Wire Wrapping

LInda Chandler
and Christine Ritchey

Reef Knot Bracelet

To o l s an d E q u i pm e nt

Simpler to make than it looks, this bracelet is also called

Flat-nose pliers

a Celtic or lover’s knot. Its simple elegance can be varied

Flush cutters
Step-nose pliers
Nylon-jaw pliers
Chain-nose pliers

by adding beads to the sides or removing the stone

Flat file

from the center.

¼" (6 mm) diameter dowel or stepped

Penknife
mandrel
3/8" (1 cm) diameter dowel or stepped
mandrel
5/16" (8 mm) diameter dowel or stepped
mandrel
Ruler
Felt-tip marker
Masking tape
Acetone or Goo-Gone

yo u ’ ll n ee d
About 44" (112 cm) of 21-gauge (0.71 mm),
square, half-hard, gold-filled wire
About 20" (51 cm) of 18-gauge (1.0 mm),
half-round, half-hard, gold-filled or
sterling silver wire
About 2¾" (7 cm) 20-gauge, square, deadsoft, gold-filled wire
6mm faceted stone
6mm gold-filled snap setting
Four or more beads approximately 3mm
in diameter. Note: the holes in the beads
should be big enough to allow the beads
to slide onto 21-gauge (0.71 mm) square
wire. It may be necessary to experiment
with different bead sizes in order to get
a proper fit. 

Reef Knot Bracelet

To o l s an d E q u i pm e nt

Simpler to make than it looks, this bracelet is also called

Flat-nose pliers

a Celtic or lover’s knot. Its simple elegance can be varied

Flush cutters
Step-nose pliers
Nylon-jaw pliers
Chain-nose pliers

by adding beads to the sides or removing the stone

Flat file

from the center.

¼" (6 mm) diameter dowel or stepped

Penknife
mandrel
3/8" (1 cm) diameter dowel or stepped
mandrel
5/16" (8 mm) diameter dowel or stepped
mandrel
Ruler
Felt-tip marker
Masking tape
Acetone or Goo-Gone

yo u ’ ll n ee d
About 44" (112 cm) of 21-gauge (0.71 mm),
square, half-hard, gold-filled wire
About 20" (51 cm) of 18-gauge (1.0 mm),
half-round, half-hard, gold-filled or
sterling silver wire
About 2¾" (7 cm) 20-gauge, square, deadsoft, gold-filled wire
6mm faceted stone
6mm gold-filled snap setting
Four or more beads approximately 3mm
in diameter. Note: the holes in the beads
should be big enough to allow the beads
to slide onto 21-gauge (0.71 mm) square
wire. It may be necessary to experiment
with different bead sizes in order to get
a proper fit. 

Step 1. Straighten about 36" (91.5 cm) of the 21-gauge (0.71 mm) wire
and cut it into four pieces 9" (23 cm) long. Lay the pieces evenly
side-by-side and mark the center of the wires with a felt-tip
marker (Figure 1).
1

wire center

2

Step 2. Curve two of the wires into a U shape by bending over approximately a 3/8" (1 cm) diameter dowel or step ring mandrel
(Figures 2). Curve the two remaining wires over approximately a
5/16" (8 mm) dowel or step ring mandrel.
Step 3. Fit the U-shaped wires closely inside each other—smaller
diameter U inside larger—so you have two pairs, and secure
each pair with tape, as shown in Figure 3. Bend each pair into a
slight curve (Figure 4). Make the pairs and curves as identical as
possible.
Step 4. Slip the two pairs of wire inside each other, forming a loose
“knot” (Figure 5). Pull the two pairs of wire, tightening the knot to
a moderate degree (Figure 6).

Step 5. Once the knot is tightened, use chain-nose pliers to spread the
opening enough to accommodate the snap setting for the 6mm
stone, which will be placed in the center (Figure 7).
Step 6. Press the snap setting firmly over the back side of the stone
(Figure 8). This may require some force before the setting snaps
into place.

7

Step 7. To help hold the stone in the setting, use chain-nose pliers
to lightly squeeze all the prongs side-by-side, as shown in
(Figure 9). Squeeze the prongs on one side, then go to the
opposite side and do the same, continuing until all the prongs
are snug and even. The idea is to squeeze the prongs just
enough to tighten the stone a little.

8

Step 8. Straighten and cut a 7" (8 cm) length of the 21-gauge (0.71 mm)
wire. This wire will hold the stone and beads. Slide one end of
this wire in the center, underneath the top end of the knot, as
shown in (Figure 10). Slide the wire down until it is even with the
other wires. You may have to remove the tape to accomplish this,
but then re-tape after inserting the wire.
9

3
top view

wire under
here
side view

Chapter 4: Take It Further

4

5

6

10 

Step 1. Straighten about 36" (91.5 cm) of the 21-gauge (0.71 mm) wire
and cut it into four pieces 9" (23 cm) long. Lay the pieces evenly
side-by-side and mark the center of the wires with a felt-tip
marker (Figure 1).
1

wire center

2

Step 2. Curve two of the wires into a U shape by bending over approximately a 3/8" (1 cm) diameter dowel or step ring mandrel
(Figures 2). Curve the two remaining wires over approximately a
5/16" (8 mm) dowel or step ring mandrel.
Step 3. Fit the U-shaped wires closely inside each other—smaller
diameter U inside larger—so you have two pairs, and secure
each pair with tape, as shown in Figure 3. Bend each pair into a
slight curve (Figure 4). Make the pairs and curves as identical as
possible.
Step 4. Slip the two pairs of wire inside each other, forming a loose
“knot” (Figure 5). Pull the two pairs of wire, tightening the knot to
a moderate degree (Figure 6).

Step 5. Once the knot is tightened, use chain-nose pliers to spread the
opening enough to accommodate the snap setting for the 6mm
stone, which will be placed in the center (Figure 7).
Step 6. Press the snap setting firmly over the back side of the stone
(Figure 8). This may require some force before the setting snaps
into place.

7

Step 7. To help hold the stone in the setting, use chain-nose pliers
to lightly squeeze all the prongs side-by-side, as shown in
(Figure 9). Squeeze the prongs on one side, then go to the
opposite side and do the same, continuing until all the prongs
are snug and even. The idea is to squeeze the prongs just
enough to tighten the stone a little.

8

Step 8. Straighten and cut a 7" (8 cm) length of the 21-gauge (0.71 mm)
wire. This wire will hold the stone and beads. Slide one end of
this wire in the center, underneath the top end of the knot, as
shown in (Figure 10). Slide the wire down until it is even with the
other wires. You may have to remove the tape to accomplish this,
but then re-tape after inserting the wire.
9

3
top view

wire under
here
side view

Chapter 4: Take It Further

4

5

6

10 

The Projects
Basic Bracelet
Dress-Up Bracelet
Bowtie Bracelet
Celtic Knot Bracelet
Walk-Along Bracelet
Wire Wrapped Ring
Pretty Bracelet
Reef Knot Bracelet

patterned wire bracelet, earrings and pendant

variation of
stone pendant

Stone Pendant
Patterned Wire Bracelet, Earrings, and Pendant

pretty bracelet and variations
basic bracelet

stone pendant

bowtie bracelet

dress-up bracelet

celtic knot bracelet

wire wrapped ring 

The Projects
Basic Bracelet
Dress-Up Bracelet
Bowtie Bracelet
Celtic Knot Bracelet
Walk-Along Bracelet
Wire Wrapped Ring
Pretty Bracelet
Reef Knot Bracelet

patterned wire bracelet, earrings and pendant

variation of
stone pendant

Stone Pendant
Patterned Wire Bracelet, Earrings, and Pendant

pretty bracelet and variations
basic bracelet

stone pendant

bowtie bracelet

dress-up bracelet

celtic knot bracelet

wire wrapped ring 

Wire wrapping made easy!
Wire is a favorite design material for jewelry artists, a versatile element that allows for
the creation of simple loops and embellishments to more involved, intricate pieces.
In Jewelry Studio: Wire Wrapping, Linda Chandler and Christine Ritchey—the
best-selling authors of Woven Wire Jewelry and Getting Started Making Wire Jewelry and
More—take the mystery out of wire wrapping and share their insider secrets for making
gorgeous jewelry from bundles of joined wire, no soldering required! This technique
allows the jewelry maker to create timeless, elegant pieces that are beautifully simple to
elaborately complex.
Inside readers will find:

• A thorough discussion of safety procedures

• A description of tools and materials

• Helpful tips, tricks, and techniques

• 
All the basic wire-wrapping essentials
Detailed process photography shows all the basics of wire wrapping step by step then
takes the reader through progressive skill building projects to teach a range of wrapping techniques. Projects include bracelets, earrings, pins, and the highly sought-after
wire-wrapped cabochon. Before you know it you’ll be creating an elegant bowtie
bracelet, a celtic link bracelet with matching earrings, a wire wrapped ring, and more!

Linda Chandler is a jewelry designer and teacher with more than twenty years’
experience. She is also a Precious Metal Clay certified teacher. Linda lives in Indianapolis, Indiana. Christine Ritchey is an independent writer/editor, potter, and
jewelry maker. She lives in north Texas. They are the authors of Woven Wire Jewelry
and Getting Started Making Wire Jewelry and More (both from Interweave Press).

Paperbound, 8½ x 9, 128 pages
400 photographs
ISBN 978-1-59668-059-3
$22.95
April 2008

Interweave Press LLC is distributed to the book trade in the U.S. and Canada by Independent
Publishers Group, in the UK and Europe by Search Press, in New Zealand by David Bateman,
Ltd, and in Australia by Keith Ainsworth Pty, Ltd. Interweave Press LLC is also the publisher of
14 craft magazines including Beadwork, Step by Step Beads, Step by Step Wire Jewelry, Jewelry
Artist, and Stringing.

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