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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012
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Internet for teens
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BY JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Student athletes and their
peers at Hopewell Valley Central
High School got some coaching in
life on Jan 19.
Joe Ehrmann, who played de-
fensive tackle in the NFL for 13
years with the Baltimore Colts
and Detroit Lions before ending
his career in 1985 in the now-de-
funct United States Football
League, told the students how ex-
cited he was for the opportunity
they have to make a difference in
the world.
He was invited to speak to the
coaches at the school in the morn-
ing and the students in the after-
noon by Jon Butler, executive di-
rector of Pop Warner Little Schol-
ars, who serves on the board of
the Hopewell Valley Recreation
Foundation.
You are signs of hope for your
families, your countries and your
world, Ehrmann told several
hundred students at an afternoon
assembly in the school auditori-
um. There are a tremendous
number of people who need to
know that tomorrow will be bet-
ter than today, and its people like
you that can make that happen.
All the isms in the world, he
said, racism, sexism, all margin-
alize the individual.
How do you define the kind of
man or woman you are going to
be, he asked, before telling the
students to turn to each other and
JIM WRIGHT/The Sun
Former NFL defensive tackle Joe Ehrmann offered students some life coaching at Hopewell Valley
Central High School on Jan. 20.
Ehrmann coaches life
please see LINEMAN, page 2
BY JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Fox Run Road residents are
tired of seeing their neighbors
houses on Mine Road lit up while
they wait out power outages after
storms, and they want to switch
from Jersey Central Power &
Light to Public Service Electric &
Gas.
About 40 of those township res-
idents were at a special presenta-
tion on Jan. 24 at which JCP&L
representatives reviewed their
power-restoration procedures
and pledged to increase their reli-
ability to customers.
I cannot impress enough on
you that there are a lot of folks
committed to this issue, to mak-
ing sure that we are providing
services to our customers,
JCP&L area manager John An-
derson told those assembled in
the auditorium of the Hopewell
Valley Regional Central High
School. This is a top priority and
we are going to address your con-
cerns.
Those concerns ranged from
lengthy delays in restoring power
after the two snowstorms and
Hurricane Irene last year, to a
drop in property values resulting
from unreliable electrical service.
Two extremely severe storms
caused the most significant dam-
age in JCP&L history, Anderson
said. We are working diligently
to improve service and reliability
in Hopewell Township.
Residents, however, were not
convinced of Andersons sinceri-
ty.
I live one house away from
Mine Road, which has power sup-
plied by PSE&G, said Fox Run
Road resident Blair Miller. It
seems to me you cant compete
with PSE&G. For three storms,
including March, we were with-
Fox Run
Road wants
PSE&G
Residents eager to switch
electric providers after
frustration with JCP&L
please see RESIDENTS, page 5
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012
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TH
state their definition of what it
means to be a man or a woman.
Most of the perceptions they
have, he said, have come from
adults in their lives, from the
media or from advertisers on
Madison Avenue.
A misconception that mas-
culinity has to do with athletic
prowess comes from the culture
of sports, he said.
One of the first lies that boys
are told at about 8 or 9 years old is
that being a man has to do with
athletic ability, he said. Being a
man has absolutely nothing to do
with athletic ability. Sports is a
tool that you use to bring fulfill-
ment to life. Its a means to an
end. What that end has to be is the
development of boys into men
and girls into women.
Our culture, he told the stu-
dents, has tried to conform peo-
ple, then judge them if they do
not measure up to societys stan-
dards.
You move toward and become
that which you believe about
yourself, he said, using the anal-
ogy of a giant keyboard around
everyones neck. Society gets to
type in whatever messages it
wants, and most of that is totally
false and erroneous informa-
tion.
How do you stand up and de-
fine yourself, he asked several
times. What are you going to
stand for and what are you going
to stand against?
All of you have been pro-
grammed to see certain aspects of
yourself and others and discount
the rest. Youre locking on to cer-
tain truths and missing out on all
the other truths.
Advertisers for example, he ex-
plained, take advantage of con-
sumers insecurity that they are
not measuring up to societys
standards.
Young boys in America are
taught that they have to separate
their heart from their heads, he
said. That creates most of the so-
cial problems in this country.
He explained that he learned
this lesson firsthand during his
seventh season with the Colts
while his brother Billy was dying
of cancer.
When he was lying there in
that hospital bed, facing his own
mortality with tears in his eyes, I
should have given him a hug, told
him how much I loved him and
wiped those tears away, he re-
called. Instead, all I had were the
tired old locker room speeches
about suck it up and be a man.
Society, he explained, defines
manhood by sexual prowess, ath-
letic ability and economic suc-
cess.
All kinds of men associate
their self worth with their net
worth, he said.
The socialization pattern leads
to an inability to put emotions
and feelings into words.
Boys are never given permis-
please see STUDENTS, page 4
Lineman: misconception
about masculinity has
come from sports culture
LINEMAN
Continued from page 1
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012
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sion to express emotions or devel-
op a vocabulary to express them,
he said. That leads to empathy-
deficient disorder. Then there is
isolation because there is no way
to express emotions.
That, he said, leads to sub-
stance abuse or violence.
You do whatever you need to
do to feel more attuned to your
masculinity, he said.
Somewhere we have to raise a
generation of men that can speak
from their heart.
The misconception that man-
hood has to do with sexual
prowess, he explained, has raised
a generation of men who think
they can use their size and
strength to control, use and hurt
women.
We need a generation of men
who can call out other men, he
said.
Young women, he said, are also
affected by societys expectations.
The socialization process has
taught young girls that worthy
women will be rescued by their
Prince Charming, he said, and
their value and worth are deter-
mined by their beauty, body type
and size based on marketing and
the media.
Girls feel like they have to be
subjugated to have their needs
met, he said. And when they
dont have what society says they
should have, they blame them-
selves.
The definition of masculinity
and femininity, he said, Comes
down to two things and two
things only: The ability to love
and be loved, and to know that
you made some kind of difference
in the world.
All of life is about relation-
ships, he said, adding that, We
all have a responsibility to give
back. Identify a cause thats big-
ger than yourself.
Leadership begins each and
every day that you walk the halls
of this school, he told the stu-
dents. Its not how youre gonna
conform to the world, its how
youre gonna change it.
At the end of the program, sev-
eral students commented on it.
Loved it, said one student at
the conclusion of the assembly.
It was good, said John Cov-
antes as he moved toward the
door. He gave us a lot of things to
take with us, not only in sports
but in everyday life.
STUDENTS
Continued from page 2
Students gave positive
feedback after program
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out power for five or six days.
Resident Bruce Clark told An-
derson that the JCP&L website
needs more street-specific infor-
mation.
I know you guys are address-
ing this, but just telling the mayor
is not working. When someone
tells me I may get power restored
within 10 days, I cant plan, he
said. The power may come on in
a few hours, it may be days.
Anderson said residents
should call in power outages for
the company to get a better idea
of the extent of an outage loca-
tion.
This storm made it very diffi-
cult to say when power would be
restored, he said. We are work-
ing very diligently to try and re-
fine that. Clearly, were not there
yet but when you have that
much damage, we cannot offer
specific information about when
power will be restored.
During non-storm mode, he
said, the company actually is very
accurate in predicting power
restorations.
He noted that restorations are
prioritized based on the number
of customers affected. Hazard-re-
sponders, he said, go to the scene
of outages first and assess dam-
age such as broken poles and
strands of down wire.
Once the area is made safe, line
crews are dispatched to restore
power based on the extent of the
outage.
Mayor Michael Markulec, how-
ever, questioned the priority sys-
tem the company uses.
There are lots of homes on
septic systems and wells, he
said. When we lose power, we
lose water, so the priority system
that you use really doesnt make
sense in a rural environment.
Anderson said the company
plans to continue to improve
its reliability rather than relin-
quish its service area in the town-
ship.
Customers would have to peti-
tion the state board of public util-
ities to get switched to the nearby
PSE&G grid and prove that the
lack of service warrants such a
switch.
Residents asked the township
to consider switching to PSE&G
from JCP&L, and Markulec said
the issue would be discussed at a
future meeting.
Markulec and Committee-
woman Vanessa Sandom were the
only committee members to at-
tend the Jan. 24 meeting, so a quo-
rum was not present, and action
could not be taken. Markulec said
Deputy Mayor James Burd could
not attend because of a family
emergency.
This is not a very large area to
look at, Sandom said to Ander-
son. And these folks deserve
more of an answer than we are
getting. You need to help us figure
out if this is a tree issue or a sys-
temic grid issue.
Richard King, supervisor of
engineering for JCP&L, had told
residents during a slide presenta-
tion that 56 percent of the power
outages last year were caused by
trees.
PSE&G has trees, too, and
they dont seem to have the prob-
lems that you do, one resident
old Anderson.
All we want is to be able to
have lights, flush our toilets and
brush our teeth, Sandom said to
Anderson. We are going to rely
on you to come back to us with
answers on what the problems
are, how you are going to fix them
and when.
Responding to several resi-
dents questions about a time-
frame for improved reliability,
Anderson would only say the
company needs to review the
input from the residents and
study the problems.
Anderson said he would have
regular meetings with the com-
mittee on the progress of improv-
ing the reliability.
RESIDENTS
Continued from page 1
Residents ask township to consider
switching energy companies
CALL TO READERS
Do you have an interesting Valentines Day story? Perhaps you had a disastrous date? Maybe you even proposed to your significant other on Valentines Day?
If so, we want to hear from you. Share your story by emailing kcanessa@elauwit.com, with Unique Valentines Day story as the subject line. We may just feature your
experience in our Valentines Day special.
in our opinion
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
G
ov. Christie was pretty excited
during his State of the State
Address. Then again, it does-
nt take much to get him excited.
But this time he had reason. The
state indeed has made quite a come-
back. The numbers back up that
claim: job creation, lower taxes, com-
panies moving to the state, etc.
And while the economy remains job
No. 1 for Christie and the state, anoth-
er of his priorities might well prove to
be the most contentious.
Christie proposed six far-reaching
reforms to the states public education
system: end tenure protection for
weak teachers; remove the least effec-
tive teachers instead of the newest if
layoffs are necessary; attract and re-
tain effective teachers where they are
most needed by paying them more;
ending forced placements; give par-
ents and children in failing schools an
alternative through charter schools;
and establish tax credits to provide
scholarships for low-income children
so that they might be able to attend a
better school.
These are, as the governor noted,
pretty much common sense.
Think of your business, for exam-
ple. Are poor employees protected?
Should you keep the best employees or
those who have been there the longest?
Shouldnt the best employees be paid
more? Should your department head
be forced to take an employee he or
she doesnt want?
And, shouldnt kids have the oppor-
tunity to attend the best schools possi-
ble?
The last several years have been dif-
ficult. As the governor noted, there
was some bitter medicine New Jersey
had to swallow to get better. But it is
getting better.
And hes right when he says the fu-
ture of the state depends on the quali-
ty of education it provides. New Jer-
sey has a history of producing, in
many cases, outstanding students.
These changes will reinforce that his-
tory and expand upon it.
Gov.: the rally caps worked
Christies comeback hasnt reached the finish line yet
Time to tackle education
The governors plans for education
reform likely will be opposed in some
quarters. But, if enacted, they will
build upon the states history of pro-
ducing outstanding students.
Visit us online at hopewellsun.com
PEAC will be hosting the MOMS Club of
Hopewell Valleys Kids Fun Run on March
11 from 1 to 3 p.m.
The MOMS Club of Hopewell Valley is a
local chapter of the International MOMS
Club, a non-profit organization. The mis-
sion of the MOMS Club is to provide a day-
time social outlet for mothers who have
chosen to stay at home to raise their chil-
dren. Hopewell Valleys MOMS Club is
comprised of 45 members, supporting and
performing at least one community service
project each year.
This year, the MOMS Club is working
with the Hopewell Valley YMCA to raise
funds to introduce Safety Town, a one-
week summer program, offered to rising
Hopewell Valley kindergarteners.
Safety Town provides an introduction to
safety with assistance from local youth vol-
unteers, and features visits from police,
firefighters, paramedics and other local
first responders. Safety Town is a realistic,
child-sized town with miniature streets,
buildings, crosswalks and working traffic
lights.
Safety Town offers an authentic setting
for bicycle, pedestrian and vehicular safety
instruction.
The inaugural Safety Town is scheduled
to be held at Hopewell Valley Elementary
School on June 25 to 29 from 9 a.m. to noon,
with limited space available for 40 partici-
pants.
The Kids Fun Run includes a wide range
of activities for kids, age pre-school to fifth-
grade. In addition to the run, there will be
a moon bounce, creative dance class, obsta-
cle course, face painting, carnival games,
giveaways, plus community vendors mak-
ing a fun-filled event.
Pre-registration is on or before March 1,
with a cost of $10 per child.
After March 1, the cost is $15 per child.
Walk-ins are welcome and parents must
remain in attendance throughout the en-
tire event to supervise the safety of their
children.
All proceeds from the Kids Fun Run will
support the Safety Town project.
Those interested in learning more about
Safety Town and to register for the sum-
mer 2012 session should email momsclubti-
tusvillehopewell@yahoo.com or visit
www.hvymca.org/preschool/safety-town.
Donations for the Hopewell Valley Safe-
ty Town may be mailed to the Hopewell
Valley MOMS Club, P.O. Box 43, Titusville,
08560. PEAC is located at 1440 Lower Ferry
Road in Ewing.
MOMs Club of Hopewell Valley
hosting Kids Fun Run in March
Teenagers have a place to surf
the Web or otherwise work on a
computer at the Hopewell Valley
YMCA thanks to Eagle Scout
Mark Tengi.
Tengi, who received his Eagle
Scout award, the highest honor in
Scouting, in October, transformed
an upper floor of the South Main
Street building in Pennington
into a computer lab.
Planning and completion of
the project, he said, took the bet-
ter part of two years.
My mom told me about the
teen center, the Hopewell Valley
Central High School senior re-
called. I got in contact with Mrs.
[Kim] Bruno and we talked about
the things we could do there.
Part of the requirement for the
Eagle Scout award is a service
project planned and coordinated
by the candidate.
The center is funded by the
Straube Foundation, and Tengi
said the Hopewell Township
Youth Advisory Committee ap-
plied for and received a $15,000
grant for the learning center to be
used by high school and middle
school students.
Part of that allocation was
used for the computer project.
Four state-of-the-art computers
were purchased with extensive
software libraries, including Mi-
crosoft Office and Adobe Suites.
I was delighted to work with
Mark, Bruno said. He was com-
mitted to the project and in
achieving the goals outlined by
the youth advisory board. He
transitioned a meeting room into
The Straube Learning Center.
The room is fantastic. I encour-
age everyone to visit it.
The project also involved wash-
ing the windows, painting the
walls, radiator and molding.
Tengi and his crew of volun-
teers also mounted a whiteboard
that had been stored in the attic.
About five or six Scouts from
Tengis Troop No. 44 helped with
the project, along with volunteers
from the community service
group at the Pennington School
on Delaware Avenue.
They were really very nice
and really very helpful, Tengi
said of the student volunteers,
adding his thanks to the Hopewell
Valley Lions Club for providing
food for the project.
Luckily, there were no major
problems, he said. Its like any-
thing, nothing goes exactly as you
planned, but it turned out fine.
The deadline was a little rushed,
because apparently if it wasnt
finished by a certain date, they
would lose the funding.
The project was completed by
the end of April. Tengi presented
an overview of his project to the
Troop Committee in October at
his board of review, at which
adult members of the troop re-
view the qualifications for Eagle
Scout candidates in an interview
before approving the application.
Tengi was then awarded his Eagle
Scout badge at a Court of Honor
in October.
FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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CALL TO READERS
Do you have an interesting Valentines Day story? Perhaps you
had a disastrous date? Maybe you even proposed to your signifi-
cant other on Valentines Day? If so, we want to hear from you.
Share your story by sending us an email to
kcanessa@elauwit.com, with Unique Valentines Day story as
the subject line. We may just feature your experience in our
Valentines Day special.
WEDNESDAY
February 1
FOR ALL
Mind, Body, Spirit : 7 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library.
MONDAY
February 6
FOR ALL
Township Committee Meeting Spe-
cial Budget: 5 p.m. at Municipal
Building.
Joint Committee Meeting with
HPC: 7 p.m. at Municipal Building.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library.
Tai Chi: 7:30 p.m. at the Hopewell
Branch Library.
TUESDAY
February 7
FOR ALL
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library.
Reiki Guided Meditation: 7 to
8 p.m. at the Hopewell Branch
Library.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
SCOUT SURFS THE WEB
Mark Tengi works on an iMac he was able to help purchase through his Eagle Scout project.
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meet-
ing or affair listed in the
Calendar or Meetings, infor-
mation must be received, in
writing, two weeks prior to
the date of the event.
Send information by mail to:
Calendar, The Hopewell Sun,
103 Carnegie Center, Suite
300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
Or by email:
calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calen-
dar listing through our web-
site (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is
available and the quality of
the photo is sufficient. Every
attempt is made to provide
coverage to all organizations.
Visit us online at
hopewellsun.com
FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
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The following are reports from
Hopewell police:
Sometime between 8:50 a.m.
and 11:20 a.m. on Jan. 13, someone
entered a Mine Road home
through an unlocked basement
level sunroom window and took
$200 worth of jewelry.
Sometime between 3:30 p.m.
Jan. 13 and 7:50 a.m. Jan. 17,
someone used a chair to break the
plastic conduit used to protect a
bell tower rope. The damage was
estimated at $20.
An 85-year-old Trenton woman
was issued a summons for failure
to maintain lane after a two-car
crash along North Route 31 near
Woosamonsa Road on Jan. 20. Po-
lice say the woman was driving a
2010 Mercedes E350 south at 5:40
p.m. when she crossed over into
the northbound lane and struck
an oncoming 2010 Toyota Corrolla
driven by a 51-year-old Lopatcong
man head on. The Pennington
First Aid Squad and personnel
from Hopewell Valley Emergency
Services responded to the acci-
dent scene. The second driver was
transported to an area hospital
where he was treated for neck
pain. The woman and her 88-year-
old husband, who was a passen-
ger in the car, were both trans-
ported to an area hospital where
they were treated for minor facial
injuries. Traffic was diverted on
to the southbound lane and south-
bound shoulder for approximate-
ly 30 minutes while the accident
was investigated.
A 20-year-old Hopewell man
suffered minor injuries in a one-
car crash on Harbourton Rock-
town Road on Jan. 21 at 3:49 a.m.
Police say the man was driving
northbound in a 1995 Ford Bronco
when it slid across a snowy road-
way, struck a guardrail and land-
ed on its roof. The man was treat-
ed on the scene by the Union First
Aid Squad for minor leg and hand
injuries.
A 43-year-old Stewartsville
man was uninjured in a one-car
accident on North Route 31 near
Route 518 on Jan. 21 at 12:49 p.m.
Police say the man was driving a
Lexus RX300 southbound when it
slid across the snowy roadway
and struck a utility pole.
A 25-year-old Hopewell woman
was uninjured in a one-car acci-
dent on Hopewell Rocky Hill Road
on Jan. 21 at 1:35 p.m. Police say
the woman was driving a 2006
Volvo S60 westbound when it slid
across the snowy roadway and
struck a utility pole.
POLICE REPORT
The Hopewell Valley Historical
Society will host New Jersey in
the American Revolution at the
Mercer County Library, Hopewell
Branch, Feb. 8 at 7 p.m.
Arthur S. Lefkowitz, independ-
ent researcher and author, will
give a slideshow presentation
based on his book The Long Re-
treat.
The program focuses on the
British invasion of New Jersey in
late 1776, which ended with Wash-
ingtons famous Christmas-night
raid on Trenton.
The speaker will demonstrate
that the closest the British ever
came to winning a military victo-
ry in the American Revolution
was at New Brunswick on Dec. 1,
1775.
This program is funded by the
Horizons Speakers Bureau of the
N.J. Council for the Humanities, a
state partner of the National En-
dowment for the Humanities
The library is located at 245
Pennington-Titusville Road in
Pennington, next to Hopewell Val-
ley Central High School.
Program focuses on
New Jersey during war
A community Valentines
Spaghetti Dinner hosted by TGIF,
an ecumenical junior and senior
high school youth group, will be
held Feb. 11 from5 to 7 p.m. at the
Pennington United Methodist
Church.
Tickets are $8 for those age 12
and older and $5 for those age 5 to
11. Those younger than 5 will be
admittedfree.
For tickets, call Carla and Rick
MacGuigan at (609) 818-9281. A
gluten-free option is available.
Proceeds fromthedinner will sup-
port TGIFyouthmissionwork.
Community spaghetti dinner on Feb. 11
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 1-7, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
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Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
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Home Improvement
Roofing
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