AS RICH IN POSSIBILITIES AS ANYTHING YOU CAN IMAGINE.

P U R E B E L G I A N C H O C O L AT E . V E L I C H E .
Once it was the closely guarded secret of Belgian chefs and chocolatiers. Now with Veliche, the exceptional flavor and consistency of pure Belgian Chocolate are yours to explore. Call 877-835-4243 or visit www.velichechocolate.com

astry&baking P
N O R T H A M E R I C A

Published by

Synergy1 Group, Inc.
PUBLISHER Synergy1 Board of Directors EDITOR IN CHIEF Joe Marcionette CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lisa Dinges SENIOR EDITOR Campbell Ross Walker ASIA PACIFIC EDITOR Rachel Lee NETWORK MANAGER Michael Ethier For the past couple of years, you’ve no doubt been hearing about the winds of change ready to sweep through the media industry: print as we know it is over, the magazines of the future will be digital only. Here’s a news flash: print magazines will always have a role in our society, especially educational, trade publications like Pastry & Baking North America. Until a computer can be rolled up and stored in one’s back pocket or flung across a floured table top to a colleague requiring further examination as to the exact placement of the chocolate decoration, printed magazines will maintain their place in our working environments. Yet, as our understanding of technology matures, we come to realize that as publishers of information we have the obligation to act as responsible stewards and provide further resources to our readers. Thus, we have acted accordingly and launched our website www.PastryNA.com where you will find a library of dessert images and their complete recipes along with our new video zone full of educational, informative and sometimes funny clips. As always, we will rely on the feedback from our readers to let us know what you like about the site and what additional features we can add to make the total experience with Pastry & Baking North America the best it can be. SENIOR WRITERS David Martell, Laura Geatty

CORPORATE OFFICES: North America PO Box 291162 Port Orange, Florida 32129-1162 Email: info@pastryna.com

Asia Pacific 32 Maxwell Road #03-07 White House Building Singapore 069115 Fax: (65) 6323 1839 www.PastryNA.com

Regards, Joe Marcionette Editor-in-Chief email: joem@pastryna.com

Pastry & Baking North America Volume 1, Issue 2. All rights reserved. © under Universal International and Pan American Copyright conventions. This publication is a creative work fully protected by all applicable copyright laws, as well as by misappropriation, trade secret, unfair competition and other applicable laws.

2 Pastry & Baking North America

astry&baking P
N O R T H A M E R I C A

House Specials
24

16
Regional Showcase
Join P&B NA on our tour of North America as we visit and showcase talented professionals who share their favorite products and recipes.

6
Off The Wire
The latest news, happenings, events and product updates.

10
Sugar Arts
The incomparable Ewald Notter provides step-by-step instruction and insight into his passion and craft.

36

36
Bakery in Focus
Acme Bread Company continues to thrive. No multi channel marketing initiatives. No bottomline conscious managerial style. No cost cutting economization on ingredients or manpower. What’s the secret?

30
Chocolate Love
Pastry chef and chocolatier extraordinaire Norman Love delves deep into building skills and techniques.

46
Creative Cakes
52 Join Certified Master Pastry Chef Frank Vollkommer as he puts his skills, creativity and attention to detail on display.

52

Chef in Focus
Being talented, focused and hard working does pay off. In three short years, Julie Jangali has gone from paralegal to heading up the pastry kitchen at Baltimore’s largest hotel.

62
Asian Fusion
Legendary Kim Young Mo shares his unique approach to the marriage of classic European pastry/baking with Asian tastes and sensibilities.

4 Pastry & Baking North America

5

Off The Wire

News, events and happenings from around the region

Wild Sweets Chocolate
Ignited by a passion for melding art and science in the kitchen, Dominique and Cindy Duby turn culinary conventions inside out. Inventive recipes tow the line between sweet and savory, fusing unlikely flavors to render unforgettable dishes. The adventurous chefs spin immaculate recipes for sweets, bites, and drinks from their culinary studio — and show you how to perfect them in your own kitchen. Step-by-step recipes and immaculate photography feature elemental, root-down methods driving the Dubys’ approach to cuisine. Sharp, clean flavors balance in a joyful harmony of sweet sand savory, inspired by ingredients that are refreshingly contemporary and distinctly west coast. Wild Sweets Chocolate is in equal parts a feast for the eyes, a delight to the senses, and an exhilarating journey through the Dubys’ famous a t e l i e r. Wi l d S w e e t s Chocolate is a hard cover book, 9” x 12” in size w ith 208-pages all printed in 4 colour t h r o u g h o u t , features 180 colour pictures and retails for $40.00 at major book stores in Canada and the USA including amazon.com.
6 Pastry & Baking North America

Signed copies are only available on the Duby’s Virtual Boutique located at www.dcduby.com and at the special price of $32.00 “It is the rare few that truly break through with important and lasting ideas. The creations contained in Wild Sweets Chocolate are fluid and provocative, yet have depth and eloquence that is only found in the hands of those that have a true mastery and profound understanding of their craft.” — Charlie Trotter

Gem of a Dessert
The Fortress Sri Lanka, an award winning luxury resort in Galle has created the most expensive dessert in the world. Priced at $14,500 ‘The Fortress Stilt Fisherman Indulgence’ is an effort by the resort’s culinary team to create a one of a kind dessert that is intrinsically linked with the destination, offering both long lasting memories and a keepsake of the experience. Available on special request, the desser t’s inspiration comes from the resort’s logo of the ‘stilt fisherman’, a centuries old fishing practice that can still be seen along the country’s coastline even today.

Off The Wire

American Retail Bakery Exposition
The Retail Bakers of America (RBA) joined forces with Xpo Management to present the largest retail bakery exposition in the United States, the American Retail Bakery Exposition (ARBE) held September 9th – 11th 2007 in Las Vegas. Designed to bring together retail bakers, decorators, suppliers and industry leaders for quality educational sessions, demonstrations and networking opportunities, the ARBE Educational Program featured 18 sessions presented by worldclass speakers geared to fulfilling the needs of today’s bakers in running a successful bakery. The sessions were divided among three tracks designed to offer information on Business, Marketing and Wedding Cakes. Each track offered learning opportunities for beginners through advanced bakers. Well-known decorators presented demonstrations showcasing the latest decorating and baking techniques. The Cake Decorating Technique Demonstrations featured decorators Paul Edwards, Elin Katz, Starr Heiliger, Rebecca Sutterby, Kerry Vincent, Carolyn Wanke, and Bronwen Weber. The Art of Decorating Technique Demonstrations featured top bakers and pastry chefs, including Klaus Tenbergen, Michel Suas, Marda Stoliar, and Dominique Homo. In addition to the sessions and demonstrations included in the registration fee, a hands-on session with Bronwen Weber was available as a separate ticketed event. Participants learned how to construct a lion’s head and finish it in three different ways: bronze, stone or true to life through cake sculpting, fondant sculpting and airbrushing techniques. The session was so popular that a second session was added to accommodate those interested in learning unique decorating techniques. This year’s event also featured a bakery tour — a behind-the-scenes look at some of the Las Vegas area’s top bakeries. Sponsored by Dawn Food Products, Inc., attendees who signed up for the much-anticipated tour had the opportunity to visit three Las Vegas bakeries, including: Carl’s Donuts, Great Buns Plant #2 and Supreme Bakery.

The conference attracted attendees from across the globe making it a truly international experience. Attendees were able to network with other bakers and visit the exhibit hall with hundreds of vendors showcasing not only the latest products, equipment and services, but also solutions to today’s baking industry problems.

SIGEP 2008
The 29th International Exhibition of Artisan Gelato, Confectionery and Bakery Production at Rimini Fiera will be held January 26th – 30th 2008 and is following a record breaking summer in terms of global consumption of Gelato (Italian ice cream). The artisan confectionery world is therefore preparing to make another qualitative leap, with the aim of maintaining a clear distinction from industrial products. These distinct differences will be on display at SIGEP 2008, where the best from Italy and around the world will demonstrate techniques, skills and competitive spirit highlighting artisan craft in gelato, confectionery and bakery.

To personally discover how the sector’s professionals work, SIGEP and Co.Gel.Fipe will present the Gelato World Cup, from January 27th – 28th, sponsored by the Ministry for Agricultural, Food and Forestry Policies and the Academy of Italian Cuisine. Gabriel Paillasson will be among the judges carefully scrutinizing teams from Argentina, Brazil, France, Italy, Morocco, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, Hungary and Team USA who has fielded a team consisting of Patrice Caillot, Xavier Fresson, Franck Fauvat and Salvatore Martano. For more information on SIGEP visit www.sigep.it or call +39 0541 744510.
8 Pastry & Baking North America

The Cultivation of Taste
Valrhona introduced Grands Crus de Terroir, its new single origin chocolate range to audiences made up of chefs, chocolatiers and experts in New York on September 10th and San Francisco on September 12th during a seminar titled “The Cultivation of Taste”. Valrhona’s Pierre Costet, Chief Cacao Sourcer and Vanessa Lemoine, Sensorial Analyst Expert, brought to life the journey from cacao bean to finished chocolate leading the audience through the growing, fermenting, and drying of cacao beans, the complexities of finding and working with growers and the science and pleasure of tasting chocolate.

The three hour seminar was followed by a dessert tasting by Valrhona pastry chef Derek Poirier and pastry chef and Valrhona consultant, Yann Duytsche, author of SWEET DIVERSIONS (Editores Montagud) and owner of Dolç par Yann Duytsche, just outside Barcelona. The five miniature desserts, based on recipes created by Valrhona’s L’Ecole du Grand Chocolat, were served in Valrhona’s new Tasting Box concept and showcased each of the Grands Crus de Terroir chocolates to stunning effect. Guests at New York’s event at the Midtown Terrace and Loft included authors Dorie Greenspan and Rose Levy Beranbaum, Michael Laskonis of Le Bernardin, Martin Howard of Brasserie 8* Joshua Needleman of Chocolate Springs, Kee Tong of Kee’s Chocolates, and Joan Coukos of Chocolat Moderne. Guests at the Ritz-Carlton San Francisco included the Ron Siegel, chef of the Dining Room at the Ritz-Carlton San Francisco and pastry chef Alexander Espiritu, Ritz-Carlton San Francisco executive chef Jean-Pierre Dubray and pastry chef Chek Yong Sam, Michael Recchiuti of Confections by Recchiuti, Michael Antonorsi of Chuao Chocolates, Gary Rulli of Emporio Rulli, Terri Wu of Farallon Restaurant, Boris Portnoy of Campton Place Restaurant, Melissa Roberts of Tartine Baker y, and Alexandra Whisnant of Chez Panisse. For more information on Valrhona’s new Grands Crus de Terroir contact Carolina Gavet via telephone (562.250.7377) or email (carolina.gavet@valrhona.fr).

Sugar Arts

Sugar Lobster
Two part tutorial for creating a very real and intricate crustacean.
Publisher’s Note: Ewald Notter is considered a leading expert in modern day confectionery arts and is also well know as a competitor and instructor. Today, Chef Ewald heads the Notter School of Pastry Arts in Orlando, Florida. (www.notterschool.com)

Part 2: Creating the Lobster and Shell
Lobster Body
Sugar Recipe 1000g sugar 400g water 200g glucose Equipment Bulb pump (wood or metal tube) Mat Gloves Hair Dryer Heat source Pot Spatula Marble

10 Pastry & Baking North America

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.
The sugar will collapse from not being able to hold its shape. 5. Continue to blow air into the sugar. Mold and form the sugar little by little. Once your desired shape is reached, you may cool the sugar down by using a hair dryer. 6. When the body has been cooled, re-warm the air channel. Cut away through the re-warmed sugar with a pair of scissors. Use the warm sugar at the 7. Attach the sugar lobster to the straw sugar base by using two pieces of very warm sugar as glue. 8. Pull five elongated petals to create the tail. 9. Immediately (as long as the petals are warm) attach the petals onto the tail. If you are too slow, you have to re-warm the sugar which will make the sugar dull in appearance.
11

1. Using your hands, form the pliable sugar into a sphere by blowing it several times in order to get an even temperature throughout. If you blow sugar with an uneven temperature, the sugar will always extract more on the warmer side. The only way to correct this is by using your hand to cool down the warmer parts. 2. Carefully push a short hole into the sphere. Try not to cool down the sugar by handling too much. 3. Slide the tubing attachment a short distance into the ball of sugar. Press the sugar onto the tube very well, so the air does not escape from the sides. 4. Pump air into the sphere and expand sugar evenly. Elongate the sphere as you blow air into the sugar. If the sugar is very warm (pliable) you cannot blow too much air in at once.

Sugar Arts

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.
14. Place a smaller sphere of sugar on the blowing tube. Blow a little air into the sphere and make sure it expands evenly before elongating. 15. While the sugar is still warm and flexible, cut the end to create the claws. 16. Use the scissors to score and form the segments. You have to work quickly to make sure you get all the parts before the sugar cools and gets too brittle. 17. Once the shape has been reached, cool the lobster claw using the hair dryer. 18. Segment the lobster legs with scissors. The legs are not blown which makes the sugar easier to work with.

10. To create the exoskeleton, you need to pull 6 straight ribbons. Try to keep the beginning and the ending pieces narrow. 11. Similar to the tail, attach the ribbons to the body of the lobster as soon as possible without re-warming. The sixth ribbon should be placed half way down the body to have enough room for the head, 8 legs and 2 claws. 12. To finish the second part of the body, you will need two ribbons. Start by pulling the ribbon wide and end by pulling the ribbon narrow. 13. Attach the wide end first and pull the narrow end up alongside the body. Repeat on the opposite side.
12 Pastry & Baking North America

19.

20.

21.

22.

23.

24.
23. You may cover the strawsugar base with a very fine piece of plastic to protect it during the spraying process. Prepare the colors in order of spraying. Red is the primary color followed by yellow, blue and finally black. You may choose to use an air brush or an atomizer. If you are using an atomizer, you will need to thicken the color by adding some food lacquer. Otherwise, the spray mist of color will not be so fine.

24.

25.
19. 20. 21. 22.

26.

Attach the lobster legs immediately. Cool the legs ass soon as possible to hold the shape. You will need 4 legs on each side. Cut out small pieces of blue sugar the size of a pea. To create the eyes, model a piece of sugar to a tear drop shape. Warm the pointed end and attach it to the face of the lobster. Blow a little sphere and pull it long to form a narrow tube. Before the tube gets cold, bend one end 11/4 inch and place it on the head. Continue this process to make the smaller antenna underneath the eyes.

25-26. Begin to apply the red color in an even-horizontal motion to ensure full application of color, followed by yellow, blue and black. You may need to apply multiple layers of color to achieve the desired effect.
13

Sugar Arts

Conch Shell
Sugar Recipe: 1000g sugar 400g water 200g glucose Equipment: Bulb pump (wood or metal tube) Mat Gloves Hair Dryer Heat source Pot Spatula Marble

1.

2.

3.

4.
1. Fold a small amount of sugar to form a sphere which has been cooled to an even-temperature throughout by this folding process. 2. Pull the sphere into a tear-drop shape. Immediately, cut through the center with scissors. It is important this step be performed while the sugar is still warm to ensure the sugar does not burst or break. 3. Twist the top of the tear-drop shape one time to achieve the conch shell shape.
14 Pastry & Baking North America

5. 6.
4. Once you obtain the shape, cool the object by using a blow dryer. Warm the end of the conch shell by using the spiritus burner and remove from the tube. Re-warm the underside of the shell and open the shell very slightly using a scissor. 5.

6-7. Re-warm if necessary to model and mold the outside of the shell to make the points protruding from the shell.

7.

8.

9.

10.
8. Moisten the shell with water or lacquer so the sugar will attach easily on the outside to create a rough texture. Dredge the shell into the granulated sugar making sure the opening stays clear of the sugar. 9.

11.

10-11. Apply the yellow color first, followed by red and blue. 12. To ensure the conch shell sticks to the straw-sugar base, scratch off a small portion of the granulated sugar before warming the area to attach. You may also want to use a smaller piece of sugar which has been warmed to use as a glue to apply to that area before you attach.

15

Showcase
16 Pastry & Baking North America

Regional

Regional Showcase

Holiday Petits Fours
Yield: 96 petits fours

Joconde Cake
14 oz almond flour 101/2 oz confectioner’s sugar 21/3 cups whole eggs 31/4 oz melted butter 1 cup egg whites 4 oz granulated sugar 4 oz all purpose flour 1. Blend almond flour, confectioner’s sugar and 1/2 of the whole eggs. Whip for 6-8 minutes. 2. Add the rest of the eggs in two batches, beating well after each addition. Whip for 8-10 more minutes. 3. Temper melted butter with about 2 cups of batter, set aside. 4. Whip the egg whites and granulated sugar like a French meringue, beating till soft peaks. Fold into reserved batter, set aside. 5. Gently fold in sifted flour. 6. Fold in tempered butter mixture. 7. Pour onto 2 greased half sheet pans. 8. Bake at 425°F till done, about 8-10 minutes. 9. Cool. Wrap tightly.

1. Add the sugar to the water in a saucepan and cook until the sugar is dissolved. 2. Add the almonds and cook it until the batter stops sticking to the pan. Remove from heat and place onto a marble slap, wooden board or a sheet pan. While still warm knead first with a wooden spatula and then by hand until smooth. 3. Store in an airtight container or plastic bag.

Glaze
3 cups icing sugar 6 tbsp cold water 1 tsp soft butter Mix icing sugar and water together in a saucepan. Heat over medium heat until mixture feels lukewarm and is of good pouring consistency. Stir in butter. Assembly 1. Spread ganache over first sheet of cake. 2. Lay second sheet on top. 3. Prepare marzipan by rolling out equal to the dimensions of the sheet cake. About 1/20 inch in thickness. 4. Diluted glucose and apply to the top sheet of cake. This will provide adhesion for the rolled marzipan. Lay the marzipan onto the prepared cake. Trim edges. 5. Cut individual petit fours using pastry bicycle or ruler/knife. 6. Glaze each cake. 7. Decorate the petits fours using royal icing with the shapes of your choosing.

Ganache
9 oz heavy cream (whip cream) 8 oz milk couverture chopped or chips 8 oz vanilla couverture chopped or chips 1. Boil the heavy cream. 2. Poor hot cream onto chocolate and stir immediately. Add 11/2 oz of butter and stir until smooth. Let cool and store in refrigerator.

Your Notes

Marzipan
3 cups sugar 1 cup water 4 cups ground blanched almonds

Brooks Coulson Nguyen
Owner/Pastry Chef Dragonfly Cakes 200 Gate Five Road Sausalito, CA 94965 Tel: (415) 332 6812 www.dragonflycakes.com

Sausalito

18 Pastry & Baking North America

Holiday Petits Fours
19

Regional Showcase

Bittersweet Espresso Chocolate Mousse Tower
Chocolate Mousse
9 oz/266ml heavy cream 6 oz/170g bittersweet chocolate 3.25 oz/92g egg yolks 4.5 oz/128g granulated sugar divided 2.5 oz/71g egg whites 2 oz/59ml dark rum rum extract, to taste orange extract vanilla 1. Whip the heavy cream to soft peaks and set aside. 2. Place the chocolate in a bowl and melt over a double boiler. 3. Place egg yolks and 2.25 oz of sugar in a bowl and place over a double boiler, whisking constantly and bring mixture to 140°F (60°C). 4. Beat the egg whites and remaining sugar to stiff peaks. 5. Stir flavorings into yolk mixture and then fold yolk mixture into the chocolate mixture. 6. Fold whipped cream into chocolate mixture and then fold in beaten egg whites. Pipe in 13/4 ” diameter x 4” high tube mold.

Saffron Chocolate Sauce
6 oz/177ml milk 4 oz/113g granulated sugar, divided 3.25oz /92g egg yolks 4 oz /113g bittersweet chocolate pinch saffron 1. In a small saucepan, bring milk and 1 oz sugar to a boil. 2. With a mixer using the wire whip, beat egg yolks and remaining sugar until light and fluffy. Temper yolks with hot milk; return to saucepan and bring back to 180°F (82°C). Remove from heat and pour over chocolate. 3. Whisk until smooth. Assembly: 1. Place chocolate mousse tower with lattice in the center of a plate. 2. Garnish plate with fresh raspberries around the base of the tower. 3. Place chocolate sauce in squeeze bottle and pipe on the side of a plate and on top of the tower. Add fresh mint. 4. Cut 3 oranges strips and red pepper compote.

Your Notes

Dark Chocolate Tower
1. Cut 20 pieces of plastic 3.5”x 6” and lay the plastic on a piece of parchment paper. 2. Pour melted chocolate into a parchment cone and pipe crisscrossing lines across each piece of plastic to create a lattice effect. Allow the chocolate to set a few minutes. 3. Unmold each chocolate mousse tower and wrap the setting chocolate lattice around the tower. Secure the overlapping plastic with a piece of tape and allow the lattice to set completely, adhering to the mousse.

Fernando Arreola
Executive Pastry Chef The Fairmont San Jose 170 South Market Street San Jose, California Tel: (408) 998-190 www.fairmont.com/sanjose

San Jose

20 Pastry & Baking North America

Bittersweet Espresso Chocolate Mousse Tower
21

Regional Showcase

Lemon Curd Tart
Serves 20

Sable Dough
125g butter 100g granulated sugar 1 egg yolk 250g flour 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1. Cream butter and sugar together until fully incorporated. 2. Add egg yolk and blend. 3. Gradually add flour and vanilla. 4. Roll flat with rolling pin between 2 pieces of parchment paper until 1/4 ” thick. 5. Chill in refrigerator up to three hours. 6. Cut using biscuit cutters to desired size. 7. Using stainless steal tart shells, place the dough in one mold and use one additional mold on top. 8. Do not press the molds together, have second mold rest lightly on dough. 9. Chill for 1 hour in refrigerator and trim edge. 10. Bake at 350°F degrees for 8-10 minutes until golden. 11. Cool.

5. Add mixture back to saucepan and place on medium heat, whisking constantly until slightly thickened, about one minute and a half. 6. Pour curd to 3/4 height of a cooled sable shell. 7. Bake briefly at 350°F until the curd starts to set up but the center is still “jello like” in appearance. 8. Remove tarts from oven and refrigerate.

Meringue
4 oz egg whites 6 oz sugar 1. Combine whites and sugar in kitchen aid and mix with whisk attachment for 5-7 minutes or until medium peak. 2. Place in piping bag with a star tip. Assembly 1. When ready to serve, remove tarts from refrigerator and pipe meringue over the top until entire surface is covered. 2. With torch, lightly toast the meringue.

Your Notes

Lemon Curd
Zest of three lemons 6 oz lemon juice 6 oz granulated sugar 4 oz unsalted, butter 8 egg yolks Pinch sea salt 1. Combine zest, juice, sugar, butter and salt in a saucepan. 2. Simmer over medium heat for 1 minute. 3. Place egg yolks in large bowl. 4. Remove saucepan from heat and slowly temper in to yolks, whisking thoroughly.

Sarah Levy
Pastry Chef/Owner Sarah’s Pastries & Candies 70 E Oak St Tel: (312) 664-6223 www.sarahscandies.com

Chicago

22 Pastry & Baking North America

Lemon Curd Tart
23

Regional Showcase

Ginger Bread and Flower Holiday Cookies
Yield: 24 cookies

Ginger Bread Cookie Dough
1/2

3. Tint portions of icing as desired and keep covered with plastic wrap until ready to decorate.

cup (125ml) unsalted butter, room temperature 1/2 cup (125ml) sugar 1 large egg 1 tsp (5ml) vanilla extract 1/2 cup (125ml) blackstrap molasses 1/4 cup (60ml) grated fresh ginger 3 cups (750ml) all-purpose flour 1 tsp (5ml) ground cinnamon 3/4 cup (4ml) baking soda 1/4 tsp (1ml) ground cloves 1. Cream butter and sugar until fluffy. 2. Beat in egg and vanilla. 3. Stir in molasses and grated ginger until evenly blended. 4. In a separate bowl, combine remaining ingredients and add to molasses mixture, Stirring just until dough comes together. 5. Shape dough into 2 disks and chill for at least 2 hours before rolling. 6. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C). 7. On a lightly floured surface, roll out 1 disk to just over 3 mm thick. Cut out desired shapes and place on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes until edges are firm to touch. 8. Allow to cool completely.

Flower Cookies
11/4 cup (300ml) unsalted butter, room temperature 1 cup (250ml) sugar 1 large egg 1 tsp (5ml) vanilla extract 2 tsp (10ml) orange blossom water 3 cups (750ml) all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp (2ml) baking powder 1/2 tsp (2ml) fine salt 1/4 tsp (1 ml) ground nutmeg 1. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C) and line a baking tray with parchment paper. 2. Beat butter and sugar until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Add egg, vanilla and orange blossom water and beat well. 3. In a separate bowl, stir flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg. Add to butter mixture and beat on low speed just until blended. 4. Shape dough into 2 disks, wrap and chill for at least 2 hours. 5. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to 1/2 inch (5mm) and cut out flower shape. Place cookies on baking tray, 1 inch (2.5cm) apart and bake for 8-10 minutes, until lightly browned around the edges. Allow to cool.

3. Break fondant into pieces, keeping each wrapped at all times. Add just a touch of desired colour to a piece of fondant and knead in with your fingers, adjusting colour if necessary. 4. Repeat with other pieces. 5. On a surface lightly dusted with icing sugar, roll out fondant to 1/8 inch (3mm) thick. Using the same cookie cutter, cut out flower shapes. 6. Brush a little egg white or meringue powder mixture onto the back of the fondant flower and adhere to each cookie. 7. Cut out a small circle of fondant for center of each flower and adhere with egg white to cookie. 8. Let cookies dry for an hour.

Your Notes

Royal Icing
3 tbsp (45ml) meringue powder 1/2 cup (125ml) warm water 41/2 cup (1.125 L) icing sugar-sifted 1 tsp (5ml) vanilla extract 1/2 tsp (2ml) cream of tartar Food coloring 1. Stir together all ingredients except the coloring to blend. 2. Beat with electric mixer on high speed until mixture is stiff, about 7 minutes.

Flower Cookie Decoration
1 lbs (450g) white rolling fondant 2 tsp (10ml) orange blossom water Egg white or meringue powder for brushing Food coloring paste Icing sugar 1. Knead fondant to soften. 2. Add orange blossom water and knead into fondant.

Anna Olson
Pastry Chef/Owner Olson Foods + Bakery 17 Lock Street Ontario Tel: (905) 938 8490 www.olsonfoodsandbakery.com

St. Catharines

24 Pastry & Baking North America

Ginger Bread and Flower Holiday Cookies
25

Regional Showcase

Flourless Manjari Chocolate Tart
Cocoa Sucre Dough
1/4

cup room temperature butter 1/4 cup powdered sugar 10 oz all purpose flour 1 oz cocoa 11/2 whole eggs, beaten 1. Cream the butter with the powdered sugar. Add in the dry ingredients and then add the beaten eggs. 2. Mix till it just comes together; you may have to work it by hand. 3. Chill for at least two hours.

6. The mixture should still be giggly in the centre. 7. Cool in fridge for 30 minutes. Remove and serve at room temperature.

Chocolate Glaze
280g heavy cream 288g water 360g sugar 120g cocoa, sifted 6 gelatin sheets 1. Bloom the gelatin in cold water. 2. Bring to a boil the cream, water and sugar. Whisk in the cocoa, cook stirring continuously for a minute. 3. Squeeze out and dry the gelatin and add it to the mixture. 4. Strain through a chinois and cool slightly. 5. Pour enough glaze onto the tarts so that it is flush with the tart shell edge. Chill.

1. Juice the oranges and strain to remove the pulp. 2. Place on the stove with the sugar and bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and allow to reduce to a syrup consistency. Cool.

Garnish
2 Blood oranges (segmented and cleaned) Fresh micro mint Chocolate curl Orange dust *To make orange dust, zest 4 naval oranges and place in a pan above the oven to dry for a day. Grind up the zest in a spice grinder to a powder consistency. Assembly 1. With warm water and a teaspoon quenelle the chocolate pudding and place in the centre of the tart. 2. Place the tart on the back corner of the plate. 3. Drop a nickel size amount of the blood orange reduction to the far left of the tart and drag it with the tip of the spoon towards the opposite corner. 4. Orange dust the tapered side of the reduction. 5. Place a mound of fresh blood oranges (3-5 depending on their size) in the opposite corner of the tart. 6. Garnish the quenelle with micro mint and place a chocolate curl standing up.

Tart Shells
1. Allow the dough to soften slightly. Roll out to 2.5mm and punch out into 4.5inch rounds. 2. Spray 3.25-inch entremets rings and line with the dough. 3. Chill for about two hours; clean the edges of the tart with a pairing knife. 4. Par-bake the shells at 325°F/163°C for 5-7 minutes. The shells can be prepped and kept unbaked in the fridge. It is best to par-bake them, fill and finish baking them the day you will serve them.

Chocolate Mint Pudding
150g whole milk 150g heavy cream 30g yolks 60g sugar 10-15 fresh citrus mint leaves 150g 64% couverture 1. Make an anglaise by bringing to boil the cream, milk, mint and half the sugar. 2. Whisk the remaining sugar with the yolks and temper into the dairy mixture. Place all back onto the stove and cook to 185°F/85°C. 3. Pour the hot anglaise over the couverture. 4. Whisk till smooth and strain into a container. Chill this overnight.

Flourless Chocolate Filling
6 oz 64% Manjari dark chocolate 6 oz unsalted butter 2 oz granulated sugar 1 oz cocoa Pinch of salt 3 whole eggs 1. Melt the chocolate and butter over a double boiler. 2. Whisk in the sugar, cocoa and salt. 3. Beat the eggs lightly and add whisk till the mixture comes together and is shiny. 4. Fill the tart shells till 3/4 full. 5. Bake at 300°F/149°C for 6 minutes and turn. Bake for another 2-3 minutes.

Your Notes

Blood Orange Reduction
15-20 fresh blood oranges 20g sugar (adjust with bitterness of oranges)

Claire Chapman
Executive Pastry Chef The Sanctuary Hotel One Sanctuary Beach Drive iawah Island, SC 29455 Tel: (843) 768-2121 www.kiawahresort.com

Kiawah Island

26 Pastry & Baking North America

Flourless Manjari Chocolate Tart
27

Regional Showcase

Passion Fruit/Mango Mousse Double Chocolate Indulgence
For 16 servings

Italian Meringue
45g large egg whites 65g superfine granulated sugar 30g water 5g powdered gelatin 20g cold water 40ºF 1. Sprinkle gelatin over water in a saucepan and let stand 2 minutes to soften. Bring to a simmer, stirring until gelatin is dissolved. 2. Cook sugar and water until 240ºF. 3. Beat whites with an electric mixer until whites hold stiff. Pour sugar mixture in the whites. Mix and add the gelatin. 4. Beat until cooled.

3. Transfer to a double boiler and add sugar, yolks, powdered milk, vanilla and orange zest. Mix well and cook until it reaches 170ºF. 4. Remove from heat and beat until the sabayon is completely cooled. 5. Swell gelatin in cold water. Drain and transfer to a small saucepan. Over moderate heat, stir until the gelatin is dissolved completely. Add to the sabayon preparation. Chill. 6. In a bowl, beat the cream until it holds soft peaks and fold into the reserved sabayon. Spoon in the mold atop mango mousse.

8. To remove from mold, dip mold in warm water and invert onto a baking sheet.

Raspberry Coulis
400 g raspberry purée 80 g icing sugar In a saucepan, heat purée and sugar until it reaches 185ºF and chill.

Tuiles
40g butter 40g icing sugar 60g large egg whites 30g pastry flour 1. Mix butter and icing sugar, beat to emulsify. Add the egg whites and mix. Add sifted flour and mix until well blended. 2. To make the tuile to garnish the dessert, make a stencil in the shape of a ribbon with cardboard or plastic 30cm long x 1.5cm wide. 3. Place the stencil on a silicone baking sheet. Spread the preparation, remove stencil. 4. Cook at 350ºF until the edges are golden and the centers are just beginning to color. 5. As soon as they are cool enough to handle, remove the tuiles from the baking sheet and shape the ribbon as a curlicues. Assembly 1. Place the cone in center of plate. 2. Spoon coulis alongside. 3. Decorate with the curlicue tuile.

Double Chocolate Cake
250g large eggs 100g large egg yolks 120g sugar 80g pastry flour, sifted 30g unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted 1. Preheat oven to 350°F. 2. Line bottom of a 20cm x 30cm x 2.5cm jellyroll pan with waxed paper. Butter paper. Lightly dust paper and pan with flour. 3. Combine eggs, egg yolk and sugar in double boiler. Whisk until mixture is just warm to touch (thermometer will register 90°F). Remove from heat. 4. Using electric mixer, beat until mixture falls in heavy ribbon when beaters are lifted. Add flour mixture, fold gently to incorporate. 5. Spread batter in prepared pan. Bake at 350ºF until cake springs back when pressed in center, approximately 20 minutes. Transfer pan to rack. Cool completely. 6. Invert cake onto working surface. Peel off paper. Cool. With a round pastry cutter equivalent to the diameter of the top of the cone-shape mold, cut out 16 circles. 7. Place circles on top of the passion fruit mousse in the mold. Freeze for a minimum of 4 hours.

Mango Mousse
250g fresh mango purée 1g lemon zest 1g orange zest 120g Italian meringue 150g heavy cream 1. Mix mango purée and zests. 2. Fold the meringue into the whipped cream and add the mango purée. 3. Pour into the bottom of cone-shape silicone pastry mold.

Passion Fruit Mousse
125g fresh passion fruit juice 35g pulp and passion fruit seeds 75g sugar 65g large egg yolks 30g powdered milk 1/4 vanilla bean 1g orange zest 2-1/2 unflavored gelatin sheets 160g heavy cream 1. Halve the passion fruits over a sieve and set over a bowl to catch any juices and scoop the seeds and pulp into the sieve. 2. Scrape the seeds with a spatula until the juice and most of the pulp has been extracted. Roughly mix the fresh juice and seeds in a blender and then strain through a fine sieve.

Your Notes

Christian Mertenat
Executive Pastry Chef Fairmont The Queen Elizabeth 900 Rene Levesque Blvd. W Quebec Tel: (514) 861-3511 www.fairmont.com/queenelizabeth

Montreal

28 Pastry & Baking North America

Passion Fruit/Mango Mousse Double Chocolate Indulgence
29

Chocolate Love

Tools: Plastic acetate Airbrush Cornet Polycarbonate demisphere Paring knife Metal triangle Fine-tooth comb Metal ring Parchment paper Soft paint brush Hot plate Putty knife Ladle

Ingredients: Ingredients: Dark chocolate Colored cocoa butter Gold powder
Publisher’s Note: In the world of gourmet chocolate creation, few can match the career and quality of Norman Love. As the former executive pastry chef for The Ritz-Carlton Company, Norman Love understands the importance of quality and presentation and his global brand of artisan chocolates can be found in innumerable retailers, restaurants and hotels around the world. For more information on Chef Norman and his gourmet chocolates, please visit his website (www.normanloveconfections.com) or his retail salon in Fort Myers, Florida.

30 Pastry & Baking North America

1.

2.

3.

4. 4. 5.
1. Lightly moisten the table and adhere acetate to the table. 2. Place ample amount of chocolate on one edge of the table. 3. Drag comb across the chocolate. 4. Allow chocolate to slightly harden. 5. Form plastic into a circle, joining ends. Place metal ring over acetate to secure in a circle. 6. Turn ring on side. Using a cornet, pipe a bead of chocolate to seal opening. Allow to harden.

6.
31

Chocolate Love

7. 8.

9.

10.

11.

12.
7. Using a polycarbonate demisphere, spray chocolate into the cavity of each mold. 8. Scrape the excess chocolate overspray off the surface of the mold. 9. Using a soft paint brush, paint gold powder thoroughly into each cavity of the mold. 10. Fill each cavity with tempered dark chocolate. 11. Scrape excess chocolate off the mold. 12. Turn mold completely over; tapping gently to discard excess chocolate. 13. After dripping stops, scrape bottom of mold clean; place on parchment paper for two to three minutes; chill mold until hardened.

13.
32 Pastry & Baking North America

14.

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.
14. Remove demispheres. 15. Quickly touch each demisphere on a heated surface. 16. Join two demispheres; then place in freezer for five minutes. 17. Place desired stencil on one-half of ball. 18. Spray with cocoa butter. 19. Allow to dry. 20. Remove plastic from coiled stripped chocolate circle. 21. Glaze cake.

20.

21.

To complete creation, place seam-side down; place ball in center.

33

Chocolate Love

34 Pastry & Baking North America

Bakery in Focus

From left: Doug Volkmer, Steve Sullivan and Rick Kirkby

25 years after its launch, Acme Bread Company continues to thrive. No multi channel marketing initiatives. No bottom-line conscious managerial style. No cost cutting economization on ingredients or manpower. What’s the secret? A sense of community.
By Karen Solomon Photography by Michael Soo

36 Pastry & Baking North America

Organic goodness

37

Bakery in Focus

T

he understated, antique signpost for Acme Bread Company, the (legendary artisan bakery that helped launch the real foods revolution in the San Francisco Bay Area almost three decades ago, hangs back from the road on an industrial warehouse on a street lined with auto (shops and party supply shops. Acme’s laid-back presence, tucked into the intersection of Berkeley’s San Pablo and Cedar streets, shares walls with Café Fanny, the informal, food-conscious café offshoot of restaurant revolutionary Chez Panisse, and Kermit Lynch Wine Cellars, one of the nation’s most celebrated distributors. If you didn’t know what you were looking for — intensely well crafted, well-crusted artisinal loafs in the old European style — you would never notice this landmark in local culinary history. Acme’s humble notoriety is an all-too-perfect reflection of the man who rolled out the company’s first baguettes, current President and, with his wife, Susan, co-founder Steve Sullivan. Sullivan’s father was an amateur viticultural historian and wine enthusiast, and his mother was “quite a cook”. Both knew Alice Waters, as they were frequent customers of her growing restaurant, Berkeley’s Chez Panisse. Sullivan’s bread-baking began as a hobby while a student at UC Berkeley in the 1970s. With a resume of restaurant jobs behind him, he served as bus boy at the restaurant, but bread-baking became a serious hobby and, with a lot of help and advice from friends, his kneading and rolling eventually gave rise to excellent results. “First, what I made was terrible. Then it became edible. Then, tolerable. And eventually, it became desirable,” Sullivan recalls.

And once it got good, in 1980, it became the house bread of Waters’ famed kitchen of locally-sourced fresh ingredients. In 1983 Sullivan and his wife opened The Acme Bread Company and their bread quickly became desirable in many of the Bay Area’s most food-focused markets and dining establishments. Ask Sullivan about any of his numerous awards and accolades — notoriety recognized by Sunset Magazine and a number of other California publications, regular mention in The New York Times, Gourmet, Bon Appetit, and other national press, an opportunity to bake on The PBS show Baking with Julia Childs to name just a few — and he shyly glances down at his flour-dusted suede boots. “It’s always nice to hear that people like what you do,” he gets out. Though it seems to pain him to say. The flagship location we visited is both bakery and retail shop, brandishing its selection of daily varieties from a menu of 50 possibilities. The baker’s racks are decked with an elegant, leaf-patterned “rosemary ladder” fougasse, the classic pain au levain (the biggest seller, along with baguettes), herb slabs, the grainy ”upstairs bread”, and even tender pastries and sweets, such as flaky cinnamon twists and apple tarts. Seasonal offerings might also include pannetone, pumpkin bread, or the weekend challah. There’s always a wait, and on weekend mornings, the bread, rolls, pastries, croissants, etc. attract a lengthy line of goodnatured devotees. (Perhaps this is because Acme’s fresh-baked everything pairs so perfectly with Café Fanny’s excellent coffee and outdoor seating.)

38 Pastry & Baking North America

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Bakery in Focus
Acme’s operation quickly outgrew the capabilities of this initial location. Demand for their bread soon required more space. Sullivan claims that the number of loaves baked is never precisely tallied, though he does report cooking up approximately 3.5 million pounds of organic flour a year. In 1989, six years after the company’s initial launch, The Sullivans, along with two longtime employees, Rick Kirkby and Doug Volkmer, opened a second, baking-only, facility that, with its most recent addition completed this year, is now nine times the size of the original 1,500 square foot facility. Growing deliveries of bread to the area’s South Bay/Silicon Valley from this second location later necessitated a third bakery in Mountain View, which Acme again accomplished by allowing long-term employees to buy into the company as owner-managers. And when San Francisco’s culinary showcase, the Ferry Building Marketplace at the foot of Market Street opened up in 2004, Acme opened up a fourth bakery and second retail storefront. Today, Sullivan may not be able to count how many loaves the bakery turns out, but he acknowledges that Acme brings in $12-$15 million a year. Clearly, business is booming. “We can’t take on any new customers, but we have a policy of accommodating growth by our existing customers” like Whole Foods Markets and Trader Joe’s “and there does seem to be pressure for greater production. Fortunately for me, owner and distribution manager Doug is on the front lines of that battle!” And yet, this bread mogul still comes across as the bus boy that happened to be at the right place at the right time. “We’re not really strategic planners. We just make decisions whenever they’re put in front of us. Acme tries to bake and deliver the best bread we can.” What’s remarkable about the growth of Acme Bread is that, like Chez Panisse, the owners have built the entire business (mostly wholesale to markets and hundreds of restaurants like Chez Panisse, Michael Mina, Bay Wolf and Zuni Café) without ever spending a single penny on marketing, advertising, public relations, or sales. Though Acme owns www.Acmebread.com, Sullivan has not yet felt the need for a website, claiming, “It’s just one more thing for us to do.” Acme’s bread has always sold itself on its consistency, integrity, real flavor, and toothsome texture. What’s helped propel Acme’s success is quality ingredients they use all organic flour, sourced by Rick Kirkby, who personally consults with farmers, brokers, and grain laboratories, and who stays in tune with seasonal variations in wheat crops. “I spend a lot of time finding varieties that work well for us,” Rick reports. “We prefer winter wheats, but we always see what the farmers have available based on color, flavor, and protein.” Acme’s owners also believes that cultivating their staff is of paramount importance, actually adding to the quality of the bread and reducing the risk of losing employees to the competition in an already crowded bread marketplace. At Acme all 168 employees have the benefit of company-paid health insurance, 401K with 100% company match, profit sharing, and other above-average benefits. As a result, turnover is low and many employees have remained with the company for decades. But good business isn’t just about treating people well. It’s also about how the business is managed and operated. The private company is concerned with far more than just the bottom line. They pay more for the organic flour — a lot more. At press time, escalating flour prices meant they were paying roughly twice the usual cost for organic wheat — $14 a bushel versus around $7. Compare that to the cost of standard commercial wheat, which can be as low as $3 for the same amount, and it becomes evident that Acme is paying attention to more than profits. What’s also remarkable about Acme is that they have achieved a tremendous product output, while still maintaining the rustic nature and quality of the bread. One baker told me that he alone had crafted about a thousand baguettes in an eight-hour shift. Yet any crusty loaf is still properly authentic, yielding

“We can’t take on any new customers, but we have a policy to accomodate existing customers.”

Clockwise from top: Acme staff attending to the hand formed product; Biodiesel delivery fleet, solar panels and the installation of an oven powered radiant floor heating system.
40 Pastry & Baking North America

Olive Loaf

serious crust, great body, and a real earthen flavor. Acme does use some relatively modern, large-scale equipment: They have fitted the firebox of the second location’s wood-fired oven with a gas burner, and use old school L’Oiselet and Kemper spiral mixers. But mostly, Acme still depends on the tools and techniques of small-batch and home baking, such as linenlined wicker baskets for proofing the loaves and balance scales for checking the piece weight. Rolling out puff pastry by hand, and hand-forming individual loaves may not be the most efficient business practices, but Acme feels that they are necessary in order to maintain their standards. Acme’s owners are pressing to make other aspects of their business more sustainable as well. They are in the midst of installing a $475,000 system of solar panels on the roof of their largest baking facility to produce roughly half of the bakery’s needed power. They are working on plans to use the heat generated by the ovens to heat office space and proofing rooms. And ten years ago, before any inkling of corporate greenwashing was at every marketer’s lips, Sullivan began converting Acme’s delivery fleet to natural gas, which now powers about a quarter of their trucks. In an initiative spearheaded by Rick Kirkby, Acme is also in the midst of converting the company’s diesel trucks

Linen proofing cloth

“All 168 of his employees have the benefit of health insurance, 401K, profit sharing, and other aboveaverage benefits.”
41

Bakery in Focus
over to biodiesel and the bakeries are even cleaned with natural products like Borax instead of harsh chemical detergents. He reports that they “support sustainable practices, always. That’s in our company mind.” Why not take the cheaper, faster route to success? Surely a company with Acme’s clout could rest on its laurels by now, and still succeed. The bakery could have easily gone the way of, say, a Boudin or a Parisian (now defunct) two large sourdough bread manufacturers based in the SF Bay Area who crank out loaves nationally and on a large scale. But instead Sullivan has opted to stay local and serve just those who are fortunate enough to live here from Sacramento to Los Gatos, San Francisco to Walnut Creek. “It’s not like my family is walking around barefoot and hungry because of these decisions. But this is not an entrepreneurial effort — we have plenty. Acme grew up within a community that needed better bread and our goal and greatest satisfaction is to supply that community’s needs. People are always trying to buy us, but it’s just not what we want to do.” But ask Sullivan about his contributions to the bread revolution, and he offers only a casual, “Who, me?” shrug. Does he feel he’s part of a culinar y uprising? “A gentle, delicious, revolution,” he concurs, when pressed. “Good food is what happens when agricultural land and a dynamic metropolitan area meet at the gates of the world. Bread’s inherent modestness has allowed it to ride this wave beyond the wealthy elite to a wider public.”

Berkeley retail outlet
42 Pastry & Baking North America

Bakery in Focus

Hand forming the bread

Whole Wheat Loaf

44 Pastry & Baking North America

Cranberry-Walnut Pumpkin Loaves
Yield: 3 small loaves
3 cups bread flour 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp grated nutmeg 1/2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tepid water (80°F - 90°F) 2 tsp active dry yeast 5 tbsp unsalted butter (room temperature) 1/3 cup sugar 8 oz (1 cup) pureed cooked pumpkin or butternut squash 1 large egg (room temperature) 3/4 cup walnut pieces, toasted 1 cup raisins 2/3 cup cranberries

Mixing and Kneading 1. Whisk 22/3 cups of the flour, the cinnamon, nutmeg and salt together in a large bowl. Set aside until needed. 2. Pour the water into a small bowl, sprinkle in the yeast and whisk to blend. Allow the yeast to rest until it’s creamy, about 5 minutes. 3. In a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, beat the butter and sugar at medium speed until creamy. Add the pumpkin and egg and beat until blended. 4. Set the mixer speed to low and add the yeast, and then begin to add the dry ingredients, about 1/2 cup at a time. 5. As soon as the mixture starts to form a dough that comes together, scrape the paddle clean and switch to the dough hook. If your dough does not come together (it might be because your pumpkin puree was liquidy), add a few more tablespoons of flour. 6. Mix and knead the dough on medium-low speed for 10 to 15 minutes, scraping the sides of the bowl and the hook now and then with a rubber spatula. 7. With the mixer on low speed, add the walnuts and raisins, mixing only until incorporated, about 1 minute. Add the cranberries and mix as little as possible to avoid crushing them.

First Rise Scrape the dough into a lightly buttered large bowl, cover tightly with plastic wrap and set aside at room temperature to rise until nearly doubled in bulk, about 2 hours. Chilling the Dough When the dough has doubled, fold it over on itself a couple of times to deflate, wrap it tightly in plastic and refrigerate overnight. Shaping the Dough 1. At least 6 hours before you want to begin baking, remove the dough from the refrigerator. Leave the dough, covered in the bowl, until it reaches at least 64°F on an instant-read thermometer. 2. Lightly butter three 53/4 x 31/4 x 2 inch loaf pans. 3. Working on a lightly floured surface, divide the dough into thirds and pat each piece of dough into 5x7 inch rectangles. 4. Starting at the top of each rectangle, roll up the dough toward you and seal the seam by pressing it with your fingertips. Seal the ends, then place each roll, seam side down, in a prepared pan. Second Rise Cover the pans lightly with a kitchen towel and allow to rise at room temperature for 11/2 - 2 hours, or until the dough has nearly doubled-it will rise to just about the rim of the pans. Baking the Bread 1. Center a rack in the oven and preheat to 350°F. 2. Bake the loaves for about 35 minutes, or until deeply golden. 3. Remove the pans to a cooling rack. After 5 minutes rest, turn the breads out of their pans and allow them to cool to room temperature on the rack. Note To use fresh pumpkin or butternut squash, split the squash, remove the seeds and place, cut side down, on a baking sheet. Roast in a preheated 350°F oven for about 1 hour or until meltingly tender. Scoop the softened pulp out of the shell and cool completely. One pound of squash yields about 12 ounces of cooked pulp.
45

Round Buns

Creative Cakes

Apple-Cranberry and Fromage Blanc Mousse w/ Spiced Apple Filling and Cinnamon Meringue

Tools: 2ea. Tube entremet molds 2ea. Channel insert molds Silicone baking mats Acrylic sheet Acetate plastic sheets Torch Pastry Comb Pastry ruler Rolling pin Pastry wheel

Publisher’s Note: Chef Frank Vollkommer CMPC, (Certified Master Pastry Chef) is the Corporate Executive Chef for Cargill Cocoa and Chocolate headquartered in Lititz, PA. Chef Vollkommer, a former instructor at both The Culinary Institute of America and The New England Culinary Institute has earned the distinction of Certified Master Pastry Chef through the America Culinary Federation. Chef Vollkommer passed the rigorous ten-day exam in 2005 becoming one of thirteen Certified Master Pastry Chefs in the world.

46 Pastry & Baking North America

1.

Brêton Cookie Base 40g Egg yolks 41g Vanilla sugar 80g Butter (room temperature) Pinch Salt 115g Pastry flour 7g Baking powder

• Foam yolks and sugar to ribbon stage. • Add soft butter and salt. • Sift together the pastry flour and baking powder. • Blend in flour mixture. • Chill.

1-2. Prepare the Brêton Cookie Base recipe according to the recipe and chill the dough thoroughly. Roll the dough to 1/8” thickness and cut rectangles slightly smaller that the entremet molds. Egg wash, sprinkle with coarse sugar and bake at 325ºF until golden brown and crisp.

2.

Biscuit Meolleux 57g 10x sugar 57g Almond flour 30g A.P. flour 15g Egg yolks 35g Egg whites 112g Egg whites 57g Sugar 60g Almonds, granulated

• Blend the sugar, almond flour, A.P. flour, yolks and whites to make a smooth paste. • Make a medium peak meringue with the egg whites and sugar. • Spread the mixture onto a parchment lined half sheet and sprinkle with the granulated almonds. • Bake at 375ºF for 6-9 minutes.

3.

3. Prepare the Biscuit Meolleux mixture and bake at 375ºF. Cool the sponge and wrap tightly to prevent it from drying out.

4.

Apple-Cranberry Filling 454g Apples, diced 30g Brown sugar 4g Orange zest 7g Orange juice 1 Vanilla bean 60g Apricot jam 15g White wine 15g Calvados 60g Cranberries, chopped 1 Cinnamon stick Pinch Clove, nutmeg 4g Gelatin 4-5. Carefully stew all of the ingredients for the Apple-Cranberry Filling until the fruit is translucent but retains shape. Remove the vanilla bean and cinnamon stick before adding the bloomed gelatin to the warm filling. Line the channel molds with acetate plastic and spread the mixture evenly. Freeze overnight.

5.

47

Creative Cakes

6.

6-9. Using a pastry wheel and ruler, cut two pieces of Biscuit Meolleux for each entremet mold. Line the bottom and sides of each mold and attach a small sponge rectangle to the Brêton Cookie Base using apricot preserves. Fromage Blanc Mousse 56g Egg yolks 68g Sugar 24g Brandy 185g Fromage blanc/Quark 32g Milk 2g Lemon zest 12g Gelatin 6g Vanilla ext. 180g Cream, medium peaks • • • • • • Make a sabayon with the egg yolks, sugar and brandy. Soften the cheese with the milk and add the zest. Bloom and melt the gelatin with the vanilla. Wisk the gelatin into the sabayon. Fold the sabayon mixture into the cheese. Fold in the whipped cream.

7.

8.
10. Prepare the Fromage Blanc Mousse and fill each mold to slightly above half way making sure to leave room for the Apple-Cranberry Bavarian and Filling. Chill the Fromage Blanc Mousse to set. 11-12. Remove the Apple-Cranberry Filling from the channel mold and place on top of the Fromage Blanc Mousse.

9.

10.
48 Pastry & Baking North America

11.

12.

Apple-Cranberry Bavarian 75g Green apple puree 75g Cranberry puree 10g Raspberry puree 14g Apple liqueur 6g Gelatin 150g Cream, medium peaks 20g Sugar 13-15.

• Warm the purees to 100ºF. • Bloom the gelatin, melt with the apple liqueur and wisk into the puree mixture. Cool to 80ºF. • Whip the cream to soft peaks with the sugar. • Fold in the whipped cream.

13.

Prepare the Apple-Cranberry Bavarian and fill the molds to within 1/4” from the top being sure not to allow any air pockets to form around the frozen fruit insert. Press the Biscuit Meolleux and Brêton Cookie Base into place evenly with the top of the mold and freeze overnight.

14.

Cinnamon Meringue 170g Egg whites 115g Sugar 230g Sugar, granulated 60g Water 1g Cinnamon • Make a stiff meringue with the whites and 10x sugar • Boil the granulated sugar and the water to soft ball stage (240ºF) and add slowly to the meringue. • Cool the meringue on low speed and add the cinnamon.

15.

16-18.

Remove the cakes from the molds and trim the ends. Prepare the Cinnamon meringue and evenly apply a thin layer using a pastry comb. Lightly caramelize the meringue using a torch.

16.

18.

17.
49

Creative Cakes

19.

20.

19-20. To prepare meringue mushroom garnishes, pipe Italian or Swiss meringue onto parchment or silicone baking mats and dry in a 120ºF oven overnight. For apple chips, slice the apples very thinly using a mandolin or sharp knife. Sprinkle the apple slices with powdered sugar and dry in a 120ºF oven until crisp. Store the apple chips and meringues in an airtight container.

21.

22.

23.

24.

25.

21-26. (Garnishes and finishing) Create interesting theme related garnishes with chocolate using textured plastic, acetate, luster powder and colorized cocoa butter. Layer the plastic starting with the luster powder and cocoa butter. Apply thin layers of tempered white and dark chocolate and cut while slightly pliable. Additionally, chocolate “cinnamon sticks” may be created in the same manor as chocolate “cigarettes” by brushing the sticks with cocoa butter and dusting with cinnamon.

50 Pastry & Baking North America

51

Chef in Focus

Bringing The WOW! To Baltimore’s Inner Harbor

Mini Pineapple Upside Down Cake

Being talented, focused and hard working does pay off. In three short years, Julie Jangali has gone from paralegal to heading up the pastry kitchen at Baltimore’s largest hotel.
By Campbell Ross Walker Photography by Cris Molina and Steve Buchanan

52 Pastry & Baking North America

“I feel my background is perfectly suited for a modern day pastry chef. I appreciate attention to detail and beauty and believe there needs to be an equal balance between visual appeal, tradition and taste.”

Preparing the Quartet
53

Chef in Focus

Baltimore Marriott Waterfront: Grill 700

I

t’s inevitable, of course. Change. Nowhere more so than in the hospitality industry. Properties open, restaurants close and chefs move up or out. When opportunity knocks and culinary professionals answer the door, the stress and anticipation of everything a new position has to offer can be taxing. There probably isn’t anything worse than the first few hours at a new job. The introductions, hand shaking, mindless chit chat, awkward pauses and of course the countless first names you try so hard to remember but invariably forget. Being the new guy (or girl) is never easy. Yet, Julie Jangali is handling her new appointment as Senior Pastry Chef at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront with aplomb and loving the opportunity of putting her skills front and center. However, considering Julie’s age, gender and industry experience (3 years) her meteoric rise to helming the pastry operations of Baltimore’s largest hotel has raised eyebrows. “I would be lying if I told you I haven’t encountered animosity along the way. But I won’t be dragged down by other people’s hang ups. What I always try to do is lead by example and when critics appear, I demonstrate my ability and passion for pastry,” Julie reports. “In the end, once they get to know me and experience my love for what I do, those detractors become allays and friends.” Julie’s parents immigrated to the United States when she was 5 and settled in Maryland. She grew up with the benefits of a large, extended family that included an uncle who operated an Iranian bakery. Her father was a jeweler and during her formative years, Julie found herself pulling shifts in both the bakery and jewelry shop. When she wasn’t sketching ring settings or designing intricate, jeweled brooches, Julie was at her uncle’s side deep into the production of Iranian sweets like shirini, bamieh, and Noon nokhodchi.
Inside the Kenmore square outlet

Julie Jangali

54 Pastry & Baking North America

Pineapple Parfait
55

Chef in Focus

Yule Log

“I feel my background is perfectly suited for a modern day pastry chef. I appreciate attention to detail and beauty and believe there needs to be an equal balance between visual appeal, tradition and taste. And with my Iranian heritage, I have the ability to use and play with distinct flavors such as saffron, rose water, cardamom and pistachios,” says Chef Julie. Working hard and being extremely goal oriented is part and parcel of Julie Jangali’s physiological makeup. She is also a firm believer in “doing what you love” so after graduating from American University with honors and landing a job as a paralegal in a prominent DC law firm, she came to grips with the fact that a career in law was not her true calling. “It didn’t get me excited. I knew it wasn’t what I was supposed to be doing. I craved a creative outlet, one in which my vision and work ethic could provide self satisfaction and daily challenges,” explains Julie. With this realization firmly in hand, Julie wasted little time and resigned from her law firm gig and headed straight into the Pasty Arts Program at L’Academie de Cuisine in Maryland. As she expected, Julie excelled in the program and she soon set her sights on gaining real world experience outside the classroom. “While enrolled at L’Academie de Cuisine, I volunteered at the
All Spice Créme Brulée Chocolate Mousse

Albert Uster Sweet Charity event at the Women’s Memorial in Virginia. I figured it was an excellent opportunity to meet working professionals and pitch them on the idea of an apprenticeship. After meeting (and pestering) almost everyone in the room, I was introduced to Executive Pastry Chef Mohan DeSilva from the Wardman Park Marriott Washington, DC. That was a lucky break,” Julie remembers fondly. As it turns out, Chef Mohan was running short handed and was receptive to the idea of a part-time apprentice. Julie’s foot was firmly in the door and after several months of trial by fire, Chef Mohan offered Julie her first full-time pastry job. In a mere 8 months, Julie had made a career altering decision, completed a concentrated culinary program (at the top of her class) and secured a position in Washington’s preeminent pastry kitchen under the tutelage of a renowned chef, very willing to teach and share his craft. For Julie Jangali, the combination of a true mentor and immersion within one of America’s most progressive corporate cultures would prove a winning combination. “I can’t say enough about Chef Mohan. He is truly my culinary hero and guiding light. He took a chance and bestowed upon me a great deal of responsibility, early in my
Cherry & White Chocolate Cocktail

56 Pastry & Baking North America

2007 Sweet Charity Event

career, and I am forever grateful for his support and friendship,” says Julie. Upon landing the perfect job, Julie went to work everyday eager to contribute and discover. Such a healthy, symbiotic relationship is often hard to find in the a la minute world of gastronomy, but in learning more about Chef Julie, the old adage ‘the harder one works, the luckier one becomes’ is on point. Certainly, nothing was handed to this pastry upstart, who constantly pushes herself and her every growing repertoire of skills. Case in point would be her bold initiative to secure a spot on Mohan DeSilva’s 2005 National Team Pastry Championship squad. “I really wanted to compete but being new to the job, I had to work extra hard to impress upon Chef DeSilva that no only could I keep up with the requirements of my dayto-day, but that I could also contribute to the overall success of the team. I earned the spot and was responsible for the chocolate showpiece. It turned out to be one of the highlights of my professional career. We didn’t win but being part of the team was an incredible experience and I learned so much about working with others, organization and time management,” remembers Julie. Chef Julie next turned her sights onto the 2006 Hotelympia in London where she represented the Wardman Park Marriott and returned home with silver medals in Chocolate and Sugar Showpiece and the Cold Buffet. “In my 38 years in the kitchen, Julie Jangali is the most unique, talented chef I’ve had the pleasure of working with. What I most admire is her openness and thirst for knowledge. She arrived at the Wardman Park and asked to be taught.

Chef in Focus
Unlike most fresh graduates who believe they know everything, she understood the tremendous difference between theoretical and practical. In terms of innate talent, organization, determination and creativity, I have not seen her equal,” offers Chef Mohan DeSilva. As Julie gained international exposure and more confidence in her abilities, she was rewarded with more responsibilities at the Wardman Park. Being D.C.’s largest hotel property, State dinners for 900 are rather commonplace. Thus, Chef DeSilva was quick to leverage his new chef and tasked Julie with critical administrative duties such as overall ordering for the hotel pastry kitchen along with the creation, presentation and implementation of the dessert menu for the hotel’s newest outlet, Stone’s Throw Restaurant. “An absolute thrill. When I was asked to create the dessert menu for Stone’s Throw I felt vindicated in my decision to pursue my passion for pastry. The interaction with the restaurant’s executive chef and the F&B management was exciting which was heightened by the positive environment inside the hotel and the overall appreciation for the highest quality desserts,” say Julie. Perhaps a test by a loyal mentor, but Julie’s stunning success with the dessert menu at Stone's Throw put her on the radar of Marriot Corporation higher ups and set the wheels in motion for her consideration in taking charge of the pastry program at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront. It’s worth noting that such contemplation is indeed a rarity in the world of four-five star hotel operations. But Julie works for Marriott, a 2002 Catalyst Award winner for its demonstrated success in advancing women's leadership in the workplace. There is no denying that women are severely underrepresented in the upper tiers of hotel pastry departments. Sure, a great number of female pastry chefs have gained notoriety in restaurants and stand alone shops, but very few make it to the top in hotels. Why is that? Is it because of the traditionally “euro-centric” atmosphere of hotel culinary operations or the heightened demands of the job where volume is king? Think fast: how many female

Espresso Delight

Pistachio Éclairs Cold Cherry Soufflé
58 Pastry & Baking North America

Frangelico Fantasy Mousse
59

Chef in Focus

pastry chefs, executive pastry chefs or corporate pastry chefs can you name that run the operations for a major hotel/hotel group? I do this for a living and I can only think of a handful. It doesn’t help that the U.S. Department of Labor considers ‘chef ’ a “non-traditional” job for women, placing it on the same list with jobs such as construction worker, firefighter and detective. But Marriott is a company that has worked tirelessly to eradicate
60 Pastry & Baking North America

barriers keeping women from advancing in their careers. For that, Marriott should be commended. Pardon the digression. Interestingly enough, the Baltimore waterfront has gone through a recent transformation with a new promenade that is now the focal point of everything. This attractive, wide brick walkway connects many of the Inner Harbor’s most popular attractions, museums and restaurants. You can walk from the far side of the harbor, past the Maryland Science Center and Harborplace, alongside USS Constellation, around the National Aquarium, and around to Fell's Point. Development begets tourists and visitors, who in turn bring disposable income and eventually their conventions and functions. Such an equation sends signals to the hospitality industry and now the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront faces an influx of competitors. Unfortunately, the hotel has been without a pastry chef from the last two years, relying on the executive chef, pastry cooks and outside suppliers to plug the gaps. In this new environment, hotel management realized they needed to raise their gastronomic bar and marching orders were given to find a pastry chef. Not just any pastry chef but one who could be instrumental in helping the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront differentiate itself from the ever increasing pack of challengers and infuse a “wow” factor in the display, presentation and taste of the properties’ showpieces and desserts. To make a not-so-long story shorter, Julie was contacted by Marriott management and alerted to the opening in Baltimore. A quick check with Chef DeSilva (loyalty is an excellent quality) and she enthusiastically threw her hat into the ring for consideration. Needless to say, she aced the interview, clicked with the executive chef and F&B director and started in September 2007. Like any new job, it takes time to acclimate and find your grove. New faces and attitudes, different kitchen set-up with new equipment, fresh suppliers etc. But all of this inconsequential to Chef Julie. She is focused on making the most of this rare opportunity and determined to prove to herself (and others) she made the right decision in following her heart and pursuing her pastry passion.

Julie and Executive Chef Tim Mullen

Tropical Pleasure
Coconut Dacquois Sponge (Base of pineapple mousse)
300g egg whites 80g sugar 110g icing sugar 70g ground almonds 125g ground coconut 70g starch 35g butter

1. Mix the egg whites with the sugar until stiff then delicately add the sifted ground almonds, icing sugar, ground coconut, starch then the cold melted butter. 2. Spread the coconut dacquois over a silicone mat and smooth with a spatula 3. Bake at 160°C for 15 minutes.

Pineapple Mousse
380g pineapple puree 18g gelatin 300g sugar 300 ml water 150g egg whites 380g whipped cream

1. Heat half the puree with the sugar to 45°C. 2. Incorporate the hydrated gelatin then strain. 3. Cool the mixture with the other half of the puree before adding the whipped cream.

Wild Sweets

More with Agar
Unique properties provide opportunities to make preparations with novel tastes and/or textures.
Publisher’s Note: Dominique and Cindy Duby are the chefs and owners of DC DUBY Wild Sweets®, a critically acclaimed chocolate atelier and virtual boutique, which has emerged as one of North America’s finest artisan chocolatiers. The couple also owns DC DUBY Hospitality Services Inc., a Vancouver-based international firm offering culinary training and consulting services to hotels and catering companies worldwide, as well as culinary creative and marketing services such as product development, food styling, and photography. For more information, visit www.dcduby.com

DC DUBY | ELEMENTS | AGAR – Part 2
The typical ratio to make an agar gel is around 1% of total liquids. Note that too much agar will result in a gel with a ‘grainy’ texture. Agar gels are not very ‘elastic’ and can actually break quite easily, thus these gels are best served flat or cut into small shapes. Elasticity can be improved though the addition of some sorbitol or glycerin. Salt, sugar or slight acidity does not affect the gelling process with agar. However, since liquids need to be heated to the boiling point, for fresh herb juices and other similar liquids that are prone to quick oxidation, agar is not recommended as the gelling agent. Other ‘specialty’ hydrocolloids yielding similar gelling properties as agar such as carageeanan or gellan are starting to surface as these provide distinct properties such as increased elasticity, softer setting or lower melting point. Since all of these hydrocolloids are plant based they are also used as a vegetarian alternative to gelatin. The follow ing recipe showcases another example of a hot gelée taken from our latest book: Wild Sweets Chocolate.

HOT RASPBERRY GELÉE WITH DARK CHOCOLATE ‘MARSHMALLOW’
Serves 8

Hot Raspberry Gelée
1 cup (250 ml) raspberry purée 1/2 tsp (2.5 ml) DC DUBY Elements Agar* pinch of citric acid (optional) 1/2 leaf gelatin 4 Tbsp (60 ml) corn syrup *NB: Other sources of agar may be substituted, but gelling properties and firmness may differ. Line a 4 x 8 inch (10 x 20 cm) shallow container with plastic wrap. Place the raspberry purée into a tall and narrow container. Add the agar powder, citric acid (if using) and blend with an immersion blender. Transfer the mixture into a saucepan, add the corn syrup and bring to a boil. Continue to cook until the mixture begins to thicken, then remove from the heat and stir in the gelatin until dissolved. Immediately pour into the plastic wrap-lined container. Let it set at room temperature. Store the Gelée in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Serve warm.

1.
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2.

3.

4.

Dark Raspberry Chocolate
3.6 oz (100 g) 70% dark chocolate, chopped 1 cup (250 ml) raspberry purée 1 cup (250 ml) whipping cream Place the chocolate in a tall and narrow container. Bring the raspberry purée and whipping cream to a boil in a saucepan. Remove from the heat and pour over the chocolate. Blend with an immersion blender until well combined and frothy. Serve immediately.

1.

2.

3.

4.
Cocoa Crisp
3 Tbsp (45g) unsalted butter, room temperature 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar 3 Tbsp (45ml) orange juice 1 1/2 Tbsp (15g) all-purpose flour 1 Tbsp (8g) unsweetened cocoa powder

5.
Cream the butter and sugar with a spatula. Add the orange juice and mix until well combined. Sift in the flour and cocoa powder. Fold to combine. Refrigerate the batter in a sealed container for at least 2 hours (overnight is best). Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Line a baking tray with a silicon mat or paper. Shape the cold batter into 11/2” squares. Bake for approximately 4 to 6 minutes. Remove from the tray and let them cool on a wire rack. Once cooled, store in an airtight container.

1.

2.
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Wild Sweets

3. 4. 5.
Bring 5 Tbsp (75 g) of the sugar to a boil in a saucepan with the water. Simmer until it begins to thicken (around 230°F/110°C).

Chocolate ‘Marshmallow’
6 Tbsp (90g) granulated sugar, divided 2 Tbsp (30ml) water 3 Tbsp (30ml) egg whites 1 leaf gelatin, bloomed 1 Tbsp (8g) unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted

Meanwhile, whip the egg whites on medium speed with an electric mixer. When the sugar water begins to thicken, turn the mixer’s speed to maximun and add the remaining 1 Tbsp (15 g) sugar. Continue whipping for 30 seconds. Add the hot thickened sugar syrup with the machine still running. Add the gelatin, and when well imcorporated, reduce the speed to low and continue mixing until the mixture thickens (about 4 to 5 minutes). Add the cocoa powder, fold with a rubber spatula, and serve immediately.

1.

2.

3.
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4.

Suggested Assembly
Cut the Hot Raspberry Gelée into desired shapes. Pipe or spoon some Chocolate Marshmallow on top of the Raspberry Gelée. Spike 3 Cocoa Crisps into the gelée and finish with fresh raspberries and a mint leaf. Serve immedately with a glass of hot frothed Dark Raspberry Chocolate.

1.

2.

3.

Hot Raspberry Gelée with Dark Chocolate ‘Marshmallow’
Photography by DC Duby

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A S I A

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Asian Fusion

Green Tea Cake
Green tea is one of the most popular beverages to hit North America in the last decade. Unlike black tea or oolong, green tea is made from unfermented tea leaves. Because it is does not go through a fermentation process, research suggests that it contains the highest concentration of polyphenols, antioxidants that rid of the body of free radicals. In Asia, where people smoke heavily and green tea is widely consumed, there is a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Some scientists refer to this as the “Asian Paradox” and draw a direct linkage between this phenomenon and green tea consumption.
Publisher’s Note: Successful entrepreneur, award winning author, instructor, international representative and current President of the Korean Bakers Association, Chef Kim Young Mo is an institution. As a trailblazing visionary in the pastry and baking fusion movement, Chef Kim marries his classical European training with his appreciation for Asian ingredients and tastes. Photos and text courtesy of Dream Character, Inc.

RECIPE
Green Tea Sponge
50g (1/4 cup) Milk 8g (11/2 tbsp) Green tea powder 60g (3) Egg yolks 17g (4 tsp) A. sugar 67g (1/2 cup) Cake flour 17g (3 tbsp) Almond flour 2g (1/2 tsp) Vanilla extract 33g (2 1/2 tbsp) Unsalted butter 90g (3) Egg whites 100g (1/2 cup and 2 tbsp) B. sugar

Green tea cream
10g (2 tbsp) Green tea powder 20g (4 tsp) Orange liqueur 150g (3/4 cup) unsalted butter 300g (11/4 cups) Custard cream

Toppings
Sweet red beans Chopped walnuts 200g (7 oz) White chocolate

Before you begin: 1. Preheat the oven to 430°F/222C. Grease or line the 15”x11” (38cm x 28cm) rectangular cake pan with parchment paper and set aside. 2. Mix and sift the cake flour and almond flour from the sponge ingredients and set aside. 3. Make the custard cream before making the green tea cream and keep it refrigerated. 4. Put butter (from sponge ingredients) in a separate bowl and place the bowl over a saucepan of hot water to melt the butter. Keep melted until ready to use for the sponge.

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Asian Fusion

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Steps: 1. Green Tea Sponge. Put milk and green tea powder in a pot bring to a boil. Once a boil is reached, turn of the heat. 2. Beat the egg yolks and A. sugar in a bowl for about 1 minute. Then, add the hot green tea milk little by little while beating the batter (do not pour all at once). Beat the batter for 2-3 minutes. In a separate bowl, put egg whites and B. sugar and make a stiff meringue. 3. Add half of the meringue and mix in with a rubber spatula. Add the sifted cake flour and almond flour and fold in well. Add the melted butter and mix in together. 4. Add the remaining meringue and vanilla extract and gently fold in well. 5. Bake. Pour the batter onto the prepared pan and use a scraper to level out the batter. In a preheated oven, bake for approximately 6 minutes at 430°F. Remove the sponge and cool on a rack. When the sponge is completely cool, carefully remove the parchment paper and cut the sponge into four squares (or rectangles). 6. Green tea cream. While you are waiting for the sponge to cool down, make the green tea cream. First, combine green tea powder and orange liqueur in a bowl and mix. Then, beat the butter in a separate bowl for 1-2 minutes. Add the custard cream to the butter and whisk a few times, then add the green tea powder with liqueur and whisk together well.

6.
68 Pastry & Baking North America

6a.

7. 8. 9.
7. Layering. Spread the green tea cream over the bottom sponge, sprinkle on the sweet red beans and apply a thin layer of cream again. Put another sponge on top and repeat.

10.
8. After you put the last sponge on top, apply a thick layer of cream and tap the cream using the tip of a metal spatula to make small, wave-like peaks. 9. Decoration. Scrape the white chocolate using a cookie cutter to get nice, decorative flakes. Scrape enough to loosely cover the cake. 10. Trim all four sides of the cake. Sprinkle on the white chocolate flakes to complete decoration.

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