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WINTER l 2008

health

Health is dedicated to educating and informing

people on health issues. This magazine seeks to reach a diverse group of readers who have a wide range of health needs and concerns. Publisher Bob Cox General Manager Mary Susan Staton - marysusanstaton@yahoo.com Vice President of Sales Laurie Finley Marketing Sales Sherry Frechette - slfreche@shaw.ca Mary Susan Staton Sales Administrative Assistant Charlene Belay Editor Ian Tizzard -ian@tizzcomm.com Creative Director Christy Goines - cdonegan@kreashuns.biz Graphic Design Kreashuns Graphics Graphic Design and Admin Assistant Demetrice Mitchell Carol Lacey Contributing Writers Christine Bavender Dr. Morag Fisher Dorothy M. Froese Dr. Leon I. Gilner Kristie Grant Jason Hasselmann Christy Kim Rebeca Kuropatwa Myron Love Christina McVetys Donna Sarna Dr. Luke Small Mireille Theriault Photography by Darcy Finley Lisa Waldner Editorial Advisory Committee Dr. Paresh Shah, DMD Dr. Gordon Sims Mr. Joe Minuk Sherry Frechette R.N. B.N. E. Allan Bailey, Master herbalist Dr. Robert B.W. Choptiany M.D. Circulation Charlene Belay
Health is published bi-monthly by the Winnipeg Free Press. All rights reserved. Contents may not be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The views expressed in this publication do not necessarily represent the view of the publisher or staff. We are not responsible for products or services advertised. We hope you have been blessed by the information you receive in this magazine. We encourage our readers to conduct their own research into any treatments, herbs, supplements, programs, and remedies in these pages. Consult your doctor before beginning any program or regimen. We welcome your comments and suggestions.

thoughts from

the general manager

A prayer for everyone


In the 1930s, theologian Reinhold Niebuhr wrote a prayer to use in a sermon he planned, a prayer that has since become famous. In the simplest language, he made a crucial request: God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference. Its such a wonderfully plain reminder to take each day as it comes, and deal with life on its terms. I believe the best way to deal with life is to assess what it gives you, take care of whatever you can. If we falter on any of these items, I would bet its usually on the wisdom part. The things we face can seem overwhelming sometimes, and we assume a new challenge is inevitable. But we must strive to at least consider change for the things we find hard to accept before we accept them. Positive thinking goes a long way towards what you can and cannot do. The prayer might do well with another line, reminding us that we all have unique abilities and challenges. We cant all change the same things what you can change, maybe I cant and vice versa. But you know your abilities and your limits the best, and youll have no regrets if you at least do your best.
To your health,

Publication Office Winnipeg Free Press 1355 Mountain Ave., Winnipeg, Mb. , R2X 3B6 www.healthmbs.ca Mary Susan Staton 204-782-9295 Sherry Frechette 204-782-6739

Mary Susan Staton


General Manager

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contents
COVER STORY
Finding Solace at Elkhorn Lodge Spa

page 50

Summer Fun for KIDS

page 22

The Storehouse of Memory

page 19

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Binge Drinking Page 8 All about Vitamin D Page9 Chiropractic for constipation Page 10 Avoiding Dehydration & Heat Stroke Page 11 Natural Essentials Page 12 Mysterious Fibromyalgia Page 13 Hernia Page 14 Treating a Wound that Wont Heal Page 15 Cosmic Tools Page 17 Advice from the Herb Gardener Page 18 Prostate Cancer Page 20 Camp Quakity Page 21 Larry Robinson - Golf Pro Who Appreciates the Game Page 23 Zap the Smoking Habit Page 24

A Key to Controlling Weight Page 26 Healing Words - Danse Dolorosa Page 27 Be Bold with Mould Page 29 If the Shoe FIts Page 30 Glow this Summer with Fabutan Page 31 Mosquitos-More than Irritating Page 32 Preparing for Lake Swimming Page 33 Restless Leg Syndrome Page 35 The Importance of Core Stability Page 36 Exercises for the Core Page 37 Pelvic Floor Strength Page 38 The Battle Against CVS Page 40 Goals for Healthcare Page 43

Health Requires Balance Page 44 Winnipeg Harvest - Feeding the Poor Page 45 Manitoba Lotteries Page 46 When Anxiety Turns Against You Page 52 Healthy Eating Alternative Pastry Castle Page 54 St. Amant Facing the Challenge Page 56 Siloam Mission Helping the Homeless Page 58 Golf Offers Pleasant Exercise Page 63 Rejuvenating With Ten Spa Page 64

a message from the editor


One of the things about health is how relative it can be from one person to another. This issue of health has two stories in particular that should make you happy to maintain a level of health beyond mere survival. Winnipeg Harvest helps the working poor avoid making choices between food and rent, while the Saul Sair Health Centre tend to homeless people who may not even have a health card. These are groups of people we all too often ignore. Beyond the relativity of health, the two stories also point out the resiliency of bodies. In fact, many people suffering illness are doing well, considering their situation. Take a good look at some homeless people and wonder at how they survive a few months with close to nothing, let alone years. They really do need more help than any of us alone can give them. And among those people with the resources to focus on our health, wonder at how many of us make foolish choices and shun the ability to stay healthy. What other machine can you put through such stresses and treat so poorly and it still works for decades? Thats one thing we all have in common health-wise as machines we tend to work very efficiently, with a programmed drive to keep it up. It only makes sense to help each other work as well as we can. . Ian Tizzard MID-SUMMER l 2008

health

Binge Drinking

By Dr. Morag Fisher

Just a night of good fun, or a problem?

lcohol holds a special place in our society. We include it as part of our social life, at our parties, family gatherings and celebrations, and most of us drink it. Some of us, though, drink too much.

If you are drinking, avoid becoming intoxicated or drunk; pace yourself with a limit that you stick to; keep track of your drinks and measure them. A rough guide is to consume no more than one drink per hour. At the same time, have something to eat and drink non-alcoholic beverages such as water, fruit juice or soft drinks. Confront some of the myths about heavy drinking: -Everyone drinks like this. But not all young people binge drink. Many do not consume alcohol at all, or drink very moderately. -We say with pride I can hold my drink. In fact this is not a good thing. It means that your body is adapting to a high alcohol intake and your liver may be working overtime to keep up. It may actually be the one of the first signs of more serious alcohol problems. Lets be responsible when we drink and teach our young people these values. In this way we can develop a culture of moderation in our use of alcohol.

A recent survey shows that over 80 per cent of Canadians 15 years of age and older consumed alcohol at some time in the previous year. Most of them drank moderately and came to no harm because of drinking, but a surprising number forego moderation. The same survey labeled 14 per cent of Canadians (3.3million people) as high risk drinkers. And heavy drinking (five or more drinks on a single occasion for men and four or more drinks on a single occasion for women) increases your chance of coming to some harm because of your drinking. Youth and young adults (18 to 24 years old) are more likely to drink heavily than older adults their rates of heavy weekly drinking and the average quantity consumed on each night of drinking are almost double those of adults. But what starts as a good night out can end in disaster. Arguments, damage to property and accidents occur frequently under the influence of alcohol. Car accidents resulting in injury or fatality and assaults are often the way the night ends. In one study, 46 per cent of trauma centre patients were injured under the influence of alcohol. Alcohol affects your judgment and decision making, too unprotected intercourse with the risk of sexually transmitted disease or unplanned pregnancy is more likely after drinking. What can we do to reduce these problems? Low risk drinking guidelines describe a pattern of drinking that is safe for most people over the legal drinking age. These guidelines have been endorsed by several health agencies, including the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba. The lowest risk of alcohol related problems comes with no consumption. Zero drinks is the safest bet. Beyond that, keep these limits in mind: -no more than two standard drinks on any one day -no more than nine standard drinks per week for women -no more than 14 standard drinks per week for men (One standard drink contains 13.6 g of alcohol the approximate amount of alcohol in five oz. of wine, 1.5 oz. of spirits or 12 oz. of regular beer.) Of course there are lots of situations where you should not consume alcohol at all during pregnancy, for example, or if you have medical conditions or take medication where alcohol would cause problems, or if you have to be particularly alert and in control such as when using machinery, or driving or boating.

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Vitamin D
By Christine Bavender

hen it comes to vitamin D, finding natural sources isnt easy, according to dietician Gina Sunderland.

There are very few natural food sources of vitamin D, says Sunderland, who owns the Action Physiotherapy and Wellness Clinic at 1235 Pembina Highway. Natural sources include oily fish such as salmon, herring and mackerel and egg yolks, and a few cereals are fortified with it. She says the main dietary source of vitamin D in Canada is milk. Fortified with vitamin D, it gives about 100 international units (IU) of the nutrient in each cup. They initially started fortifying milk in the 60s to prevent rickets which is a bone deforming disease, Sunderland says. Weve pretty much eliminated it in the main population but we still see an occasional incidence of rickets in the northern part of the region where they dont drink a lot of milk. The best place to find vitamin D? Outside. Called the sunshine vitamin, it is created in our bodies after skin is exposed to sunlight. Its specifically ultraviolet B rays, Sunderland says. Once it contacts the skin, were actually able to create an active form of vitamin D in our body. Being out there between 11:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. when the sun is the strongest for just 15 to 20 minutes, we can make 10,000 international units of vitamin D. But dermatologists arent happy with that news, Sunderland added, because the body wont make vitamin D if you wear sunscreen which is recommended to avoid skin cancer. The daily recommended (supplemental) dose of vitamin D is 400 international units; the Canadian Dermatology Association recommends more but they dont want people out in the sun, she says. Can you get too much vitamin D? (Health Canada) has an upper tolerable level set at 2,000 IU, Sunderland said. But there have not been any reports of toxicity by going over that amount. Sunderland explains that vitamin D really hasnt gotten a lot of attention until about five years ago, and that the level Health Canada recommended hasnt changed since the 60s. In fact, based on all the current research it really looks like its the most talked about vitamin right now. And now we know that six months out of the year we cant synthesize enough through our skin from October to the end of March because of our latitude, she said. The sun is too low in the sky and the rays are not strong enough for us to synthesize vitamin D. A lack of vitamin D can play a part in certain chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and colorectal cancer. It also plays a role in muscle strength and balance, Sunderland said. So if you give seniors calcium with vitamin D it cuts down on the risk of fractures. The new Canada Food Guide recommends everyone over the age of 50 take a vitamin supplement each day that has at least 400 IU of vitamin D, a suggestion Sunderland supports fully. Its the easiest way to make sure you get enough of it, she says.
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Chiropractic for constipation and hemorrhoids. No, really.


By Christine Bavender

hen it comes to relieving constipation or taking the burn out of hemorrhoids, you might not think of turning to a chiropractor.

But according to Dr. Darrin Thorvaldson, of Island Lakes Chiropractic, treatments at his office can actually offer relief. The most important thing is to understand how chiropractic works, Thorvaldson says. Chiropractic helps improve nerve system function and when you get down to how the body works, the nerve system controls every cell, tissue, organ and system in the body. In essence, he calls it the master system that determines how our bodies run to keep us alive on a daily basis. Among the network of connections that make up the nervous system, the enteric nervous system sub-division is dedicated solely to the gastrointestinal process, controlling digestion from the stomach to the bowels. Thorvaldson explains that this collection of nerves run the digestive system through a sort of feedback mechanism. For example, if the small intestine isnt pushing food through fast enough, it sends a message to the stomach to slow down. In regards to constipation and digestive issues, chiropractic can prove to be very effective by improving nerve system function and by giving lifestyle and nutrition suggestions, Thorvaldson says. In fact we have had great success in our office with all kinds of debilitating stomach and digestive issues. Thorvaldson has had a lot of success with children, too. Colicky babies especially, he says. Quite often they have some sort of birth trauma so it impacts function. Ive had a lot of success keeping kids pooping. Sometimes theyre not even out of the office before theyre exploding.

As for hemorrhoids and how chiropractic can help, Thorvaldson says hemorrhoids can be related to constipation because of active pushing. Its a burst blood vessel, he says. So once you have it, it can be there for good or go away or wax and wane. The key is not so much chiro and quicker repair, but understanding lifestyle issues so you have stool that is somewhat soft and doesnt burst those blood vessels in the first place. Thorvaldson says lifestyle issues can range from exercising to eating right. Its really about proper nerve system function, he explains. We all know people who eat healthy and exercise and all that but still get sick. So the first piece to the puzzle is getting the nerve system working right since it controls everything in our body. He says its the same for any other issue in the body that chiropractic can help, but that any patient has to make choices to maintain his or her own health. At the end of the day, whether you work with a fivemonth-old baby or a 60-year-old, you work with them exactly the same and lifestyle plays a lot in that.

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Dehydration and Heat Stroke: know them and avoid them

By Rebeca Kuropatwa

ummer is the time of the year weve all been waiting for. But while were out there having fun running and playing, its important to take some precautions to protect ourselves from dehydration and heat stroke.

strongest. Other good precautions he adds: Wear hats, sunglasses, lightweight and light-coloured clothing, and use an umbrella. Remember that while we love the heat, we can have too much of it. Stay hydrated and stay healthy.

Dr. John Reda, Medical Director of the Urgent Care Centre at Misericordia Hospital, describes dehydration as a point when you arent getting enough water in your bloodstream to support your body. He explains that our bodies produce heat that is released through sweating, breathing, urine, stool, and tears. We can generally replace this loss by drinking liquids and eating foods that contain water, except under extenuating circumstances. For example, diarrhoea, vomiting, and some medicines can cause general dehydration when the body loses water content and essential body salts like sodium, potassium, calcium bicarbonate, and phosphate. But overexposure to the sun or to extremely high temperatures can also cause dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration may include fatigue, light-headedness or dizziness, or a dry mouth and dry mucous membranes. Children may also experience no tears when crying, dry diapers for more than three hours, a sunken abdomen, eyes, or cheeks, high fever, listlessness, irritability, and skin that does not flatten when pinched and released. When caught early, dehydration can be corrected by ingesting fluids bring water or a sports drink with you when you exercise outside, and drink before you get thirsty. Left unchecked, dehydration may lead to heat stroke, when a body cannot sweat enough to maintain a safe temperature. High humidity, extreme heat, or vigorous activity in the sun or heat can result in our body temperature rising to dangerous levels. The situation is much more serious than mere dehydration, and requires medical attention. Symptoms of heat stroke may include headache, agitation or confusion, seizure, skin that is hot, dry and flushed but not sweaty, loss of consciousness, rapid heart beat and hallucinations. If someone gets heat stroke, it is best to call for medical assistance, and move the person inside. Apply cool water, fanning, and ice packs, and have the person lie down in cool area with their feet elevated. But, people use heat stroke as a loose term, adds Reda. They can mean anything from feeling generally unwell due to heat exhaustion to serious, potentially fatal conditions. The best way to prevent dehydration or heat stroke is to replace the water your body loses. Make sure youre drinking enough fluids, like Gatorade or water even coffee, tea, or soda as some fluid is better than none, says Reda. Stay indoors or in the shade and avoid physical exertion in direct sunlight especially between noon and 4:00 p.m., when the sun is
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Natural Essentials

By Christina McVetys

re you looking for a new approach to pampering, something out of the ordinary and a step away from the usual manicure and massage at the spa? Shed the stresses of life with a trip to Natural Essentials where clients are offered opportunities to try new methods in relaxation and alternative health treatments. Enhance the body, mind and soul.

If youre not sure where to start, an in-depth consultation is available to help decide which treatments are right for you and your needs. Flaherty and her staff offer many services including iridology, contact reflex analysis, metabolic efficiency analysis, body talk, foot detox treatments and homeopathy. Natural Essentials also provides Reiki, Thai massage, reflexology and integrative subtle-energy balancing. Theres something designed to promote wellness and relaxation in everyone. Why not convince the boss to take the whole office to Natural Essentials to relax with coworkers for one of their corporate or group packages offered? A day of pampering is the perfect cure for any type of office blues. Choose from the group half-day or fullday package designed for five to 10 people. The day begins with guided mediation and deep breathing to prepare your body for an entire day of relaxing. Following that, group members de-stress in the infrared sauna, which offers deep-down relief of sore muscles and joints with a gentle, dry heat. Later, they enjoy a therapeutic steam with essential oils, reflexology to relieve tension and improve circulation, a foot detox and therapeutic massage. Groups and individuals can also experience Thai massage, an ancient massage based on yoga postures to bring one into a peaceful state, calm the body and much more. Organic snacks, juices and herbal teas are provided during your half-day or full-day package. Sometimes, more than just your feet or back that require pampering. At Natural Essentials youre providing relaxation for your entire being body, mind and soul.

This is the motto of Natural Essentials, located at 300-487 River Avenue in the hub of Osborne Village, supporting all the services provided from their third-floor sanctuary. Upon entering the centre, visitors are encouraged to take their shoes off and leave their daily pressures and stresses at the door. They experience a variety of treatments designed to alleviate stress and give their souls a holiday, all in the serene atmosphere there. Deborah Flaherty, owner of Natural Essentials, started her journey in the alternative health field over 15 year ago. She studied at Dominion Herbal College to learn the benefits of herbs and herbal remedies, iridology and the bodys metabolic efficiency. But Flaherty wanted more. She wanted to share her knowledge and expertise and provide options to people. I had a vision for a facility that would house as many modalities as possible to help others along their journey to find wellness at all levels, says Flaherty. Today, she lives out her dream, providing her clients the tools needed for their own alternative health journey.

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Mysterious Fibromyalgia
By Christy Kim Do you lose sleep, tossing and turning during the night? Does every muscle feel tired and twitchy? Are you suffering with headto-toe pain for no apparent reason? For people with fibromyalgia, the answer may be yes to all those questions. Other symptoms of this mysterious disease with no known cure include pain, fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, dizziness, skin sensitivities and impaired coordination. Though it mostly strikes women between the ages of 35 and 55, fibromyalgia can be debilitating and affects people at any age. It may arise on its own, though it is often associated with other diseases such as lupus or rheumatoid arthritis. Psychological distress, trauma and infection appear to play a key role in fibromyalgia, though a cause or causes remain unknown. Illness, injury or sleep interruptions may trigger it. In some cases, fibromyalgia patients have elevated levels of a neurotransmitter called Substance P. Carol Hailstone, owner of Country Connections, knows all too well the severe afflictions of Fibromyalgia. She started a home business in January 1997 while bedridden for days at a time with fibromyalgia symptoms. Despite the challenge of that, she built a client base while developing her soothing muscle mist for fibromyalgia sufferers. Fibromyalgia is not a life sentence, says Hailstone, aspiring to inspire other fibromyalgia sufferers through her through her several health products and services. You need to learn how to live healthy, recognize the signs of fibromyalgia and understand your limitations when they arise, she says. Beyond her spray-on pain reliever, Hailstone has incorporated the services of popular foot detox and biofeedback machines to assist her clientele with health issues. Her main goal is to help other people in pain and provide counseling to help clients help themselves. There are so many products to improve your health conditions without having to constantly take medications, she says. Physicians presented with fibromyalgia-like symptoms first rule out possible lupus and multiple sclerosis symptoms before making a fibromyalgia diagnosis. Once diagnosed, symptoms may be controlled to some extent by anti-depressant or anti-inflammatory medications. Some patients have found relief through making eating habit adjustments, acupuncture or massage. However, the same relief doesnt occur in everyone. Some treatments work for some people and not others. Hailstone suggests anyone suffering from fibromyalgia should also research on their own while they seek medical attention. She sees more research taking place to investigate this disease than ever before, and says help and support are likewise more readily available.
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Hernia
By Christina McVetys

When attempting to lift something heavy, these words of wisdom should come to mind: Lift with your knees. Of course this is true, but by following that advice youre doing more than preventing a back ache youre protecting yourself against a hernia. Your abdominal wall is built to act like a corset; it simply stops your insides from falling out. When there is a weakness or tear in the abdominal wall, part of your intestines may bulge out, causing a noticeable lump called a hernia, which can be painful and uncomfortable. Heavy lifting, rigorous exercise, coughing or even straining on the toilet is enough to raise the pressure in the abdomen and produce a hernia. The most common hernias are in the groin. In the beginning stages of a hernia, you might feel that something has given out and you may feel some discomfort or pain. Soon a lump appears and you know youre dealing with a hernia. In most cases hernias cause discomfort but if the hernia strangulates, the bloody supply is cut off and an emergency surgery is required to remove it immediately. Trusses are used to keep the hernia in place, but a simple operation can fix the weakness and prevent other problems from arising. Most operations can be performed in an hour and will have you back at home in a day. To prevent hernias it is recommended that you maintain your ideal weight, and when lifting heavy objects bend your knees and keep your back straight.

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How to treat a wound that will not heal.


B
ruce Aikenhead of NorthStar Physiotherapy Centre has been working as a physiotherapist in private practice for over 20 years. During that time he has not been pursued by patients for help in treating skin wounds that have failed to heal, such as diabetic ulcers. That is, until he began to use a technology called low intensity laser therapy (LILT). He discovered that he could successfully treat cases with LILT that had been treated unsuccessfully by conventional means for months or even years in some cases. When Aikenhead pursued the research on LILT, he found convincing physical evidence behind it. Dr. Fred Kahn, with the technical department at Ryerson University, developed the Bioflex therapeutic laser system Aikenhead uses. Many patients attending Aikenheads clinic are asking for LILT treatment by name, after searching for answers to their wound and pain issues. LILT is pain-free, has no side effects, is non-invasive, is cost effective and can reduce the need for surgeries and medications. LILT is being used by major sports teams across North America and in many private clinic settings internationally. Laser therapy is the use of monochromatic light emission from a low intensity laser diode or an array of high intensity super luminous diodes. The light source is placed in contact with the skin allowing the photon energy to penetrate tissue, where it interacts with various components within the cells making up the tissues, resulting in the restoration of normal cell structure and function and enhancing the bodys natural healing processes. Conditions treated include wounds as well as musculoskeletal injuries such as those often encountered with work, sport and motor vehicle injuries. Chronic and degenerative conditions and wounds also respond well. One of the questions often asked of us is whether treatment is covered by insurance, he says Aikenhead. But many insurance policies, including Workers Compensation Board and Manitoba Public Insurance, cover physiotherapy. He notes that referrals are necessary only if required by your plan. According to Aikenhead, LILT is also used in treating many conditions including: Back and neck pain Sports injuries Muscle and tendon strains TMJ pain Ligament sprains Bursitis Scar tissue Arthritis Car accident injuries Tendonitis Work injuries Deep bruising

By Dorothy M. Froese

Hopeless wounds? Not for physiotherapist Bruce Aikenhead.


You can visit NorthStar Physiotherapy in person at 8-877 Waverley Street or online at www.northstarlaser.ca.

One of the questions often asked of us is whether treatment is covered by insurance, he says. But many insurance policies, including Workers Compensation Board and Manitoba Public Insurance, cover physiotherapy. He notes that referrals are necessary only if required by your plan.
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cosmic tools

By Christina McVetys

ave you ever wondered about the healing powers of crystals and minerals? Are you curious about the energies certain gems and stones give off?

Even if youre skeptical about crystal energy, you cant deny the beauty of these treasures of nature. Theres no harm in booking an appointment for a mineral consultation at Cosmic Tools for a free and fun treat. Joe Fedorowich and his wife, Sharon Granove, opened their therapeutic gift shop at 300-478 River Avenue in November 2006. Since then, the Osborne Village shop continues to sell an eclectic mix including jewelry, candle holders, salt lamps, incense, hemp belts, cultural items from Africa and Latin America and, of course, crystals and minerals many of them from Manitoba. The cozy gift shop also provides a thriving custom order business where they design and create products for the specific needs of their customers. Customers take in pieces of driftwood that Fedorowich decorates with the appropriate gems, transforming it into a decorative wand. Fedorowich and Granove are both Reiki masters and offer their clients a variety of services. Soul therapy meditation is an hour long meditation performed in a private room. Clients lay down on a metatronic mat, a copper magnetic grid aligned to the sacred geometric principle of the soul. The participant experiences soulful meditation and finds themselves awakened to the concept of self healing. As a result of the therapy, clients may leave with a greater sense of courage and determination to take on their personal problems and combat negative energies in their life. Etheric weaver treatment also takes place on a metatronic mat, but involves the use of etheric weavers, devices used to help balance your Chi and focus energy troubles in your etheric field. During the treatment, clients may experience subtle electrical stimulation throughout the body. Cosmic Tools also offers Karuna Reiki by appointment in a private room. Before clients choose the right therapy for their needs, they are encouraged to book an appointment to help Fedorowich and Granove better understand the type of therapy appropriate for their own needs. In the first session, we sit and talk for about a half an hour about the issues the individual wants to overcome, such as grief or anger. Some of these issues that are plaguing the client grief in particular will never completely go away, but I can help them to alleviate these negative patterns in their life, says Fedorowich. If youre looking for a different approach to self-healing and self-awareness, Cosmic Tools offers several therapies to point you in the right direction. But if youre just looking for that perfect crystal and would like to learn more about them, book an appointment with Cosmic Tools today.

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Sage Advice for the novice Herb Gardener


By Mireille Theriaut

For example, if you want to bring plants inside at the end of the season, Hanson cautions that large plants will become stressed more easily than a smaller plant. Also, the heartiest ones tend to be less adapted to growing indoors. French tarragon is terrible indoors and fantastic outdoors in the ground, says Hanson, but Mexican tarragon has a wonderful flavour and does best indoors. Whether you favor indoor or outdoor gardening, Hanson encourages gardeners to take an organic approach because plants are trained from the start to be more resistant to the challenges they face with bugs and fungus. A lot of people seem to think that organic gardening is more complicated, expensive, time-consuming or labour-intensive, but really what youre doing is simply creating a healthy soil system that makes plants work for themselves to get the nutrients they need.

resh herbs add wonderful flavour to all sorts of cooking without the need for salt. Yet for novice gardeners who consider pansies exotic, the thought of growing herbs could be daunting until they get a little advice from the right source.

Herbs are no more difficult to grow than anything else, says Dave Hanson, owner and operator of Sage Garden Herb Centre. You have to start with understanding the strengths and limitations of the particular plants, but basically, the key ingredients to a successful herb garden are good drainage, a sunny spot and a nutrient rich soil. If you can provide those things in-ground, in containers or on the windowsill, you can grow healthy plants. The easiest and heartiest plants grow best outdoors in an in-ground garden. These are primarily annuals that re-grow year after year. The majority of these (such as basil, cilantro, dill, marjoram and savory) also happen to grow very well from seed. The number one mistake people make is starting seeds indoors way too early, says Hanson. They get all excited in April of even March, but in our climate its best to wait until early June and then direct seed into an outdoor garden, or even in large outdoor containers. By then the soil has warmed up enough and plants come up so easily. You wont get tall spindly plants that are stressed during transplanting. Perennials generally grow better from cuttings rooted in a container of water on the windowsill. The critical thing is flushing it with new water every couple of days to combat algae, says Hanson. What you want to see are oxygen bubbles on the growth. Just when the rules seem straightforward though, Hanson warns that you do have to research your specific choices because so many basic herbs have variations that do better indoors or outdoors. Make sure to look at the strength of the plants, he says.

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The storehouse of memory


By Christy Kim

Where did I put that thing?


e all have memory lapses. We go from one room to the next and forget what for. The car keys disappear. We blank on phone numbers we call all the time. But with all the information our brains store, retrieve and sort, we have to expect

Whats a memory?
Short-term memory refers to things you remember from the last few minutes. Unimportant short-term information gets replaced easily with other thoughts that come along, and new pieces of short-term information frequently bump others out of mind. Repetition increases the probability of short-term memory entering permanent storage in our brains. Intermediate-term memory (a.k.a. working memory) refers to information about a current task. It allows us to remember what we are doing and why we are doing it. Long-term memories last for several years. Everything we remember about our world is organized as long-term memory, and we retrieve stored items by several routes in the brain.

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the occasional glitch.

But is it merely occasional? Does your memory loss disrupt daily life? How often? Is dementia around the corner? Physicians can evaluate your level of memory loss various ways, including a compilation of medical history, testing mental capabilities or physical and neurological exams. Computerized axial tomography (CAT) scans or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also help identify possible strokes or tumors, which may put patients at risk for further memory loss problems. Everything that affects our thinking, learning and remembering can affect our memory, and there are many possible contributors to memory loss: medications such as anxiety or anti-depressants, which inhibit the minds processing levels; alcohol and drugs; emotional or physical stress; depression or negative thought processes; head injuries; sleep disorders; nutritional deficiencies and the normal aging process. There are many ways to help prevent memory loss: lowering cholesterol and high blood pressure seems to help, as does reducing smoke and alcohol consumption, exercising regularly, improving eating habits and maintaining social interaction. Dont let forgetfulness become a fact of life. Whichever level of memory loss you are experiencing, it is best to seek professional advice if the problem persists and becomes worse.
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Its no secret that prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Canadian men over 50, and that the methods used for detection are invasive. The prostate, found close to the rectum, presents men with an uncomfortable situation when a doctor performs a test. It may be an uncomfortable experience, but necessary. The risk for prostate cancer increases as men age, and men must undergo testing as they age to aid in early detection.

Prostate Cancer

By Christina McVetys

During a DRE, a doctor inserts a gloved finger into the rectum to feel the prostate gland which is usually smooth and rubbery. If the doctor feels irregularities, a biopsy is needed to examine the cells. The PAS is a blood test that measures a substance called prostate-specific antigen. Prostate problems can cause PAS levels to rise, which can lead to a biopsy for further cell investigation. Although there are tests available to check for irregularities in the prostate and the amount of PAS in blood, there is no screening process that can confirm prostate cancer without a biopsy. Cancer survivor Joseph Courchaine experienced a lack of information during his 10-year battle with prostate cancer and understands the confusion men can feel during the first stages of diagnosis. During his first meeting with his urologist after cancer was detected, he received very little information and a few pamphlets. Courchaine chose to take charge of his situation by researching treatments and alternatives on his own. All through these 10 years, very little information is available, nor is there any great decision map that one can follow in both the treatments and side effects, says Couchraine. As a result of his experiences, Courchaine vowed to speak with anyone about the disease and tells his story at speaking engagements. Couchraine is involved with the Manitoba Prostate Cancer Support Group and serves as the treasurer. I really believe that men need to start taking charge of their health and they need to start a screening program so that this disease may be identified in its early stages, he says.

Men are at higher risk if prostate cancer runs in their family or if they are of African ancestry, though it is still possible to develop prostate cancer without either of these risk factors present. The two most common methods of testing for prostate cancer are the digital rectal examination (DRE) and the prostate-specific antigen test (PAS).

Signs of prostate cancer Difficulty urinating, erectile dysfunction and painful ejaculation a few symptoms associated with prostate cancer, although many men experience no symptoms. Prostate cancer grows slow and because of its commonality in older men, most prostate cancers do not grow to the point where symptoms are felt. Many men with prostate cancer die of other causes before the cancer grows enough to create symptoms.

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MID-SUMMER l 2008

Quality: Campers need it from volunteers, too.


By Mireille Theriault

ike most children excitedly awaiting summer camp, the kids headed for Camp Quality look forward to fun, friendship and new experiences to remember long after the week is over. The only thing that sets them apart is that every child at Camp Quality has been touched by cancer. People might assume that this is a sad place, says volunteer camp registrar Danielle Weidman. Sure there can be some emotional moments, but I can honestly say this is a very happy place, where having fun is the number one priority for everyone. Camp director, Noelle Bowles agrees wholeheartedly. It is first and foremost a summer camp for kids, and everything is geared to making their week here as special as possible, she says. Since the first Camp Quality in Manitoba in 2005, a dedicated hub of volunteers has worked to organize the camp, which runs this year from August 10 to 16. They host kids fighting cancer, kids in remission and the brothers and sisters of those kids. Including all the children in a family is an important part of what we offer, says Weidman. Both she and Bowles recall a little girl without cancer telling them she felt as though the camp was the first time anyone had acknowledged that cancer had stolen her childhood too, as she struggled to cope with helping to care for younger siblings. The camp includes outdoor experiences, games and sports, and arts and crafts. A unique component of the Camp Quality experience is that every child is paired with a companion who is at least 18 years old. There are very special relationships that form when a child and companion return to camp year after year, says Weidman. The camp sets up in an established facility only 45 minutes outside Winnipeg, with the regular amenities like cabins and a mess hall, and with the special addition of a temporary medical station. We call it the Tiki Hut, says Weidman. Children on medication come to see the nurses there. She says the medical component is vital to families who would not otherwise consider sending their children away for a week. For many parents, this is the only time when they can enjoy a respite, secure in the knowledge that all their children are enjoying a wonderful week. Camp Quality also helps families struggling under the financial strain of caring for a critically ill child. Donations and volunteer fundraising efforts cover the entire cost of sending each and every child and companion to camp. It costs roughly $1,000 per person to attend and this summer we anticipate hosting 20 to 30 campers, says Bowles, making a call for help. We cant emphasize our need for volunteers enough. There will be an
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extra orientation prior to the week of August 10. We need people to come to camp with us on-site for the week, whether they volunteer to be a companion or in some other capacity, from programming to cooking. Weidman also points to their Up Up and Away Dinner, a gala fundraiser on October 15. Well need volunteers and donations to make this vital fundraising event as successful as it can be, says Weidman. For more information about volunteer opportunities with Camp Quality or ticket information for the gala fundraiser, visit the website at www. campquality.com and follow the links to the Manitoba camp.

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The possibilities are endless for kids summer break activities By Rebeca Kuropatwa
Summer vacation is nearing, and we face the question what kinds of activities will be of interest to kids? The best way to figure this out may be as simple as asking your kids for ideas. After all, who would know better than them what they would enjoy doing? Whether kids start a hobby or craft, go to summer camp, play a sport, plant a garden, surprise a neighbour with a good deed, plan a neighbourhood Olympics, or make a backyard obstacle course, as long as they are enjoying what they are doing, the options are infinite. Moreover, interested activity keeps them sharp and active, providing necessary elements in a healthy life. Run over this list of ideas with your kid or kids and see whether any appeal to them. .

Research and Learn

Volunteering builds skills and experience in spare time


Volunteering lets kids of all ages share their know-how while they help others, learn new skills, gain valuable references and meet new people, and there are many places where kids can volunteer their time. Volunteer Manitoba lists over 350 organizations where youths from 12 to 24 can volunteer. At Agape Table, for example, kids who are 15-years-old and up can serve meals to those who need them, help at fundraisers, or donate goods. Kids 16-years-old and up can help in a similar manner at Winnipeg Harvest. Jennifer Sheppard, volunteer coordinator of the Sharon Home seniors residence says volunteers as young as 11-years-old make a big difference in the lives of seniors. Our recreation department needs young volunteers for things like summer barbeques, outings, games night, bingo, walking clubs, and adult day programs, says Sheppard. The spare time of summer vacation may be the most important time kids have to spend. Get them involved in decisions about something productive to do with it, and theyll reap rewards long after the dog days are gone.

- If your children enjoy nature, they might like to record information about what kinds of flowers, butterflies, birds, animals, or trees that they have spotted in the back yard or in a nearby park. You can incorporate these activities with a day-trip to go fishing, hiking or cycling at a park. -Go to the zoo, art gallery, or a history or science museum and talk about what you saw and found out. -Starting some type of collection bugs, coins, leaves, stamps, rocks, or marbles is a great way for kids to get further involved in something that interests them, while they have fun doing it. -At the public library, there are reading clubs, workshops and other clubs that encourage learning in various mediums.

Group Work
-At home, your kids can work on a play or performance with other neighbourhood kids creating the set, costumes, and script and invite the neighbours to come see the show. -Prepare a menu and make a meal with the kids and invite friends over for dinner. -Or consider getting the kids involved in a big family project, like planning a vacation or trip. Research places you want to go to, and make a list of what everyone would like to see or do there. Then go, and have fun.

Stress the Green


-Ride a bike, skateboard, or go swimming, says Alix Sobler, a volunteer for Green Kids, a nonprofit, live-theatre group dedicated to environmental education for young people. Summer was made for environmentally friendly activities, he says. Even on rainy days, kids can take time to turn old t-shirts into tote bags. Cleaning out their closets and donating the results to second hand stores is an environmentally friendly activity, too.

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MID-SUMMER l 2008

Golf pro appreciates game that gave him a second chance at life
By Myron Love Four years ago, Robinsons life hit rock bottom. He landed in hospital having lost his wife and child, his job at the Steinbach course and his home. That was when he began the long process of recovery. After working at a another job for a time, Robinson was offered a position as the golf pro at Larters at St. Andrews Golf and Country Club by club co-owner Peter Ewert, a former owner of the Steinbach course. I am one of the lucky ones, Robinson says. My family, friends and the golf fraternity stood by me. It was golf that made a big difference, too, he says. Golf is an excellent form of regular exercise, Robinson points out. Youre out in the fresh air for four to five hours and will have walked about five miles by the time you cover all 18 holes. Golf also teaches patience and a sense of the spiritual, he adds. And its a game that you can play until your time on earth is finished. There is no other sport that can make the same claim. Robinson has now been sober for four years. He views his recovery as a gift from God and feels the obligation to help other recovering addicts stick to the straight and narrow. I am helping a couple of other guys right now, he says. If youre not giving something back to your fellow man, what is the meaning of life anyway? What I want to get across to others suffering from addiction is that there is a way out.

arry Robinson owes a lot to golf. Golf gave him a leg up when he was a kid growing up on the wrong side of the tracks in Thompson, and golf has given this long time golf pro and recovering addict a second chance at life.

The son of a Thompson municipal worker, Robinson took up golf at the age of 13, playing on the three-hole INCO-owned course in the northern community. I knew right from the start that I wanted to make golf my life, he says. As a youngster though, he had learned to fend for himself, a characteristic that proved to have negative consequences when he became addicted to alcohol also at an early age. I see that sense of self-reliance and self-will in a lot of people who have addictions, Robinson says. The young golf enthusiast apprenticed from 1975 to 1979 at the St. Boniface Golf Course, before serving as head pro at Steinbachs golf course for 25 years. All of that time, his problem with alcohol addiction was getting worse. I wanted to quit drinking for years, but I wasnt able to, he says. For a long time, alcohol worked for me. I wasnt a daily drinker, but golf is a social game and the golf pro enjoys a certain status. Alcohol allowed me to be the life of the party. I didnt realize that I was sick.
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Laser therapy helps former-smokers stay quit

Zap the smoking habit

By Ian Tizzard

eople have been using acupuncture to help them quit smoking for decades among smokers hip to acupuncture, its a popular cessation method. But not every smoker likes the idea of someone poking him or her with dozens of little needles. Most would prefer the same results without the piercing sensation. Thats how Jaye Feemer helps out. At Southside Laser Therapy, on St Marys Road, she provides needle-less acupuncture that does away with the part that spooks many people, and replaces it with a low-power laser. A lot of her work with low intensity laser therapy (LILT) includes helping people with pain from heel spurs and tennis elbow, as well as a facial regimen that uses the laser to stimulate collagen in the skin. (Proponents explain that LILT stimulates cell activity by providing the body with an external source of light energy photons that encourage the production of energy-packed adenosine triphosphate.) But in the last five years or so, Feemer has ventured more and more towards using LILT to alleviate the physical symptoms of smoking withdrawal. It has between 75 and 80 per cent success rate, after only one session, says Feemer. It amazes me still every day. Some of them never have a second of difficulty. Feemer uses the laser as a high-tech acupuncture needle, aiming it at the same points an acupuncturist would stick a needle in. She says that stimulating specific acupuncture points around the body can help combat stress and increased appetite, as well as stimulate the nervous system and the bodys elimination system. In a single session, she lights up each acupoint for 15 seconds of nourishing photons. Its like giving the body a tune-up, says Feemer. It gets everything working more effectively. She admits that the process is no magic bullet, though. Feemer promises to help with the physiological challenges of withdrawal the physical craving but reminds would-be quitters that the decision to quit is up

to them. When they come in the door, theyve already quit, says Feemer. The psychological part is up to them they have to change their behavior but this makes it easier to do. This relatively new method has detractors, but growing support, too: the Journal of Chinese Medicine, February 2008 edition, published a paper by a trio of researchers at the U.K.s Middlesex University studying laser acupoint stimulation to help smokers quit concluded that acupoint stimulation using lasers does indeed modify the physical symptoms of withdrawal and make it possible for motivated persons to succeed in overcoming habitual smoking of tobacco. The results werent astounding, but they still point to help for anyone dedicated to stop smoking. Feemers laser treatment for smoking cessation costs $125. If her clients feel the need for a follow-up, she will repeat the treatment for $25. For more information, or to book an appointment, call her at 256-6080.

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MID-SUMMER l 2008

SPRING l 2008

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New book identifies newly-developed super-soluble fibre as key to controlling appetite, reducing weight
By Myron Love
Dr. Michael Lyon knows what its like to wrestle with a weight problem. I was the only obese child in my class, says the medical and research director of the Vancouverbased Canadian Centre for Functional Medicine. I had to struggle with that identity. But when he was 16, Lyon received a book on health and nutrition by leading health writer Paul Bragg that changed his life. Lyon got his weight under control and became more physically active. After graduating from medicine, he decided to devote his life to helping people who had problems with their weight as he did. My focus is on preventive medicine, says Lyon, who is originally from Calgary but today makes his home on Vancouver Island. To that end, the specialist in treating obesity and appetite control came to Winnipeg in May to promote his newest book Hunger Free Forever, co-written by leading natural medicine specialist Michael Murray. Information, personal stories and recipes pack the 284-page book aimed at showing readers how they can stay fit and healthy. The key, Lyon says, is PolyGlyclopex (PGX), a fibre supplement that regulates appetite and blood sugar. Lyon says University of Toronto researchers developed PGX to help diabetics improve insulin sensitivity. A noticeable side effect was that everyone who started adding the fibre to their meals lost weight. The biggest difficulty for people with weight problems is controlling their appetites, says Lyon. Our research centre in Vancouver (which is affiliated with the University of British Columbia, where Lyon is also an adjunct professor in the Food, Nutrition and Health program) is a world leader in appetite regulation. He reports that studies at UBC labs showed that overweight patients even those who didnt yet have diabetes have extremely unstable blood sugar levels. For individuals of normal weight, blood sugar levels are stable, rising only slightly after meals, Lyon points out. Blood sugar levels in people with weight problems bounce up and down constantly. Every time the blood sugar level drops, a message is transmitted to the brain that it is time to eat. Lyon reports that five grams of PGX (which is available in health food stores) taken with every meal restores blood sugar stability. That reduces the urge to binge on food. What we do with patients first is regulate their appetite, says Lyon. Rather than give people specific diets, we teach them eating strategies that help them achieve a sense of satiety and satisfaction. We encourage people to reduce their portions, eat appropriately (starting with breakfast), eat more mindfully and choose healthier food alternatives. We also offer cooking and food classes. Lyon reports that Hunger Free Forever has just come out in paperback. He is the author or co-author of three previous books on diabetes and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). He is currently nearing completion of a new book, The Serenity Molecule, about L-theanine, an amino acid commonly found in tea, which helps control ADHD.

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MID-SUMMER l 2008

Healing words
The luxury of pleasant words has a healing power we should all be able to afford. Any time is a good time to contemplate the imagery of poetry. Take the time now, if you can. An old friend of Health Magazines general manager a neurological and spinal surgeon wrote this for us.

Danse Dolorosa
By Leon I. Gilner

Oh friend, sweet friend, please dance with me, From ache and age come let us flee. And leave us cross no boundaries too high or too low, With your might and my mind we both shall grow. Say my hands in a vice are squeezing while my lungs with rasp and gasp are wheezing. Say naught of this to the medic approaching; I see you still need so much coaching; act dumbchew gum. Oh dear, my sweet, run fast as the rain, Outrun the twist, the crank, the iron, and the pain. Ease down the bricks where the walls are quite angled, Though the path is quite smooth, the ropes get so tangled. Im told that my brain is dead rotten and spoiled; the healers say its better grilled than boiled; dont look at them or our plans will be foiled. Act politethats almost right. I played the fool and I played the king. I acted quite square inside of the ring. I lifted my eyes to the sun and the moon and acted like David was nearly here soon. But the worms and the ants knew naught of my rants and sucked out my marrow through the holes in my pants. Oh love, oh my love, indulge me my needs, And carry my heart in a basket of reeds. Surrounded by lilies picked fresh in the morn, And covered with kisses from babies just born. If you liked this, Dr. Gilner has samples of other poems at his website: www.leongilnermd.yourmd.com
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WINTER l 2008

Dont be meek with mould. Be bold.


By Kristie Grant
Can it be more polluted indoors than outside? If the interior conditions are right, many varieties of mould can grow, reproduce and thrive. Children, the elderly, and those with suppressed immune systems are especially susceptible to resulting respiratory illness, allergies and general malaise. Rob Goodman of Associated Environmental Services says that adequate air ventilation is a key to keeping mould levels low. Many people dont use the ventilation systems they have in place. For example, when people take showers, they often turn off the bathroom fan immediately, when really it should continue to run for fifteen minutes to a half hour after. A good filtration system is also important. Furnace filters should be changed four times a year, and air humidity should always be kept at 55 per cent or less, as mould cannot live in a dry environment. A professional assessment of a homes mould count is an option that many choose. Goodman says that his clients contact him if there is plain-Jane mould on the wall due to water damage or if the kids are suffering from allergies or other ailments. Air samples are taken and analyzed to see how many and what type of moulds are present per cubic metre. Goodman will also look behind drywall to see if there is mould growth behind the drywall. Mould needs the damp to grow if you get rid of the damp, you get rid of the mould, he says. Ironically, common methods of cleaning can affect the healthiness of the home for the worse. For example, shampooing the carpet and leaving it damp without proper circulation to dry quickly (especially in the basement on concrete floors) can contribute to mould growth. Meaning well, the homeowner in effect creates conditions that may make mould growth worse than before. But even when we clean by the accepted rules, many of us wonder about what our cleaning products do to us. For example, the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia warns that mould and mildew cleaners can contain formaldehyde, a carcinogen and sensitizer, phenol, kerosene, pentachlorophenol, chlorine and fungicides. The Environmental Protection Agency has classified more than 300 different active ingredients found in antimicrobial products including mould and mildew cleaners as pesticides. Health food stores carry eco-friendly replacements, and some big box stores are starting to carry them as well. And dont forget, you can always mix your own cleaners using basic ingredients: baking soda, baking powder, borax, vinegar and essential oils.
Homemade mould and mildew cleaning formula: 1 teaspoon liquid castile soap, 1 teaspoon trisodium phosphate (available at hardware store paint departments), 1 teaspoon borax, 1 teaspoon vinegar, and 1 litre hot water. Mix it all in a refillable spray bottle, and clean away. (Source: http://lesstoxicguide.ca. Incidentally, this website, run by the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia, lists homemade alternatives for dozens of household cleaning solutions.)

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If the shoe fits


By Mireille Theriault

If the shoe fits, youre likely in the minority who invest the time and, yes, money, to find the right footwear. Few stores take the time to properly measure the width and length of each foot, says Brian Scharfstein, certified pedorthist and president of Canadian Footwear. Left to our own devices, consumers have a tendency to put price and appearance above fit. There is this false belief that you have to put up with discomfort in a shoe long enough to break them in, says Scharfstein. But foot pain is not okay. Poorly fitting shoes dont only contribute to exhaustion at the end of the day and cause common problems like blisters, calluses and corns; they can also aggravate serious conditions like hammer toes, bunions, and plantar fasciitis. As a pedorthist, Scharfstein says that clients too often end up seeking relief for these conditions, as well as general foot pain, in custom orthodic devices, while never giving adequate thought to their everyday footwear. Scharfstein contests the idea of functional shoes as chunky clogs. High heels have long been considered the worst offenders, but there are well-designed fashionable heels that do conform to the structure of the foot, rather than forcing it into an even more unnatural position. In fact, he says any shoe that doesnt provide adequate foot and arch support wont serve any better, no matter how sensible they appear or how cushy they feel initially. He says that popular flip-flops and rubber gardening shoes are among the worst in this category for two reasons. In a backless or slip-on shoe, the foot has to work unnaturally and grab with the toes to keep the shoe on. As for materials, the foam or rubber most commonly used quickly breaks down and flattens to a thickness that offers little protection let alone support. Scharfstein points to these as examples of what he calls disposable shoes. By comparison, functional shoes come in a variety of widths as opposed to a few stock sizes. They have adequate depth in the toes and enough bracing at the heel to provide support for the body all day long. He suggests that a decent pair of shoes costs on average $125. In this price range, all components

from heel to toe should be repairable or replaceable. A good pair of shoes should last 400 to 500 hours of active wear, or about 18 months to two years, he says. Knowing that shoes in the $125 range are out of reach for many consumers he stresses the increased importance of taking time to find the best fit, especially if you have to sacrifice quality for affordability. Another point he makes is that inserting equally ill-fitting insoles will not help poorly fitted shoes or foot pain, and can do more harm than good. Unfortunately, many insoles available in drug stores cost less to make than the packaging, and even a good product needs to be the right product for you, he says. If you have foot pain, you need to have someone properly assess the cause and the right treatment. You can compare what a pedorthist does to the services of a pharmacist. Whether the product is over-the-counter or a custom orthodic, we can assess and offer recommendations based on your particular needs.

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MID-SUMMER l 2008

Glow inside and out


By Christy Kim

Summer has finally arrived and the time has come again to look great and feel great with the healthy glow of a tan. We, as humans, rely heavily on sun exposure and the life-giving effects of ultra-violet (UV) light. However, the question remains as to how much sun exposure is healthy or actually exceeds our requirements? Jeff Taylor, owner of the St. Boniface Fabutan Sun Tan Studio, is the person to talk to regarding the benefits and tips for indoor tanning. Everyone can benefit from added vitamin D and a glowing tan. It is a huge health benefit inside and out, Jeff says. When we feel great, we are able to do more and be better prepared for the many challenges in life. Help to let people live healthy, positive lifestyles is what Jeff shares with all his clients at Fabutan. I really enjoy meeting new people and helping them look and feel their best, he says. We always treat everyone special and make sure they benefit from every treatment. Besides providing a fetching look, sun exposure has also been seen to play a key role in prevention of breast, prostate, ovarian and colon cancers, heart disease and multiple sclerosis. And skin conditions such as psoriasis and acne have been greatly improved by UV exposure as the UV rays tend to dry out skin eruptions and control oil-producing sebum. Exposure to UV rays can also help improve mood and depression conditions, especially in winter months when the suns UV levels tend to drop. As awareness increases of both the health benefits associated with regular exposure to sunlight as well as the importance of managing risks associated with sunburn and overexposure, more people turn to indoor tanning for a controlled environment designed to minimize the risk of sunburn. Indoor tanning helps to minimize the risk of sunburn damage while maximizing
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the enjoyment and benefits of having a glowing tan. When visiting the tan salon, your skin produces a tan similar to the one you get from basking in the direct suns rays through UV absorption. However, as climate changes control the atmospheres UV rays outside, preventing us from tanning anytime we wish, more people seek the advantages of yearround, easily accessible indoor tanning as an alternative to direct sunlight outdoors. The convenience of tanning salons also adds to their appeal you dont have to rely on the weather to get that bronzed-look you seek and that glow is available all year round, day or night. So, do go ahead and seek that healthy tanned look you desire. Enjoy the benefits, inside and out.

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When mosquitoes are more than irritating


By Kristie Grant The drone of a mosquito can be more than just irritating. The heat and humidity of a Manitoba summer create a perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes the nuisance varieties as well as Culex tarsalis, the particular mosquito most likely to carry the West Nile virus. Although Heath Canada studies show that most people who contract West Nile virus have mild symptoms or no symptoms at all, a segment of the population, including infants, the elderly and those with chronic diseases, are at a greater risk for serious health effects. The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority advises that anyone experiencing severe symptoms such as persistent high fever, muscle weakness, and headache should seek medical attention immediately. Prevention is key in reducing the cases of West Nile virus says Dr. Susan Roberecki, deputy chief medical officer of health with Manitobas Department of Health and Healthy Living. The best way to protect yourself and your family is by eliminating your exposure to mosquitoes and by eliminating mosquito breeding grounds around your home and vacation property, says Roberecki. Manitobans can reduce standing or stagnant water on their property in several simple ways. For example, eavestroughs should be cleaned out regularly, as should bird baths. Covering rain barrels with mosquito screening and clearing the yard of old tires and other debris that collect water also reduce potential breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Wearing long sleeved light coloured shirts and pants and reducing the time outside from dusk to dawn are two effective precautionary measures, Roberecki adds. Also, making sure that screen doors and windows are in good repair will reduce the possibility of being bitten. Although cases of West Nile virus are rare, that doesnt mean that the populace shouldnt be vigilant about protecting your family from Culex tarsalis. Health Links-Info Sant is an excellent resource for people to use, with one selection that allows callers to report dead crows, ravens, magpies or blue jays. (Often, these dead birds indicate the presence of virus-infected mosquitoes.) Callers can also get information about West Nile virus programming, and if the caller feels that they may have West Nile virus, a nurse is available to discuss the symptoms with them. The Manitoba Health website also provides West Nile virus information and updates at www.gov.mb.ca/health/wnv. For specific advice regarding medical care, contact your health care provider, or Health Links-Info Sant at 788-8200 in Winnipeg or toll-free at 1-888315-9257.
Looking out for West Nile virus
According to the Manitoba Health website, usually, people infected by West Nile virus have no symptoms and do not become ill. Of those who do become ill, most will develop West Nile Virus Non-Neurological Syndrome, an illness with symptoms such as fever, headache, fatigue and body aches. This milder version of the infection usually clears up on its own. A less frequent but more serious infection may lead to West Nile neurological syndrome. People with pre-existing medical conditions and older adults are more at risk for severe illness. However, illness has occurred in all age groups. The website advises that anyone experiencing severe symptoms (ex: persistent high fever, muscle weakness, headache) should seek medical attention promptly for diagnosis and care. It also notes that there is no vaccine or specific treatment for West Nile virus.

MID-SUMMER l 2008

Gearing up for summer:


By Rebeca Kuropatwa

Be prepared for safe, fun lake swimming

ith approximately one lake for every ten people, Manitoba offers a lot of chances for swimmers to escape the summer heat with a dip in the water. But before you take the plunge, there are precautions to ensure a safe, as well as fun, summer. Manitobans really make great use of the summers and all that comes with them, says Minister of Water Stewardship, Christine Melnick. Go out and enjoy our 110, 000 lakes, but be reasonably cautious when you have a great time. The Province has a Clean Beaches program that monitors 60 beach areas between the months of May and September. We hire students to do the monitoring, says Melnick. They look out for things like the density of E. coli, algal blooms and the risk of swimmers itch. E. coli risk comes when human or animal feces (which contain Escherichia coli bacteria) get into the water. Swimmers can become infected if they accidentally swallow contaminated water. The result may be a nasty gastrointestinal infection. Swimmers itch is a temporary, itchy rash caused by small worm-like parasites. These worms are found in many lakes in the warm summer months. After a person leaves the water, microscopic worm larvae may start to burrow under their skin but they die soon after. Blue-green algal blooms are the result of bacteria that grow in shallow, warm and slow moving or still water. Every healthy lake contains algae, but too much of it may collect as scum. If you swim in contaminated water, you may get itchy and irritated eyes and skin, or worse. Swallowing enough algae-contaminated water can be harmful to the liver or nervous system. When the Province approves a monitored beach as safe, officials post a blue-coloured sign. If the lake fails inspection, they post a yellow-coloured sign. Melnick offers a short list of basic precautions when you go lake swimming: Towel-dry yourself well, clean up after your pets, and change diapers well away from the water and throw them in the garbage, along

with any other garbage. Dont swallow water and wash your hands after swimming. Once you are at the lake, watch for things such as broken glass or discarded cans not everyone cleans up after themselves. Also check for sharp rocks on the floor of the lake when you check to see how shallow the water is. And dont forget the basics of swimming skill. If youre not sure of yours, sign up for swimming lessons at your local pool. If you can find a lake area to swim in with an attending lifeguard, its all the better. And if you swim with a buddy, you can look out for each other and get help if needed. As an extra precaution, try to stay close to the shore. If you ever find yourself caught up in a current, dont try to swim against it. Swim at an angle to the current, towards land, so you can gradually ease out of it and return to the shore. When you are swimming where there are watercrafts, like boats or jet skis, stay clear of them. If they come too close, shout or wave your arms to let them know youre there. Finally, before heading out to your favourite beach area check the forecast, pack the sunscreen, and bring lots of water to drink. For more information on the Provinces lake safety programs, visit www. gov.mb.ca/waterstewardship/quality/beach_table.html or www.manitoba. ca/waterstewardship

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health



By Ian Tizzard

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SUMMER l 2008

What is restless leg syndrome?


By Christy Kim
Do you ever feel burning or itching inside your legs? Do you ever have uncomfortable spasm-like sensations inside your legs which you just cannot control? Do these sensations occur on a regular basis or cause discomfort to your daily life? These unusual symptoms are all ones experienced by people with restless leg syndrome. Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is known as a neurological disorder characterized by unpleasant sensations in the legs, and sometimes the arms. People with RLS often feel, not pain, but near-uncontrollable urges to move their legs for relief from feelings of burning, tugging or pins-and-needles, or spasm-like sensations. The sensations are usually worse at rest, especially when lying in bed. As a result, most people with RLS have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep. Left untreated, the condition causes exhaustion and daytime fatigue. Many people with RLS report that their exhaustion affects their job, personal relations, and activities of daily living. They cant concentrate, have impaired memory, or fail to accomplish daily tasks. Traveling long distances by car or plane can also constrict the ability to move the legs, bringing on leg cramps and worsening the symptoms. Severity of RLS symptoms ranges from mild to intolerable. RLS affects people of all ages and both genders, but mostly strikes at middle-age or later. Though RLS symptoms are usually quite mild in young adults, symptoms tend to gradually get worse over time in about two-thirds of people afflicted. RLS is often unrecognized or misdiagnosed. Some cases have lasted as long as 20 years before a doctor makes a diagnosis of RLS. Diagnosing children can be especially difficult since physicians rely heavily on a patients description of symptoms, which, given the nature of RLS symptoms, can be difficult for a child. Common misdiagnoses include attention deficit disorder and growing pains. Once correctly diagnosed, though, RLS can often be treated successfully. Physicians may choose from a variety of medications to help treat RLS symptoms, such as central nervous system depressants and anticonvulsants. Medications used to treat Parkinsons disease have also been shown to reduce RLS symptoms. For those with mild to moderate symptoms, prevention is a key. Many physicians suggest lifestyle and diet changes and activities to reduce continued symptoms. For example: -Decreased use of caffeine, alcohol, and tobacco seems to provide relief for some. -Physicians also suggest that certain individuals take supplements to correct deficiencies in iron, folate and magnesium. -Studies also have shown that maintaining a regular sleep pattern can reduce symptoms. -Some RLS patients find relief with hot baths, leg massages, heating pads or ice packs. -Exercise helps some RLS sufferers sleep better. Then again, exercise aggravates the symptoms in others. No therapy, treatment or drug completely eliminates symptoms, and what helps one can person make it worse for another. RLS remains a lifetime condition with no cure. People afflicted with RLS sometimes experience spontaneous improvement over a period of weeks or months, usually during the early stages of the disorder. Rarely, they experience spontaneous improvement over a period of years. But symptoms generally become more severe over time.

Through continued research, restless leg syndrome appears to be related to certain factors or conditions, although no evidence suggests that these factors cause RLS: -People with low iron levels or anemia may be prone to RLS. Iron supplements do reduce symptoms in some patients. -Chronic diseases such as kidney failure, diabetes, Parkinsons disease, and peripheral neuropathy have been associated with RLS. Sometimes treating those conditions leads to reduced RLS symptoms. -Certain medications such as anti-nausea drugs, anti-seizure drugs, anti-psychotic drugs and some cold and allergy medications may aggravate symptoms. RLS patients should talk with their physicians about any medication complications or changes.

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health



Coreit Stability 101: What is and why is it important.


By Donna Sarna

ore stability is a common term used in the fitness as well as rehabilitation world. Many of us have either been exposed to this term in our favourite health or fitness magazines or in our fitness classes and local running clubs. We may have even been exposed to the term through our medical professionals or trainers, in their efforts to encourage us to strengthen our core. But do we really know what the core is and why it is important? A stable core creates a solid base or foundation for efficient and effective movements of our arms and legs. It also allows us to transfer energy from our core to our extremities during higher level physical activities such as hitting a golf ball or serving a tennis ball. Good core stability can aid in maximizing athletic performance, preventing injury and allowing for participation in everyday activities. A series of muscles and their attachments to the spine, ribcage and pelvis establish core stability. These muscles can be divided into two sections, based upon their role. Inner core muscles primarily stabilize and support the spine and pelvis; outer core muscles lend support to the inner core as well as initiate the movement of the trunk and back. We often work the outer core muscles while participating in a fitness program, through

abdominal exercises like sit-ups, but we generally do not pay much attention to our inner core muscles. The inner core muscles are deep muscles and include the innermost abdominal muscle, the deep back spinal muscles, the diaphragm and muscles of the pelvic floor. These muscles, when healthy, work continuously in a coordinated fashion to provide the necessary postural and spinal support as we participate in everyday activities, whether we are shovelling snow, washing the dishes, or going for a run. We dont have to think about activating them; they are engaged automatically prior to a movement taking place. Nevertheless, the coordinated activation of these muscles can be affected by injury to the back or pelvic floor, poor or altered posture, pregnancy and even abdominal surgery. Injury or altered posture may result in changes to the activation pattern of the inner core muscles or cause differences in the amount of activation from one side to the other. The timing of the activation may also be affected, with the inner core engaging after the movement instead of in preparation for the movement. The brain may also have difficulties finding one or more of the muscles to activate them. Any of these situations will interfere with core stability and possibly lead to pain and dysfunction, affecting daily and sporting activity. While participating in a core strengthening program it is important to ensure that the inner core is engaged to support the spine, with the movement of the arms and legs utilized as a way to challenge the engaged core. If recovering from an injury, focusing on the inner core is even more important to regain the coordinated activation of the muscles necessary for a return to an active lifestyle



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Exercises to hit you at the core


Core exercises make almost everything easier, from sports to staying comfortable sitting down, and you only need a little padding on the floor to do them any time. Do an Internet search for core strengthening to find a wide variety of exercises designed for a strong midsection. And check with a doctor before starting a new exercise routine. These exercises come from the Mayo Clinic website, which suggests you start with five repetitions of each: Abdominal crunches: - Lie on your back and place your feet on a wall so that your knees and hips are bent at 90degree angles. Tighten your abdominal muscles. - Raise your head and shoulders off the floor. To avoid straining your neck, cross your arms on your chest rather than locking them behind your head. Hold for three deep breaths before returning to the start position. Back bridge: - Lie on your back with your knees bent. Keep your back in a neutral position, not arched and not pressed into the floor. Avoid tilting your hips. Tighten your abdominal muscles. - Raise your hips off the floor until your hips are aligned with your knees and shoulders. Hold for three deep breaths before returning to the start position. Single-leg abdominal press: - Lie on your back with your knees bent. Keep your back in a neutral position, not arched and not pressed into the floor. Avoid tilting your hips. Tighten your abdominal muscles. - Raise your right leg off the floor so that your knee and hip are bent at 90-degree angles. Rest your right hand on top of your right knee. - Push your hand against your knee while using your abdominal muscles to pull your knee toward your hand. Keep your arm straight. Hold for three deep breaths before returning to the start position. - Vary this with a hand reaching across to press the opposite knee, or with a double-leg press. Segmental rotation: - Lie on your back with your knees bent and your back in a neutral position, not arched and not pressed into the floor. Tighten your abdominal muscles. - Keeping your shoulders on the floor, let your knees fall slowly to the left. Go only as far as is comfortable. You should feel a stretch, but no pain. Hold for three deep breaths before returning to the start position. The side plank: - Lie on your left side, raising yourself onto your left forearm. Place your left shoulder directly above your left elbow, keeping your shoulders, hips and knees in alignment. Rest your right arm along the side of your body. - Tighten your abdominal muscles. Hold for three deep breaths. Repeat on your right side.

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health



Pelvic floor strength key to control.


By Mireille Theriault

or one out of every three women, just getting out of a car is cause for concern. A sneeze can be disastrous and a burst of laughter is no joke when she is compelled to race to a washroom for damage control. Maybe its because incontinence is so common, certainly not life threatening or even painful, that women are reluctant to seek treatment until it becomes more than a nuisance. Besides, isnt a little leakage a normal consequence of getting older, and as inevitable as stretch marks when it comes to pregnancy? Absolutely not, remarks physiotherapist Katie Dyck. There is so much that we can do about incontinence. Initially its a matter of assessing a womans pelvic floor muscles, educating her on how to locate those muscles, and then giving her the right exercises to strengthen them, says Katie. Physiotherapy can also use tools like biofeedback and electrical impulses to actually get the muscles working better if we need to. As a physiotherapist with DArcy Bain Physiotherapy in St. Vital, Katie is very enthusiastic about the Womens Health program she started this January. Having worked with women though their Physiofit Mom Pre- and Postnatal Fitness program, Katie realized there was a need to help women deal with this problem. Incontinence is now defined as any involuntary loss of urine, from one drop to complete bladder emptying. Leaking a little when you cough or sneeze, climb stairs or exercise is not normal, and it can be improved or corrected in most cases. And leaking is not necessarily a consequence of pregnancy, childbirth, aging or menopause, although these are considered risk factors for leaking, along with obesity, smoking, pelvic surgeries and certain neurological conditions such
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health



The Battle against Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS)


Dr. Luke Small, optometrist

he computer; the visual display terminal; the digital box; the ultimate filing cabinet the machine that makes many of us say: My eyes are killing me.

Over the last few decades, our dependence on the computer has taken a dramatic upswing and often results in what has been coined computer vision syndrome, or CVS. More and more of my own patients are stating that their computer use ranges from four hours in many cases and up to 16 hours per day in extreme cases. After twenty years of using computers extensively, we now know that there arent any long term effects in terms of radiation or eye damage. However, its the short-term effects that cause so many problems: eyestrain, headaches, light sensitivity, squinting, blurred distance vision and near vision, not to mention dry, irritated, burning and sometimes painful eyes. Some of us have been fortunate enough to have consulted with someone specializing in the physical ergonomics of our workspace set up studies have shown that only 20 per cent of daily computer users suffer from carpal tunnel syndrome. Yet almost 80 per cent of those same people suffer from symptoms relating to CVS. Studies have shown that visual fatigue will result in a loss of productivity, increased error rate, and decreased job satisfaction. Baseline eye exam Fixing or minimizing CVS is all done with prevention in mind. Bad habits need to be addressed and good ones need to be maintained. One of the first items that need to be addressed in this battle against CVS is a regular eye exam with your optometrist. A baseline ocular health assessment that determines your refractive error (eye glass prescription) is half the battle. I cant tell you how many patients come in with complaints of years of computer eyestrain only to realize that they have astigmatism (irregular shaped eyeball) or that one eye has a different prescription than the other. Often, getting those patients a new glasses prescription can make all of the difference. But these problems compound as we get closer to 50, since the computer is often sitting at what we call an intermediate distance. Anything beyond our arms reach is considered distance vision and anything within roughly within 40 cm is considered near vision. With a computer screen

in between near and far, patients close to 50 years of age sometimes face the fact that they need three different prescriptions to meet all of their visual needs. Depending on how often that person is using a computer, I am recommending what we call an occupational lens more and more. Progressive lenses (no-line bifocals or multifocals) dont always cut it and an occupational computer lens has answered the call for many people who look at a computer for long periods since they have a large intermediate zone that helps eyes focus at a computer distance. Finally a good anti-reflective coating on your glasses is something I recommend to everyone who wears glasses at a computer. Eye breaks and blinking Besides corrective lenses, I also suggest guidelines to help you get through your workday with less eye fatigue. Probably the biggest and most important tip that I emphasize is the 20-20-20 rule. That is, you should look 20 feet away every 20 minutes for 20 seconds. This gives the focusing muscles in your eyes a break. My second rule is a reminder to blink. Many studies have shown that a persons blink rate decreases dramatically when they are in front of computer. Get a sticky note right now and write down 20-20-20 rule and blink and stick it your monitor. A good artificial tear recommended by your eye care professional will also help to alleviate the sandy, gritty and burning eyes many of us encounter on a daily basis. I find my patients usually dont use these enough, out of concern that they will become addicted to these lubricating eye drops. Your eyes will not become addicted to true lubricating drops. Keep some near your

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computer and use them before your eyes start to burn. If your eyes continue to dry out, you may have an underlying problem of dry eye syndrome. See your eye care professional if compliant artificial tear use isnt helping. Monitor height and distance The distance and height at which your computer sits is important, too. Ideally it should be at least more than arms length away and you should be able to just look over the top of the monitor when you are looking straight ahead. With the monitor set higher than that, your eyelids are forced up. More of the ocular surface shows, and that increases the chance they will dry out. Lighting and glare The lighting in your office can be crucial. Ideally, an office window should be to your side or behind you. Having a window directly behind your monitor (in front of you) increases glare and causes more squinting that often results in headaches. Increasing the contrast on the monitor and keeping the lights (and especially fluorescent lights) to a lower setting will also help. Tasks lamps are great and should be used to highlight your reading material and not pointed towards the computer screen.

Relieving CVS
Sit at least arms length away from your monitor Set your monitor at a height where you just see over top of it in straight ahead gaze Increase the contrast on your screen and avoid direct lights at the screen Use a task lamp to highlight your reading material Keep windows to the side or behind you in relation to your work station If you use glasses, have a good quality anti-reflective/anti-glare coating Follow the 20-20-20 Rule and remember to blink See an optometrist for a baseline ocular health assessment

Dr. Small is in private practice at Armstrong and Small Eye Care Centre located at 1140 Portage Ave. Hes a third generation optometrist proud to carry on the family tradition that started more than 90 years ago. Contact him with any eye-related questions at drlukesmall@mts.net

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Big goals for advanced health care


By Ian Tizzard

Health Sciences Foundation meets big targets to fund innovation

ally Flintoft is no stranger to large amounts of money. The Health Sciences Centre Foundation (HSCF) president and chief executive officer oversees millions of dollars a year collected in support of the Health Sciences Centre (HSC).

$100,000 here and $35,000 there. When looking at collecting millions, every penny counts for the HSCF, and the foundation has taken part in many events already this year. For example, in April, the Womens Health and Lifestyle Weekend let 80 women enjoy spa treatments and a night out at the Fort Garry Hotel to raise money for breast reconstructive surgery research; the Keeping Abreast event raised $100,000 for breast cancer research in May; and the first annual HOPE Classic Golf Tournament sold out long before deadline, raising money in June for the Kleysen Centre. With summer in full swing, the HSCF plans yet more events. In July, look for news about the third annual Pearls of Life Golf Tournament, which raises money for the most common forms of cancer; the Mondetta Charity Classic Golf Tournament will give half of its August 5 proceeds to the HSCF; and coming up in September, the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 832 Golf Classic offers half of its proceeds to the HSCs leukemia and lymphoma wards. Flintoft says she especially looks forward to the annual Laureate Award of Excellence gala dinner in September, and the HSCF will round out this years efforts with the annual Gift of Hope Radioathon, broadcasting on CJOB 68 on November 6. With Flintoft challenged to tell people just how their help can be used, the radioathon may be the most crucial of the years events, giving listeners a day to hear stories from people whove directly benefited from care received at the HSC. If you have one to tell, the foundations communications department wants to hear it. Call Carol Dynkavitch there, at 787-1301 or send her e-mail at cdynkavitch@hsc.mb.ca. For contact information related to the HSCF events coming up, go online to: www.hscfoundation.mb.ca/events.asp You can learn about other ways to give, through legacy gifts or online donations, at: www.hscfoundation.mb.ca/donations.asp

Flintoft explains that the HSCF is the primary accepter of philanthropic funding that the HSC gets they handle all the donations. In just over 25 years of supporting the hospital, the HSCF has raised over $75 million. Flintoft and her team recently achieved one huge funding goal, but they have other goals still challenging them. Were in a position of privilege everybody knows of the Health Sciences Centre, Flintoft admits. But its such a huge place, and we put a lot of work into helping people understand the great scope and extent of the work done here. Its a challenge in terms of explaining to people where they can make an impact. The HSCFs annual grants program remains a cornerstone of the foundations funding, allowing researchers to explore new ways and ideas to keep us healthy. In the 2006-07 year the HSCF issued $500,000 to 25 different projects, covering topics such as mental health, liver cancer, asthma and brain aneurysms. But advanced health care is much more expensive than that, and the foundation faces big targets. For example, the Health Sciences Centre needed $25 million towards building the Siemens Institute for Advanced Medicine. Philanthropy and government funding helped the hospital reach that goal this year, but as the huge new facility gets built Flintoft says the hospital needs another $12 million to make the surgical research centre fully operational. (The Siemens Centre will focus on neurosurgery innovation, including the current ORs of the Future program three operating rooms and the bioengineering capacity to develop new surgical instruments as well as the new Kleysen Centre for Surgical Innovation, where the HSC will train new surgeons and test new equipment and procedures.) Surgeons at the HSC have been among the first to help. Members of the hospitals surgery division recently pooled significant donations towards ORs of the Future. Flintoft wont say exactly how much the surgeons gave, saying instead its in the very high six figures. Among the general public, Flintoft says the HSCFs big profile projects have had a positive response. In fact, in their first year running a big-prize lottery, the HSCF topped most of the lottery competition in terms of prize value and the speed of ticket sales. People eager to win a house (among other things) snatched up almost 55,000 tickets only 26 days after they went on sale. It was so fantastic, says Flintoft. The key to the successful fundraising seems to be in presenting many events that each produce impressive, but relatively small, amounts of money say

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Health requires balance


helps me keep my back in shape for days of leaning over my patients. Yoga goes beyond physical benefits and into the mind and soul. Its hard to be in the moment with the busy lives we lead, but I find yoga helps a lot. Hockey. I play the sieve position in a friendly hockey league. Though Im not the best goaltender, the game is great for fitness and camaraderie. If you have to travel, dont neglect fitness on the road. Most hotels have a terrific fitness facility. Fill-up on high-grade best fuel You are what you eat, which makes it easy to become saturated and fat if youre not careful. There are always temptations to skip breakfast, eat fast food, and binge on junk. Its harder still if you find yourself eating out a lot, but I follow a few easy rules. Read up on simple, healthy recipes. I find lots of them in health and lifestyle magazines. Take care to notice portion sizes, especially when you cant control them. At many restaurants, I find soup and an appetizer are plenty to satisfy my hunger. Read labels, choose fresh over processed, avoid dessert, and set a good example for your kids. Mind your vices. Drink alcohol in moderation and if you smoke Come on. With what we know about that poison? Quit now. Relax This is an important one, yet one we all seem to have trouble with. You need the time to attend to things that mater most, but time easily slips away and is gone for good. For me, it comes down to time management. I make lists and dedicate one late night at work a week to make sure I stay on top of the things I have to do. That way, Im sure to have time for no one but me and my loved ones.

Who better to give advice on a rounded, healthy life than someone who has one? Dr. R. Bruce McFarlane independently runs an orthodontic clinic on Taylor Avenue with eight employees. He coaches his kids sports teams, and acts as mentor to aspiring students and other orthodontists, traveling around North America to teach. Counting other occupations such as karaoke star, sportsman and lifelong student, he manages to keep it all together. His McFarlaneisms make good tips for anyone who feels the need to settle the scales in their own balance of wellness. Heres what he has to offer: Health starts with family A persons toughest balancing act is often between work and family, but healthy families take work, too. Get involved. Kids grow up too fast to not get involved in their lives. Whatever your kids do, get involved as a coach or by giving help in some way. It keeps you in touch with their lives and keeps them motivated to stay active. It can help you, too in your personal life. Other volunteering parents can become business or social contacts. Avoid time wasters. Television and the Internet must be the two biggest time-suckers of the modern age. Avoid them by making sure your TV internet use is actually useful. Involve your family with your own life. Take the kids to work if you can. If you make business trips, bring them along once in a while. I get my kids to work in my office, which gives them a sense of what my life involves. We have a stronger bond because of it. Stay fit. Fitness has to be a big part of your life. It helps with the endurance and drive necessary to keep functioning at a high level. These are some of my favorites: Pilates is a great workout, excellent for strength and flexibility. And it

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A harvest of good will needs your help

Harvest faces a constant challenge feeding the poor


By Ian Tizzard allowances.) Cook took the challenge this year and burdened herself with a month-long commitment, instead of the suggested week. A week didnt seem long enough, says Cook, adding that a week will be plenty of time next year. You have to strategize everything. Its very tiring, says Cook, who kept a blog recounting her experiences. Near the end of her month of selfimposed poverty, she wrote I am exhausted, and I feel like no matter how hard I try, my dignity and self esteem are always on the line. Now, imagine that feeling when theres no guarantee it will end in a week or four weeks. In order to give help, Winnipeg Harvest, too, needs all the help it can get. We understand the pressure our clients are under, says Northcott. We have no guaranteed money and its a daily challenge to get people fed. Harvest is on the same edge that many of our client families are on. It takes a collective of people to make this happen, he adds. Many people who use a food bank help out at them. Other volunteers come on their own, or from schools, church groups and community clubs. Cook says that besides the benefits of helping a good cause, the company alone makes volunteering worthwhile. Theres no pretension at a food bank, she says. We check everything at the door. Its probably the most genuine place Ive ever stepped into. Northcott says volunteer work equates to about 125 full-time employees a day, but they could always use more. A page at the Winnipeg Harvest website explains how to donate money, food, goods including pallet jacks and cardboard boxes, and time. Give us a call, says Northcott. Well be happy to put you to work. To find out more about Winnipeg Harvest and how you can help them in their efforts, see their website at: www.winnipegharvest.org, or call 9823660 (1-800-970-5559 outside Winnipeg). To read about Shelley Cooks experience on her extended version of the Poverty Challenge, go to: thepovertychallenge.blogspot.com

You never know who might need the services of a food bank. Shelley Cooks family needed one once in a while when she was a kid, and she never even knew it. Later, as a full-time student and part-time wage earner, she sometimes went without food rather than visit one herself. Self-sufficient now, she volunteers at Winnipeg Harvest remembering the feelings of shame that too many of the poor feel when they cant make ends meet. I cant say how many there are, she says, but Im certain there are many more people who need food banks than people who use them. Thats a shocking notion to consider, given the nearly 40,000 people that Winnipeg Harvest helps to feed every month. Anyone making a confidential call to Winnipeg Harvest can make an appointment to visit one of the local food banks that Harvest supports in and around Winnipeg. Depending on how many people there are in the calling household, the caller arranges to pick up a food kit good for two to three days. Callers can arrange for a visit once every two weeks. Winnipeg Harvest executive coordinator David Northcott suggests readers imagine living off the proceeds of a full-time minimum wage job, providing only about $17,000 a year. Worse yet, how do you live on welfare, which provides about $5600 per person per year? People talk about getting rid of the penny, says Northcott. They say we dont need it, that its just a nuisance. But other people literally count every penny they have and still end up with less than they need to survive. Because of the debilitating pressure they face, Northcott says that expecting the poor to affect change for themselves amounts to pure ignorance. People think the poor must have done something wrong to become poor, he says. But its usually a circumstance of birth or chance. Sometimes its the result of a bad choice, but no one wants to be poor. We need to affect change from the wealthy. To give the wealthy (or, at least, the relatively wealthy) a chance to experience a life of poverty, every June Winnipeg Harvest organizes a week-long Poverty Challenge, a sort of starvation marathon when participants are told to spend no more than $6.50 a day for food and clothing. (They determined the amount based on current rates of assistance available to single, non-disabled welfare recipients, not including housing
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How much is gambling worth to you?


Manitoba Lotteries Corporation wants you to know how gambling works

By Ian Tizzard

irst off, gambling is entertainment that you pay for. You may pay a little, or you may lose everything you have. How much you pay is up to you, but help is available if you need help to play less or stop altogether.

For another example of how the MLC can help, the voluntary exclusion program can let gamblers, in effect, ban themselves from the casinos. The program includes participants leaving their picture with security at the casinos. If they come in within two years, they will be asked to leave. You might think youre generally lucky, but casinos have nothing to do with luck. The house stays in business by keeping a percentage of all the money you put on a table or drop in a machine. The only thing not left to chance is the houses odds on making money always better than yours.

Bev Mehmed, director of responsible gaming programs and research for Manitoba Lotteries Corporation (MLC), makes no pretense about games of chance as a gambler, you are being entertained and you are paying for it, even including the occasional win. Mehmed can tell you about short-term volatility and long-term predictability, or the principle of randomness but shed sound like a mathematician and people generally glaze over. The main thing, she says, is useable and understandable information about how gambling works. Considering its role as the house, the MLC makes considerable efforts to keep gambling in check. Its relationship with the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba led to the first casino kiosks in Canada that told gamblers detailed information about the odds against them. As the house operator, we gain from their involvement, says Mehmed. They bring a unique perspective to us. The recent MLC ad campaign hit television, print and radio with messages based on two themes. One spread information about Responsible Gaming Information Centres (at the casinos, lottery ticket centres and VLT sites), where people can learn about odds, randomness and house edge. The other publicized AFM treatment and awareness programs for problem gambling, which the MLC funds with $3 million a year. Mehmed says the Responsible Gaming Information Centres at the casinos are staffed by AFM people with information about gambling available to players. Kiosks there with touch-screen displays tell players such things as where to turn for help with problem gambling, while it explains risk level and lets players use a cost-per-play calculator to measure how much they can expect to spend gambling. The same information is also available at the AFM website, www. getgamblingfacts.ca. When it comes to problem gambling, Mehmed says people need to make their own decisions about getting help. I think people realize it, but they need urging to make the necessary changes.

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Pay a reasonable price


These lists of reminders about gambling come from the Manitoba Lotteries Corporation website: Tips to Keep Gambling Fun Play for entertainment, not to make money. As with all forms of entertainment, there is a cost involved. The more you play, the more you pay. Set a budget and stick to it. Before you start playing, set a limit on how much you want to spend. If you do this before you play, youll be more likely to stop once youve spent your budgeted amount. Learn as much as you can about the games you play. This will give you a realistic idea of your odds of winning. Use money you can afford to spend. Dont use money intended for everyday expenses, or borrow money to gamble. Keep track of your spending over time. This will give you a realistic idea of the cost of your play and whether or not this is affordable entertainment for you. Signs of Problem Gambling Spending more time or money on gambling than is affordable or planned Borrowing money to gamble Gambling with money meant for essentials like food or rent Neglecting important responsibilities like work, school, or family to gamble Lying about the extent of gambling Chasing losses to try and get money back Increasing arguments with friends and family, especially about money issues Increasing debts due to gambling Making a call for help Gamblers alone are responsible for acting to curb or quit their habit, but the Manitoba Lotteries Corporation and the Addictions Foundation of Manitoba make efforts to help. They these sources if you are concerned about your own gambling or the gambling of someone you know: -the AFM Problem Gambling Helpline receives about 300 calls a month at 1-800-463-1554 -Shift managers at Winnipegs casinos receive AFM training in order to help, and you can call one at Club Regent (957-2500 ext. 3798) or McPhillips Street Station (957-2500 ext. 1427). -The casinos also both have a Responsible Gaming Information Centre, staffed by the AFM. Call 9851240 for the one at McPhillips Street Station, or 985-0419 for the one at Club Regent. -The AFM website has a section on gambling that you can visit at: www.afm.mb.ca/Services/ gambling.htm
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Solace at the Solstice


Elkhorn Lodge Spa complements natural beauty
By Ian Tizzard

rov i n c e - w i d e , people know the Elkhorn Resorts reputation as an eventful, yet peaceful, getaway spot. At any time of the year, nature-lovers flock there to bike, hike, bird watch, swim, go horseback riding or just bask in the natural beauty of Manitobas parkland region. But besides the outdoor amenities on site and near the resort, Elkhorn offers temptations that might just leave you satisfied never stepping outside the doors once youre there. Take the case of this magazines sales team, general manager Mary Susan Staton and associate Sherry Frechette. Offered a couple of rooms and some time at the resorts Solstice Spa a few weekends ago, they arrived and hardly spent a moment outside. That doesnt really surprise spa director Breanna Hall. The treatments and sessions are designed to take you to a complete sense of relaxation, says Hall. It ties in to the sense of escape throughout the lodge. Staton and Frechette say they felt nearly overwhelmed, looking over the spas brochure, packed with more than 30 treatment choices. They left it up to Hall to make suggestions for them, something Hall and her staff does quite often. Theyre very attentive and sensitive to what people are looking for, says Staton, to quick agreement from Frechette. Absolutely, says Frechette. Right away, they got a really good feel for us and made great choices on our behalf. And they do an excellent job explaining what the treatments are about, before you go in and while you have them.

Staton took advantage of the Sea Breeze facial, the Clear Lake Cleanse and the Canadian Prairie Mud Wrap (opting to add-in the Vichy shower). Frechette also had a Sea Breeze facial along with a Guided Energy Reiki session, the Scents of the Earth session, and a Raindrop Therapy session. Spa staff giving treatments include a naturopathic doctor, an intuitive healer, Reiki masters, massage therapists, an esthetician and a reflexologist.

After some serious pondering, Frechette picks the Guided Energy session as her favorite part of the weekend. There was such good energy like a spiritual experience and so cleansing. I could feel the physical tension aches and soreness leaving my body. But more than that, I could feel conflicts being taken away for a while. I actually started crying, it was such a relief. In between treatments, in the spa lounging area, the two workmates enjoyed their fill of refreshing cucumber water, teas and muffins. Its a decadent experience, so nurturing, says Staton, who especially liked the mud wrap. It feels like youre being preserved, she says, laughing. At the spa, Frechette had to calm down the boisterous Staton more than once. They like to encourage a quiet atmosphere, says Staton. But I couldnt stop raving about how great I felt there. The pain in my shins and calves went away. It was very therapeutic. I cant begin to tell you how awesome it was, says Staton. And its not just in the spa. You can take a serene walk in the woods and return to fast Internet service in the room for your laptop. The Mountain Grill restaurant helped keep the pair inside, too, where they had pan-fried Manitoba pickerel and the maple chicken and rib combo for dinner the first day, and whole-wheat Saskatoon cakes and homemade banana bread French toast for breakfast the next day. I still cant get over the beauty of the nature there, says Staton. Soon after I got there, I looked out the window and saw a pair of beautiful colts over at the Triangle Ranch thats near the resort. I think that moment, for me, sums up my whole time there. What an escape it was. Ill remember it for years.

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In all, the Solstice Spa offers more than 30 treatments. Choose them separately, or pick from one of the nine Peace of Nature packages that bundle certain treatments to make choosing easier. After all, this is not the kind of place where they encourage any kind of stress. They also offer a selection of five signature treatments, new this year, some named for the local region, like the Wasagaming Ritual and the Riding Mountain Revival. The signature treatments exemplify the spa, says Hall. They provide a complete Solstice experience. Following are descriptions of the treatments the magazines sales team got to experience. For a complete list of treatments and sessions Solstice Spa offers, visit the spa website at www.elkhornresort.mb.ca/spa.php. Sea Breeze Facial. This 45-minute treatment combines organic wild seaweeds and pure organic essential oils to firm the skin, reduce toxic build up, and improve tone and texture. Clear Lake Cleanse. This full-body detoxifying treatment in a 90-minute session combines a Manitoba-inspired wheat germ exfoliation and a massage oil application along with a heated body wrap infused with essential oils from rosehip (which local Aboriginals traditionally used for colds and fevers) and juniper berry (traditionally used for asthma, kidneys, or as a cure all medicine). Both those plants grow wild in the forests of Riding Mountain National Park Elkhorn Resort. Massage and reflexology enhance the ritual. Canadian Prairie Mud Wrap. This 75-minute session helps people shed impurities and toxins, which are drawn out by a coating of mineral-rich mud from deep within the Canadian Prairies. Guided Energy Session. Allow yourself to experience a whole new kind of healing with physical, emotional and spiritual shifts enabling your body to heal itself. This 105-minute session uses the ancient arts of Reiki and laying on hands to tap into the cellular memory of wellness, thereby opening, cleansing and balancing the bodys energy centers. In 30- or 60-minute sessions Reiki energy encourages the body back to a natural state of well being. Scents of the Earth. In 90 minutes, this session gives a full-body aromatherapy experience that begins with an invigorating hydrotherapy tub treatment. Complete aromatherapy oil application follows, with pure essential oils chosen to enhance strength, comfort, sensitivity, harmony and peace. It ends with a hot towel body wrap and scalp massage.

continued on page 62

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When anxiety turns against you


By Ian Tizzard

eople all feel the effects of anxiety, to greater or lesser degrees, most likely on a daily basis. Without the occasional bout of fretful worry, wed find it hard to cope. Healthy anxiety helps you get things done, says Winnipeg psychiatrist Dr. Jitender Sareen. It helps you meet deadlines, it motivates people. But imagine how hard it would be to cope if the anxiety never went away. Or if it came so fast and powerful that it scared you senseless. Sareen says people cross the line between healthy anxiety and an anxiety disorder when anxiety disrupts their life in a significant way. People usually notice the disruption on their own and assessments are made based on physician interviews. Sareen says the family doctor is usually the first and sometimes the last to treat it. Family doctors do a good job of treating anxiety in Manitoba,

he says. Beyond general practitioners, psychologists or psychiatrists may also help. Treatments include medication such as anti-depressants, which have been found to be helpful for people with anxiety disorders. Cognitive behavior therapy (which addresses patterns in thought and behavior) also has positive effects for many people suffering anxiety disorders. Initially, the patient and therapist identify thoughts and thought patterns that cause anxiety and then challenge those thoughts. The behavioral aspect involves challenging the patient through a gradual process called exposure to confront situations, sensations and thoughts that he or she now avoids out of fear. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada publication, A Report on Mental Illness, various theories describe a mix of genetic and environmental factors that may cause anxiety disorders. For example, people may learn fear from a traumatic situation or from over-protective parents, or they may inherit a

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The range extreme anxiety takes predisposition to anxiety disorders. Either way or both ways, children of adults with anxiety disorders have a greater risk than general population. Despite the associated reluctance of many people to face the extent of their fear, Sareen says that over a lifetime up to one in seven Canadians may experience the effects of an anxiety disorder. He says early help is best. Left untreated, the chances of managing or recovering from symptoms dwindles. Incidentally, Sareen says anxiety disorder is itself a risk factor for future depression or substance abuse treatment as soon as its needed improves life now and years from now.

According to a range of sources, anxiety disorders cover six specific disorders. Social phobia: This is described by the Canadian Mental Health Association as a paralyzing, irrational self-consciousness about social situationsso extreme that people with social phobia tend to avoid objects or situations that might stimulate that fear, which dramatically reduces their ability to lead a normal life. Post-traumatic stress disorder: Flashbacks, nightmares and other symptoms may without warning affect survivors of rape, war or another terrifying experience that involved physical harm or threat. Panic disorder: Someone experiencing a panic attack wants to flee, and may feel such symptoms as heart palpitations, chills or hot flashes, dizziness, queasiness, shortness of breath, and a feeling of sudden terror. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: Intrusive and distressing thoughts make up the obsessive part. The obsessions may be accompanied by compulsions in response, which may or may not be logically connected to the obsession. Patients feel unable to control either. Specific phobias: Many people are scared of various things, but phobias are marked by overwhelming or unreasonable fears a fear of cars to the point of never going in one, or a fear of open spaces, for example. Generalized anxiety disorder: Nausea, tension and chest pain may accompany unspecific fears in this disorder. People with generalized anxiety disorder cant explain why they feel fretful, scared or anxious, but they feel that way more often than not.

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A new healthy eating alternative downtown


By Jason Hasselmann

astry Castle Bakery and Caf is a breath of fresh air when it comes to healthy eating in Winnipegs Exchange District. Opened in 2007, the open space bakery and caf offers a variety of fresh and healthy choices on the menu for people conscious about their diet and where their food is made.

Daniel Arbrehem and Rica Roque run Pastry Castle at 237 McDermot Avenue, and Abrehem, a trained bakery chef, says that healthy choices are a priority for the restaurant. It all starts with a clean kitchen, he says. For us it is important that we keep a healthy environment when food is being prepared. The restaurant is inviting and very clean. Windows run the length of the caf which provides generous natural light. Tables of various sizes and shapes adorn the interior with grey tile flooring accenting the soft green coloured table tops. Couches there invite customers to stay for a more relaxing visit, and the caf also has a large patio incorporating the use of cobblestone that is synonymous with the Exchange District. Everything we serve is made fresh daily on the premises, says Abrehem. The restaurant bakes its own bread, muffins, pastries and desserts on site. Freshly baked desserts and organic baked goods such as cinnamon buns, bread and croissants all look delicious. And we use fresh peppers, fresh vegetables and fresh bread in all our sandwiches, he adds, explaining his and Roques idea of giving people in the Exchange District an alternative when it comes to choosing a location for a healthy and tasty breakfast, lunch or dinner. Before immigrating to Canada in 1994, Abrehem lived in Greece for five years as a baker and chef. The influence can be seen in the food available. One of Abrehems favorite items on the menus is the spanakopita, one of three daily specials available at the caf. Spanakopita is a Greek pastry with a filling of spinach, feta cheese, green onions, egg, and seasoning between layers of phyllo pastry drizzled with virgin olive oil. It is in the way you prepare the onions, says a smiling Abrehem, careful to not divulge too much information. Counter service is friendly and a blackboard menu is clearly visible, listing the variety of sandwiches, soups and salads to order. Sandwiches with names like Sunken Treasure, The King, and Queens Garden can be had for around $6. Salads called Caesars Palace, Exotic Kingdom and Greek Princess have similar prices. Abrehem says providing people with a healthy and fresh alternative is what Pastry Castle Bakery and Caf is all about. For example, they use only virgin olive oil to make their salads and sandwich fillings. I dont have my own kids, so this is a way for me to make sure others are eating healthy, says Abrehem. The caf and bakery is open from 9 am to 10 pm Monday through Thursday, 9 am to 11 pm on Saturdays and from 9 am to 6 pm on Sundays.

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Egg Salad Pitas


5 hard-cooked eggs, peeled cup cottage cheese 1% M.F. (125 mL) cup each chopped red pepper and celery 2 tbsp finely chopped green onions 1 tbsp each light mayonnaise and sweet relish Salt and pepper 2 whole wheat pita breads Curly lettuce

Taste of the Month

In large bowl, using a pastry blender or a fork, coarsely chop or mash eggs. Stir in cottage cheese, red pepper, celery, green onions, mayonnaise and relish; mix well. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Cut each pita bread in half and line each pocket with lettuce leaf. Fill with egg salad mixture, about cup (125 mL) in each pocket. Tip: Keep a supply of hard-cooked eggs in your refrigerator for a meal on the run. Hard-cooked eggs can be kept in the fridge for one full week.

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St. Amant Centre

adds to the richness of life


By Ian Tizzard

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evelopmental disabilities and autism once meant a life sentence for many people who had them. Institutions with horrifying conditions and government-mandated sterilization are not that far back in our history. But since the values of family and community support for these people began to take hold, children, women and men who once would have been ignored and neglected can live their lives as fully as possible. In Winnipeg, St. Amant Centre is responsible for a great deal of the help received by families and individuals affected by developmental disorders or autism. From his office at the St. Amant Campus, on St. Vitals River Road, Dr. Carl Stephens, explains the extent of services and programs he oversees, including group homes, a day care, a school, an individualized care home and a research centre. Theres always a big challenge for people with developmental

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disabilities, says Stephens, the president and chief executive officer of St. Amant Centre. They have complex needs, and we build long-term relationships with people. The benefits of people sharing time with others they care about take precedence at St. Amant. We place a high value on family and community life, and we prefer seeing support given in families and communities, says Stephens. Though the centres River Road Place attends to over 200 children and adults around the clock with individualized care and developmental services, the people there represent a small portion of the population with a developmental disability. (A developmental disability) affects about three per cent of the population, says Stephens. But well under five per cent of that number have severe needs, he adds, emphasizing that most people with a developmental disability are capable, with the right support, of living with a measure of independence and self-determination. In fact, St. Amants services affect over 1000 families throughout Manitoba. For example, St. Amant runs a community residential program that maintains 45 group homes staffed with support workers. Relationships with foster families, too, helps 160 people live as independently as possible.

And the Applied Behavior Analysis pre-school program provides autistic children with 31 hours a week of in-home, one-on-one teaching for three years. Parents are trained to deliver another five hours a week of instruction. Were driven by families needing a normal life pattern, says Stephens, noting that St. Amant is at work on a similar program for school-aged kids. Other programs include clinical supports through physiotherapy or speech therapy, and a respite program that allows family-member caregivers a break from their trying responsibilities. Everybody who lives experiences life, says Stephens. We want to allow people the richest life possible. Nevertheless, funding for St. Amants programs and services continues to be a challenge. The needs of the people we help dont always rise to the top among competing interests, says Stephens. This years funding efforts included participation in the Frontier Toyota Charity Golf Classic, the annual Miles of Smile walkathon, and a lottery that sent four people to see Miley Cyrus perform in Provo, Utah. Coming up, on October 2, the St. Amant Foundation will be hosting An Evening in the Vinyard at the Bergmanns on Lombard event centre. To find out more about that, or to make a donation directly, call the St. Amant Centre Foundation at 258-7052.

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If health begins in the home, what about the homeless?

Winnipeg health care centre attends to health needs of the most needy
By Ian Tizzard

ven with the guaranteed medical care we often take for granted, the idea of the time and resources to pursue a healthy lifestyle remains a luxury denied to many of our fellow citizens. The Saul Sair Health Centre, located in Siloam Mission on the rougher end of Princess Street in downtown Winnipeg, helps change that. The centre tends to a variety of health issues faced by the homeless and near-homeless, with the intent of building constructive relationships based on generous and attentive health care. The centres dental program coordinator, Kari Enns, says the key to the centres success lies in accessibility. Were on their turf, she says. Health care is different for the homeless theyre on the streets all day long, and health care can fall to the bottom on the list of priorities when you dont even know where your next meal is coming from. The centre opened last August thanks to a $1 million gift from the estate of Saul Sair, a Winnipeg pharmacist who died in 2003. Amenities there include three examination rooms one has eye-testing apparatus a lab for blood test work, and a room dedicated to dental care. This is my area, says Enns, standing next to a reclining dentists chair. We perform everything from basic checkups to cleaning and emergency care.

She explains that money for the major equipment such as the chair and lead-lined cabinets came from various grants and donations. Everyday supplies come from manufacturers in the industry. The same reliance on good will runs the whole clinic and the rest of Siloam Mission, which relies on private funding for about 96 per cent of its expenses. As a result, the clinic welcomes volunteers from the medical community, including podiatrists, chiropractors, dentists, optometrists and general practitioners. The clinic sees up to 40 patients a day between medical and dental services. Some of the patients dont have health cards, says Enns, but no one gets turned away. If we werent here, where would they go? Enns stresses that education makes up a large part of what the clinic provides. The acute care we give builds a basis for a relationship geared towards transition, and when you educate you empower. To that end, the clinic uses a small conference room at the end of the hallway to host well-attended information sessions that cover topics such as diabetes, sexually transmitted infections and hepatitis. This place opened my eyes about homelessness, says Enns. I was one of the ones who wondered why they werent working. But they face so many barriers mental illness, learning disabilities, circumstance. None of them chose to be here; theyre people just like you and me.

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Enns says the clinic gets referrals and works closely with the other services at Siloam Mission, which is almost entirely privately funded (96 per cent). Front-end services at Siloam include the Mission: Off the Street Team, which provides work experience and a paycheque; a busy daytime drop-in centre; the Hannahs Place 100-bed emergency shelter; a clothing outlet where people can find a complete outfit from shirt to socks; and a kitchen that served 18,971 meals in May. Siloam Mission is glad to take donations of money, time, clothes and food. Call their donation services line at 1-866-648-HOPE (4673).

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pelvic floor strength from page 38

as stroke and multiple sclerosis. Katie is emphatic about the importance of looking beyond the immediate nuisance. The important thing to realize is that it is not just an embarrassment. Incontinence caused by weak muscles stands to worsen as time goes on, she says. Pelvic floor dysfunction also contributes greatly, or can be the cause, behind hip and lower back pain that can respond very well to physiotherapy and proper exercises without drugs or anything more invasive than a simple examination. Katie also stresses that treating the cause of the incontinence not only provides peace of mind, but can improve the quality of life by giving women the confidence to pursue physical activities they may have put aside. Did you know that incontinence is the number one reason women stop exercising? she asks. Besides which, the pelvic floor muscles are an integral part of our core muscles that include our abdominals and back muscles. They all need to be strong in order to provide the stability and flexibility to keep our posture straight and avoid injury. Treating incontinence is a natural progression from the very popular Physiofit Mom classes that Katie offers through the DArcy Bain clinic at 4-827 Dakota Street as well as at the clinic of her partner, physiotherapist Denise Colburn at the 100-2200 McPhillips Street. The pre- and post-natal classes truly go from belly, to baby and beyond as women learn exercises best suited to enhancing muscle tone in the pelvic floor to help them prior to pregnancy through to managing pain during delivery and paving the way to a quicker recovery after.
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Solstice from page 51


Raindrop Therapy. Solstice Spa uses therapeutic-grade plant essential oils dripped along the spine, along with reflexology and relaxing fingertip massage. The 75-minute session helps support natural healing, relieves back pain and improves balance of the bodys vital energy centers. Celestial Cycle. This is a 30-minute facial treatment that helps eliminate toxins from the body and maintains healthy skin, while it treats guests to a full-body massage. An esthetician tends to your face, using Methode Physiodermie products developed in Switzerland. This line of products uses the highest quality and concentration of active plant and essential oils in a time diffused system. They penetrate the skin and are released at the deepest layer of skin where they are needed. Meanwhile, your body relaxes in the hot vibration of the spas Alpha Massage Capsule.

Exfoliation Tips from the Solstice Spa


Exfoliation is a wonderful way to start your path to wellness at home or in the spa setting. Many of the treatments you can enjoy in a spa begin with a full body exfoliation. Using one of a variety of techniques, your spa therapist will gently remove any dead skin cells left on your body. Some of the techniques commonly used to exfoliate are dry brushing, and salt massage. Exfoliation increases blood circulation and relaxes tired muscles. It leaves your skin feeling refreshed, renewed, and silky smooth. It helps remove dead skin cells so your largest organ, the skin can eliminate any toxins within your body, and any impurities on the skins surface. After exfoliating, apply a moisturizer, as this is when your skin is most prepared to accept the healing emollients found in many natural body lotions. Exfoliating products are easy to find and can be a wonderful asset to your home care skin program.

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W
healthier place than a nice fairway.

Golf offers pleasant exercise for a lifetime


By Myron Love ith their well-manicured green lawns and strategically-placed shade trees providing an air of genteel seclusion, golf courses have to be among the most soothing places there can be. And as Larry Robinson, the golf pro at Larters at St. Andrews Golf and Country Club, points out, a golfer playing 18 holes can walk five miles in five hours by the end of a game. Try to find a

Robinson himself has been playing golf since he was 13, when the game hooked him. I knew then I wanted to make golf my life, he says. A golf pro for more than 30 years, he apprenticed from 1975 to 1979 at the St. Boniface Golf Course and served as head pro at Steinbachs golf course for 25 years. He came to Larters in 2004. One of the aspects about Larters that stands out, Robinson says, is the wide range of people the course attracts, young and old, families and couples. Golfing is a good way for anyone to spend time together, he says. We see young couples and families, and golf is a very healthy activity for seniors, he says, emphasizing that golfers can continue playing well into old age, even after mobility issues may arise. In fact, he says that the club has just brought in its first golf cart with a hydraulic-assist seat. The cart came from Augusta, Georgia, primarily for a long-time Larters member who lost the use of his legs due to illness last year. He was told that he would never be able to walk again, but he is walking now with a walker, Robinson says. This electric cart with its hydraulic seat lets the member go out golfing with his buddies again. That camaraderie is another of the healthful benefits that golf has to offer, Robinson says. Psychologically, the sense of fellowship you get playing as part of a foursome is very beneficial. And Robinson notes that Larters offers free junior golf classes throughout the summer to get kids started on the game, as well as an indoor winter golf school that generally sells out quickly. Membership at Larters is $1,575 a year per adult, with family rates also available. Golf can bring out the best and the worst in a person, Robinson says, adding that the best usually outplays the worst. Golfers are often very passionate about the game, but golf also teaches a lot of patience.
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Rejuvenate

with a good Turkish steam

By Myron Love and Christie Kim

he Fort Garry Hotels Ten spa - located on the classic heritage hotels 10th floor - is unlike any other spa in North America. The still relatively new spa is the only spa in North America based on the Hamam

Robin writing for papers in Vancouver, Edmonton and Ottawa suggested it was the most exotic steam in the country. We attract clients from across western Canada and the States, says Zinchenko. And people from eastern Canada stop off here on their way west. The Hamam has a dress code, and you get a pair of Italian slippers and a fringed cotton wrap, called a pestemal, to wear during your Hamam experience. It starts with a shower of mist either a warm mist of rain scented with eucalyptus or a cold fog scented with mint. After the mist, sip some Turkish tea and enjoy a sweet before entering the Hamam. Inside the Hamam, you sit on a heated bench and enjoy an aromatic salt scrub to start you perspiring and cleansing. In about 15 minutes, a Hamam attendant rinses you off, pouring water from a cup called a tas. Rinsed, you rest on a large communal heated marble platform where the ritual continues. Zinchenko says its not uncommon for people to fall asleep there. To help keep you awake, the treatment may include a foot and scalp massage or private soap scrub with olive oil soap depending on the package you buy. We use only handmade olive oil soap imported from Turkey, Zinchenko says. And everything is sterilized, she adds. This is the cleanest therapeutic treatment around. You wont believe how clean and rejuvenated you feel, Zinchenko says. After treatments, people sip on the provided airan beverage (a salty yoghurt drink) and tell her they want to

A Hamam is a modern version of the old Turkish/ Roman bathing ritual. Instead of a water bath, a Hamam uses steam and high temperatures to detoxify and rejuvenate the body. Spas usually involve water treatment, explains spa director Elena Zinchenko. We wanted to avoid that. We found a company in Germany theyve installed Hamam equipment in several high end Middle Eastern hotels and learned about the Hamam through them. The spa stays true to centuries-old tradition by using water on hot surfaces to produce steam, rather than steam jets used in other so-called Hamams popping up around the country. To maintain the traditionalist methods, Ten Spa flies in therapists from Turkey at least once a year and sometimes more often to provide spa staff with ongoing training. The hotels owners, Ida Albo and Rick Bell went to Turkey to learn about and experience Hamams first hand. The spas they saw on their Eurasian excursion impressed them, they decided to make a $1 million investment creating a spa and luxurious environment like no other. They opened Ten Spa in January, 2006, and it already has fans far and wide. Only a few months after opening day, the Hamam facilities at Ten Spa got the attention of the Globe and Mail travel section, which called it a leap to another continent -- and another era, when Ottoman bathing traditions were influenced by Roman and Byzantine dynasties. Last year, Laura

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come back already. Besides the great Hamam, Ten Spa has created a luxury haven in a posh and spacious environment in the heart of Winnipegs Downtown area. Ten Spa offers a full complement of therapeutic and rejuvenating facial and body care treatments. During a tour, Zinchenko points out double rooms for couples or friends to enjoy treatments together, beds that can be adjusted to ensure maximum comfort for clients with back problems, scented showers and scented candles, healthy snacks and bottled water, and an array of creams and lotions. Topping it off, the clean, soft-hued dcor also helps make a stay there into one of the most pleasant therapeutic experiences you can have. Spa treatments start at $50 and packages range from $125 to $500 a couple. Ten Spa can accommodate up to 30 people at the same time, Zinchenko says. Ten Spa can be booked for bridal showers, birthday parties and other special occasions. To help keep you awake, the treatment may include a foot and scalp massage or private soap scrub with olive oil soap depending on the package you buy. We use only hand-made olive oil soap imported from Turkey, Zinchenko says. And everything is sterilized, she adds. This is the cleanest therapeutic treatment around. You wont believe how clean and rejuvenated you feel, Zinchenko says. After treatments, people sip on the provided airan beverage (a salty yoghurt drink) and tell her they want to come back already. Besides the great Hamam, Ten Spa has created a luxury haven in a posh and spacious environment in the heart of Winnipegs Downtown area. Ten Spa offers a full complement of therapeutic and rejuvenating facial and body care treatments. During a tour, Zinchenko points out double rooms for couples or friends to enjoy treatments together, beds that can be adjusted to ensure maximum comfort for clients with back problems, scented showers and scented candles, healthy snacks and bottled water, and an array of creams and lotions. Topping it off, the clean, soft-hued dcor also helps make a stay there into one of the most pleasant therapeutic experiences you can have. Spa treatments start at $50 and packages range from $125 to $500 a couple. Ten Spa can accommodate up to 30 people at the same time, Zinchenko says. Ten Spa can be booked for bridal showers, birthday parties and other special occasions.

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Taste Two!
Fudgey Brownies
1 cups all purpose flour (300 mL) 1 tsp tsp cup 1 cup 4 eggs 2 tsp 1 cup (10 mL) vanilla extract (250 mL) chopped walnuts Cooking spray baking powder (5 mL) (2 mL) salt (175 mL) each butter or margarine (250 mL) each packed brown sugar IBlend together flour, baking powder and salt; set aside. Melt butter over low heat in a large saucepan. Remove from heat. Stir in cocoa, Beat in brown sugar, white sugar, eggs and vanilla. Stir in dry ingredients and walnuts. Spray a 9-inch square pan (23 cm) with cooking spray. Spread batter in pan. Bake in a 350F (180C) oven for 40 minutes. Do not over bake. Cook completely. Spread fudgey icing over top.
A decadently delicious treat with a cold glass of milk

and cocoa powder and white sugar



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