internal working surfaces only with a small amount of CLP. c. Heavy Rain and Fording – All Climates: GSAT-24 17 June 2001 . h.

and lower receiver and extension assembly for corrosion.SARG . upper receiver and barrel assembly. Inspect hidden surfaces of the bolt carrier assembly. This makes it easier to operate the trigger when you are wearing arctic mittens. Wet Climates – Jungle: 1) Perform maintenance more frequently. depress the trigger guard plunger and open the trigger guard. 3) Check ammunitions and magazines frequently for corrosion. keep rifle covered when moving from a warm to a cold area to allow gradual cooling. d. remove handprints. Moisture will cause malfunctions. and cover will help protect your rifle. Clean magazines using CLP and rags. c. GSAT-25 17 June 2001 . 3) Always keep the rifle dry. Hot. 5) Using AAL equipment such as protective cap. bag. 1) To operate the rifle in extremely cold climates. dry and lubricate lightly with CLP.GSAT Use AAL equipment and expendable items to protect the rifle and keep the rifle dry. Dry the bore with a cleaning patch and cleaning rod if necessary. 4) Use appropriate AAL equipment and expendable items for protection. 2) Clean and lubricate the rifle inside a warm room. Always keep snow out of the barrel bore. 2) To help prevent corrosion. 4) Keep ammunition dry. clean and lubricate. Extremely Cold Climates – Arctic: Use LAW for Lubricating and CLP for cleaning. if necessary. Apply a light coat of LAW to all functional parts. Hand function the rifle approximately every 30 minutes to help prevent freezing of components. Clean barrel with patch and cleaning rod. If corrosion is found. Do not lay a hot rifle in snow or ice. Always drain any water from the barrel before firing. Using the protective cap will help keep water out of the barrel. Do not lubricate the ammunition. To prevent freezing. before firing.

then shut it down and store it. before releasing the latches. Release the four latches securing the top of the carrying case and remove the top. Open the bag and remove the sight. press the core of the relief valve. Unpack the sight. Be sure to turn the ONOFF/TUBE BRIGHTNESS and O N . 1. and abrasions) and ensure that the decals are readable. Note: A N /P V S . Inspect the sight for damage (cracks. Performance Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 Reference: TM 11-5855-213-10 Note: To relieve air pressure inside the carrying case. STANDARDS: Prepare and correctly place the AN/PVS-4 sight into operation.SARG . b. T h e y must always be handled carefully. c. Report deficiencies. Demonstration. located near the handle.O F F /R E T I C L E BRIGHTNESS switches OFF before installing batteries. BATTLE FOCUS: Time: 5 – 10 min Type of Instruction: Discussion. Remove the carrying bag from the carrying case.o p t i c a l i n s t r u m e n t s .GSAT TASK: Operate Night Vision Sight AN/PVS-4 (071-315-0003) CONDITIONS: At night. a. given an AN/PVS-4 sight in its carrying case and BA-1567/U batteries. GSAT-26 17 June 2001 .4 s i g h t s a r e p r e c i s i o n e l e c t r o . chips.

GSAT-27 17 June 2001 . Note: Most AN/PVS-4’s have a ‘AA’ (BA –3058/U) battery adapter that can be used if the Nickle Cadmium (BA-1567/U) batteries are not available. Remove the battery caps by turning them counterclockwise.GSAT 2. Install the batteries (Figure 1). c. Replace the battery caps and tighten them snugly. b. Insert a battery in each cap with the negative (-) terminal (raised end) facing into the cap. Battery Installation. OBJECTIVE LENS ASSEMBLY CAP BATTERY CAP BATTERY EYEPIECE ASSEMBLY BATTERY HOUSING ASSEMBLY IMAGE INTENSIFIER ASSEMBLY (INSIDE) Figure 1.SARG . a.

SARG . GSAT-28 17 June 2001 . The daylight cover must be installed during daylight and removed at night. Controls and indicators. . NOTES: 1. refer to the troubleshooting procedures in TM 11-5855-213-10. Note: Using the sight without the eye guard installed may cause detection by the enemy and. b. 3. to prevent accidentally turning on the sight. when operated on a weapon. NOTE: If the equipment fails to operate. c. Turn the ON-OFF/TUBE BRIGHTNESS control clockwise to turn on the sight. 2. Adjust the ON-OFF/TUBE BRIGHTNESS control to the lowest setting that provides good target-to-background contrast. a. can result in physical injury to the operator because of weapon recoil. Batteries must be removed when the sight is not in use. Press the eye against the eye guard to open the rubber leaves that prevent the emission of stray light.GSAT RETICLE ELEVATION ADJUSTMENT ACTIVATOR ON-OFF RETICLE BRIGHTNESS OBJECTIVE FOCUS RING DIOPTER FOCUS RING RETICLE AZIMUTH ADJUSTMENT ACTIVATOR ON-OFF TUBE BRIGHTNESS DIOPTER INDICATOR Figure 2. Operate the device under normal conditions (Figure 2).

brightness may damage the image- f. Turn the ON-OFF/RETICLE BRIGHTNESS control clockwise to turn on the lightemitting diode. Adjust the light intensity so that the reticle is just visible against the background. Turn the diopter focus ring (Figure 2) to obtain the clearest image of the reticle pattern. Replace the sight in the carrying case. Perform after-operation procedures. GSAT-29 17 June 2001 . 4. g. the operator must adjust the objective focus to ensure a sharp image at different ranges. a. NOTE: During surveillance or target engagement. Turn the reticle and tube brightness controls fully counterclockwise.SARG . b. c. e. Turn the objective focus ring (Figure 2) until the target in the field of view is sharply defined. Note: Excessive reticle intensifier tube. Remove both batteries.GSAT d.

STP 7-11 BCHM 14-SM-TG 1. 2. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:8 to 1:12 Reference: FM 23-9. if necessary. Insert and loosely tighten the mounting screw. 4.56 mm brass case as a lever to help tighten the screw. 5. the screw is tight enough. Performance.SARG . dismount or remove the scope. Inspect. CONDITIONS: Given an M16 Rifle. and clean the scope if necessary. 3. 6. Push the scope to its most forward position and hold it there while securely tightening the mounting screw. the scope can still move slightly front to rear. Position the scope on the rifle carry handle with the large end toward the muzzle. GSAT-30 17 June 2001 . Each soldier will mount and remove an AN/PVS-4 from an M16 Rifle. Demonstration. STANDARDS: Each soldier will Inspect for serviceability and clean. Mount and Remove AN/PVS-4 from an M16 Rifle. Note: At this point. screw and screw hole for serviceability. rifle carry handle. and clean if necessary. Periodically check the position and tightness of the screw while the scope is in use. AN/PVS-4. Carefully loosen the screw and remove the screw and AN/PVS-4 from the carry handle. Type of Instruction: Discussion.10 minutes.GSAT TASK: Inspect AN/PVS-4 for Serviceability. After use. Inspect the mounting surfaces of the scope. mounting bracket. When the mouth of the brass case begins to bend. BATTLE FOCUS: Time: 5 .56 mm brass case. the AN/PVS-4. before storing it in its case. in a classroom or on a range. SARG suggests using an empty piece of 5. expended 5.

1. Turn the reticle and tube brightness to the lowest setting that allows good visibility of the reticle and target. etc. Note: ensure that the M16/M203 reticle is installed in the AN/PVS-4. Soldier #1 views the boresight point through the barrel. 25m zero target Reference: Note: This task is best accomplished using a three-soldier team. using field expedient methods. Time: 15 min. Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:4 to 1:9 Training Aids: M16 Rifle. the upper receiver separated from the lower receiver and the bolt removed.GSAT TASK: Boresight AN/PVS-4 to an M16 Rifle CONDITIONS: Given an M16 rifle. in a field environment. sand bag. boresight target. AN/PVS-4. sand bags. GSAT-31 17 June 2001 . STANDARDS: Soldiers will boresight an AN/PVS-4 to an M16 rifle. BATTLE FOCUS: It may be necessary to boresight the scope in a combat environment or other environment where rounds can not be fired for the normal zeroing process. Soldier #2 stabilizes the upper receiver of an M16 on a rucksack. and the target through the AN/PVS-4. Start with the scope mounted on the rifle. Note: The daylight lense cover must be used for this exercise. and the focus to make the target clear. Adjust the scope for best vision: Turn the daylight lense cover to the smallest opening depending on the available light. Adjust the diopter to make the reticle clear. Performance. Type of Instruction: Discussion. Soldier #3 makes sight adjustments on the scope.SARG .

GSAT 1. Sample 25-meter zeroing target for M16A2 GSAT-32 17 June 2001 . so that a soldier can view the bore-sight point (lower) through the barrel and the target (upper) through the scope. 2. Figure 1. Confirm the zero with live fire at the earliest opportunity. vertically. 3.SARG . Make the zero point by drawing around a quarter or washer and coloring it in with a black marker.). Note: If a zero target is not available.5 cm (1 in) zero point 7 cm below the center of mass of an M16 Rifle 25-meter zero target. center to center. Make horizontal and vertical adjustments on the scope until the reticle is center of mass on the upper target. Place the target at 25 meters. Stabilize the upper receiver on a support (rucksack. use any piece of paper with contrasting target points placed 7 cm. Repeat the observations until the reticle is centered on the upper target and the lower target is centered in the barrel. etc. While the rifle is held so that the lower point is in the center of the bore. sand bag. Mark a 2. raise the head to observe the reticle.

Time: 15 to 20 minutes Type of Instruction: Demonstration. AN/PVS-4 Scope 3.GSAT TASK: Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M16 rifle. Laser boresighting. center to center.56 mm mandrel. vertically. Make the zero point by drawing around a quarter or washer and coloring it in with a black marker. TM 11-5855-213-10 Note: this task is best performed with a 2-soldier team. Performance Training Aids: 1. BATTLE FOCUS: In a combat or hostile environment. using the LMTS laser. use any piece of paper with contrasting target points placed 7 cm. Calibrated LMTS Laser with 5. Place the target at 25m. Expended 5.56mm Shell Casing References: STP 19-95B1-SM. CONDITION: Day or night. Discussion. One soldier holds the reticle on the upper target.5 cm (1 in) zero point 7 cm below the center of mass of an M16 Rifle 25-meter zero target. Note: If a zero target is not available. Using the Laser BoreSighting Method. Many times soldiers assigned to night duty are issued night vision devices such as the AN/PVS-4 but are not issued ammunition to live fire zero the night sight to their assigned rifle. an LMTS laser with a 5.SARG .56mm Mandrel 4 . is a non-firing method of zeroing a night sight so that a soldier can be reasonably assured of hitting a man-size target out to 200 meters. STANDARD: The soldier will boresight zero the AN/PVS-4 to an M16 rifle at 25 meters. M16 Rifle 2. GSAT-33 17 June 2001 . while the other soldier adjusts the azimuth and elevation adjustment actuators until the laser dot is on the lower bore-sight point. using an LMTS laser. 25 Meter Zero Target with Reference Dot Located 7cm below center of mass (Figure 2) 5. an AN/PVS-4. Passive Vision Sights are employed extensively for night perimeter defense. and a boresight target. given an M16 rifle. BORE-SIGHT AN/PVS-4 1. Mark a 2.

Confirm the zero with live fire at the earliest opportunity. 3. 5.SARG . Assume a prone supported position with sand bags or similar items for support. Be sure to lubricate the mandrel with CLP before inserting it into the rifle barrel. place a bore-sight zero target at one end. Insert the LMTS laser mandrel into the M16 Rifle barrel.GSAT 2. In an area with dim light and an exact distance of 25 meters. Adjust the elevation and azimuth adjustment actuators until the laser dot is 7 cm below the center of the zero target while the reticle is centered on the upper target. Put AN/PVS-4 into operation as prescribed in the operators manual. Sample 25-meter zeroing target for M16A2 GSAT-34 17 June 2001 . 4. 6. Turn the laser to continuous beam. Figure 1. Aim the reticle at center of mass of the 25 meter zero target.

Note: For use of the range finding reticle. 75 meters: 7 hits for 10 rounds 175 meters: 5 hits for 10 rounds 300 meters: 2 hits for 10 rounds BATTLE FOCUS: Soldiers may be required to determine range and engage targets at night or in reduces light. Use the lower part of the reticle for aiming. STANDARDS: Each soldier will have 60 seconds for each target. and 300 meters.SARG . 30 rounds of 5.GSAT TASK: Engage Targets with an M16 Rifle using a Night Vision Sight AN/PVS-4 (071-315-2308) CONDITIONS: At night. Reticle Use. a. on a field fire range. Hold the central part of the aiming reticle on the center of mass of each target to 300 meters. b. Given an M16 Rifle equipped with AN/PVS-4. 3. and E-type silhouettes at 75. GSAT-35 17 June 2001 . 2.56 mm ball ammunition (3 magazines of 10 rounds each). Use the upper part of the reticle to determine range to target. 175. Time: Type of Instruction: Lecture and Performance Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:20 Reference: FM 23-9 1. Place the AN/PVS-4 in operation and adjust the focus for the mid-range target (175 M). refer to the 11B Soldier’ manual.

GSAT AIMING POINT 0 TO 250 METERS AIMING POINT 400 METERS AIMING POINT 500 METERS Figure 1.SARG . Sample 25-meter zeroing target for M16A2 GSAT-36 17 June 2001 . Zero aiming point Figure 2.

perform the next step. Time: Type of Instruction: Lecture. Mount the AN/PVS-4 on an M249. STANDARDS: The Soldiers will zero the AN/TVS-4 to an M249. Place the mounting bracket on top of the feed cover assembly. to prevent cross threading and damage to the threads. 25 M zero target. AN/PVS-4. Note: If on a live fire range. E-type silhouettes. LMTS Boresight if LMTS is available BATTLE FOCUS: It may be necessary to zero for night operations or to engage targets at night or in reduced light. Note: Use care when aligning the mounting screws with the holes in the AN/PVS-4 and in the feed cover. Night Fire CONDITIONS: Day or Night. c. Sand bags or other support. Remove the screw cover (plug) from behind the rear sight.SARG . Calibrated LMTS laser with 5. Use live fire. Given M249. Retighten the bracket and scope mounting screws. so that the two front hooks are secured around the headless pins. Position the scope on top of the bracket.GSAT TASK: Mount and Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M249 Automatic Rifle. Turn the mounting knob until the screw is tight. b. e. a. Boresight. using several methods. Repeat this step. Performance Instructor to Soldier Ratio: 1:12 Training Aids: Reference: FM 23-14 1. and screw the bracket knob in until it is tight. so that the mounting hole of the scope aligns with the mounting knob and screw. Demonstration. Range and Linked 5.56 mm mandrel if available.. Fire a three-round burst down range to seat the mount and scope.56 ball ammunition if live fire. d. GSAT-37 17 June 2001 .

use any piece of paper with contrasting target points placed 8 cm. While the receiver and barrel group is held so that the lower point is in the center of the bore. a. Place the target at 25 meters. Note: : This task is best accomplished using a three-soldier team.SARG . etc. c. Note: If a zero target is not available. Repeat the observations until the reticle is centered on the upper target and the lower target is centered in the barrel. Stabilize the receiver and barrel group on a support (rucksack. Mark a 2. e. and the target through the AN/PVS-4. so that a soldier can view the bore-sight point (lower) through the barrel and the target (upper) through the scope. Boresight Zero. sand bag. sand bag. Adjust the scope for best vision: Turn the daylight lense cover to the smallest opening depending on the available light. with the lower point 2 cm to the right. Soldier #2 stabilizes the receiver and barrel group of an M249 on a rucksack. Note: ensure that the M16/M203 reticle is installed in the AN/PVS-4. Soldier #1 views the boresight point through the barrel. vertically. GSAT-38 17 June 2001 .). Remove the buttstock and the operating rod group. Latch the feed cover. Make horizontal and vertical adjustments on the scope until the reticle is center of mass on the upper target. Confirm the zero with live fire at the earliest opportunity. Turn the reticle and tube brightness to the lowest setting that allows good visibility of the reticle and target. Note: The daylight lense cover must be used for this exercise. Adjust the diopter to make the reticle clear. b. raise the head to observe the reticle. and the focus to make the target clear. so that a soldier can look through the bore. etc. Make the zero point by drawing around a quarter or washer and coloring it in with a black marker.GSAT 2. Soldier #3 makes sight adjustments on the scope. center to center. d.5 cm (1 in) zero point 8 cm below and 2 cm to the right of the center of mass of an M16 25 M zero target.

GSAT-39 17 June 2001 . such as the shadow of a wall. Place a lubricated 5. Adjust the scope for best vision: Turn the daylight lense cover to the smallest opening depending on the available light. Make the zero point by drawing around a quarter or washer and coloring it in with a black marker. A second soldier adjusts the elevation and azimuth adjustment actuators until the laser dot is 8 cm below the center and 2 cm to the right of the zero target. while the reticle is centered on the upper target. Adjust the diopter to make the reticle clear. LMTS Bore-sight Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M249. use any piece of paper with contrasting target points placed 8 cm. Note: The daylight lense cover must be used for this exercise. Turn the reticle and tube brightness to the lowest setting that allows good visibility of the reticle and target. with the lower point 2 cm to the right.GSAT 3. a. and holds the reticle on the center of mass of the target. The gunner assumes a supported position. d. Note: ensure that the M16/M203 reticle is installed in the AN/PVS-4. and the focus to make the target clear. Confirm the zero with live fire at the earliest opportunity. Note: If a zero target is not available. b.5 cm (1 in) zero point.SARG . Place the target at 25 meters in an area with dim light. Mark a 2. vertically.56 mm mandrel with a calibrated LMTS laser in the bore of the M249. c. 8 cm below and 2 cm to the right of the center of mass of an M16 25 M zero target. center to center.

Note: Periodically check the tightness of the mounting screws during a firing exercise. Note: Five E-Type silhouttes targets are exposed with no time limit: 2 at 100 meters. preferably at 300 meters at night. GSAT-40 17 June 2001 . Live-Fire Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M249 at 25 meters. Note: 30 rounds are allowed for zero. 6. Note: 30 rounds are allowed for zero. Fire single rounds at a 300 meter target. a. 6 rounds in 2 or 3 bursts to seat the sights. Fire 30 rounds at five targets (2 3-round bursts can be fired at each target) with no time limit. 6 rounds in 2 or 3 bursts to seat the sights. Instructional Night Fire. c. Targets will fall when hit. Confirm the zero with 3 round bursts. Confirm the zero with 3 round bursts. and fire single rounds at the 25 M target. 12 single rounds to adjust zero.GSAT 4. preferably at night. and 12 rounds in 3 round bursts to confirm zero. and 12 rounds in 3 round bursts to confirm zero. 5. Adjust the elevation and azimuth adjustment actuators to get hits 8 cm below and 2 cm to the right of the center of mass. and 1 each at 200. Hold the reticle on the center of mass. Adjust the elevation and azimuth adjustment actuators based on observations of a spotter to get hits on the 300 meter target. 12 single rounds to adjust zero. 300.SARG . and 400 meters. b. Note: Periodically check the tightness of the mounting screws during a firing exercise. c. a. Live-Fire Zero an AN/PVS-4 to an M249 at 300 meters. b.