CULTURAL RESOURCES RESEARCH DESIGN: FERC PROJECT 184 HYDROELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CAMPS EL DORADO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
         

         

ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 
Sonoma State University  Rohnert Park, California 
 

June 2007 

 

 

Cover photo. Camp C in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation District. 

       

CULTURAL RESOURCES RESEARCH DESIGN: FERC PROJECT 184 HYDROELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION CAMPS EL DORADO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
  0906-001               Prepared by  Mark Walker, M.Phil  Heidi Koenig, M.A., RPA  and  Elaine Maryse Solari, M.A.  Anthropological Studies Center  Sonoma State University  Rohnert Park, California   
phone: (707) 664‐2381 fax: (707) 664‐4155 

www.sonoma.edu/projects/asc  e‐mail: asc@sonoma.edu        Prepared for  Trish Fernandez, M.A., RPA  Environmental Review Specialist—Cultural Resources  El Dorado Irrigation District  Placerville, California              June 2007 

 

 

MANAGEMENT SUMMARY
    This  research  design  has  been  prepared  for  the  El  Dorado  Irrigation  District  (EID),  El  Dorado County, California, as part of their compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic  Preservation Act (NHPA) for the management and treatment of historic properties. Compliance  is necessary for EID’s license issued by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for  operating  the  El  Dorado  Hydroelectric  Project  in  El  Dorado,  Amador,  and  Alpine  counties,  California. FERC is the lead federal agency for the project and, in this case, has authorized EID  to carry out its day‐to‐day Section 106 responsibilities.     The  research  design  is  for  11  construction  camps  associated  with  the  1922–1924  rehabilitation  of  the  El  Dorado  Canal  and  construction  of  the  El  Dorado  Powerhouse  to  determine their status as historic properties as defined by NHPA to evaluate their eligibility for  listing  in  the  National  Register  of  Historic  Places  (NRHP).  Field  visits  to  the  sites  by  archaeologists from the Anthropological Studies Center and EID has determined that two (2) of  the sites (05‐03‐56‐830 and 05‐03‐56‐834) are so disturbed that they no longer possess research  potential and evaluation is thus unnecessary. The nine (9) remaining sites will be evaluated for  NRHP eligibility. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 


 

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
  Management Summary.............................................................................................................................. i Introduction ................................................................................................................................................ 1 Project Description..................................................................................................................................... 2 Previous work and Site Summaries .................................................................................................. 2 2007 Field Visit ............................................................................................................................ 16 Archival Research ....................................................................................................................... 16 Historic Context ....................................................................................................................................... 17 Hydroelectric Development in California...................................................................................... 17 History Of Project 184 ....................................................................................................................... 20 The El Dorado Canal .................................................................................................................. 20 The Western States Gas & Electric Company ......................................................................... 21 Construction of the El Dorado Powerhouse System.............................................................. 22 Operation of the El Dorado Hydroelectric System, 1924–Present ....................................... 23 California Work Camps in the 1920s .............................................................................................. 25 Investigations of Rural Labor.................................................................................................... 25 Work Camp Reform.................................................................................................................... 28 The Western States Construction Camps....................................................................................... 30 Research Design ....................................................................................................................................... 43 NRHP Criteria for Evaluation ......................................................................................................... 43 Research Orientation......................................................................................................................... 44 Property Types................................................................................................................................... 45 Intrasite Property Types............................................................................................................. 46 Previous Research.............................................................................................................................. 49 Research Domains ............................................................................................................................. 51 Camp Function and Design....................................................................................................... 52 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 52 Corporate Policy and Labor ...................................................................................................... 53 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 54 Camp Conditions ........................................................................................................................ 54 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 54 Labor Stratification ..................................................................................................................... 54 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 56 Immigration and Ethnicity ........................................................................................................ 56 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 57 Gender and Family ..................................................................................................................... 57 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 59 Daily Life ...................................................................................................................................... 59 Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 59 Labor Organization and Legislation ........................................................................................ 60
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    ii   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Data Requirements............................................................................................................... 60 Implementation.................................................................................................................................. 60 Assessing Integrity...................................................................................................................... 61 Association ............................................................................................................................ 62 Design .................................................................................................................................... 62 Materials ................................................................................................................................ 62 Assessing Archaeological Research Potential ............................................................................... 63 Evaluation Approach ................................................................................................................. 64 Mapping ....................................................................................................................................... 64 Metal Detection ........................................................................................................................... 64 Probing ......................................................................................................................................... 65 Surface Clearing .......................................................................................................................... 65 Excavation Units ......................................................................................................................... 65 In‐field Analyses ......................................................................................................................... 66 Reporting...................................................................................................................................... 66 References Cited....................................................................................................................................... 67

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  iii  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  TABLES  1.  Project 184 Construction Camps .................................................................................................... 16 2.  Work Camp Sanitation (after Parker 1915)................................................................................... 28 3.  Project 184 Construction Camps: Buildings and Structures from Camp Plans ...................... 41 4.  Anticipated Property Types, and Frequency by Camp (from 1922 Plans) .............................. 46   FIGURES  1a.  Location Map—Camps A, R, K, and B............................................................................................ 6 1b.  Location Map—Camps M and N..................................................................................................... 7 1c.  Location Map—Camps P and T ....................................................................................................... 8 1d.  Location Map—Camps S and G....................................................................................................... 9 1e.  Location Map—Camp C ................................................................................................................. 10 2.  1922 Plan of Construction Camp C................................................................................................ 11 3.  1922 Plan of Construction Camps G and P .................................................................................. 12 4.  1922 Plan of Construction Camps M and S .................................................................................. 13 5.  1922 Plan of Construction Camps A, N, R, and T ....................................................................... 14 6.  1922 Plan of Construction Camps B and K................................................................................... 15 7.  Panorama of Camp B....................................................................................................................... 33 8.  Camp A showing tent flats ............................................................................................................. 34 9.  Camp A showing tents with stovepipes ....................................................................................... 35 10.  Tents at Camp T ............................................................................................................................... 36 11.  Cookhouse at Camp A .................................................................................................................... 37 12.  Kitchen at Camp G........................................................................................................................... 38 13.  Interior of Icehouse at Camp G ...................................................................................................... 39 14.  Mess hall at Camp G........................................................................................................................ 40  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  iv  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

INTRODUCTION
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has issued a license to the El Dorado  Irrigation  District  (EID)  for  operation  of  the  El  Dorado  Hydroelectric  Project  (Project  184).  As  part of FERC’s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), a  Programmatic  Agreement  (PA)  and  associated  draft  Historic  Properties  Management  Plan  (HPMP)  was  prepared.  The  Project  184  area  of  potential  effects  (APE)  includes  private  lands  and  lands  administered  by  the  Eldorado  National  Forest  in  Amador,  Alpine,  and  El  Dorado  counties. Project 184 includes:  • • • • storage facilities at Silver Lake, Caples Lake, Echo Lakes, Aloha Lake and Forebay  Reservoir;   diversion and intake facilities near Kyburz, California;  a water conveyance system that includes the El Dorado Canal, siphons, tunnels, and  pipelines; and  the El Dorado Power Plant near Pollock Pines on the South Fork of the American River. 

  Completion  of  the  draft  HPMP  was  required  before  historic  properties  were  identified  within the Project 184 APE. Historic properties  are defined as cultural resources that have been  determined  eligible  for  inclusion  on  the  National  Register  of  Historic  Places  (NRHP).  Thus,  a  plan for the treatment of such properties assumes that they have been formally evaluated and  found eligible under the criteria outlined in 36 CFR 60.4. Cultural resources that are determined  ineligible are released from further consideration under Section 106 of the NHPA.    A  complete  field  survey  of  the  APE  was  conducted  and  cultural  resources  have  been  identified,  but  their  status  as  historic  properties  has  not  been  determined.  The  next  step  in  implementing  the  HPMP,  then,  is  evaluating  cultural  resources  identified  within  the  APE  to  determine  if  they  qualify  as  historic  properties.  This  research  design  is  intended  to  provide  a  framework  for  evaluation  of  11  construction  camps  within  the  Project  184  APE  to  determine  their eligibility for inclusion in the NRHP, and thus their status as historic properties. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

1  
   

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION
    The  APE  includes  11  construction  camp  sites  in  El  Dorado  County,  California,  along  the  South Fork of the American River from Kyburz to the El Dorado Powerhouse near Pollock Pines  (Figures 1a–1e). Elevations of the sites range from 2,000 to 4,200 ft. above mean sea level (amsl).  Vegetation consists primarily of coniferous forest. The camps are associated with the 1922–1924  rehabilitation  of  the  El  Dorado  Canal  system  by  the  Western  States  Gas  &  Electric  Company  (Western States).   

PREVIOUS WORK AND SITE SUMMARIES
  The  sites  were  recorded  and/or  updated  in  2002  by  archaeologists  from  Far  Western  Anthropological Research Group, Inc., and are discussed in the Project 184 HPMP (Hildebrandt  and Waechter 2003).     They are summarized in the HPMP as follows (Hildebrandt and Waechter 2003:72–79):  FS  #05‐03‐56‐833  [Figures  1e  and  2].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  C,  this site is located just west of the El Dorado Canal intake on the north bank of  the South Fork of the American River. The 1922 historic plan map, on file at  EID, depicts 28 tent houses (wood floor and frame structures with canvas roof  and sides), as well as wood‐frame kitchen, mess hall, wood shed, bath house,  foreman’s house, and toilet. Remains of Camp C today encompass an area of  about  5,600  m²,  and  are  limited  to  dirt  pads  where  the  mess  hall  and  bath  house  were  located.  The  pad  at  the  bath  house  has  two  large  pits  full  of  modern trash. No historic trash was seen. The site as been subjected to much  past  and  recent  ground  disturbance.  It  lies  within  the  portion  of  the  APE  spanning the  north  and  south  banks  of  the  South  Fork,  in  the  vicinity  of  the  diversion dam [2003:72].   FS #05‐03‐56‐832 [Figures 1d and 3]. Also known as Western States Camp G,  this site is located at the base of a slope on the east side of Alder Creek, near  its  confluence  with  the  South  Fork  of  the  American  River.  The  1922  historic  plan map depicts 36 tent houses and several wood‐frame buildings. The latter  include  the  foreman’s  house,  a  bath  house  with  a  boiler,  a  blacksmith  shop,  two  mess  halls  and  a  kitchen,  a  meat  house,  a  store  room,  a  gas  house,  and  three  toilets.  Only  a  few  structure  pads  remain  of  Camp  G,  which  encompasses  an  area  of  9,500  square  meters.  No  other  features  or  historic  artifacts  were  observed.  Modern  cabins,  a  parking  lot,  and  dirt  roads,  including  a  project  access  road,  are  on  the  site  [the  2007  field  check  by  ASC  and  EID  archaeologists indicated  that  the  site  has  been  so disturbed  by  later  development that evaluation would serve no purpose; 2003:72].  FS  #05‐03‐56‐711  [Figures  1d  and  4].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  S,  this site is located adjacent to and immediately north of the El Dorado Canal, 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

2  
   

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  in  a  stretch  north  of  the  Mill  Creek  to  Bull  Creek  tunnel.  An  access  road  bisects the site. The 1922 historic plan map depicts 22 tent houses and several  wood‐frame  buildings,  the  latter  including  a  bath  house,  mess  hall  and  kitchen, meat house, an unspecified outbuilding, and two toilets, all covering  an area of about 5,100 m². In 1993, Rood et al. recorded the portion of the site  on US Forest Service property, noting that much of the site extends north on  to  private  land.  Still,  Rood  et  al.  reports  this  incomplete  site  area  as  much  more  extensive  than  indicated  on  the  1922  map,  covering  47,600  square  meters.  Finds  noted  on  federal  property  include  two  tent  flats,  two  building  pads,  a  warming  shed,  a  trail,  a  spiked  tree,  and  much  historic  occupation  refuse.  Modern  trash  and  construction  debris  cover  much  of  the  National  Forest portion of the site, but Rood et al. estimate that about 50% of that area  is relatively intact [2003:73].   FS  #05‐03‐56‐825  [Figures  1c  and  5].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  T,  this site is located along Plum Creek immediately west of U.S. Forest Service  road  10N08YA.  The  1922  historic  plan  map  shows  five  tent  houses,  a  mess  tent,  a  wood‐frame  meat  house,  and  a  toilet,  all  told  circumscribing  an  area  790  m².  The  1922  plan  map  also  notes  that  Camp  T  was  abandoned  October  14,  1922.  No  historic  features  or  artifacts  are  present,  only  large  amounts  of  modern trash. The site is frequently used as an informal campsite [2003:75].   FS  #05‐03‐56‐830  [Figures  1c  and  3].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  P,  this site is located immediately upslope from the El Dorado Canal 1.5 mi east  of  the  Esmeralda  Tunnel,  at  the  terminus  of  access  road  10N40M.  The  1922  historic  plan  map  depicts  a  dug  out  structure,  28  tent  houses,  and  a  wood‐ frame  bath  house,  store  house,  and  four  toilets.  A  1925  plan  map  shows  a  storage  shed  was  added  after  1922.  Today,  Camp  P  comprises  4,010  m²,  including  a  privy  pit,  bath  house,  depressions,  a  dugout  structure,  and  two  small  dumps  with  historic  habitation  debris.  The  site  has  been  disturbed  by  recent logging [2003:76].   FS #05‐03‐56‐834 [Figures 1b and 5]. Also known as Western States Camp N,  this  site  is  located  on  a  flat  ridgetop  0.1  mile  north  of  the  crossing  of  the  El  Dorado  Canal  by  U.S.  Forest  Service  road  10N40.1,  and  1.5  miles  east  of  Pacific House. The 1922 historic plan map delineates 27 tent structures, as well  as  a  wood‐frame  bath  house,  store  house,  meat  house,  mess  hall,  kitchen,  office,  and  wood  shed,  in  an  area  of  4,010  square  meters.  Dave  Buel  of  EID  states  that  Camp  N  was  used  during  two  construction  phases,  during  1910– 1920  when  building  the  canal  [N.B.  this  date  is  probably  not  correct  and  the  statement  in  fact  refers  to  the  1922‐24  rehabilitation  of  the  canal],  and  during  the  1920s  by  Swedes  excavating  the  Esmeralda  Tunnel.  Remains  of  Camp  N  are  limited to two pits where the bath house stood, each now filled with historic  refuse.  Some  of  this  refuse  has  been  removed  by  relic  hunters.  U.S.  Forest  Service road 10N40N bisects the site [2003:76–77].  
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

3  
   

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  FS #05‐03‐56‐823 [Figures 1b and 4]. Also known as Western States Camp M,  this  site  is  located  on  a  north  slope  on  the  downslope  side  of  the  El  Dorado  Canal,  due  south  of  Fresh  Pond.  The  1923  historic  plan  map  shows  26  tent  houses,  including  kitchen  and  mess  tents,  as  well  as  a  wood‐frame  wood  shed, store house,  and two  toilets, all  circumscribing  an  area  of  3,210 square  meters. Remains of Camp M observed in the field include a few possible tent  flats, a gallon paint can, and two 2‐x‐12‐in. boards. The site has been heavily  disturbed by recent logging [2003:77].   FS  #05‐03‐56‐829  [Figures  1a  and  6].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  B,  this site is located on a gentle slope just northeast of Forebay Road’s crossing  of  the  El  Dorado  Canal  penstock.  The  1922  historic  plan  map  shows  a  substantial camp with 60 tent houses. Wood‐frame structures depicted on the  map  include  a  large  bath  house,  two  smaller  wash  houses,  tool  house,  engineers’  office,  kitchen/mess  hall,  wood  shed,  and  five  toilets,  all  told  circumscribing  an  area  of  13,200  square  meters.  A  1926  plan  map,  however,  shows  only a  temporary  cottage,  store  room,  garage,  and  wood  shed.  Today  the  site  comprises  two  structural  pads,  one  at  the  location  of  the  former  Office/Commissary  or  temporary  cottage,  the  other  an  old  car  platform.  An  old road is also present. No historic artifacts are present [the 2007 field check  by  ASC  archaeologists  showed  that  site  had  been  graded  since  the  last  recording; only the bath house floor remains extant; 2003:78].  FS #05‐03‐56‐811 [Figures 1a and 6]. Also known as Western States Camp K,  this  site  is  located  at  the  north  end  of  Moon  Lane,  one  mile  northwest  of  Pollock  Pines,  near  the  northern  edge  of  a  broad  ridgetop  overlooking  the  steep canyon of the South Fork of the American River. An access road bisects  the site and the northern margin of the site lies within the canal portion of the  APE. The 1922 historic plan map shows another large camp, delimiting a site  area  of  11,260  square  meters.  Features  depicted  on  the  1922  map  include  56  tent houses, as well as a wood‐frame bath house, office, two mess halls, meat  house, tool house, blacksmith shop, store house, pump house, two tanks, and  three  toilets.  The  site  was  originally  recorded  by  Rood  (2002),  who  noted  several scatters of historic cans but only one feature (the bath house pit noted  below).  Features  recorded  during  the  2007  field  check  include  five  piles  of  steel shoes used to shim the old wooden penstock, a rectangular structure flat,  two  rectangular  tent  flats,  one  definite  and  one  possible  privy  pit,  a  rock  alignment  and  structure  pad  of  the  Timekeeper’s  Office,  a  pit  where  the  old  bath house stood, and a standing structure used as the toolhouse [2003:78].   FS #05‐03‐56‐828 [Figures 1a and 5]. Also known as Western States Camp A,  this  site  is  located  on  a  flat  on  a  narrow  ridge  adjacent  to  the  steep,  narrow  access road leading to the El Dorado Powerhouse. The 1922 historic plan map  shows a large camp, including 47 tent houses, one of them used as the camp  office.  Wood‐frame  structures  include  a  blacksmith  shop,  mess  hall  and 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

4  
   

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  kitchen, bath house, wash house, store house, and toilet. A small tramway is  also  shown  on  the  map.  The  site  area  shown  on  the  historic  map  is  10,950  square  meters.  Features  recorded  in  the  2007  field  check  include  numerous  tent  flats,  and  a  rock  foundation  for  the  mess  hall  and  kitchen.  No  formal  dump was found. The few artifacts seen include a gas lantern, a wheelbarrow  hub, medicine bottles, and a few cans. The site is nearly undisturbed [2003:79].   FS  #05‐03‐56‐838  [Figures  1a and  5].  Also  known  as  Western  States  Camp  R,  this site is located just downstream from the El Dorado Powerhouse. The site  is bisected by an access road to the powerhouse. Camp R is shown on the 1922  historic  plan  on  both  sides  of  the  South  Fork  of  the  American  River,  though  most of the features were on the south bank. The south bank was the site of  nine  frame  buildings,  including  two  bunk  houses,  two  offices,  a  bath  house,  store house, mess hall and kitchen, cement shed, and hoist house. North of the  river, seven tent houses were used, as well as wood‐frame buildings used as a  blacksmith shop, toilet, and an unspecified shed. The site area was about 5,660  square meters. Today, Camp R appears to have been almost totally destroyed.  Concrete  foundation  walls  noted  at  the  location  cannot  be  definitively  associated with the camp, and no historic artifacts were noted [the 2007 field  check  by  ASC  and  EID  archaeologists  confirmed  that  there  is  nothing  remaining that can be definitively associated with Camp R. An evaluation of  this site would serve no purpose; 2003:79]. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

5  
   

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

TN
0

0 1/2 SCALE 1:24000

1/2 mile 1 km

FS# 05-03-56-838 Camp R

FS# 05-03-56-828 Camp A

FS# 05-03-56-811 Camp K

FS# 05-03-56-829 Camp B

Sou th
Fork

Am

a eri c n

Riv er

Figure 1a. Location Map - Camps A, R, K, and B

6

TN
0

0 1/2 SCALE 1:24000

1/2 mile 1 km

FS# 05-03-56-834 Camp N

FS# 05-03-56-823 Camp M

Sou th
Fork

ri ca n me A

Riv er

Figure 1b. Location Map - Camps M and N 7

TN
0

0 1/2 SCALE 1:24000

1/2 mile 1 km

FS# 05-03-56-830 Camp P

FS# 05-03-56-825 Camp T

Sou th
Fork

ri ca n me A

Riv er

Figure 1c. Location Map - Camps P and T 8

TN
0

0 1/2 SCALE 1:24000

1/2 mile 1 km

FS# 05-03-56-711 Camp S

FS# 05-03-56-832 Camp G

Sou th
Fork

ri ca n me A

Riv er

Figure 1d. Location Map - Camps S and G 9

TN
0

0 1/2 SCALE 1:24000

1/2 mile 1 km

FS# 05-03-56-833 Camp C

Sou th
Fork

ri ca n me A

Riv er

Figure 1e. Location Map - Camp C 10

11

Figure 2. 1922 Map of Construction Camp C (FS# 05-03-56-833)

12

Figure 3. 1922 Map of Construction Camps G (FS# 05-03-56-832) and P (FS# 05-03-56-830)

13

Figure 4. 1922 Map of Construction Camps M (FS# 05-03-56-823) and S (FS# 05-03-56-711)

14

Figure 5. 1922 Map of Construction Camps A (FS# 05-03-56-828), N (FS# 05-03-56-834), R (FS# 05-03-56-838), and T (FS# 05-03-56-825)

15

Figure 6. 1922 Map of Construction Camps B (FS# 05-03-56-829) and K (FS# 05-03-56-811)

  2007 Field Visit   In  January  2007,  ten  of  the  camps  were  visited  by  personnel  from  the  Anthropological  Studies  Center  (ASC)  and  EID  to  assess  their  current  condition  in  relation  to  the  latest  site  record. It was not possible to visit Camp T due to icy conditions. Table 1 lists the camps, their  site records and pertinent observations from the 2007 visit.    Table 1. Project 184 Construction Camps 
USFS designation 
05‐03‐56‐711  05‐03‐56‐811  05‐03‐56‐823  05‐03‐56‐825  05‐03‐56‐828  05‐03‐56‐830  05‐03‐56‐832  05‐03‐56‐834  05‐03‐56‐838  05‐03‐56‐829  05‐03‐56‐833 

Camp Name 
Construction Camp S  Construction Camp K   Construction Camp M  Construction Camp T  Construction Camp A   Construction Camp P   Construction Camp G  Construction Camp N  Construction Camp R  Construction Camp B  Construction Camp C 

Record and Update on file 
Rood 1993  Darcangelo 2002; Rood 2002; Wee  2002; Waechter 2003  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002  Darcangelo 2002; Waechter 2003  Darcangelo 2002 

Current condition 
Poor visibility  Good  Disturbed  Unknown  Good  Good  Extensively disturbed  Disturbed  No evidence of site  Extensively disturbed  Good 

    Due  to  their  extensive  disturbance,  there  is  no  purpose  of  evaluating  Camps  G  and  R.  Although Camp B is extensively disturbed, it does possess a surviving feature in the form of the  wood  and  concrete  floor  for  the  bath  house.  As  this  is  the  only  such  feature  from  any  of  the  camps, the feature should be evaluated.   Archival Research   Research  included  a  review  of  documents  on  file  at  the  PG&E  Archives  in  Brisbane  for  information on the construction camps built and used in 1922 during the renovation/rebuilding  of the El Dorado Canal. Although over 100 archive boxes were pulled and inspected, very little  information pertaining specifically to these camps was found. Occasional mentions of particular  camps  were  encountered  in  construction  ledgers  and  accounting  records,  providing  a  limited  amount of detail on camp construction and removal. The documents contained no information  on  the  workers  who  lived  in  the  camps.  Appendix  A  provides  specific  details  on  the  search  parameters, a brief description of the materials found to be potentially useful, and a list of the  boxes that were searched and determined not to be pertinent.    The research effort also included a review of historical photos on file at EID; in addition,  EID provided historic plans of the construction camps. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  16    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

HISTORIC CONTEXT
    The  El  Dorado  Hydroelectric  Project  along  the  South  Fork  of  the  American  River,  now  owned  and  operated  by  the  El  Dorado  Irrigation  District,  was  built  by  Western  States  Gas  &  Electric  Company  (Western  States),  a  subsidiary  of  H.  M.  Byllesby  Engineering  and  Management  Corporation,  between  1922  and  1924.  This  new  hydroelectric  power  system  consisted of several high‐mountain reservoirs, an intake dam on the South Fork of the American  River,  and  a  22‐mile‐long  canal  terminating  at  a  forebay  reservoir  at  Pollock  Pines;  from  that  point a wood‐stave pipe conduit and steel penstock led to a powerhouse below Pollock Pines on  the  South  Fork  of  the American  River.  This  system  was  in  turn  part  of  an  older water  system  established in the 1870s during the era of hydraulic mining for the purpose of providing water  to mining and irrigation concerns in the City of Placerville. Thus, the resources related to this  water development cover a vast area from high in the mountains above 8,000 ft. in elevation on  various tributaries to the South Fork and spread across three counties, down to a powerhouse  on  the  South  Fork  at  an  elevation  of  only  1,889  feet.  The  El  Dorado  Hydroelectric  Power  Development,  brought  on  line  in  1924,  is  one  example  of  dozens  of  similar  high‐head  hydroelectric  plants  in  the  Sierra  Nevada  that  were  built  during  the  1920s,  a  period  of  rapid  growth in the electrical industry in California.   

HYDROELECTRIC DEVELOPMENT IN CALIFORNIA
adapted from Wee 2003 and Shoup 1990    For  much  of  the  19th  century  gold  mining  was  the  primary  impetus  behind  the  development  of  methods  to  tap  high‐head  waterpower.  As  early  as  the  1850s,  gold  miners  working placer deposits in the Sierra Nevada had devised complex water‐delivery  systems of  wooden  and  iron  pipes,  ditches,  dams,  and  flumes.  Hydraulic  mining,  which  used  high  pressure  waterpower  to  sluice  gold‐bearing  deposits  from  hillsides,  required  even  more  extensive water delivery and storage systems.    Hydraulic  mining  as  a  major  corporate  enterprise  was  virtually  halted  in  California  January  1884  with  the  decision  of  Judge  Sawyer  in  Woodruff v. North Bloomfield Gravel Mining Company, et al. Finding that the hydraulic mining industry was causing widespread damage by  depositing its tailings into the rivers of the state, the judge ordered a halt to hydraulic mining  and issued an injunction perpetually enjoining the miners from discharging their waste into the  rivers (Kelley 1959:188–216).     In  addition  to  its  devastating  environmental  impact,  hydraulic  mining  left  an  important  legacy to the economic development of California in the elaborate systems of dams, reservoirs,  tunnels,  and  ditches  that  were  subsequently  utilized  for  irrigation,  hydroelectric  power  generation, and municipal water systems (JRP and Caltrans 2000: 31–53). The combined length  of  all  ditches  that  had  been  constructed  in  California  for  mining  purposes  by  the  end  of  the  hydraulic  mining  era  was  staggering.  One  mining  expert  estimated  that  by  1882  there  were  more than 6,000 miles of main ditches, another 1,000 miles of secondary lines, and an unknown 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    17     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  larger  quantity  of  small  distributing  ditches  in  California’s  mining  region.  Probably  no  more  than 24 of these ditches can be classified as large mining canals, i.e., those carrying at least 50  ft.³/second (2,000 miner’s inches) of water (De Groot 1882:161). The large ditches alone totaled  about  1,750  miles  in  length  and  represented  an  investment  of  more  than  $11,500,000.  These  principal ditches diverted water from the major streams that drain the west slope of the north  central Sierra Nevada—the Feather, Yuba, Bear, American, Mokelumne, Cosumnes, Stanislaus,  and  Tuolumne  rivers.  Furthermore,  the  technological  developments  of  hydraulic  mining  influenced the hydroelectric industry. For example, the hydraulic monitor was adapted by the  hydroelectric industry as a way of turning tangential waterwheels, and the ability to control the  rate of water flow through a nozzle was later used in hydroelectric plants.    The development of the hydroelectric industry in California was an evolutionary process  that dates as far back as 1879, the year in which the Excelsior Water and Mining Company in  Yuba County became the first mining company to use electricity. The company used a water‐ driven Brush dynamo to supply power to three arc lights, thus doubling its production capacity  because  the  mine  could  be  worked  throughout  the  night.  Another  milestone  also  occurred  in  1879,  as  the  San  Francisco‐based  California  Electric  Light  Company  began  operation,  distributing  generated  electricity  to  local  subscribers  from  a  central  station.  During  the  1880s,  the  use  of  electricity  in  California  became  widespread,  and  local  electric  companies  began  to  spring  up  in  cities  throughout  the  state.  By  the  1880s,  Sacramento,  San  Jose,  Oakland,  San  Francisco, and Los Angeles all used electric motors to power streetcars or lighting for buildings  and  streets.  Most  of  these  motors  were  driven  by  steam  converted  from  water  through  the  burning of coal or wood, both costly commodities in California at the time (Myers 1983:11).    While  energy  created  from  burning  fuels  was  quite  costly,  hydroelectric  energy— electricity created from the flow of water—was comparatively inexpensive and abundant. The  Sierra  Nevada  provided  an  annual  snow  pack  that  melted  throughout  the  spring  and  early  summer, which in turn created numerous creeks, streams, and rivers that dropped rapidly from  the  mountains  to  the  lower  elevations.  In  terms  of  generating  hydroelectric  power,  California  was  geographically  distinct  from  the  East  where  plants  utilized  high  volumes  of  water  flow  with  low  heads  and  benefited  from  year‐round  flow.  California’s  plants,  in  contrast,  utilized  high‐head  and  low  volumes  of  flow  usually  along  a  watershed  in  the  Sierra  Nevada  or  Transverse  Range.  Large  storage  reservoirs  were  also  required,  not  only  to  store  water  in  the  dry  summer  and  fall  seasons,  but  to  provide  carry‐over  storage  to  ensure  supplies  during  a  prolonged period of drought (JRP and Caltrans 2000:54–55).    The  decades  from  the  1890s  to  1910  were  a  period  of  experimentation  in  hydroelectric  plant  design  (JRP  and  Caltrans  2000:54–55).  The  Pomona  Plant  of  the  San  Antonio  Light  &  Power Company, brought online in 1892, was the first hydroelectric facility in California to use  “step‐up”  AC  transformers,  in  which  the  generator  potential  of  1,000  volts  was  increased  to  10,000  volts  for  transmission.  The  voltage  was  then  “stepped  down”  at  the  receiving  stations.  The  concept  of  boosting  voltage  for  transmission  was  a  major  innovation  that  soon  became  standard practice throughout the industry. The hydroelectric system of which the plant was a  part was, however, far more elementary. It utilized water diverted from the San Antonio Creek  through  a  2,370‐ft.  pipe,  emerging  from  a  tunnel  400  ft.  above  the  floor  of  the  canyon.  A 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    18     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  penstock delivered the water to a small concrete powerhouse, which generated the energy and  transmitted it to San Bernardino, a distance of 28 miles (Fowler 1923; JRP and Caltrans 2000:56– 57; Myers 1983:24–31; Williams 1997:175–176).    The first high‐head hydroelectric plant in California was developed by the Nevada County  Electric  Company  between  1892  and  1896.  Water  was  diverted  from  the  South  Yuba  River  through  an  18,400‐ft.  wooden  flume  and  then  dropped  206  ft.  through  a  pressure  pipe  to  the  powerhouse on the lower river. The same company built a second plant on Rock Creek in 1897  that  utilized  a  head  of  785  feet.  In  1893,  the  Redlands  Electric  Light  &  Power  Company  Mill  Creek  Plant  Number  1  became  the  first  three‐phase  alternating  current  plant  in  California,  a  technology  that  increased  efficiency  and  reliability  of  power  transmission  (Fowler  1923:1–2).  Two years later, the Folsom Powerhouse on the American River was completed; its three‐phase  plant,  with  four  750‐kilowatt  generators  and  11,000‐volt  transmission  system,  represented  a  significant  advance  over  Mill  Creek  and  was  the  first  hydroelectric  powerhouse  in  northern  California.  In  the  wake  of  Mill  Creek  and  Folsom,  enthusiasm  for  hydroelectric  development  blossomed, prompting the San Francisco Call to report, “The air of the whole Pacific Coast has  all at once become filled with talk about setting up water wheels in lonely mountain places and  making  them  give  light  and  cheaply  turn  other  wheels  in  towns  miles  away”  (San  Francisco  Call, 1 June 1895 in Williams 1997:177).    The  first  decades  of  the  twentieth  century  were  a  period  of  rapid  growth  in  the  hydroelectric  industry.  Between  1900  and  1910  the  population  of  California  increased  by  60  percent, with a consequent increased demand for electric power (Coleman 1952:257). Dozens of  hydroelectric companies formed throughout California, many building new powerhouses and  long‐distance  transmission  lines  to  service  new  and  growing  markets.  By  1900  there  were  already 25 hydroelectric plants in service throughout the state, with many more to follow in the  upcoming decades. The American River Electric Company’s Rock Creek Plant, later to become  part of the Western States Gas & Electric System, was completed in 1903. Also in that year the  Valley Counties Power Company opened its De Sabla plant on the Feather River; this plant had  the highest static head of its time (1,528 ft.) and set several long‐distance transmission records.  Another  important  plant  built  during  this  period  was  Great  Western  Power  Company’s  (GWPC) Big Bend plant on the Feather River in 1908, with a total generating capacity of 40,000  kilovolt amperes (kva). By 1916, the plant had been expanded to a total capacity of 65,000 kva,  the  largest  of  its  time  in  California  (Fowler  1923:275,  364;  JRP  1986:96,  102;  Myers  1983:44–47;  Williams 1997:178–182).    The extensive build‐up of hydroelectric plants in California that began around the turn of  the  last  century  continued  into  the  early  1920s,  with  several  large  developments  breaking  the  previously  held  output  records.  During  1923  and  1924,  no  fewer  than  40  power  plants  were  built  or  under  construction  in  the  western  United  States  and  Canadian  British  Columbia.  Of  these, half were located in California. The generating capacity of these plants ranged from less  than 1,000 kilowatts to upwards of 80,000 kva and had static heads ranging from less than 100  ft. to nearly 2,500 ft. (Journal of Electricity 1924:97–98). In 1928, the two largest developments in  terms of output were the Big Creek No. 3 plant (1923), run by Southern California Edison, with 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  19    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  an  84,000‐kva  capacity,  and  Pit  No.  3  (1925),  run  by  PG&E,  which  had  an  81,000‐kva  capacity  (Bonner 1928:20, 118).   

HISTORY OF PROJECT 184
adapted from Wee 2003 and Shoup 1990  The El Dorado Canal   The El Dorado Canal, built between 1873 and 1876, was constructed during a period when  hydraulic‐mining  holdings  in  the  state  were  being  consolidated  by  large  corporations.  The  reservoir  and  ditch  system  of  the  Canal  was  based  upon  appropriative  water  filings  made  by  John Kirk and Francis A. Bishop in the 1850s and their efforts to build a canal to bring water to  the  hydraulic  mines  in  Placerville.  By  1873  the  two  men  had  spent  more  than  $20,000  on  the  canal  system,  which  consisted  of  a  diversion  dam  at  Cedar  Rock  on  the  South  Fork  of  the  American River, small dams at the outlet of Silver and Echo lakes, and a short segment of the  ditch excavation on the lower end of the canal line.    The El Dorado Water and Deep Gravel Mining Company (the Mining Company) acquired  the water and ditch rights of Kirk and Bishop in 1873. Kirk left the project, but Bishop remained  with  the  new  company,  serving  on  its  board  of  directors  and  as  supervising  engineer  on  the  canal  construction  project.  Financed  with  $150,000  by  a  prominent  group  of  San  Francisco  capitalists who had experience in California and Nevada mining and strong financial ties to the  Bank of California, the El Dorado Company began by consolidating about 750 acres of mining  ground  above  Placerville  into  their  ownership,  together  with  some  112  miles  of  distribution  ditches and small canals to combine with the ditch and water rights of Kirk and Bishop on the  upper South Fork of the American River. The Mining Company expanded its potential storage  rights  in  the  fall  of  1873  by  making  claims  on  numerous  high‐Sierra  lakes  and  streams  with  potential reservoir sites. The following year the company began construction work on its major  trunk line canal down the south side of the South Fork of the American River Canyon.    Expectations of delivering water the following season were shattered by the realities of the  difficult environmental barriers facing the project. At the end of the first year, Bishop assessed  the  major  problem  facing  the  construction  crews:  hidden  boulders.  Bare  granite  domes  characteristic  of  the  region  drained  by  the  American,  Mokelumne,  and  Tuolumne  rivers  are  numerous in the eastern part of the American River basin. Weathered outcrops of massive gray  rock rise above steep and unstable mountain slopes containing an extensive litter of loose rock.  From  below  Riverton  to  Pollock  Pines,  the  canyon  walls  become  less  precipitous  but  are  still  quite rugged, and decomposed volcanic and sedimentary rock dominate the landscape. These  topographic and geologic conditions brought both engineering problems and opportunities for  Bishop. His practical solutions are what give the El Dorado Canal its extensive and unique dry‐ laid granite engineering features.    During  the  winter  of  1873–1874  Bishop  readied  himself  for  the  following  construction  season by obtaining contract wage labor, skilled masons and blasters, and lumber contractors.  He  carefully  mapped  out  a  schedule  of  work  and  ascended  into  the  Sierra  in  the  winter  to 
  20    

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  experiment with the use of black powder and nitro‐glycerine compounds to determine how to  best  induce  lines  of  rupture  that  would  dislodge  rock  in  blocks  suitable  for  construction  purposes.  Because  of  the  high  cost  of  lumber  for  trestles,  the  difficult  rocky  condition  of  the  ground,  and  the  topography  of  the  canyon  along  the  upper  canal,  neither  ditching  nor  trestle  building were economical alternatives. Bishop decided to rest flumes on a solid bed of dry‐laid  granite  block  and  rubble  bench  walls  wherever  possible.  This  approach  economized  the  foundation  work,  because  bracing  and  timbers  for  trestle  substructures  had  to  be  massive  timbers and custom‐cut for each use. With uniform wall foundations in place and at grade, all  of  the  required  flume  lumber  could  be  mass‐produced  to  pre‐set  dimensions  at  a  mill  located  upstream on the canal and floated down the conduit to awaiting carpenters.    Constructing the canal involved an enormous work force that peaked at more than 1,200  men.  Crews  were  housed  at  camps along  the  route  of  the  canal  in accommodations  that  were  primarily  tents  and  at  least  one  boardinghouse.  There  were  10  to  12  camps  including  a  large  camp of Chinese laborers at Fresh Pond, a camp at the diversion dam, and camps designated as  2,  5,  7,  and 10  at  various  locations  along  the  route.  The  majority  of  the  laborers  were  Chinese  immigrants; up to 1,000 by mid‐July 1874 (Shoup 1990:8).     In order to maintain the canal after completion, ditch tenders would walk along the boards  and banks for miles checking the flume and earthen berm ditch for breaks, damage, and other  problems. The ditch tenders were housed at the four numbered camps. Each camp had a frame  dwelling  and  various  outbuildings  including  sheds  and  blacksmith  shops.  The  ditch  tenders  lived  an  isolated  existence  most  often  only  the  ditch  tender  and  his  family  would  live  at  the  camp. They were required to order supplies to last from November through May. Many kept a  small  amount  of  livestock  and  hunted  for  the  majority  of  their  meat.  A  telephone  system  operated between the camps along the ditch line, although winter storms often brought down  the poles and cut off service. The men worked in extraordinary conditions for extended hours  and reportedly had only four days off a year (Shoup 1990:21).    When the 26‐mile‐long main canal was completed in 1876, the Mining Company had spent  $650,000, or an average of $25,000 per mile. Mile for mile, it was the most expensive canal built  in California during the hydraulic mining era. Although the canal was productive, the owners  had speculatively high expectations and records indicate that the income from this service fell  short of what was needed to reimburse the original investment. Between 1876 and 1916, when it  was acquired by Western States, ownership changed several times. In the later years the canal  did not even produce enough to meet immediate expenses (Shoup 1990:16).  The Western States Gas & Electric Company   At  least  as  early  as  1907  there  was  interest  in  converting  the  canal  to  hydroelectric  generation.  These  plans  reached  fruition  in  1916  with  the  incorporation  of  the  canal  in  to  the  Western  States  system.  The  canal  was  reconstructed  in  1922,  and  the  El  Dorado  Powerhouse,  which would generate power from the water of the canal, was built in 1923–1924.     Western States, a subsidiary of the Byllesby Engineering and Management Corporation of  Chicago,  was  created  in  1910  through  the  consolidation  of  several  existing  California  power  companies: the Stockton Gas & Electric Company, the American River Electric Corporation, the 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    21     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Richmond  Lighting  Corporation,  the  Humboldt  Gas  &  Electric  Company,  the  Arcata  Lighting  Company, the Ferndale Electric Lighting Company, and the Fortuna Lighting Company. From  these  holdings,  Western  States  established  the  Eureka,  Richmond,  and  Stockton  districts,  each  providing  gas  or  electricity  to  customers  in  and  around  those  communities.  The  Stockton  district  consisted  of  properties  formerly  held  by  American  River  Electric,  including  the  8,100‐ horsepower Rock Creek hydroelectric plant near Placerville (built in 1903), transmission lines to  Stockton, a steam plant in Stockton, and local distribution systems in Placerville and Stockton.  The  purchase  also  included  the  El  Dorado  Canal,  together  with  its  three  storage  facilities  at  Echo  Lakes,  Medley  Lakes  (Lake  Aloha),  and  Silver  Lake  (Fowler  1923:390–391;  Tenney  1923:49).    It  soon  became  clear  to  the  Western  States  executives  that  the  Rock  Creek  and  Stockton  plants  were  not  sufficient  to  satisfy  the  growing  needs  of  its  market  in  the  Central  Valley.  By  1923, Western States was purchasing $400,000 of energy annually from outside sources, and as  early  as  1916,  the  company  had  begun  plans  to  expand  and  add  to  the  American  River  hydroelectric system. Early work included an enlarged dam at the Medley Lake and two new  dams  at  Twin  Lakes  reservoir  (now  Caples  Lake),  as  well  as  repairs  to  the  canal  that  fed  the  Rock  Creek  Plant.  By  1922  these  upgrades  to  the  existing  system  had  been  completed  and  Western States had turned its energies toward the construction of a new powerhouse. In 1921,  the  El  Dorado  Power  Company,  a  subsidiary  of  Western  States,  filed  an  application  with  the  California  Railroad  Commission  to  build  the  El  Dorado  Powerhouse  and  improve  the  old  El  Dorado Canal; the permit was granted in February 1922, and work on the canal began shortly  thereafter. The entire project, including the restoration of the El Dorado Canal, was estimated to  cost $5 million (PAR 1995:5–7; Tenney 1923:49).  Construction of the El Dorado Powerhouse System   Major  rehabilitation  work  on  the  old  canal  commenced  in  1922.  The  canal  conduit  was  widened  and  re‐lined  and  the  flumes  replaced  and  enlarged  along  its  entire  22‐mile  length,  from its Cedar Rock diversion dam on the American River near Kyburz to the new forebay at  Pollock Pines. At the time of its completion in 1923, it was for all intents and purposes a new  canal.  Its  theoretical  capacity  was  more  than  doubled  from  about  70  to  more  than  150  ft.³/second,  and  most  of  the  original  engineering  features  were  replaced.  Two  new  redwood‐ stave pipe siphons were constructed above ground level across the mouths of Alder Creek and  Plum  Creek  canyons.  Flumes  and  ditches  were  enlarged  with  the  canal  being  lined  through  long  stretches  with  steel‐reinforced  gunite  shells  floated  into  place  by  boat  from  temporary  manufacturing  plants  located  along  the  canal.  Dry‐laid  and  mortared  rock  lining  and  wood  panels  were  also  used  to  enhance  the  efficiency  and  durability  of  canal  segments.  The  old  rectangular box flumes were reconstructed and reconfigured with flared sides to increase their  carrying  capacity.  Western  States  also  built  a  new  rock‐filled,  timber‐crib  intake  dam  in  the  summer  of  1923.  The  only  original  features  between  the  diversion  dam  and  the  forebay  to  remain intact were the extensive rock bench foundation walls that supported the many flumes  on the ditch system and two tunnels, the latter of which were both eventually enlarged and re‐ lined. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  22    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    In  addition to  work  on the  old  canal,  upgrades  to  the water‐storage  system  in  the upper  South Fork watershed were also undertaken. Three of the four reservoirs in the system required  either new construction or expansion. At Twin Lakes (Caples Lake) on a tributary of the Silver  Fork, construction of a new earthen storage dam and an auxiliary spillway was initiated in 1917  and  completed  in  1923,  creating  a  reservoir  with  a  storage  capacity  of  21,581  acre‐feet.  After  extensive  planning,  the  old  rock‐filled  and  timber‐crib  dam  built  in  1876  at  Silver  Lake  was  enlarged  and  substantially  reconstructed  in  the  late  1920s  to  increase  storage  capacity  from  about  5,000  acre‐feet  to  11,800  acre‐feet.  Finally,  at  the  Medley  Lakes  site,  the  old  reservoir  containing  only  350  acre‐feet  was  enlarged  between  1917  and  1923  by  construction  of  a  new  main dam and eleven auxiliary dams raising the reservoir, now called Lake Aloha, to a storage  capacity of about 5,350 acre‐feet (Tenney 1923 in State of California DWR 1979:50–51).    New construction was also required at the lower end of the project. The El Dorado Canal  emptied  into  a  forebay  that  was  built  to  a  capacity  of  400  acre‐ft.  of  water.  From  the  forebay  intake  and  valve  house,  water  was  released  into  a  two  and  one‐half  mile‐long  pipeline,  consisting of 66‐in. and 84‐in. wood‐stave pipe. At the end of the pipeline the water flows were  controlled at a tall surge chamber and valve house at the head of the penstock. The welded steel  penstock was about 4,000 ft. long with a 52‐in. diameter at the top and a 30‐in. diameter at the  bottom. The penstock split at a Y‐junction near the powerhouse and provided the motive power  to run the generators at the powerhouse (PAR 1995:7).    One problem of construction was  supplying  materials to parts of the ditch that were not  near any main roadway. This was mainly solved with the use of 6‐1/2‐ft.‐diameter round steel  tubs  that  were  used  to  float  loads  of  cement,  sand,  tools,  supplies,  and  other  items  down  the  canal.  A  hoist  and  derrick  system  was  used  to  put  in  and  take  out  the  tubs  from  the  water  (Engineering News‐Record, 23 February 1923 in Shoup 1990:30).    The powerhouse was built at an elevation of 1,889 ft. amsl, and, with the forebay at 3,797  ft.  amsl,  it  had  a  static  head  of  1,910  feet.  Two  General  Electric  10,000‐kw  generators  were  installed, with plans to add up to six more units in the future. Other equipment included two  Allis‐Chalmers  single  overhung  impulse  wheels,  two  General  Electric  exciters,  and  two  Allis‐ Chalmers  governors.  These  were  considered  state‐of‐the‐art  at  the  time  and  found  in  many  contemporary hydroelectric plants in California (Electrical West, 15 May 1932:370–376 cited in  PAR 1995:7). Early plans of the powerhouse show a “proposed expansion” on the east side that  would approximately double the original floor space and accommodate two new generators. To  accommodate  this  expansion,  the  east  wall  of  the  powerhouse  was  built  of  wood‐frame,  as  opposed to the other walls, which were constructed of reinforced concrete. The expansion was,  however, never undertaken.  Operation of the El Dorado Hydroelectric System, 1924–Present   As part of the 1922–1924 construction project, five new permanent ditch camps (Camps 1– 5)  were  built  to  house  ditch  tenders  and  other  personnel  who  were  needed  to  maintain  and  repair  the  El  Dorado  Canal  to  permit  year‐round  operation  of  the  hydroelectric  plant.  At  the  head of the system were the lake tender’s cabins at Caples Lake and Silver Lake. Ditch Camp 5,  located a short distance above the town of Pollock Pines and on the state highway, became the 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  23    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  headquarters camp for the project. A few storage sheds were also constructed at strategic points  along the canal where maintenance and emergency repair tools were stored. These sheds also  served  as  refuge  shelters  where  protection  could  be  secured  from  the  elements  during  severe  weather. Some of these structures built in the 1920s still remain on the canal system today.    Ditch  tenders  generally  lived  at  the  camps  with  their  families.  The  term  camps  is  a  misnomer  since  each  location  included  permanent  standing  structures  and  infrastructure,  utilities, and even some modest landscaping. Life along the ditch was isolated despite telephone  communication. Ditch tenders walked their “beat” daily checking water flows, clearing debris,  and checking for damage or wear to the canal and flumes. Further information about the lives  of ditch tenders is available in Baxter, Allen, and Fernandez (2006).    Western States continued to own and operate the powerhouse until the company’s merger  with  PG&E  in  1928.  PG&E  acquired  95  percent  of  the  Western  States  stock  and  assumed  ownership  of  the  latter  company’s  properties  and  holdings;  the  California  State  Railroad  Commission approved the merger in April of that year. Under PG&E ownership, the El Dorado  Canal  has  been  modified  through  routine  or  cyclical  maintenance  and  repair  work  that  introduced new materials not found on the 1922–1924 hydroelectric system. Major construction  projects  have  also  been  undertaken.  Among  the  most  notable  would  be  construction  of  Esmeralda  Tunnel  (1930–1931)  and  Slide  Tunnel  (1983–1984),  replacement  of  the  wood‐stave  Alder Creek and Plum Creek siphons with a steel pipe conduit (1945–1947), and replacement of  the old wood‐stave forebay‐powerhouse conduit with a steel pipe (Shoup 1990:34–40). The two  PG&E tunnel projects, as well as the more recent Mill to Bull Creek tunnel, have resulted in the  abandonment of long sections of the canal and flume.    During  the  era  of  PG&E  ownership,  the  El  Dorado  Powerhouse  experienced  some  modifications to its original equipment and structure, most often as a result of major flooding  events.  The  first  of  these  events,  a  penstock  rupture  on  the  hillside  above  the  powerhouse,  occurred in 1943. Water and eroded soil flowed through the windows on the south side of the  plant,  depositing  approximately  six  ft.  of  debris  on  the  floor  surrounding  the  turbines  and  generators. PG&E reacted by infilling the south window bays with concrete and constructing a  concrete stream diversion wall on the west (downstream) side of the powerhouse. In 1955 the  South Fork of the American River rose above the level of the floor of the powerhouse, causing  damage to equipment inside. To prevent further high‐water flooding in the future, PG&E built a  second  concrete  wall,  this  one  on  the  east  (upstream)  side  of  the  plant.  These  preventative  modifications proved effective against major floods in December 1964 and February 1986. The  1964  flood  was  the  highest  on  record  to  that  date,  but  the  floodwalls  held  and  there  was  no  reported  damage  to  the  powerhouse  or  its  equipment.  The  flood  protection  measures  performed well in 1986, again resulting in no damage.    Perhaps  the  most  devastating  flooding  event  occurred  in  1993,  because  it  resulted  in  the  closure  of  the  powerhouse.  Mechanical  failure  was  to  blame:  the  Unit  2  Turbine  Nozzle  Body  failed  because  of  a  governor  malfunction  coupled  with  an  undetected  flaw  in  the  original  casting of the nozzle body. The resulting flood deposited four feet of water in the powerhouse  and caused severe damage to electrical and mechanical equipment. EID had purchased the El  Dorado Hydroelectric Project, including the powerhouse, in 1995 and completed repairs to the 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    24     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  nozzle  bodies,  hydraulic  pressure  systems,  governors,  and  controls  in  1995–1996.  EID  also  replaced  the  penstock  relief  valves  with  jet  deflectors  at  this  time,  thus  improving  control  of  penstock pressure rise.    The  most  recent  flooding  occurred  in  1997.  Unusually  high  amounts  of  rainfall  in  late  December  1996  culminated  in  a  100‐year  flood  event  on  the  morning  of  January  2,  1997.  The  water  level  overflowed  the  flood  protection  wall  on  the  upstream  side  and  flooded  the  powerhouse  with  nine  feet  of  water  and  debris.  The  damage  to  the  plant  included  the  loss  of  control  equipment  and  damage  to  the  governors  and  generators,  as  well  as  loss  of  part  of  a  window on the east wall and a suspended foot bridge over the river. The generators and control  equipment have since been replaced or repaired and protective measures to modify the concrete  shell of the building to prevent further flooding are under construction.    During  the  short  time  that  EID  has  owned  the  project,  damages  resulting  from  fire  and  unstable  mountain  slopes  have  given  rise  to  concerns  about  the  viability  of  retaining  certain  segments of the canal. EID has placed some canal segments into pipe and the recent Mill to Bull  Creek tunnel bypasses a particularly troublesome section of canal located in an area subject to  massive  recurring  landslides.  EID  also  built  a  new  intake  dam  at  Cedar  Rock  near  Kyburz  in  2001.   

CALIFORNIA WORK CAMPS IN THE 1920S
  The  1920s  were,  other  than  a  brief  but  very  sharp  recession  after  WWI,  a  period  of  economic expansion, at least until 1929, and for many workers a time of steady work, rising real  wages,  and  the  beginnings  of  the  modern  consumer  society.  It  was  also  a  time  of  relative  industrial peace compared to the previous decade. The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW)  had  been  suppressed,  by  both  legal  and  extralegal  means,  and  was  no  longer  considered  a  serious  threat  and  there  was  a  decline  in  union  membership.  The  Progressive  ideal  of  a  harmony  of  interests  between  labor  and  capital  was  still  an  important  idea  during  the  1920s,  although  hardly  a  universal  one.  California  rural  industry  started  drawing  once  again  on  a  transnational migrant workforce, recruiting workers from the Philippines and Mexico.    Several  trends  should  be  considered  for  the  study  of  the  1922  construction  camps.  The  economy was moving into a period of expansion after the post‐WWI slump. The labor market  was relatively tight, in part due to the expanding economy, but also because of the passage of  the  restrictive  1917  Immigration  Act.  A  third  factor  was  the  impact  of  earlier  Progressive‐era  investigations and reforms, particularly those of the California Commission of Immigration and  Housing (CCIH).   Investigations of Rural Labor   During  the  previous  decade,  a  nationwide  eruption  outburst  of  strikes,  the  growing  influence  of  the  International  Workers  of  the  World  (IWW,  or  ʺWobbliesʺ),  and  the  indiscriminate use of violence by corporations and government forces resulted in public, state  and scholarly attention to the ʺlabor question.ʺ The end result was a general shift on the part of 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  25    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  many  industries  from  outright  confrontation  to  cooptation,  improving  work  conditions  sufficiently to make independent organization unattractive for their workers.     The violence of the 1910s, in particular the Wheatland Riot of 1913, marked a turning point  in the history of California rural labor. The Wheatland Strike led to an investigation of seasonal  work  in  California  by  the  Commission  on  Industrial  Relations,  and  the  establishment  of  the  California  Commission  of  Immigration  and  Housing  (CCIH).  The  records  and  recommendations  of  these  investigators  comprise  an  invaluable  resource  for  understanding  California  rural  labor  in  the  early  20th  century.  There  exists  no  comparable  record  until  the  1930s  when  the  internal  migration  of  American  tenant  farmers  from  the  southwest  sparked  another series of investigations.     The presence of the IWW had also been an impetus behind the spate of investigations of  rural  working  class  life  at  the  turn  of  the  century.  Rural  labor  was  generally  unskilled  and  transient, and, as such, of little interest to the craft unions of the American Federation of Labor  (AFL). Thus the IWW was for many years the only union that actively organized rural laborers  (Higbie  2003:8).  Their  belief  in  ʺOne  Big  Union,ʺ  a  single  union  for  all  workers,  and  their  rhetoric of revolution and sabotage was seen by many Americans, including other unions, as a  significant threat to the social order.     The State‐level CCIH and Federal‐level Commission on Industrial Relations (CIR), as well  as  other  Progressive‐era  reforms,  grew  out  of  the  public  awareness  that  the  struggle  between  labor and capital now posed an important social problem. Numerous investigations sought to  define the precise nature of the problem. In the case of transient laborers, the bread and butter  of  IWW  organizing,  the  subject  was  so  mysterious  to  the  middle‐class  professionals  who  comprised the reforming committees that some extraordinary measures were taken, particularly  a series of ʺparticipant observationsʺ in which investigators went undercover as hobo workers  in order to try to get some idea of the realities of this class of workersʹ day‐to‐day life.     This work produced a wealth of detail on work camp life in the early 20th century from a  variety  of  industries.  Before  Wheatland  the  prevailing  attitude  towards  work  camp  housing  might  at  best  be  described  as  laissez  faire,  especially  among  agriculturalists.  A  leading  1903  textbook,  Farm  Management,  advised  that  good  housing  was  a  waste  of  capital  as  harvest  workers  were  ʺunappreciative  of  attempts  to  provide  livable  surroundingsʺ  and  were  ʺbest  cared for with some cheap shelter where they can flopʺ (quoted in Street 2004:503).     Conditions  in  other  industries  were  probably  marginally  better—a  workforce  cannot  just  ʺflopʺ wherever it can when constructing canals in the Sierras. There were some notable early  experiments  in  paternalism,  especially  among  citrus  growers,  who  required  a  more  skilled  workforce  (Mitchell  1996:97–98).  Nonetheless  housing  could  be  grim.  In  testimony  before  the  CIR  in  1916,  one  George  Speed  described  conditions  on  dam  construction  camps  on  the  Sacramento  River,  ʺWell,  I  have  been  in  camps  where  there  has  been  four  to  500  men  packed  together in a camp in tiers, four tiers high, with only an alleyway of about 2 ft. between them,  and then boards put on the rafters for the men to sleep on thereʺ (Walsh and Manly 1916:4937).  A CCIH investigator, F.C. Mills, worked undercover at a logging camp in 1914 and noted that  the  workers  lived  four  to  a  tent  or  cabin,  and that  there  were  no  toilets,  ʺthe hill‐sides  nearby 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    26     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  being used.ʺ The water was piped from a distance, a method that Mills referred to as unclean  (Woirol 1992:55–56).    Diet  was  another  element  of  work  camp  life  that  received  attention.  Street  (2004)  writes  that  most  hobo  farmworkers  had  a  very  regimented  diet,  due  to  an  influential  study  of  the  economics of providing board for farm workers by Richard L. Adams (Street 2004:553). Because  the  largest  of  all  expenditures  was  typically  for  meat,  workers  were  usually  given  meat  in  a  stew rather than whole cuts. This allowed employers to use the bones and other unsavory parts  that  could  be  easily  disguised  in  gravy  and  sopped  up  with  bread.  Workers  also  ate  meat  substitutes  like  eggs,  milk,  dried  fruit;  and  packinghouse  byproducts  like  hog  jowls,  oxtails,  pigsʹ feet, sausages, ʺ the lesser cuts ʺ and lamb tongue (Street 2004:553). At the other extreme  lumber workers appear to have had rather good diets, regardless of how poor camp conditions  were  otherwise  (Cornford  1987:24;  Franzen  1992;  Higbie  2003:39).  Diet  could  also  vary  by  ethnicity and individual arrangements on the part of the workers.    Carleton Parker (1915) summarized the finding of the CCIH investigations on work camps.  The  Commission  investigated  876  labor  camps  in  California,  which  contained  60,813  workers,  and  included  lumber  camps,  construction  camps,  hop  camps,  berry  camps  and  highway  construction camps. Of the 876, 297 (34 percent) were ʺgood;ʺ 316 (36 percent) were ʺfair;ʺ and  263  (30  percent)  were  ʺbad.ʺ  By  ʹbadʺ  Parker  meant  there  were  no  toilet  or  bathing  facilities  (with some of the camps having nearly 100 women and children present), the camps ʺviolated  the state law with regard to the sleeping accommodations—the cubic air law that there should  be 500 cubic ft. of air for every sleeper.ʺ The kitchens and dining rooms were unscreened, and in  many,  the  bunkhouses  there  had  no  flooring  (Walsh  and  Manly  1916:4935).  ʺFairʺ  camps  had  some  accommodation,  but  were  still  below  the  standards  established  by  the  State  Board  of  Health.     Using  the  state  of  the  toilets  as  a  measure  of  sanitation  at  the  camps,  Parker  listed  the  percent of  unsanitary by industry (Table 2). Parker noted the relatively good sanitation of the  railway  and  highway  camps  as  being  due  to  their  operation  by  large  corporations  (Parker  1915:119) that presumably had the capital to invest in work camps.    The  report  noted  that  of  the  876  camps  as  a  whole,  13  percent  had  no  toilets,  41  percent  had  filthy  toilets,  20.4  percent  were  fairly  sanitary,  and  23.4  percent  were  sanitary  and  fly‐ screened.  Forty  percent  of  the  camps  had  no  bathing  facilities,  and  39  percent  had  tubs  or  showers.  Twenty‐five  percent  of  the  camps  had  no  garbage  disposal,  with  the  kitchen  refuse  being allowed to accumulate indefinitely. Five hundred twenty seven camps had horses, and of  these,  47  percent  allowed  manure  to  accumulate  around  the  kitchen  and  mess  tent  (Parker  1915:119–120).  Parker  also  observed  that  a  ʺgood  deal  of  the  unrest  which  has  convulsed  Californiaʹs agricultural workers this year was due to the carelessness and indifferent housing  of migratory casual laborersʺ (Walsh and Manly 1916:4935). 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  27    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Table 2. Work Camp Sanitation (after Parker 1915) 
Camp Type  Fruit Camps  Grape Camps  Hop Camps  Ranch Camps  Mining Camps  Lumber Camps  Highway Camps  Railway Camps  Oil Camps  ʺFilthyʺ Toilets  68%  69%  52%  61%  37%  42%  38%  24%  27% 

    An explicit part of the CCIH program was reforming the camps so that they conformed to  an  ʺAmerican  standard  of  living.ʺ  This  was  intended  to  assimilate  some  nationalities  while  driving out others. For example in 1926 the CCIH convinced the Guasti operation to construct a  complete new camp for its Mexican farm worker families. The CCIH investigator noted that:  It is worth the trip to Guasti to see just how all some of the Mexican families  can be elevated ... the kitchens of this new camp are piped for gas. The Guasti  Co.  sells  gas  to  the  occupants  for  so  much  a  month  same  as  installment  houses. I assure you that it was a pleasure for me to look into these Mexican  kitchens and see the Mexican women instead of being smoked out with an old  Dutch  oven,  standing  by  gas  stoves  like  noble  Anglo‐Saxons  [Mitchell  1996:105].    The material improvements described here, such as piped gas, went beyond being simple  amenities  to  make  their  workersʹ  lives  easier,  but  were  bound  up  with  racial  ideologies  and  strategies for assimilating immigrant workers into a middle class idea of the American way of  life.   Work Camp Reform   Early Progressive legislation was on one hand an effort to forestall the looming threat of  class conflict in the early 20th century through the implementation of selected reforms, and was  an  acknowledgment  that  a  policy  of  open  repression  was  not  necessarily  the  best  response  to  labor  agitation  (Adams  1966;  Gitelman  1988).  These  reforms  were  also  intended  as  a  form  of  social  engineering.  Donald  Mitchell  (1996)  discussed  this  aspect  of  Progressive  Era  reforms  in  reference to California farmworker camps and the California Commission of Immigration and  Housing (CCIH).     As with much social research, the findings of these investigations were framed within the  researchersʹ  class  backgrounds  and  expectations,  and  a  mix  of  prevailing  ideological  representations of the working classes. Within social Darwinist models transient workers were 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    28     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  the losers in social competition, compelled to the margins of society by their own inadequacies.  Racial  models  dwelt  on  the  biological  characteristics  of  the  different  ethnic  groups  that  comprised  rural  laborers.  Some  progressive  researchers  saw  the  attitudes  and  worldview  of  transient workers as rationalizing laziness (Higbie 2003:3). Carleton Parker, the first director of  the  CCIH,  was  strongly  influenced  by  the  then‐modern  field  of  psychology,  arguing  that  the  mindsets  of  migratory  workers  were  psychological  abnormalities  caused  by  environmental  conditions,  that  their  ʺstates  of  conventional  willfulness  such  as  a  laziness,  inefficiency,  destructiveness  in  strikes,  etc.,  as  ordinary  mental  disease  of  a  functional  kind,  a  sort  of  industrial  psychosisʺ  (Higbie  2003:88).  The  psychological  strains  experienced  by  migrant  workers,  their  absence  from  the  stabilizing  influence  of  women  and  family,  their  rootlessness,  and the degrading conditions in which they lived and worked, combined with their frustration  at being unable to enjoy the ʺhigh‐end social and economic life of the American middle classʺ  (Higbie 2003:87) led to their propensity to engage in irrational behavior such as working slowly  or  striking.  For  Parker,  social  upheavals  such  as  Wheatland  were  not  reactions  to  power,  exploitation,  and  economics,  but  psychological  disturbances  brought  about  by  environmental  conditions (Mitchell 1996:52).     Carleton Parker and many of the CCIH reformers interpreted labor violence on the part of  seasonal  workers  as  the  result  of  pathologies  brought  on  by  unhealthy  environments.  Reforming  these  brutalizing  environments  would  eliminate  the  source  of  the  pathologies  and  thus  eliminate  strikes  and  other  forms  of  labor  agitation  (Mitchell  1996:51).  Historians  and  archaeologists have noted in many studies of 19th and 20th century immigration that notions of  ʺAmericanismʺ  included  strong  ideas  about  standards  of  living,  public  display,  and  had  a  definite material component. This could be expressed through architecture, diet, table settings,  furnishings, and childrenʹs toys (Cohen 1986; Jameson 1998; Praetzellis and Praetzellis 2001)    For  middle  class  Americans  in  the  late‐19th  and  early‐20th  centuries,  the  material  world  served an explicit pedagogical purpose, inculcating appropriate forms of behavior and the use  of  modern  amenities  and  objects.  There  was  also  a  more  general  idea  of  environmental  determinism,  the  environment  in  this  case  being  an  artificial  one.  Unpleasant  environments  bred  unpleasant  people,  and  vice  versa.  Many  domestic  reformers  thus  saw  working  class  agitation  as  the  result  of  pathologies  brought  about  by  the  domestic  environments  in  which  working class people lived. Class tensions could be resolved by reforming working class home  life, eliminating the source of the pathologies that led to strikes and criminal behavior.    The  Progressive  Era  reforms  of  the  CCIH  should  be  seen  in  the  light  of  these  prevailing  middle class ideologies towards class tensions. The Director of the CCIH, Carleton Parker, was  committed to the idea that violent eruptions such as Wheatland could be avoided by a series of  environmental  ʺtweaksʺ  that  would  provide  a  domestic  environment  for  workers  that  would  make workers less pathologically inclined to strike, engage in violence, or other socially deviant  behavior.     Based  on  Parkerʹs  analysis  the  CCIH  produced  a  set  of  standardized  work  camp  plans  (CCIH:1919),  in  essence  commencing  a  program  of  environmental  fixes  to  the  places  that  produced  psychological  disturbances.  The  plans  were  developed  by  one  J.J.  Rosenthal,  a  sanitary engineer, with the input of a board of prominent public health authorities. The plans 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    29     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  incorporated innovative approaches to sanitary engineering pioneering, for example, up‐to‐date  sanitary toilets. The work camp program became the most important part of the CCIH activities,  and  in  1915  the  CCIH  recommendations  became  the  Labor  Camp  Act  of  1915.  The  guidelines  produced by the CCIH, Advisory Pamphlet on Sanitation and Housing, form an important baseline  for the archaeological study of work camps, providing a sense of socially acceptable norms for  work camps, such as the number of people per tent, proper sanitation, construction, and other  facilities. The degree to which employers conformed to or deviated from the guidelines is also  an important topic for research (Maniery 2002).     Although by the 1920s the political power of the CCIH was in decline, it had succeeded in  getting  some  work  camp  legislation  passed  into  law  (the  1915  Labor  Camp  Act)  and  it  maintained inspections and published guidelines for work camp construction. The CCIH work  camp  program  started  declining  in  importance  after  ca.  1919,  when  postwar  conditions,  a  resurgent  nativism,  and  a  lull  in  labor  activism  lead  to  a  gradual  dismantling  and  bureaucratization of CCIHʹs functions (Mitchell 1996:52). Responsibility for the enforcement of  the  Labor  Camp  Act  was  thereafter  transferred  to  the  California  Department  of  Industrial  Relations in 1927.    

THE WESTERN STATES CONSTRUCTION CAMPS
  To complete this massive construction project, Western States employed some 2,000 men,  the  majority  of  whom  were  housed  in  temporary  construction  camps  along  the  40  miles  from  the  powerhouse  at  the  lower  end  of  the  system  to  Caples  Lake  (formerly  Twin  Lakes)  at  the  upper end. Most of the camps were identified by letters. While the Headquarters Camp, located  near  14  Mile  House  (current  Pollock  Pines),  had  wood‐frame  office  buildings  and  several  cottages, the typical construction camp consisted of varying numbers of tents put up on wooden  frames  with  wood  floors.  Each  camp  employed  a  foreman,  engineer,  timekeeper,  and  a  cook  (Shoup 1990:29). The camps that concern us here are the eleven camps between the powerhouse  and Kyburz; Camps A, B, C, G, K, M, N, P, R, S, and T. The numbers of buildings and structures  for each of these camps, as reconstructed from the 1922 plans, is shown in Table 3.    The  numbers  in  Table  3  give  some  idea  of  the  different  workforces  amassed  for  the  different  operations  along  the  canal  construction  zone.  Camps  A,  B,  K,  and  R  cluster  down at  western end of the canal, around the forebay reservoir, the pipe conduit, the penstock, and the  powerhouse.  These  large  construction  projects  are  reflected  in  the  size  of  the  camps.  Setting  aside Camp R, which was a more permanent arrangement with frame bunkhouses as opposed  to  tents,  these  Camps  A,  B  and  K  had  43,  62,  and  51  tents  respectively.  Camp  B  also  had  a  temporary cottage. The camps along the canal east of the forebay had, with one exception, from  25  to  30  tents.  The  exception  was  Camp  T,  which  had  only  five  tents, and  may have  served  a  specialized function.    The  camps  had  a  standardized  array  of  support  structures—a  kitchen,  mess  hall,  bath  house, store house, and meat house. Water was provided from tanks, as was oil and gas. Work‐ related buildings, such as blacksmith shops, tool houses, and offices occurred primarily in the  camps  at  the  western  and  eastern  ends  of  the  canal,  with  the  camps  in  the  central  stretch 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    30     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  (Camps  M,  N,  P,  and  T)  having  only  wood  sheds,  and  a  semi‐subterranean  structure  (the  “dugout” on the plan, Figure 3) at Camp P. Every camp had formal toilet facilities. It should be  noted that a cursory inspection of the camps by archaeologists from the ASC and EID revealed  variation  from  the  plans  at  least  two  of  the  camps.  At  Camp  P  the  variation  was  minor  consisting  of  some additional  structures  not  indicated  on  the  plan.  At  Camp  A,  the difference  was  significant.  The  camp  was  far  larger  with  more  substantial  structures  than  the  1922  plan  indicated.     The tents at the camps were typically on raised wooden platforms, regardless of whether  the tents were on sloping ground or not (Figure 7), and had wooden sides. Where the slope was  severe,  as  at  Camp  A,  flats and terraces  were  constructed  with  retaining  walls  (Figure  8).  The  tents in many of the camps do not seem to have been heated, probably because it was summer  when  the  photographs  were  taken.  An  exception  was  Camp  A  (Figure  9),  where  the  photo  shows stove pipes protruding from the rear flaps of the tents. Either the photo was taken later  in spring or fall, or Camp A was considerably cooler due to its location in the canyon. Bedding  within the tents appears to have consisted of steel cots (Figure 10).    The  cookhouses  were  relatively  substantial  frame  buildings  with  well‐equipped  kitchens  (Figures  11  and  12).  Unsurprisingly  the  associated  refrigerated  meat  houses  also  had  a  substantial construction, which would be necessary for insulation (Figure 13).     The  main  information  we  have  on  the  Western  States  workforce  comes  from  the  reminiscences of Walter McLean, a field engineer on the project (McLean 1993). He recalls that  the workers were hired like agricultural labor, through hiring halls in Stockton and Sacramento.  His statement is worth quoting at length.  McLean:  …Most of these fellows came in through hiring halls. In those days Sacramento  and Stockton had what they call labor hiring halls. If you wanted men for your  construction camp you would call up Marray and Ready in Sacramento and say  “I  want  three  of  four  carpenters,  I  want  so  many  laborers,  and  I  want  so  many  workers,” or something like that. And they would round them up and take them  by bus to the job.  Lage:  It’s reminiscent of agricultural day labor now. 

McLean:  Pretty  much  the  same  as  agricultural  labor.  In  other  words,  these  people  were  actually labor contractors, you might call them. If you wanted laborers or cement  workers  or  somebody  like  that,  why  you’d  call  Murray  and  Ready.  Tere  were  also  three  or  four  other  agencies.  You’d  call  them  up  and  say,  “  Send  me  up  x  number of laborers for tomorrow, “ or the next day or something like that, see?  In those days I think they used to pay a dollar a head. In other words, for every  man  they  sent  up  for  the  job,  the  contractor  would  then  pay  a  dollar  for  that  particular fellow.  Lage:  Pay to the labor contractor? 

McLean:  Yes,  to  the  hiring  group—to  Murray  and  Ready.  Then  they  would  deduct  that  dollar from the worker’s first paycheck [McLean 1993:58]. 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    31     SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    The  early  1920s  came  after  tightened  immigration  restrictions  from  Asian  countries  and  were  a  period  of  increasing  immigration  from  southern  and  eastern  Europe.  Other  archaeologists have noted that work forces on hydroelectric projects tend to be European and  American  (Maniery  2007,  pers.  comm.),  and  this  may  be  the  case  for  the  Western  States  workforce.  The  site  record  for  Camp  N  notes  that  the  occupants  were  Swedish  immigrants  (Darcangelo  and  Collins  2002h).  At  this  time  Mexican  immigrants  were  an  important  part  of  mining and road and railroad construction projects. Western States was drawing on this labor  pool  is  unknown.  McLean’s  discussion  of  the  hiring  process  does  suggest,  however,  that  Western States was drawing on the same pool as agricultural labor.     Likewise little is known of labor relations on the project. One Floyd Poole, interviewed in  1987  by  Laurence  Shoup,  relayed  one  incident  that  sheds  light  on  labor  relations  during  that  place  and  time.  Western  States  hired  thousands  of  men  in  order  to  meet  the  established  deadlines. Having little time to screen the men, the company was fearful of unions and strikes.  Many of the working men were undoubtedly favorable to a union. The conservative tenor of the  1920s forced unions to oftentimes exist underground, but in place to emerge if the needs arose.  Western  States  used  spies  to  respond  to  this  perceived  threat.  The  company  would  have  an  agent dress as a workman and hire on to the project. The agent was really in place to discover  the  existence  of  a  union  and  identify  its  leaders.  Once,  when  one  of  these  spies  arrived  at  a  construction  camp,  the  workmen  asked  to  see  his  “red  card,”  the  membership  card  of  the  Industrial  Workers  of  the  World  or  the  “Wobblies.”  The  spy  was  told  that  nobody  worked  at  that camp unless they had a red card. The spy reported this to the company supervisors who  immediately fired about 100 men or the entire camp except one (Shoup 1990:29). On the other  hand  McLean  (1993:59)  recalls  that  the  carpenters  and  riggers  were  unionized,  while  the  laborers and concrete workers were not.   

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  32    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 7.  Panorama of Camp B (FS# 05‐03‐56‐829). Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado  Irrigation District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  33    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 8.  Camp A (FS# 05‐03‐56‐828), showing tent flats. Photo taken in  1922. Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  34    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 9.  Camp A (FS# 05‐03‐56‐828), showing tents with stovepipes.  Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  35    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 10.  Tents at Camp T (FS# 05‐03‐56‐825). Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation  District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  36    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 11.  Cookhouse at Camp A (FS# 05‐03‐56‐828). Photo taken in 1922.  Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  37    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 12.  Kitchen at Camp G (FS# 05‐03‐56‐832). Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado Irrigation  District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  38    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 13.  Interior of Icehouse at Camp G (FS# 05‐03‐56‐832). Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El  Dorado Irrigation District. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  39    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

Figure 14.  Mess hall at Camp G (FS# 05‐03‐56‐832). Photo taken in 1922. Courtesy of El Dorado  Irrigation District.

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  40    

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Table 3. Project 184 Construction Camps: Buildings and Structures from Camp Plans 
    05‐03‐56‐ 828  05‐03‐56‐ 829  05‐03‐56‐ 833  05‐03‐56‐ 832  05‐03‐56‐ 811  05‐03‐56‐ 823  05‐03‐56‐ 834  05‐03‐56‐ 830  05‐03‐56‐ 838  05‐03‐56‐ 711  05‐03‐56‐ 825 

Camp A  Camp B  Camp C  Camp G  Camp K  Camp M  Camp N  Camp P  Camp R  Camp S  Camp T  (Figure 5)  (Figure 6)  (Figure 2)  (Figure 3)  (Figure 6)  (Figure 4)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 3)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 5) 

Tent  Engineerʹs Tent  Cookʹs Tent  Timekeeperʹs Tent  Foremanʹs Tent  Sub‐foremanʹs Tent   Bunkhouse  Temp. Cottage  Kitchen 

43                1  1  1  1  1  2  1  1         

61  1            1  1  1  1  2  1    2    2  1  1   

23  1    1          1  1  1  2  1  2    1  1       

25  1  1  1  1  1      1  1  2  1  1               

50      1          1  1  2  1  1  1    1        1 

23                1  1  1  1  1  1      1       

26        1        1  1  1  1  1  1    1  1       

22  1  1  1          1  1  1  1  1  2             

4            2    1  1  1  1        2         

25                1  1  1    1  1             

4  1                  1    1               

41    

Bath House  Mess Hall  Store House  Meathouse/Refrig.  Wash Stand  Wash House  Office  Wood Shed  Commissary  Vegetable House  Pantry 

  Table 3. Project 184 Construction Camps: Buildings and Structures from Camp Plans, continued 
    05‐03‐56‐ 828  05‐03‐56‐ 829  05‐03‐56‐ 833  05‐03‐56‐ 832  05‐03‐56‐ 811  05‐03‐56‐ 823  05‐03‐56‐ 834  05‐03‐56‐ 830  05‐03‐56‐ 838  05‐03‐56‐ 711  05‐03‐56‐ 825 

Camp A  Camp B  Camp C  Camp G  Camp K  Camp M  Camp N  Camp P  Camp R  Camp S  Camp T  (Figure 5)  (Figure 6)  (Figure 2)  (Figure 3)  (Figure 6)  (Figure 4)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 3)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 5)  (Figure 5) 

Gas and Oil Stand  Tank  Water Tank  Tool House  Blacksmith Shop  Engineerʹs Office  Car Platform  Garage  Dugout  Cement Shed  Warehouse  Toilet  Frame Building  Illegible 

1      1  1              1     

  2    1    1  1  1      1  5  1   

1                      1  1  2 

1      1  1  1            2     

  2    1  1              2  1   

  1                    2     

1                      2     

1    1            1      3     

  1      1          1    1  1   

  1    1                2     

                      1     

42  

 

RESEARCH DESIGN
    In  the  context  of  a  Federal  undertaking,  the  legal  significance  of  cultural  resources  is  critical because it determines whether the properties ʺshould be considered for protection from  destruction  or  impairmentʺ  (36  CFR  60.2).  Impacts  to  historic  properties  listed  or  eligible  for  listing  in  the  National  Register  of  Historic  Places  (NRHP)  must  be  considered  in  accordance  with  the  regulations  of  the  Advisory  Council  on  Historic  Preservation  (ACHP)  set  forth  in  36  CFR  800.  Cultural  remains  determined  to  be  not  significant  usually  do  not  require  further  management consideration.    The  process  by  which  one  determines  the  NRHP  eligibility  of  a  property  is  set  out  in  Archaeology and Historic Preservation: Secretary of the Interiorʹs Standards and Guidelines (48  CFR 44716–44742).    

NRHP CRITERIA FOR EVALUATION
  The  significance  of  a  historic  resource  is  measured  against  the  NRHP  Criteria  for  Evaluation.  The  quality  of  significance  in  American  history,  architecture,  archaeology,  engineering,  and  culture  is  present  in  districts,  sites,  buildings,  structures,  and  objects  that  possess integrity of location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association,  and,   a.  That  are  associated  with  events  that  have  made  a  significant  contribution  to  the  broad  patterns of our history; or  b.  That are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or  c.  That embody the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, or method of construction,  or  that  represent  the  work  of  a  master,  or  that  possess  high  artistic  values,  or  that  represent  a  significant  and  distinguishable  entity  whose  components  may  lack  individual distinction; or  d.  That  have  yielded,  or  may  be  likely  to  yield,  information  important  in  prehistory  or  history [36 CFR 60.4].    While  examples  of  all  categories  of  properties—districts,  sites,  buildings,  structures,  and  objects—may be judged in relation to any or all of the criteria, the significance of archaeological  properties is usually assessed by applying Criterion D. This criterion stresses the importance of  the information contained in an archaeological site rather than its intrinsic value as a surviving  example of a type or its historical association with an important person or event.    To  assess  whether  a  property  is  likely  to  contain  important  information,  the  researcher  must  prepare  an  archaeological  research  design.  This  document  identifies  the  important  questions that could be addressed by the kind of data that the property is likely to contain and  that cannot be addressed using data from other sources alone.    
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    43   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

RESEARCH ORIENTATION
  At first glance work camps are not the most appealing topics. The camps themselves are  often  designed,  reflecting  only  the  cost  efficiencies  and  paternalistic  concerns  of  corporate  engineering  departments.  With  little  presence  in  the  historical  record  and  a  nondescript  material culture, the inhabitants of work camps can appear as an undifferentiated conglomerate  mass, without culture or ethnicity.     We take the perspective that the cultures of classes—working class, capitalist, and middle  class—are,  like  classes  themselves,  relational.  They  exist  only  in  their  relations  with  other  classes or class segments. Working  class culture does not exist outside its relations with other  classes.  Work  camps  are  likewise  the  products  of  the  relations  between  classes,  between  workers and their employers, albeit relations that are not on equal terms. A central notion here  is  the  concept  of  power,  and  an  awareness  of  the  different  kinds  of  power  that  exist  and  the  conflicts  between  these  kinds  of  power  (Giddens  1979;  Wolf  1990;  Brumfiel  1992),  essentially  boiling down in the case of work camps to the dialectic between ʺpower overʺ and ʺpower to;ʺ  the  power  over  othersʹ  lives  and  the  power  to  control  oneʹs  own  life  (Miller  and  Tilley  1984;  Paynter  and  McGuire  1991).  The  power  of  work  camp  operators  is  formal,  institutional,  and  easily  documented.  The  power  of  the  workers  in  the  camp  is  informal,  heterogeneous,  and  rarely documented, unless it should erupt into large labor actions. Employersʹ interests are the  most  obvious  element  in  work  camp  design.  But  even  these  interests  are  the  outcome  of  class  relations, as employers designed the camps in response to episodes of labor strife or in response  to  legislation,  which  is  also  often  also  the  result  of  labor  strife.  And  their  employees  react  to,  adapt to, and alter those designs.     While  work  camps  can  inform  on  a  number  of  general  issues  within  historical  archaeological research, such as consumerism, commodity flows, or local adaptations, they also  have a specific and unique contribution to make to our understanding of Western history and  archaeology.  When  considered  within  the  framework  of  California  labor  history,  work  camps  are one of the only material resources associated with California rural labor.     Through  their  labor  on  road  and  railroad  construction,  irrigation  and  hydroelectric  projects,  and  in  agriculture,  logging,  and  mining,  it  was  largely  immigrant  or  transient  labor  who  built  the  landscape  of  the  modern  West.  Yet  it  is  a  workforce  for  which  it  is  singularly  difficult  to  form  an  accurate  historical  picture.  The  jobs  they  worked,  and  lived,  on  were  seasonal  and  temporary.  The  workers  themselves  were  of  little  interest  to  the  broader  society  unless  they  became  perceived  as  a  problem,  either  through  strikes,  as  the  object  of  one  of  the  periodic eruptions of nativism among white Americans, or when the labor pool that most rural  workers  cycled  in  and  out  of,  the  indigent  and  unemployed,  became  large  enough  to  be  perceived  as  a  social  problem.  For  example  the  state  and  national  reaction  to  1914 Wheatland  Riot,  Kelleyʹs  Army,  and  the  expansion  of  the  IWW,  and  a  host  of  other  labor  struggles  provided us with an important series of documents and testimonies as investigators sought to  diagnose  the  reason  for  these  social  upheavals.  Likewise  the  massive  internal  migration  of  southwestern tenant farmers, as well as another upsurge of labor struggle during the 1930s also  sparked a series of investigations. But otherwise, as long as they were there when needed, and  gone when not, rural labor was an object of little interest and thus little documented.  
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    44   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    This lack of documentation is a particular problem in the 1920s. The 1920s appear as a kind  of  lull  in  the  history  of  American  labor,  a  quiet  spot  between  the  industrial  violence  and  repression  of  the  1910s  and  the  Great  Depression  of  the  1930s.  This  period  is  ensconced  in  popular  memory  as  the  ʺJazz  Ageʺ—evoking  images  of  flappers,  Art  Deco,  and  national  prosperity.  As  it  was  no  longer  perceived  as  an  overriding  social  problem,  the  life  of  labor  during  this  period  did  not  generate  the  rich  documentary  investigative  record  that  it  did  in  earlier and later decades.     The historical difficulty in characterizing rural labor is exacerbated by the nature of rural  labor itself. The sources historians use for demographic information, such as the U.S. census, are  of  limited  use  in  reconstructing  the  make‐up  of  the  rural  labor  force.  Rural  workers  are  often  transient,  moving  from  place  to  place,  job  to  job,  and  industry  to  industry,  often  within  the  space of a few days and often on a national or international scale. There has been little detailed  study  of  transient  workers  simply  because  tracking  their  lives  and  their  movements  is  enormously difficult (Peck 2000:2).     What we are left with in the documentary record is, at best, snapshots of these workers at  specific points and places in their lives, working within specific industries, but with little way of  connecting  these  points to  form  coherent  narratives  of  these  workersʹ  lives  or  even  awareness  that these points might need to be connected. ʺThe conclusions we draw about laborers depend  very much  on where we find them in the historical record. But the course of a working life— even  in  the  course  of  a  few  days—a  laborer  might  be  a  lumberjack,  a  railroad  worker,  a  farm  laborer, a beggar, or a minerʺ (Higbie 2003:100). This work was seasonal and temporary. Other  than  a  few  privileged  ones,  most  workers  moved  on  when  the  job  was  over.  They  lived  in  a  ceaseless  cycle  between  mines,  logging  camps,  and  fields,  or  any  other  number  of  industries  such as fruit packing, canning, or construction, hoping to accumulate enough to hold them over  during the jobless winter months in cities and towns if they did not leave the state altogether.     This combination of poverty, social marginalization, and mobility, often on a national and  international scale, does not make for easy study or understanding. Both the documentary trail  and the material trail are very scanty.     As  the  foregoing  discussion  suggests,  it  is  important  to  note  that  work  camps  represent  only  one  moment  in  rural  workersʹ  lives,  but  often  the  only  moment  where  we  have  material  remains  that  can  be  closely  associated  with  those  lives.  Isolated  camps  along  railroads  and  roads become ʺcan scattersʺ or ʺcan dumps.ʺ Winter quarters in cities and towns are, at best, the  archaeological remains of cheap hotels, flophouses and boardinghouses, sites that yield highly  mixed  assemblages  without  definitive  associations.  Work  camps  are  the  most  identifiable  material resource we have associated with California rural labor.   

PROPERTY TYPES
  The  National  Register  of  Historic  Places  defines  a  property  type  as  ʺa  grouping  of  properties defined by common physical or associative attributes.ʺ The definition is flexible, and  properly  so,  since  what  constitutes  a  ʺproperty  typeʺ  will  vary  by  the  circumstances  of  the 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  45  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  project, the research questions, and management considerations. There are at least three scales  of analysis within which property types can be defined—intrasite, site, and intersite.   • The  intrasite  level  of  analysis  operates  at  the  level  of  the  individual  features  and  deposits  or  meaningful  groups  of  features  and  deposits  that  comprise  the  work  camp  site. These features may individually have research potential or may only have potential  in relation to other features when considered in the context of the work camp as a whole.   The  site  level  of  analysis  considers  the  work  camp  site  as  a  single  entity.  Here  the  research  potential  may  derive  from  the  intrasite  analysis  of  the  features  and  deposits,  informing on topics such as spatial organization and activity areas.  The intersite level of analysis considers groups of work camps. Here the purpose may  be  analyzing  change  through  time,  considering  variation  with  or  across  different  industries, or sampling from a set of standardized work camps.  

Intrasite Property Types   All three levels of analysis are important for the Project 184 construction camps. But while  the Site and Intersite property types are self evident (ʺthe construction camp siteʺ and ʺmultiple  construction camp sitesʺ), property types at the intrasite level require further definition as they  are the building blocks upon which other levels of analysis will rest.     Review  of  the  historical  plans  for  the  construction  of  the  camps,  site  records,  and  a  field  visit  provided  us  with  a  list  of  anticipated  relevant  property  types  for  the  extant  Project  184  construction camp sites (Table 4). Certain features such as roads and the El Dorado Canal or the  canalʹs old flume pass through or border some of the work camp sites, but are separate sites.  Table 4. Anticipated Property Types, and Frequency by Camp (from 1922 Plans) 
 
 

05‐03‐ 56‐828 

05‐03‐ 56‐829 

05‐03‐ 56‐828 

05‐03‐ 56‐833 

05‐03‐ 56‐823 

05‐03‐ 56‐834 

05‐03‐ 56‐830 

05‐03‐ 56‐711 

05‐03‐ 56‐825 

Camp A  Camp B  Camp C  Camp K  CampM  Camp N  Camp P  Camp S  Camp T 

Residential  Tent  Engineerʹs Tent  Cookʹs Tent  Timekeeperʹs  Tent  Foremanʹs Tent  Support  Mess Hall  Kitchen  Meathouse/Refrig  Pantry  Bath House 

  43            1  1  1    1 

                      1 

  23  1    1      1  1  1    1 

  50      1      2  1  1  1  1 

  23            1  1  1    1 

  26        1    1  1  1    1 

  22  1  1  1      1  1  1    1 

  25            1  1  1    1 

  4  1          1    1     

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  46  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Table 4. Anticipated Property Types, and Frequency by Camp (continued) 
 
 

05‐03‐ 56‐828 

05‐03‐ 56‐829 

05‐03‐ 56‐828 

05‐03‐ 56‐833 

05‐03‐ 56‐823 

05‐03‐ 56‐834 

05‐03‐ 56‐830 

05‐03‐ 56‐711 

05‐03‐ 56‐825 

Camp A  Camp B  Camp C  Camp K  CampM  Camp N  Camp P  Camp S  Camp T 

Support (cont.)  Wash Stand  Wash House  Wood Shed  Store House  Office  Infrastructure  Gas and Oil Stand  Tank  Water Tank  Road*  Path  Terrace  Work   Tool House  Blacksmith Shop  Dugout  Small Tramway  Canal/Flume*  Refuse Disposal  Toilet  Dump 

  2  1    1  1    1      1  1  ≥5    1  1    1      1  ≥1 

                                           

  2    1  2  1    1      1                    1  ≥1 

  1      1  1      2    1        1  1          2  ≥1 

  1    1  1        1    1                1    2   

  1    1  1  1    1      1                    2  ≥1 

  2      1      1    1  1            1        3  ≥1 

  1              1    1        1        1    2  ≥1 

                    1                1    1  ≥1 

*Separate linear resources that cross or border the construction camp site. 

    Residential features consist of those buildings in which people slept, and probably spent  much of their non‐work time (Figures 7, 8, and 9). These will comprise the bulk of the properties  at the intrasite level. Depending on the nature of the camp, and the company or agency running  the  camp,  a  work  camp  residence  can  range  from  a  blanket  on  the  ground  to  a  large  formal  bunkhouse or individual family home. Differences in architecture or size can inform on issues  such  as  stratification  and  segregation  within  the  camp,  as  well  as  the  quality  of  life.  The  presence  or  absence  of  architectural  amenities  such  as  stoves,  flooring,  screens,  or  glass  windows  are  also  important  indictors  of  living  conditions.  The  presence  of  food  preparation  and  serving  and  consumption  artifacts  such  as  enamelware,  ceramics,  cans,  cutlery,  in  the  residential  properties  might,  for  example,  indicate  individualized  food  preparation  and 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  47  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  consumption.  Early  20th‐century  investigators  sometimes  observed  that  foreign‐born  workers  preferred to prepare their own meals to eating in the mess hall. Recreation and health‐related  artifacts can provide information on area of sociability and health treatment in the camp.    Support  features  are  those  properties  within  the  camp  that  served  to  house  an  administrative  or  support  function.  Key  functions  here  were  board  for  the  workers,  as  evidenced  by  a  cookhouse  or  kitchen  (Figures  11  and  12),  mess  hall  (Figure  14);  and  food  storage  facilities  (Figure  13);  and  hygiene,  as  evidenced  by  a  shower  or  bathhouse.  Food,  its  storage,  preparation,  and  content,  was  a  central  concern  of  work  camp  life.  For  example,  diet  was probably one of the few redeeming features of life in logging camps throughout the U.S.,  by  most  accounts  being  plentiful  and  even  healthful  (Cornford  1987;  Brashler  1991;  Franzen  1992; Higbie 2003). Other workers, such as many agricultural workers, were not necessarily so  fortunate. In the crowded conditions and often unhygienic conditions of work camps, facilities  for washing and bathing were less a luxury than a necessity. Provisions for bathing, however,  were highly variable. The CCIH recommended heated water, at least one shower per 15 people,  and separate facilities for men and women (CCIH 1919), but in its investigations found facilities  could be little more than a public pump or an irrigation ditch. On the other hand, some camps  for Japanese workers incorporated bathhouses to accommodate Japanese traditions.     Infrastructural features are the systems of features that are largely used for transport and  transmission,  be  it  of  people,  water,  electricity,  gas,  or  sewage.  The  presence  of  infrastructure  and  its  condition  yields  information  on  amenities  such  as  electricity  or  running  water,  but  is  also  an  important  indicator  of  hygiene.  Poor  drainage  of  living  areas,  unpaved  roads  and  walkways,  and  open  drains  would  have  been  factors  in  the  quality  of  life  in  the  camp.  Water  sources and the filtration of drinking water are conditions that would have affected health.     Refuse disposal features are the features archaeologists like the most. These may take the  form  of  hollow  refuse‐filled  features  such  as  trashpits  and  privies,  or  may  be  surface  dumps,  such as material broadcast down the nearest slope. These are of course the source of the artifacts  and faunal remains that are the staples of archaeological research. But the features themselves  are important. The placement of these features in relation to the residential properties and water  sources is a significant factor in assessing health and sanitation practices at a camp. In relation  to  outhouses,  the  CCIH  recommended  one  per  15  persons,  and  that  the  deposits  within  be  regularly  covered  with  crude  oil,  lime,  or  ashes.  The  development  of  cheap  portable  sanitary  toilets was something of which the CCIH was particularly proud (Mitchell 1996:52).     Unlike  more  permanent  settlements,  refuse  disposal  at  work  camps  was  generally  communal. The artifacts usually cannot be associated with individual households, but represent  the refuse of the entire camp. This is counterbalanced by the short time span of most camps and,  relative  to  most  urban  settings,  a  fairly  homogeneous  composition.  The  association  for  a  1922  work camp dump is significantly more focused than the association for a municipal dump. The  refuse can still yield significant meaningful information.    Beyond  the refuse  itself,  the  nature  of  the  disposal  is  important  for  insights  into  hygiene  and sanitation practices at the camp. For example, burned refuse in a segregated dumping area 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  48  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  suggests a greater concern with sanitation than would a scatter of faunal material immediately  outside the cookhouse back door.    Work features mark the boundary between the camp and the industry for which the camp  existed. These features include facilities for animals, the maintenance of equipment, and storage  areas  for  tools  and  materials.  In  some  cases,  such  as  packing  houses,  and  blacksmith  and  machine  shops,  the  feature  is  the  actual  place  of  work  itself.  These  features  can  convey  information  about  the  nature  of  the  work  and  specific  technological  adaptation.  They  can  in  some cases yield information about the control of work and attitudes towards work.    

PREVIOUS RESEARCH
  Work camps are always part of a larger industrial landscape and thus research tends to fall  within industry‐based categories—logging camps, mining camps, railroad camps, and so forth.  The edited volume Communities Defined by Work: Life in Western Work Camps (Van Bueren 2002a)  considers  the  phenomenon  of  work  camps  as  a  research  topic  in  itself,  establishing  commonalities  and  distinctions  between  work  camps  in  different  industries  and  geographic  areas,  including  oilfield  camps,  strike  camps,  ,  and  aqueduct‐  and  dam‐construction  camps.  Baxter  (2002)  analyzes  how  oilfield  workers  at  Squaw  Flat  in  Ventura  County  created  a  separation in work and domestic space that was not designed into the work camp. Van Bueren  (2002b)  discusses  ethnic  and  class  differences  at  the  Alabama  Gates  Aqueduct  construction  camp, finding that, although there was segregation of housing, there was little in the material  culture  to  suggest  substantial  class  or  ethnic  differences.  Maniery  (2002)  looks  at  health  and  sanitation at the 1920s Butt Valley Dam construction camp, particularly in relation to corporate  compliance with the 1915 Labor Camp Act. This article is of particular value as it contains the  key points of the 1920 version of the CCIH guideline as an appendix.     Work  camps  associated  with  the  construction  of  dams  and  hydroelectric  facilities  are  probably the most extensively studied work camps in the West. An investigation of more than  50 dam‐construction camps in central Arizona is still by far the largest study of its kind (Rogge  et al. 1994, 1995). That research focused on the work camps associated with the construction of  seven dams built between the 1890s and 1940s. Rogge et al. noted after the turn of the century,  most  camps  shifted  away  from  almost  exclusively  male  societies  to  communities  with  more  women  and  children.  With  this  shift  there  was  an  increase  in  community  social  institutions.  Although  managers  sought  to  control  alcohol  use  there  was  evidence  of  alcohol  consumption  and home brewing. The arrangement of the camps also became increasingly formal, with more  substantial structures at later camps. The spatial layout of the camps was found to reflect social  hierarchies.    Prior  to  the  1920s  the  large  unskilled  component  of  the  Arizona  dam‐construction  workforce was highly transient. Due to the tight labor market, management had a difficult time  maintaining a full crew. The high numbers of Apaches and other ethnic groups in the workforce  may have been due, at least in part, to that labor shortage (Bassett 1994). Rogge et al. (1994:295– 296)  suggest  that  social  differentiation  within  work  camps  may  offer  a  fruitful  avenue  for  research. 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    49   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    Several dam‐construction camps have also been investigated in California, including two  located along the upper Santa Ana River in western San Bernardino County (Foster et al. 1988)  and  the  Relief  Dam  construction  camp  in  Tuolumne  County  (Shoup  1989;  Van  Bueren  1989).  Numerous camps built during the 1920s for hydroelectric development projects, stretching from  the  Stanislaus  River  to  the  Pit  River  in  northern  California  (Maniery  1999;  Baker  2001,  2002;  Maniery and Compas 2002), have also been studied. The Santa Ana River construction camps  investigated  by  Foster  et  al.  comprise  CA‐SBR‐5500H,  occupied  around  1905,  and  the  Warm  Springs construction camp (CA‐SBR‐5503H), first occupied in 1903 and later reused in 1926. The  former  camp  had  an  unstructured  organization  and  contained  industrial  features,  structure  pads,  refuse‐disposal  pits,  and  evidence  of  corporate  food  preparation  for  large  numbers  of  workers.  Foster  et  al.  also  surmised  that  proscriptions  against  alcohol  use  may  have  been  responsible for the low numbers of alcoholic beverage containers at CA‐SBR‐5500H.    Foster  et  al.  (1988)  found  little  evidence  of  the  1903  Warm  Springs  Camp  and  no  investigations were undertaken in the area reoccupied by the highly structured 1926 camp. Both  CA‐SBR‐5500H and ‐5503H, however, were evaluated as eligible for the National Register based  on  their  potential  to  address  topics  concerning  technology,  spatial  patterning,  economics,  sociocultural context, chronology, and subsistence practices.    The  Relief  Dam  construction  camp  in  northeastern  Tuolumne  County  was  determined  eligible  for  the  National  Register  without  excavation  in  1989  (Shoup  1989).  The  hoistworks,  cableway anchors, steam donkeys, and other equipment used to build this remote dam in the  high  Sierra  Nevada  were  abandoned  in  place.  A  large  flat  adjacent  to  the  dam  contains  numerous  structure  pads  and  an  extensive  refuse  dump  dominated  by  commercial‐size  tin  canisters,  indicative  of  corporate  food  preparation  at  a  mess  hall  (Van  Bueren  1989).  Workers  lived in seven bunkhouses, while managers and a doctor lived in separate wood‐framed houses  with their own associated refuse deposits. Status differences are clearly reflected in the remains  found in those different parts of the camp.    Excavation of the Butt Valley Dam Construction Camp 5, a National Register‐eligible site  (CA‐PLU‐1245H)  occupied  from  1922  to  1924,  resulted  in  an  extensive  data  base  capable  of  addressing topics similar to those studied by Foster et al. (1988). This was a large camp, with a  machine shop, roundhouse, rows of cabins (each with a wood stove), a cookhouse, and hospital.  A substation provided lighting, and a bathhouse with sump area, and wood‐lined privies large  enough  to  accommodate  four  seats  were  at  the  fringes  of  the  residential  areas.  Water  lines  transported water from large tanks to camp facilities, and wastewater from the cookhouse was  removed by pipe and discharged into earthen pits with wood lids (Maniery 1999:200–209).    In  contrast  to  findings  by  Rogge  et  al.  (1994)  and  Foster  et  al.  (1988),  at  the  earlier  dam  construction  camps,  Maniery  (1999)  found  that  conditions  at  Butt  Valley  were  somewhat  improved. Workers at Butt Valley ate moderate‐ to high‐priced meat cuts, such as roasts, ham,  and  leg  of  lamb,  instead  of  stews.  A  hospital  was  on‐site  and  was  identified  archaeologically.  There was little in the way of alcohol containers.     Five  other  1920s  camps  at  Lake  Almanor  suggest  that  hydroelectric  camps  maintained  a  rigid social organization and division between workers and supervisors (Maniery and Compas 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    50   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  2002).  At  Camp  Almanor  the  foremenʹs  housing  had  running  water  and  a  sewer  system,  whereas  laborers  lived  in  cabins  with  communal  latrines  and  outside  spigots.  The  layout  at  Camp  Almanor  was  terraced,  with  the  administration  and  foreman  housing  located  at  the  highest  level  of  the  camp.  The  terrace  below  the  administration  area  contained  seasonal  work  bunkhouses and cabins.     Three camps from the 1908‐to‐1913 construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct have been  investigated. These are the Narka Camp (CA‐INY‐6359H) (Tordoff and Marvin 2003), the Dove  Springs  Camp  (Faull  and  Hangan  2004),  and  the  Alabama  Gates  Camp  (CA‐INY‐3760/H)  (Costello and Marvin 1992; Tordoff 1995a, 1995b). Of these the Alabama Gates Camp site was  determined  eligible  for  the  National  Register,  on  the  basis  of  surface  evidence  alone.  was  occupied for less than a year starting in 1912. Remains at that camp consisted in part of well‐ defined rows of tent pad outlines, associated artifact scatters, and equally well‐defined wooden  house  locations.  Data‐recovery  excavations  yielded  information  on  several  topics,  including  camp  layout,  daily  life,  camp  occupants,  labor‐management  relations,  and  the  spread  of  technological innovations in the early 20th century (Van Bueren et al. 1999).   

RESEARCH DOMAINS
This  section  lays  out  eight  inter‐related  general  themes,  within  which  there  are  specific  questions.   The themes are:  • • • • • • • • Camp Function and Design  Corporate Policy and Labor  Camp Conditions  Labor Stratification  Immigration and Ethnicity  Gender and Family  Daily Life  Labor Organization and Legislation 

  The  first  three  themes  are  intended  to  illuminate  how  and  why  the  work  camps  were  organized  in  certain  ways  and  why  certain  settings  were  chosen.  Proximity  to  work,  environmental  constraints,  and  comfort  were  among  the  factors  contributing  to  choices  of  particular  locations  for  camps.  Their  formal  organization  reflected  management  attitudes,  sanitation  considerations,  laws,  social  factors,  and  environmental  constraints.  To  address  this  issue, details are needed regarding the design, locations, and functions of all features within the  camp.    The  remaining  five  themes  focus  on  the  life  of  labor  in  the  camps,  the  relations  with  the  employers,  and  the  broader  issues  of  labor  and  social  history.  Work  camps  are  the  result  of  what  today  is  a  relatively  unfamiliar  situation  for  most  people—employers  constructing  and 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    51   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  operating  living  spaces  for  their  employees,  as  well  as  providing  food  and  other  services  for  them.  This  enmeshes  employees  and  employers  in  tensions  that  stand  outside  the  idealized  contractual relation of waged labor—individuals in the market place, exchanging a set amount  of  labor  for  a  set  amount  of  money.  The  isolation  and  mobility  of  rural  industry  entailed  that  employers also provide housing, food, and other services for their employees. Employers had to  invest valuable capital in physical plants for which there was no possibility of financial return,  and employees found themselves still subject to workplace relationships outside the workplace.  The  differing  ways  in  which  this  non‐work  relationship  was  interpreted,  struggled  over,  and  negotiated by workers and employing institutions is a central issue in the study of work camps.     Camp Function and Design   Camp  Function  and  Design  elicits  basic  information  about  the  individual  camps  under  study; what kinds of camps they were, why the individual camps were laid out, and why they  had  or  did  not  have  particular  features.  Some  of  these  questions  are  resource‐specific  and  descriptive and, in of and of themselves, probably trivial, but once answered provide data for  more  interpretive  questions.  Some  basic  questions  that  archaeologists  ask  within  this  domain  include ones along the lines of: “What property types are present within the site? How was the  camp laid out?” Many of these basic descriptive questions have been answered, to a greater or  lesser extent, through reference to the 1922 camp plans. It should be noted however that plans  are not necessarily reality, and that in at least one case (Camp A) the archaeological site was far  more extensive than the 1922 plans indicated.   • • • • How many residences were there? How many people lived at the camp?   What support facilities were there at the camp?  What was the infrastructure of the camp? Was there drainage? Was there supplied water  and gas? Was there electricity and for what purposes?  What kinds of work areas are present and where are they located in relation to the  residential and other areas of the camp? Were work areas and habitations segregated or  interspersed and how did that impact the livability of the camp?  Was a blacksmith shop present and, if so, how was it organized and what types of repairs  and fabrication were attempted? What kinds of adaptations and innovations are indicated,  if any?  What were the environmental and structural constraints and opportunities that affected  the location and design of the camp and its structures?   What adaptations to specific environmental/work conditions are evident in the layout?  Data Requirements   Documentary:  camp  plans,  construction  and  maintenance  ledgers,  building  blueprints,  historical photos. 

• •

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  52  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    Archaeological: sufficient focus to delimit building locations, functions and, if necessary,  dimensions.    Corporate Policy and Labor   Corporate Policy and Labor addresses how the corporationʹs policies and  attitudes towards  their  employees  influenced  the  design  of  the  camp  and  the  facilities  within  it.  These  policies  might arise from factors as diverse as genuine concern for their employees, prevalent racial or  class ideologies, competition for scarce labor, or simply compliance with current legislation. An  important aspect of this theme is interaction of the often ideal world of corporate planning (as  reflected in blueprints, plans and regulations) and on‐the ground realities and compromises.     A second aspect relates to management ideologies and attitudes towards their employees.  Shoup (1990) relates an anecdote concerning the measures Western States took to prevent union  organization  of  the  construction  workers.  The  El  Dorado  Canal  project  commenced  in  the  immediate aftermath of the ʺRed Scareʺ and the Palmer raids of 1919–1920, a period in which  radical  groups,  particularly  the  International  Workers  of  the  World  (the  IWW  or  ʺWobbliesʺ)  were suppressed. Although the power of the IWW was broken, it still remained a threat, or at  least  was  perceived  to  remain  a  threat,  and  many  corporations  carefully  monitored  their  employees.     Management  ideologies  during  the  1920s  were  also  the  product  of  Progressive‐era  ideas  and  legislation,  as  well  as  a  somewhat  less  violently  confrontational  approach  to  labor  problems.  There  was  a  general,  albeit  not  universal,  acknowledgment  that  potential  labor  problems  could  be  defused  and  unions  co‐opted  by  reforming  workersʹ  living  and  working  conditions.  A  final  factor  was  the  relatively  tight  labor  market  of  the  1920s.  Holding  on  to  a  labor  force  required  an  attention  to  amenities  and  conditions  that  was  not  necessary  when  workers had fewer options for employment.  • • • • Do the material remains conform to the 1922 plans, the 1915 Labor Camp Act, and CCIH  guidelines? If there are differences, what are they and why did they occur?  Does the camp reflect the labor market‐‐is there an effort to attract and hold labor through  improvements, diet, and amenities?  How does the camp layout and design reflect management approaches to labor? E.g.,  paternalistic, laissez faire, or racial ideologies?  The construction effort took place during Prohibition. Did the corporation or institution  impose a moral or disciplinary regimen on their workers (e.g., surveillance, Taylorism, or  control of drinking)? Conversely, did the corporation tolerate certain activities that were  illegal, such as drinking, or socially questionable, such as prostitution? If so, how is this  reflected in the material culture?   Does the camp reflect efforts to control or oversee the workers and their families during  unpaid time? 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  53  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  • Did management approaches vary depending on the workers in question, e.g., benevolent  paternalism towards Euroamerican skilled workers and ʺbenign neglectʺ of unskilled or  migrant workers?    Data Requirements   Documentary: camp plans, Western States regulations for camp layout and employee  conduct, California state regulations and guidelines.     Archaeological: camp layout; refuse deposits; tent pads/tent clusters with associated  refuse deposits; artifacts related to medicine and indulgences; residential, support, and  infrastructure features.     Camp Conditions   Camp  Conditions  follows  on  from  the  corporate  policy  theme,  but  focuses  on  the  lived  experience  of  the  camp,  incorporating  not  only  corporate  design,  but  also  alterations  and  adaptations  by  the  inhabitants.  These  adaptations  may  consist  of  improvements,  ignoring  corporate policy, or simply ʺvoting with oneʹs feetʺ and quitting.   • • • Is there evidence that the inhabitants altered or adapted housing to suit their own needs or  desires (e.g, informal features and efforts to personalize residential spaces)?  Was there a communal dining structure and central food storage and preparation facilities  or did workers prepare their own food, or both?  What kinds of health and sanitation practices were employed at the camp? What sanitary  facilities were there (e.g., showers, privies, septic tanks, cesspools)? Were sanitation  facilities and housing adequate or overcrowded for the number of workers?  How was refuse disposed of at the camp? Was refuse burned, buried, or just dumped or  scattered? Was there a central dump?  What was the spatial relationship of housing and refuse?  Are there differences in conditions between larger and smaller camps?   Data Requirements   Documentary: camp plans, camp ledgers, blueprints,     Archaeological: residential tent pads; support buildings such as mess halls and kitchens;  refuse disposal features; diet‐related artifacts.    Labor Stratification   Labor  stratification  addresses  the  complex  questions  of  multiple  divisions  among  the  workers, divisions that might be racial, ethnic, class or skill‐based or, more rarely in the case of  work camps, gender‐based.     A key point to be aware of in looking at the people who lived in work camps is they do not  comprise  a  monolithic  group.  Labor  is  stratified.  Particularly  in  the  19th  century,  most 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    54   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

• • •

  industrial work consists of a large proportion of low‐paid unskilled laborers. Above this is the  higher paid and more privileged group of skilled workers. A third group consists of managers,  supervisors,  administrative  personnel,  and  skilled  professionals,  such  as  engineers  and  surveyors. Even within a single industry the workforce is often divided into multiple technical  specializations. Some of these jobs are skilled, requiring workers with experience and training,  while  others  are  regarded  as  unskilled,  simply  requiring  ʺa  strong  back.ʺ  Other  jobs  such  as  engineers and surveyors are professional, requiring formal education.     The  divisions  between  skilled  and  unskilled  workers  in  the  19th  and  20th  centuries  are  well documented in labor history. Skilled workers were able to gain a certain amount of control  over  the  labor  process  and  their  wages  through  their  monopoly  of  skill,  often  organizing  into  exclusive  and  powerful  craft‐based  unions.  In  the  19th  and  early  20th  centuries  the  American  Federation of Labor (AFL) was an association intended to defend the interests of craft unions,  and  had  little  interest  in  organizing  workers  it  saw  as  unskilled.  The  reluctance  of  the  mainstream labor movement to organize rural labor is a recurrent theme in labor history.     On  the  other  side  of  the  equation,  the  bulk  of  the  rural  work  force  were  classed  as  unskilled—ʺlaborer,ʺ  ʺcasual  worker,ʺ  or  some  similar  term  in  the  census  and  other  official  documentation (Parker 1915). They performed physical labor that required little formal training,  although performing it efficiently or even surviving the work, as in the case of blasting railroad  grade,  could  in  fact  take  considerable  skill.  The  reluctance  of  the  AFL  to  organize  unskilled  workers meant that more radical organizations, such as the International Workers of the World  (IWW)  and  the  communist  Cannery  and  Agricultural  Workers  Industrial  Union  (CAWIU),  played important roles in the history of rural labor in California.     A  second  and  inter‐related  form  of  labor  stratification  was  rooted  in  social  attitudes  towards biology and culture: race and ethnicity. Stratification by skill and stratification by race  and ethnicity cannot easily be separated. Workers from certain nationalities found  themselves  channeled  into  specific  industries,  specific  jobs,  and  often  very  different  living  conditions.  In  part  this  was  due  to  the  organization  of  labor,  the  labor  market  itself,  but  it  was  also  due  to  racial  assumptions  about  the  capabilities  and  the  desirability  of  different  ethnic  groups.  Even  when Europeans or Americans of European descent predominated in the unskilled rural labor  force, their presence in this workforce was cast in quasi‐racial and biological terms (Stein 1973;  Higbie  2003;  Street  2004),  particularly  when  social  Darwinist  theories  of  social  stratification  were dominant.     In  testimony  before  the  CIR  an  investigator  of  camps  in  Montana  noted  the  distinction  between  those  living  on  a  ʺWhite  manʹs  basisʺ  wherein  the  workers  received  board  from  a  commissary  company,  and  the  way  in  which  foreign  workers  lived.  At  one  railroad  camp  in  Montana  the  25  U.S.  citizen  workers  purchased  their  board  from  the  commissary  company,  while the 46 foreign workers (43 Bulgarians and three Russians) shared the cost of staples such  as  potatoes,  bread,  and  coffee,  and  bought  more  expensive  items  like  eggs  and  meat  individually.  At  another  camp  in  South  Dakota,  the  inhabitants  (seven  Greeks  and  seven  Romanians) all lived in six old boxcars and bought all their food communally, each chipping in  30 cents per day and buying their food in town. Another investigator, summarizing in 1915 the  findings of his investigation for the CIR, noted that ʺThe term white man (also white hobo) ... 
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    55   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  applies  to  Native  or  old‐time  immigrant  laborers,  who  are  boarded  by  the  employers  in  the  camps, or who individually prepare their own meals.ʺ In contrast, ʺʹForeignersʹ or members of a  ʹForeign gangʹ means chiefly newly arrived immigrants organized into their own boarding gang  on  a  cooperative  basis,  having  their  own  cook  who  prepares  the  meals  according  to  their  national customs and tastesʺ (Higbie 2003:106).  • Is stratification by skill, class, or ethnicity reflected in housing and camp layout? Does the  layout reflect stratification through spatial segregation? Do the camps’ conditions reflect  this and, if so, how? Are different groups of workers housed and fed differently?  Were there distinctions in living conditions for workers with different positions? Were  some jobs, such as cook, afforded a higher status within the camp that is reflected in the  material record? Were there transient or seasonal workers? Were the workers skilled, unskilled, or  professionals? What were their class backgrounds? Were they segregated or were  conditions stratified by skill? Does the material culture of the camps reflect different  expectations? If so, how?  Data Requirements   Documentary: plans showing residences of certain occupations (cook, engineer, foreman,  etc.), corporate or other records indicating ethnicity or nationality, corporate records indicating  jobs and pay scales.     Archaeological: camp layout, residential features and deposits, support and infrastructure  features, refuse disposal features and deposits.    Immigration and Ethnicity   Immigration  and  Ethnicity  highlights  the  important  role  of  work  camps  in  understanding  immigrant labor in California. This theme concentrates on immigrants as part of rural labor, but  each immigrant group also has a range of research issues specific to its historical experience that  may be relevant to the study of work camps. The early 1920s were a time of rising immigration  from Southern and Eastern Europe, a trend that was pinched off by the 1924 Immigration Act.  Mexican  workers  were  by  this  time  firmly  established  as  a  significant  part  of  rural  labor.  Although declining, Japanese immigrants were also an important labor force.     Most  probably,  identification  of  different  ethnic  groups  in  the  Project  184  construction  camps  will  be  dependent  on  the  documentary  record.  Without  this  information  there  will  be  little opportunity to address this research domain.    Work  camps  are  one  of  the  most  important  archaeological  resources  we  have  relating  to  the immigrant history of California. In contrast to the industrial centers of the northeast, where  immigrants funneled into steel working, the needle trades, and other urban trades, the driving  economic  engine  behind  immigration  in  California  was  unskilled  manual  labor  in  rural  industries. The demographic make up of California is a result of the need for large temporary 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  56  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  labor  forces  in  isolated  settings.  The  most  significant  industries  in  drawing  immigrant  labor  were agriculture and railroad construction.     Obviously  not  all  rural  labor  was  migrant  labor  and  not  all  immigrants  were  alike.  Scandinavian  loggers  and  Chinese  railroad  workers  followed  different  patterns  of  migration  and migrated for different reasons. Some sought to make enough in the U.S. to return home and  buy  their  own  land,  and  others  followed  what  we  tend  to  see  as  the  more  ʺclassicʺ  pattern  of  seeking a new home in the U.S.; yet others came simply because the U.S. was where work was  available.  • What were the ethnic, racial, or cultural backgrounds of the workers? Were any of them  migrants and, if so, from where? If there were migrants, what was the type of migration  (chain, circular, etc.), is this reflected in the material culture, and does that reflection  coincide with assumption about migratory workers (e.g., single men traveling light,  families with household possessions)?  Is there evidence of ethnic stratification in jobs and living conditions? Were particular  racial or nativist ideologies dominant in this period reflected in the camp conditions?  Data Requirements   Documentary: corporate or other records indicating ethnicity or nationality, pay scale, and  occupation, newspaper articles.    Archaeological:  residences  and  deposits  that  can  be  associated  with  ethnically  or  nationally distinct groups.     Gender and Family   Gender  and  Family  addresses  the  presence  of  families  in  the  camps,  domestic  labor,  domesticity,  and  the  construction  of  gender  (male  as  well  as  female).  There  is  little  in  the  historical photos or the camp plans to suggest that families or women were present full‐time in  the Project 184 work camps, but possibility of female employees or family members should not  be ruled out. The only definite mention of women in the camps we have found is a mention of  regular visits by prostitutes to at least one the camps (Camp B) on pay days (McLean 1993:57).      Gendered  labor  in  work  camps  was  not  necessarily  waged  labor.  More  often,  if  women  and  families  were  present  in  the  camp,  female  gender  was  represented  by  unwaged  labor.  In  family  situations  the  domestic  economy  was  generally  in  the  hands  of  wives.  Archaeological  remains  of  food,  drink,  and  other  amenities  are  often  the  reflection  of  careful,  and  sometime  desperate, decisions balancing household budgets and necessities.     Ideas of gender and domesticity also played into work camp design and construction. For  example the Americanization programs of the CCIH centered on certain notions of domesticity.  As exemplified by the CCIH observer at the Guasti agricultural camp (i.e., the Mexican women  standing  by  their  gas  stoves  “like  noble  Anglo‐Saxons”)  considerations  of  gender  are  often  intertwined with notions of ethnicity and acculturation.  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  57  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    Gender is an important consideration in another way. Gender is not only the construction  of femaleness, but also maleness. The fact that work camps consisted of large numbers of single  men  was  a  source  of  anxiety  to  the  CCIH  and  most  probably  to  most  managers,  particularly  given  prevalent  notions  of  working  class  masculinity.  Constructions  of  masculinity  were,  and  are,  an  important  factor  in  working  menʹs  identity.  Even  today,  lumberjacks  are  popular  paragons  of  exaggerated  masculinity.  What  constituted  appropriate  manly  behavior  was  also  subject  to  conflicting  interpretations  and  change  through  time.  In  the  later‐19th  and  into  the  20th  century,  middle  class  and  Victorian  notions  of  masculinity  were  bound  up  in  ideas  of  individuality, nativist ideas of Anglo‐Saxon virility, and the virtues of physical labor. Working  class  men,  particularly  white  working  class  men,  were  often  seen  as  typifying  these  virtues  (Dabakis  1999).  Many  of  the  descriptions  of  certain  kinds  of  camp  by  reformers  reflect  these  attitudes. There is little doubt that the management tolerance of prostitution was also based on  specific ideas of masculine behaviors and needs.     Working‐class  notions  of  gender  and  masculinity  varied  by  ethnicity,  subculture,  and  other divisions within the working class. Skilled and unionized workers often drew on middle‐ class ideas of gender in making their claims to social respectability and wages (Jameson 1998).  The  Victorian  ideal  of  the  family  being  supported  by  a  single  male  head‐of‐household  was  a  crucial element in working menʹs arguments for a ʺfamily wageʺ, a wage with which they could  support  their  families  in  a  respectable  American  manner.  White  working‐class  men  also  incorporated  ideologies  of  Anglo‐Saxon  virility  and  working‐class  respectability  in  nativist  campaigns against immigrant labor.     Ideals  of  masculinity  also  played  a  role  in  recreation  and  sociability  in  work  camps,  and  conflicts over these activities. The role of alcohol in the social life of working‐class men is well  documented  as  source  of  concern  for  middle‐class  reformers,  particularly  during  the  Prohibition.  The  conflict  and  negotiation  between  working‐class  drinking  and  middle‐class  notions  of  respectability  has  been  documented  by  archaeologists  in  a  number  of  settings  (Beaudry 1989; Beaudry, et al. 1991; Praetzellis and Praetzellis 1993; Shackel 1996; Reckner and  Brighton 1999).   • • Were families present in the camp? Were children present? Were they part of the waged  work force?   Were there women workers in the camp? Was labor in the camp gendered? What jobs did  men and women perform (e.g. women in the packing sheds)? Were there efforts to  separate facilities by sex?  Does the presence of families correspond to other variables such as job or class? Was  having a family in camp a prerequisite of a certain class position (manager, professional,  etc.)?   How did the material world of the camp participate in the creation and maintenance of  gender roles (e.g., notions of working class sociability and masculinity)? Were dominant  notions of appropriate gender behavior reflected in camp layout and architecture? Were  they ignored and, if so, why?  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  58  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Data Requirements   Documentary: documents indicating the presence or absence of women and families in the  camps; guidelines and regulations pertaining to camp discipline and moral regimen.    Archaeological:  camp  layout;  residential  features;  support  features,  refuse  deposits  containing domestic artifacts.    Daily Life   Daily Life focuses on questions of household life, particularly diet and health, as these were  central to work camp conditions. More generalized historical archaeology research topics, such  as  those  relating  to  consumerism  and  commodity  flows,  can  also  be  addressed  under  this  theme.   • What types of food were eaten by camp residents and what does that reveal about the  balance struck between quality, volume, and cost? How was food obtained and supplied  by the institution?  How and where was food prepared?  Was meat butchered at the camp and, if so, what can be inferred about dietary uses of  animals within the camp?  Did workers supplement their diet with purchases and/or local procurement (i.e., hunting,  fishing, and gathering)? What is the context of this augmentation (e.g., berries are available  nearby and they are collected and preserved; or the camp operator is not providing  adequate food and workers go to greater efforts to augment their supply)?  What was the relationship between the camp and local markets? What about more distant  markets, and ultimately, what was the “reach” of the work camp and distant markets? Is  there archaeological evidence of interaction with local Native American communities?  Is there evidence of a non‐regulated economy within the camps or between the camps and  nearby communities? This would include local merchandise, as well as unsanctioned or  illegal recreational activities including drug use, alcohol production and consumption, and  prostitution. An oral history taken from a field engineer on the El Dorado rehabilitation  notes, for example, visits by cars of prostitutes to the forebay camp (Camp B) on paydays  (McLean 1993:57).   What kinds of health problems are indicated at the camp? To what extent did the residents  of the camp treat their own medical needs?  Data Requirements   Documentary:  company  records  on  camp  supply  and  medical  treatment,  newspaper  records, reminiscences of camp life.     Archaeological: mess hall features, kitchen features, refuse deposits, diet‐related artifacts,  medical artifacts, artifacts with makerʹs marks.   
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    59   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

• • •

  Labor Organization and Legislation   Labor history as an academic field was initially the study of the history of unions. In the  last  decades  of  the  20th  century  with  the  growth  of  social  history,  labor  history  branched  out  beyond  its  initial  institutional  focus  to  encompass  unorganized  workers,  women,  issues  of  gender and family, working class culture, and immigration history.     One  of  the major  areas of  historical  interest  to which  archaeology  can  make  a significant  contribution  is  understanding  the  impact  of  labor  organization  and  legislation  on  lived  conditions,  as  well  as  understanding  how  lived  conditions  contributed  to  labor  organization  and militancy, or the lack thereof.     This theme places work camps in the broader framework of California rural labor history.  Shoup (1990) indicates that Western States took definite precautions to forestall organization of  the work camps by the IWW. While the specific case he came across was the use of company  spies,  there  may  have  been  other  precautions,  including  the  design  of  the  camps  for  ease  of  surveillance or improving camp conditions to make unionization unattractive.   • • What was the impact of legislation and state involvement on camp conditions?  Is there evidence that workers resisted efforts to regiment their time or private life by, for  example, concealing sociability or gatherings? Is there evidence of sabotage in work places,  for example, broken tools and equipment?  How did labor and management respond to labor disputes and did this influence work  camps?   Data Requirements   Documentary:  CCIH  work  camp  guidelines;  guidelines  and  regulations  pertaining  to  camp discipline;     Archaeological:  camp  layout,  work  features,  refuse  deposits  with  indulgences  or  tools,  concealed features or deposits, informal alterations to residences.   

IMPLEMENTATION
  Integrity  is  an  essential  prerequisite  for  NRHP‐eligibility.  For  most  archaeological  properties, integrity is a matter of the property’s research potential. This dictum, however, begs  the question of the property’s physical condition. Most of the research questions in the project  research design require, in addition to portable artifacts, an adequate archaeological context in  the  form  of  archaeological  strata,  interfaces,  and  features.  To  possess  research  potential,  archaeological  phenomena  must  have  adequate  physical  integrity  in  the  form  of  what  James  Deetz (1977) has called archaeological “focus.” By focus, Deetz refers to the level of clarity with  which the archaeological remains can be seen to represent a particular  phenomenon. Remains  that represent a number of activities or other characteristics that cannot be separated out from  one another are said to lack focus. Where focus is lacking as the result of disturbance, a property  also lacks integrity. The following criteria will be used to assess integrity:  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  60  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  • • Does the property have focus? That is, is it possible to interpret the behaviors that are  represented by it?   Does the property have integrity of location and setting with respect to the arrangement of  remains? That is, does the property retain a significant portion of its original contents and  condition, and is it in its original location?  

Properties that retain integrity will be evaluated in relation to the NRHP criteria for eligibility.  For  historic‐period  archaeological  sites,  this  involves  assessing  the  property’s  historical  associations and information potential under Criterion D.   Assessing Integrity   NR Bulletin 15 defines integrity as the “ability of a property to convey its significance.” A  site must have integrity  to be eligible for listing  on the NRHP. Although many archaeologists  take  the  concept  on  its  face  value  to  mean  a  site’s  physical  condition,  this  is  only  part  of  the  story. For a site that is being evaluated under Criterion D integrity is actually a measure of the  property’s  ability  to  yield  important  information—that  is,  whether  the  site  has  the  necessary  qualities to meet the data requirements of a particular research question. Even a disturbed site  will meet this test if intact stratigraphy is not necessary to meet data requirements such as the  presence of certain diagnostic artifacts.    The NRHP  Criteria for  Evaluation recognizes seven aspects of integrity: location, design,  setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, and association.   
Location  Design  Setting  Materials  Workmanship  Feeling  Association  The place where the property was constructed.  The combination of elements that create the form, place, space, structure, and style of a  property.  The physical environment of a property.  The physical elements that were combined or deposited during a particular period of  time and in a particular pattern or configuration to form a historic property.  The physical evidence of the crafts of a particular culture or people during any given  time period in history.  A property’s expression of the aesthetic or historic sense of a particular period of time.  The direct link between an important historic event or person and a property. 

    NR Bulletins 15 and 36 as well as the book by Hardesty and Little (2000) provide detailed,  practical  guidance  on  how  each  of  these  aspects  of  integrity  should  be  applied.  In  general,  archaeological properties should retain integrity of location, design, materials, and association  to  be  important  under  Criterion  D.  There  is  usually  no  need  to  address  setting  and  feeling  as  these  characteristics  rarely  affect  a  site’s  information  value.  Every  evaluation  of  NRHP  eligibility must discuss the aspects of integrity that are relevant to the important qualities of the  site being assessed.  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  61  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Association   Often many work camp features and artifact deposits cannot be associated with particular  individuals  or  households.  For  example,  centralized  dumping  locations  mean  that  refuse  deposits  have  a  community‐wide  association  and  cannot  be  associated  with  individual  households  within  the  community,  although  there  certainly  may  be  light  artifact  scatters  that  can.  This  is  counterbalanced  by  the  fact  that  work  camps  have  a  tight  chronology  and  can  be  associated with particular historical events and groups of people, if not specific individuals. A  community‐wide association for a work camp dump is far tighter than for a municipal one.     Often, identifying a historical association for the work camp as a whole is not a problem.  They can be recorded in corporate archives, or the proximity of a camp site with an extractive or  construction enterprise may also provide the association. However the integrity of association  can be affected by subsequent occupations. The rarity of deep hollow features with discrete and  sealed artifact deposits means that work camp artifact deposits are easily contaminated by later  occupations. Integrity of association entails that the work camp be relatively ʺpristine,ʺ without  much  in  the  way  of  later  occupation,  or,  if  there  is  such  occupation,  that  the  deposits  have  enough spatial separation to be distinguishable.   Design   Since  work  camp  integrity  tends  to  be  horizontal  and  spatial  rather  than  vertical  and  stratigraphic,  integrity  of  design  is  an  important  part  of  determining  the  integrity  of  a  work  camp site. The shallowness of work camp features and deposits means that they are fragile and  often easily destroyed or displaced through factors such as off‐road vehicular traffic or erosion,  with  flats  disappearing  and  formerly  discrete  artifact  deposits  being  merged  into  a  large  and  indistinct smear. Integrity of design entails that the camp retain significant portions of its layout  and internal structure.   Materials   As  with  integrity  of  design,  the  shallow  nature  of  work  camp  deposits  is  an  important  factor  in  the  integrity  of  materials.  Surface  or  shallow  refuse  deposits  are  visible  and  very  attractive  to  looters.  With  work  camp  refuse  deposits,  stratigraphic  integrity  is  often  not  a  primary  concern  as  the  deposits  were  usually  created  rapidly  and  had  little  stratigraphy  to  begin with. Looting will usually mean that certain classes of artifacts, such as whole bottles, will  be  under‐represented.  Faunal  remains  will  probably  also  be  under‐represented  due  to  the  activity of wildlife.     Lack of integrity of materials may also result from clean up and demolition after the camp  had served its purpose, especially if heavy equipment was involved. The work camp may also  lack  integrity  of  materials  right  from  the  beginning,  either  due  to  energetic  refuse  disposal  efforts  in  which  garbage  was  removed  a  sufficient  distance  from  the  camp  that  association  is  uncertain,  or  due  to  the  occupants  never  depositing  enough  for  the  material  to  have  research  potential.    

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  62  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

ASSESSING ARCHAEOLOGICAL RESEARCH POTENTIAL
  It is seldom necessary, or appropriate, to collect and record all possible data. Investigation  strategies  should  consider  the  following  factors:  1)  specific  data  needs;  2)  time  and  funds  available  to  secure  the  data;  and  3)  relative  cost  efficiency  of  various  strategies.  The  approach  suggested  here  involves  employing  a  set  of  general  principles  that  would  aid  in  determining  which  archaeological  remains  will  be  excavated  and  analyzed  and  which  will  not.  The  principles are not criteria, in that they should not be applied directly as a “test.” Rather, they are  intended to guide the thoughtful consideration of a difficult issue. They will not substitute for  the best judgment of a team of experienced professionals, but they may help to direct it. In this  scheme, archaeological research potential is defined as the ability of a deposit to contribute to  the questions identified in the research design. The principles are as follows:   1.  Association. All else being equal, the research potential of an archaeological deposit that  has reliable cultural, historical, or chronological associations will be higher than one  whose associations are less certain.   2.  Integrity. All else being equal, an archaeological phenomenon that retains good  integrity will have more research potential than one whose integrity has been  compromised.   3.  Materials. All else being equal, the research potential of a cache of archaeological  materials from a domestic context will increase with the number of items and the  variety of types present.   4.  Stratigraphy. All else being equal, remains from a feature or site with vertically or  horizontally discrete stratification meeting the criteria herein retain importance.  However, remains from an archaeological feature with a complex stratigraphic  sequence representative of different events over time can have the added advantage of  providing an independent chronological check on artifact diagnosis, and the  interpretation of the sequence of environmental or sociocultural events. Stratigraphic  integrity may not be as important in the case of redeposited prehistoric material.   5.  Relative Rarity. All else being equal, remains from a group that is poorly represented in  the sample universe will be more important, because of their rarity, than remains that  relate to a well‐represented entity.     The  initial  letters  from  the  above  principles  of  Association,  Integrity,  Materials,  Stratigraphy and Rarity provide a simple mnemonic for use in the field and laboratory: “AIMS‐ R.”  That  is,  archaeologists  in  the  field  can  make  an  initial  assessment  of  the  property  type  encountered on the basis of what the assessment “aims are,” as represented in the mnemonic.  Of course, all remains that will be encountered in the course of project activities will have the  characteristics of some degree of relative association, integrity, materials, and rarity, and all will  be  found  in  some  form  of  archaeological  context.  Should  it  become  necessary,  the  process  of  evaluation  would  consist  of  comparing  individual  properties  on  the  basis  of  these  characteristics.  But  this  evaluation  cannot  be  done  in  a  mechanistic  fashion.  A  feature  or  site  with poor physical integrity might still have research potential if its relative rarity is high.  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  63  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Evaluation Approach   The  evaluation  of  the  eight  camps  that  may  possess  sufficient  integrity  to  have  research  potential will have two phases: archival research and fieldwork. The archival research will focus  on: (a) site association, refining our knowledge of the workers in the camps; and (b) corporate  policy, identifying the decisions that went into overall camp design, employee regulations, and  how the camps were supplied and maintained. This should include further work in the PG&E  archives,  the  archives  of  local  newspapers,  contacts  with  local  historians,  and,  if  feasible,  oral  history interviews.     The  field  approach  should  emphasize  mapping, identifying  and  delineating  features  and  deposits,  and  sampling  artifact  deposits  sufficiently  to  assess  their  integrity  and  information  potential. Although they could be quite dense settlements, work camps present a distinct set of  problems from town sites, and can require distinct approaches. In contrast to most urban sites,  work  camp  sites  tend  to  be  either  on  the  surface  or  very  shallow  and,  on  cursory  inspection,  indistinct, without the defined property boundaries, substantial architectural features, and deep  stratified hollow features, like privies and wells, that town sites are likely to contain. While the  nature  of  work  camps  means  that  the  sites  tend  to  consist  mainly  of  surface  or  very  shallow  deposits, there are hollow features, such as sumps, that served as repositories for camp refuse,  that will require deeper excavation. Most features, however, can probably be assessed through  surface recording and sampling, or shallow excavation.     The HPMP recommends a program of mapping, metal detection, probing, surface clearing,  and  excavation  units.  The  following  discussion  is  adapted  from  the  HPMP  (Hildebrandt  and  Waechter 2003:109–11).    These  methods  are  subject  to  change,  depending  on  actual  site/ground  conditions;  work  will be conducted at the discretion of the Field Director. In general, evaluation work at historic  archaeological  sites  will  include  a  combination  of  detailed  mapping  and  feature  drawing,  surface clearing, feature‐oriented excavation, and controlled scanning with a metal detector and  fiberglass probe to determine the presence, condition, and composition of subsurface deposits.  Excavations will be by  stratigraphic levels and broad surface clearing of features; data will be  documented using US standard nomenclature.  Mapping   Excavation  units,  newly  identified  features,  surface‐clearing  areas,  and  metal‐detection  areas  will  be  added  to  existing  base  maps  generated  during  the  inventory  phase.  To  ensure  rapid mapping and ready integration with GIS, mapping ideally should be accomplished with a  combination of a total station and a survey‐grade GPS unit, along with compasses and tapes.   Metal Detection   Metal  detection  is  useful  for  a  variety  of  reasons:  (1)  to  confirm  the  location  of  site  boundaries;  (2)  to  determine  the  extent  of  features  or  artifact  concentrations;  and  (3)  to  detect  concentrations of nails or other metal between features or across the site that could indicate the  remains of structures. At the discretion of the field director or principal investigator, detection  should be conducted by an experienced staff person using a top‐of‐the‐line metal detector.  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  64  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

  Probing   Numerous  depressions  have  been  recorded  at  many  of  the  sites.  In  some  cases,  these  depressions correspond to privy locations plotted on historic maps of the camps and the bath  house sumps. A probe should be used to ascertain if these depressions are hollow fill features,  and  to  determine  their  approximate  depths.  The  probe  will  also  be  used  to  estimate  depth  of  some  refuse  deposits.  Probing  will  be  done  in  conjunction  with  metal  detection.  Once  hollow  features are identified through probing, excavation units (see below) will be used to quarter or  cross‐section the features to identify their composition and structure.   Surface Clearing   Surface clearing will include systematic clearing of duff within designated units to expose  all  rock,  artifacts,  and  features.  Clearing  will  be  completed  primarily  using  rakes,  due  to  the  nature of the duff. Other hand tools, such as trowels, hoes, shovels, and hedge clippers may be  used. Generally, clearing will consist of pulling duff away from a feature, leaving any artifacts  in  place.  At  sites  with  foundation  remains,  however,  a  grid  may  be  laid  out  surrounding  the  structural features.     Surface clearing may occur around a selected number of features representing a variety of  types  and  locations.  Stone  alignments  or  foundations  will  be  cleared  to  document  size,  structure, composition, and associated features or artifact areas. Surface clearing may also apply  to  artifact  concentration  areas  identified  on  the  original  site  record  or  by  metal  detecting.  Feature clearing will be used to accurately determine the size, structure, and composition of the  features and to reveal any ash deposits, surface depressions, or other anomalies.     Once  a  feature  area  is  cleared,  a  scaled  drawing  will  be  made  and  photographs  taken  to  document the exposed extent of the feature and associated material. Concentrations of artifacts  will be noted and should be sampled. Feature‐associated artifacts exposed during the clearing  activities will be catalogued in the field by material, type, and function, and left in place.   Excavation Units   Two  types  of  excavation  units  may  be  used  during  the  field  evaluation  phase.  Surface  Transect Units (STUs) consist of small units excavated to varying depths. The STUs will be dug  to  test  surface  concentrations  of  artifacts,  metal‐detector  “hot  spots,”  feature‐associated  deposits, and site boundaries. Generally STUs are planned to determine presence or absence of  artifactual  materials  and  depth  of  deposit.  Artifacts  from  STUs  will  be  catalogued  by  strata,  material, type, and function, and left in place.    Excavation  units  may  range  from  3  to  5  ft.²  and  will  be  used  to  expose  and  define  concentrations of artifacts, depressions, or other features. In dense concentrations of refuse, one  unit  will  be  placed  in  the  center  of  the  concentration,  and  artifacts  within  that  unit  will  be  excavated  and  recorded,  providing  a  representative  sample  of  material  contained  in  that  deposit.  Unit  size  will  be  determined  by  the  size  of  the  deposit.  Excavation  units  may  also  be  used  to  expose  and  better  define  structural  foundations  or  features,  or  areas  containing  high  numbers of metal‐detector readings but with little surface evidence of artifacts. 

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  65  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

    All  units  will  be  dug  using  picks,  shovels,  and  trowels.  Material  from  the  units  will  be  passed  through  1/4‐in.‐mesh  screen.  Level  records  will  be  completed  for  all  units,  recording  cultural and non‐cultural materials, methods, and observations regarding soil texture and depth  of cultural deposits. Munsell color charts will be used to standardize soil information gathered  in the field. Digital or black‐and‐white photographs will be taken to document the excavation  process.   In-field Analyses   Artifacts  will  be  catalogued  in  the  field  to  avoid  collection  of  repetitive  or  fragmentary  artifacts  and  non‐museum‐quality  specimens  (cans,  glass  and  ceramic  fragments,  nails),  to  avoid curation expenses. No collection of any excavated historic‐eras artifacts is anticipated. All  work  will  be  designed  to  conduct  the  minimum  amount  of  work  necessary  to  determine  the  structure and stratigraphic integrity of a feature, artifact deposit, or site, the approximate date of  deposition, functional representation, quantity of artifacts, and contextual association.     Artifacts  will  be  separated  by  material  for  cataloguing  and  analysis.  The  laboratory  procedures  should  be  designed  to  address  relevant  research  questions.  Generally,  analytical  procedures  will  consist  of  sorting,  cataloguing,  identifying,  and  interpreting  the  artifacts  recovered  during  excavations,  as  well  as  processing  and  synthesizing  the  historical  data  collected from the archival research phase.     Historical  artifacts  will  be  sorted  by  material  type,  artifact  class,  and  provenience.  Materials  of  limited  interpretive  value  (e.g.,  small  glass  shards,  tin  can  fragments)  will  be  counted and catalogued by lot. Diagnostic specimens will be measured, described, individually  catalogued and photographed (if necessary) to facilitate further analysis. Like‐items, such as tin  cans of the same diameter and size, will be grouped and catalogued as one lot.     The  artifacts,  stratigraphic  data,  and  other  information  on  horizontal  and  vertical  site  structure  obtained  during  the  archaeological  investigations  will  be  collectively  analyzed.  The  goals of this analysis are to address issues such as chronology, site structure, and applicability  to the stated research domains and goals.   Reporting   The technical report documenting archival research, fieldwork, and analyses of historic‐era  remains  will  include  the  following:  a  historical  context  of  the  project  area;  a  research  design;  methods and results, including site histories and descriptions by contextual theme; a summary  of the analyses; and a National Register evaluation of each site in accordance with 36 CFR 800.4.  Appendices will include pertinent feature drawings, plans or profiles, and catalogue sheets.  

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  66  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

REFERENCES CITED
  Adams, G.    1966  The Age of Industrial Violence, 1910–1915: The Activities and Findings of the U.S. Commission on  Industrial Relations. Columbia University Press, New York.    Baker, C., with contributions by M.L. Maniery    2001  National Register of Historic Places Evaluation, Pit River 3, 4, and 5 Hydroelectric System, Shasta  County, California. PAR Environmental Services, Sacramento. Prepared for Pacific Gas and  Electric Company, San Francisco.      2002  National Register of Historic Places Evaluation, Spring Gap‐Stanislaus Hydroelectric System, FERC  No. 2130, Tuolumne County, California. PAR Environmental Services, Sacramento. Prepared for  Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco.    Baker, C., and T. Bakic    2001  National Register of Historic Places Evaluation, Upper North Fork Feather River Hydroelectric System, Plumas County, California. On file, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Chico and San Francisco,  California.    Bassett, E.    1994  ‘We Took Care of Each Other Like Families Were Meant To’: Gender, Social Organization, and  Wage Labor Among the Apache at Roosevelt. In Those of Little Note : Gender, Race, and Class in  Historical Archaeology, pp. 55–79, edited by Elizabeth Scott. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.    Baxter, R.S.    2002  Industrial and Domestic Landscapes of a California Oil Field. In Communities Defined by Work:  Life in Western Work Camps, pp. 18–27, edited by Thad M. Van Bueren. Society for Historical  Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.    Baxter, R.S., Rebecca A., and T. Fernandez    2006  Research Design for Hydroelectric Maintenance and Operations Residences in FERC Project 184 APE.  Past Forward, Garden Valley, California. Prepared for El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville,  California.    Beaudry, M.C.    1989  The Lowell Boott Mills Complex and its Housing: Material Expressions of Corporate Ideology.  Historical Archaeology 23(1):19–32.    Beaudry, M.C., L.J. Cook, and S.A. Mrozowski  1991  Artifacts and Active Voices: Material Culture as Social Discourse. In The Archaeology of  Inequality, pp. 150–181, edited by Randall H. McGuire and Robert Paynter. Basil Blackwell,  London.    Bonner, F.E.    1928  Report to the Federal Power Commission on the Water Powers of California. Federal Power  Commission, Washington, DC. No. 20 and 118.   
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    67   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Brashler, J.    1991  ‘When Daddy was a Shanty Boy’: The Role of Gender in the Organization of the Logging  Industry in Highland West Virginia. In Gender in Historical Archaeology, pp. 54–68, edited by  Donna J. Seifert. Society for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.    Brumfiel, E.    1992  Distinguished Lecture in Archaeology: Breaking and Entering the Ecosystem—Gender, Class,  and Faction Steal the Show. American Anthropologist 94:551–587.  Clement, D.    1995  Historic Architectural Survey Report and Historic Resource Evaluation Report for State Route 88  Rehabilitation and Improvement Project at Silver Lake, Amador County. Prepared for California  Department of Transportation, District 10, Stockton, California.    Cohen, L.A.    1986  Embellishing a Life of Labor: An Interpretation of the Material Culture of American Working‐ class Homes, 1885–1915. In Common Places: Readings in American Vernacular Architecture, pp. 261– 278, edited by Dell Upton and John Michael Vlach. University of Georgia Press, Athens.    Coleman, C.M.    1952  PG&E of California: The Centennial Story of Pacific Gas and Electric Company. McGraw‐Hill Book  Company, New York.    Commission of Immigration and Housing of California (CCIH)    1919  Advisory Pamphlet on Sanitation and Housing (Revised 1919). Commission of Immigration and  Housing of California, San Francisco.    Cornford, D.A.    1987  Workers and Dissent in the Redwood Empire. Temple University Press, Philadelphia.    Costello, J., and J. Marvin    1998  Bread Fresh from the Oven: Memories of Italian Breadmaking in the California Mother Lode.  Historical Archaeology 31(1):66–73.    Dabakis, M.    1999  Visualizing Labor in American Sculpture: Monuments, Manliness, and the Work Ethic, 1880–1935.  Cambridge University Press, New York.    Darcangelo, M. and J. Collins    2002a  Primary record for CA‐ELD‐6. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.       2002b  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐811/812. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville,  California.       2002c  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐823. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.      2002d  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐825. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.      2002e  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐828. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.   

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  68  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Darcangelo, M. and J. Collins (continued)    2002f  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐830. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, C  California.       2002g  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐832. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.      2002h  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐834. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.      2002i  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐838. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.    Darcangelo, M., and N. Pagaling    2002  Primary record for CA‐ELD‐7. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.     Deetz, J.    1977  In Small Things Forgotten: The Archaeology of Early American Life. Doubleday, New York.  De Groot, H.    1882  Hydraulic and Drift Mining. In Second Report of the State Mineralogist of California, 1880–1882. State  Printing Office, Sacramento, California.    Faull, M. and M. Hangan     2004  Snapshot in Time: Life at the Dove Springs Aqueduct Construction Camp. Paper presented at  the 38th Annual Meeting of the Society for Californai Archaeology, Riverside, California.     Foster, J.M., R.S. Greenwood, and A. Duffield    1988  Work Camps in the Upper Santa Ana River Canyon. Greenwood and Associates. Contract Number  DACW09‐86‐D‐0034. Prepared for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District,  California.    Fowler, F.H.    1923  Hydroelectric Power Systems of California and Their Extensions into Oregon and Nevada. U.S. Forest  Service, Washington D.C.    Franzen, J.G.    1992  Northern Michigan Logging Camps: Material Culture and Worker Adaptation on the Industrial  Frontier. Historical Archaeology 26(2):74–98.    Giddens, A.    1979  Central Problems in Social Theory: Action, Structure and Contradiction in Social Analysis. University  of California Press, Berkeley.    Gitelman, H.M.    1988  Legacy of the Ludlow Massacre: A Chapter in American Industrial Relations. University of  Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.    Hardesty, D., and B. Little    2000  Assessing Site Significance: A Guide for Archaeologists and Historians. AltaMira Press, Walnut  Creek, California.   

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  69  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Higbie, F.T.    2003  Indispensable Outcasts: Hobo Workers and Community in the American Midwest, 1880–1930.  University of Illinois Press, Urbana.    Hildebrandt, W.R. and S.A. Waechter    2003  Proposed Hydroelectric Relicensing of the El Dorado Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project 184): Historic  Properties Management Plan. Far Western Anthropological Research Group, Davis, California.  Prepared for El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.    Jackson Research Projects    1986  Great Western Power Company: Hydroelectric Power Development on the North Fork of the Feather  River, 1902–1930. Prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Hydroelectric Division  Library, San Francisco.    Jameson, E.    1998  All That Glitters: Class, Conflict, and Community in Cripple Creek. University of Illinois Press,  Urbana.    Journal of Electricity    1924  Journal of Electricity. 1 February 1924:97–98.    JRP Historical Consulting Services and California Department of Transportation    2000  Water Conveyance Systems in California: Historic Context Development and Evaluation Procedures.  Environmental Program/Cultural Studies Office. Prepared for California Department of  Transportation Headquarters, Sacramento.    Kelley, R.    1959  Gold vs. Grain: The Hydraulic Mining Controversy in California’s Sacramento Valley. Arthur H.  Clarke Co., Glendale, California.      1989  Battling the Inland Sea: American Political Culture, Public Policy, and the Sacramento Valley, 1850– 1986. University of California Press, Berkeley.    Maniery, M.L.    1999  Historical Archaeology at the Butt Valley Dam Site (CA-PLU-1245/H), Plumas County, California, Volume 1: Historical Archaeology. PAR Environmental Services, Inc., Sacramento, California.  Submitted to Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco, California.      2002  Health, Sanitation, and Diet in a Twentieth‐Century Dam Construction Camp: A View from  Butt Valley, California. In Communities Defined by Work: Life in Western Work Camps, pp. 69–84,  edited by Thad M. Van Bueren. Society for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.    Maniery, M.L., and C. Baker    1997  National Register Evaluation of the Red River, Fruit Growers, and Lassen Lumber and Box Railroad Logging Systems, Lassen National Forest, California. PAR Environmental Services, Inc.,  Sacramento, California. Submitted to Lassen National Forest, USDA Forest Service, Susanville,  California.     
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    70   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Maniery, M.L., and L. Compas    2002  National Register of Historic Places Evaluation of 37 Historical Archaeological Sites and PSEA Camp Almanor for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Upper North Fork Feather River FERC Relicensing Project, Plumas County, California. On file, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Chico and San  Francisco, California.    McLean, W. R.  1993  From Pardee to Buckhorn: Water Resources Engineering and Water Policy in the East Bay Municipal  Utility District, 1927‐1991, with an Introduction by Jay Zeno. Interviews conducted by Ann Lage in  1991. East Bay Municipal Utility District Oral History Series. Regional Oral History Office, The  Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.    Miller, D., and C. Tilley (editors)    1984  Ideology, Power, and Prehistory. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.    Mitchell, D.    1996  The Lie of the Land: Migrant Workers and the California Landscape. University of Minnesota Press,  Minneapolis.    Myers, W.A.    1983  Iron Men and Copper Wires: A Centennial History of the Southern California Edison Company. Trans‐ Anglo Books, Glendale, California.    Myrtle, F.S.    1923  Six Monthsʹ Progress in Construction of Pit Three Development. Pacific Service Magazine,  December:196–205.    Owens, K.N.    1989  Archaeological and Historical Investigation of the Mormon‐Carson Immigrant Trail: El Dorado and  Toiyabe National Forests, Vol II: History. Prepared for the El Dorado National Forest, USDA Forest  Service.    PAR Environmental Services    1995  National Register of Historic Places Evaluation of Equipment and Pipeline Segment, El Dorado  Hydroelectric System, El Dorado County, California. September 13.    Parker, C.H.    1915  The California Casual and His Revolt. The Quarterly Journal of Economics 30(1):110–126.  Paynter, R., and R.H. McGuire    1991  The Archaeology of Inequality: Material Culture, Domination, and Resistance. In The  Archaeology of Inequality, pp. 1–27, edited by Randall McGuire and Robert Paynter. Basil  Blackwell, Oxford.  Peck, G.    2000  Reinventing Free Labor: Padrones and Immigrant Workers in the North American West, 1880–1930.  University of Cambridge Press, Cambridge.   
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    71   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Praetzellis, A., and M. Praetzellis    1993  Life and Work at the Cole and Nelson Sawmill, Sierra County, California: Archaeological Data Recovery  for the Granite Chief Land Exchange. Anthropological Studies Center, Sonoma State University,  Rohnert Park, California. Prepared for Tahoe National Forest, Nevada City, California.      2001  Mangling Symbols of Gentility in the Wild West: Case Studies in Interpretive Archaeology.  American Anthropologist 103(3):645–654.    Reckner, P.E., and S.A. Brighton    1999  ‘Free From All Vicious Habits’: Archaeological Perspectives on Class Conflict and the Rhetoric  of Temperance. In Confronting Class, pp. 63–86, edited by LouAnn Wurst and Robert K. Fitts.  Society for Historical Archaeology Special Publication Series.     Rogge, A.E., M. Keane, and D.L. McWaters    1994  The Historical Archaeology of Dam Construction Camps in Central Arizona, Volume 1: Synthesis.  Prepared for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Phoenix, Arizona.    Rogge, A.E., D.L. McWatters, M. Keane, and R.P. Emanuel  1995   Raising Arizona’s Dams: Daily Life, Danger, and Discrimination in the Dam Construction Camps of  Central Arizona, 1890s‐1940s. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.    Rood, J.    2002  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐811. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville, California.     Rood, J., W. Bloomer, J. Northrup, and R. Palmer    1993  Archaeological Site Record for FS 05‐03‐56‐711. On file, On file, El Dorado Irrigation District,  Placerville, California.    Shoup, L.    1982  Theoretical Models for Project Area History. In Final Report of the New Melones Archeological  Project, California. Volume VII: Review and Synthesis of Research at Historical Sites, pp. 7–12, edited  by Roberta S. Greenwood and Laurence H. Shoup. Infotec Research Incorporated. Coyote Press,  Salinas, California.      1989  Cultural Resources Overview and National Register of Historic Places Significance Evaluation of Relief  Dam and Vicinity, Stanislaus National Forest, Volume 1. Prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric  Company, San Francisco.      1990  Historical Overview and Significance Evaluation of the El Dorado Canal, El Dorado County, California,  Volume 1. Prepared for Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco.    Stein, W.    1973  California and the Dust Bowl Migration. Greenwood Publishing Group, Westport, Connecticut.    Street, R.S.    2004  Beasts of the Field: A Narrative History of California Farmworkers, 1769–1913. Stanford University  Press, Stanford, California.     

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  72  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Tenney, G.C.    1923   ‘Changing Miner’s Inches to Kilowatt Hours,’ State of California Department of Water  Resources. In Dams Within Jurisdiction of the State of California, Bulletin 17‐79 (December  1979):50–51.    Tordoff, J.D.    1995a  Memorandum to Hans Kreutzberg, California Office of Historic Preservation concerning the  Alabama Gates Aqueduct Construction Camp, dated 24 August 1995.      1995b  Supplemental Historical Study Report, CA‐INY‐3760/H, the Alabama Gates Aqueduct Construction  Camp. Submitted to California Department of Transportation, District 9, Bishop.    Tordoff, J. D., and J. Marvin    2003  Historic Resource Evaluation Report Little Lake Rehabilitation Project. Report prepared for the  California Department of Transportation, District 6, Fresno.     Van Bueren, T.M. (editor)    2002a  Communities Defined by Work: Life in Western Work Camps. Society for Historical Archaeology,  California, Pennsylvania.    Van Bueren, T.M.    1989  Cultural Resources Overview and National Register of Historic Places Significance Evaluation of Relief  Dam and Vicinity, Stanislaus National Forest, Volume 2: Confidential Site Records and Maps.  Prepared for Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Francisco.      2002b  Struggling with Class Relations at a Los Angeles Aqueduct Construction Camp. In Communities  Defined by Work: Life in Western Work Camps, pp. 28–43, edited by Thad M. Van Bueren. Society  for Historical Archaeology, California, Pennsylvania.    Van Bueren, T.M., J. Marvin, S. Psota, and M. Stoyka    1998  Building the Los Angeles Aqueduct: Archaeological Data Recovery at the Alabama Gates Construction  Camp. Environmental Analysis Branch, Headquarters, California Department of Transportation,  Sacramento. Prepared for California Department of Transportation, District 06, Environmental  Analysis Branch Chief, Fresno.    Walsh, F.P., and B.M. Manly    1916  Industrial Relations: Final Report and Testimony: Submitted to Congress by the Commission on  Industrial Relations. Vol. V. U.S. Commission on Industrial Relations, Washington, D.C.    Wee, S.    2003  Historic Context. In Proposed Relicensing of the El Dorado Hydroelectric Project (FERC Project 184).  Historic Properties Management Plan, by William R. Hildebrandt and Sharon A. Waechter. Far  Western Anthropological Research Group, Inc., Davis, California. Prepared for El Dorado  Irrigation District, Placerville, California.    Wee, S., and A. Walters    2002  Primary record for FS 05‐03‐56‐811/812. On file, El Dorado Irrigation District, Placerville,  California.    
EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN    73   SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 
Williams, J.C    1997  Energy and the Making of Modern California. University of Akron Press, Akron, Ohio.    Woirol, G.R.    1992  In the Floating Army: F.C. Mills on Itinerant Life in California, 1914. University of Illinois Press,  Urbana, Illinois.    Wolf, E.    1990  Distinguished Lecture: Facing Power—Old Insights, New Questions. American Anthropologist  92:586–595.

EL DORADO IRRIGATION DISTRICT  CONSTRUCTION CAMPS RESEARCH DESIGN 

  74  

SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY  ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES CENTER 

 

APPENDIX A The PG&E Archives

 

 

RESEARCH METHODS AND RESULTS
    In  1966  PG&E  established  its  Records  Center  to  centrally  store  the  company’s  records.  Until  then,  records  were  stored  where  they  were  generated.  When  the  call  went  out  to  the  outlying areas to obtain the old records, employees boxed the records and sent them to central  storage.  These  early  records  are  stored  in  the  manner  that  they  were  originally  sent  in;  thus,  similar  records  were  not  organized  and  archived  together.  Nor  was  an  index  as  to  what  the  records contained typically provided. Circa 1971 a standard practice for record transmittal was  established;  however,  the  manner  in  which  the  records  were  described  varied  widely.  Some  descriptions were vague and generic; other descriptions were more detailed and useful. There  are  approximately  160,000  boxes  in  PG&Eʹs  four  archive  facilities.  Research  was  done  in  the  Record  Center  in  Brisbane,  California.  Records  stored  in  the  other  facilities  were  ordered  and  delivered to the Brisbane facilities.     The  computer  database  for  these  records  is  only  as  good  as  the  information  that  was  provided and entered into it, often by temporary help. According to William Baxter Supervisor  of Records at the Records Center, it can be hit or miss whether you find useful information at  the  archives.  Some  people  have  come  in  and  been  delighted  with  all  the  materials  they  have  found. On the other hand, once a group of ten people came in and searched for days and they  found little that they needed (William Baxter, personal communication 5 March 2007, 23 March  2007).  The Archives database was searched as follows:  Camp  Names:  Camp  A,  Camp  B,  Camp  C,  Camp  G,  Camp  K,  Camp  M,  Camp  N,  Camp  P,  Camp R, Camp S, and Camp T.  Place  Names  (closest  area  to  individual  camps):  Alder  Creek,  El  Dorado  Canal,  El  Dorado  Ditch, El Dorado Power House, El  Dorado Power Plant, Fresh Pond, Kyburz, Ogilby Canyon,  Pollock  Pines,  Riverton,  Silver  Fork,  South  Fork  American  River  AND  El  Dorado,  and  White  Hall.  Word Searches:  1922 Installation  Blueprints  Boarding House  Construction Camp  Ditch Camp  El  Dorado  (this  broad  search  produce  777  pages  of  results;  because  of  time  and  efficiency  constraints did not read word for word, but did a variety of searches within it and did a scan  through it)  El Dorado Development  FERC 184 

 

A‐1

  Word Searches (continued):  Project 184  Western States Gas and Electric  Work Camp  Combined Searches:  Camp  w/25  words  of:  regulations;  rules;  guidelines;  policy;  employees;  El  Dorado;  1922;  temporary; construction; ditch; canal; Western States  1920 w/25 words of: workers; employees, laborers  1921 w/25 words of: workers; employees, laborers  1922 w/25 words of: workers; employees, laborers    The  descriptions  of  the  records  for  these  searches  were  then  evaluated  for  potential  usefulness. It was frequently difficult to determine how useful they would be without looking  manually through the archive box. As a result over 100 boxes were inspected. Nothing relevant  was found in the files pulled for the various camps. It was discovered that more than one camp  would  have  the  same  letter  name.  Also  an  abbreviation  after  the  word  Camp  provided  false  leads.  Searching  by  location  name  was  also  not  useful.  This  search  would  produce  a  box  of  hundreds  of  General  Maintenance  files  from  various  years  for  the  entire  area.  It  was  quickly  realized  that  looking  through  these  records  was  not  an  efficient  use  of  time  and  hence  not  continued. Generally the most useful records were the construction and accounting records of  the  Western  States  Gas  and  Electric  Company  and  the  FERC  184  files.  The  potentially  useful  records are briefly described below. The archive boxes that were inspected but found not to be  relevant are also listed so that they will not need to be rechecked in the future.    POTENTIALLY USEFUL RESOURCES  Box W00486    Includes Western States Gas and Electric Co. Construction Accounts – El Dorado Project,  April 1922‐February 1925. Broken down into six accounts: 2‐G Grounds and Improvements; 3‐G  Generating  Station;  4‐G  Hydraulic  Equipment;  5‐G  Electrical  Equipment;  6‐G  Auxiliary  Equipment;  30‐G‐1  Expense  Not  Covered  by  Estimate;  38‐G  General  Transportation;  39‐G  Insurance; 40‐G Local Engineering and Superintendence; 41‐G Watchmen, Waterboys, Nippers;  42‐G Field Office; 43‐G Traveling Expenses. Information on the construction camps is buried in  the  records;  for  example  in  2‐G‐1  Power  Plants  and  Improvements‐Power  House  Road,  May  1922,  “Hauling  by  Placerville  Transfer,  $17.50,  Groceries  to  C  “then  from  C”  to  A‐  7  hrs;  “Hauling‐3 spans at Camp B, 14 da. @ 3.00 per span‐by G.L. Blakely”. Records contain details of  various  supplies  and  costs,  which  were  presumably  for  the  construction  camps  but  were  not  necessarily  broken  down  by  individual  camp.  Under  Misc.  Accounts  various  employees  and  amount paid at El Dorado Hydroelectric Plant are listed. Note that for many listings; e.g., pipe  line clearing labor is listed without individual name or location. This ledger also has pages on  operators’ cottages in 1923. This ledger would definitely be worth looking at in greater detail. 

 

A‐2

  Box 096153    Historical Cost Report Electric Utility. Western States Gas and Electric Company (Stockton  Division) December 31, 1921. Byllesby Engineering and Management Corp.    Information  on  El  Dorado  Project,  pages  290‐297  “Construction  in  Progress  to  June  30,  1922.” Gives estimates for construction camps, for their salvage, for moving them, etc.     Box 087112    Contains  Minutes  of  PG&E  Employees  Welfare  Committee,  1920–1929.  Great  detailed  information  down  to  individual  level  of  whose  who  filed  complaints,  request  for  pension;  request  for  religious  services  at  Pit  Camp;  workers’  rights;  applications  for  loans;  pension  system,  etc.  For  example,  abstract  of  pension  application  for  Frank  L.  Harris,  lake  tender,  operating department San Joaquin Division gives brief details of his employment for the past 23  years up through 1929. Mentions some of the camps (none of the construction camps specified)  where he worked. Potential exists that other employees mentioned in these records would list  whether they worked at a specific construction camp.    Box 004132    Contains  “Index  to  Mist  Cost  Reports,  Work  Orders,  Construction  Contracts,  Constr.  Authorized,  Monthly  Progress  Reports,  Improvements  Req.,  etc.  Western  States  G  &  E;  Coast  Valley G & E. Refers to July 8, 1922 for El Dorado Hydro Development on American river (3)  Cont. No. 654. Box did not contain Cont [Contract?, Container?] No. 654. If these records could  be located in the archives, they could potentially contain very useful information.    Box 008877    Includes  FERC  Project  No.  184  Unit  Cost  Report  For  Revised  Statement  of  Actual  Legitimate  Original  Cost  Of  Project  as  of  2/1/24  and  Historical  Valuation  Computation  of  Depreciation Annuity FPC 12/31/24 To 12/31/27. Contains detailed information on Ditch Camps  1–5  that  were  used  by  ditch  tenders  and  maintenance  workers  for  the  new  El  Dorado  Canal.  Lists the buildings and their dimensions. Also lists equipment that was housed in some of the  buildings  in  the  mid  1920s  as  well  as  storage  sheds  scattered  along  the  ditch.  A  typescript  by  W.B.  Rittenhouse  provides  details  and  history  on  the  El  Dorado  Project.  These  records  would  definitely  be  worth  looking  at  in  greater  detail.  Even  if  nothing  specific  to  the  construction  camps is found, they provide great information for other camps in the area within a several year  period.    Box 008876    Includes  El  Dorado  Power  Co  Cost  12/31/24  Summary  Valuation  Survey  of  El  Dorado  Canal for Western States, dated December 1920 by Jerome Barieau; Unit Cost Report of Revised  Statement  of  Actual  Legitimate  Original  Cost  of  Project  #184  as  of  2/1/24  to  12/31/27;  Work  papers For Unit Cost Report For Revised Statement of Actual Legitimate Cost of Projects as of 

 

A‐3

  2/1/24;  Fixed  Capital  Accounts;  and  other  accounting  records.  At  first  glance,  information  is  relevant to the canal itself rather than details on work camps.     Box 005197    Includes the Annual Reports of the Western States Gas and Electric Company of [various  divisions including Stockton] to the Railroad Commission of California for the years 1920–1926.  Lists  number  of  employees  for  El  Dorado  Development,  but  does  not  break  down  to  Camp  level. Provides overall all wages per year for the project, but not down to individual level. Note  that  in  the  Stockton  Report  it  states:  “All  statistical  data  available  on  covering  this  ‘water  system’ has been submitted to the commission in the case of El Dorado Water Users Association  versus Western States Gas and Electric Company.ʺ     Box 028019    Western  States  Gas  and  Electric  Co.  Minutes  of  the  Board  of  Directors,  Volume  5,  1922– 1925. Includes expenditures for March 1, 1922 through November 30, 1923 and broad categories.  Does not break down into local level. Might find some detail on El Dorado project but doubtful  down to work camp level. Includes by laws, dividends, stockholders, articles of incorporation;  does not appear to contain policy or regulations as for work camps or employees etc.    Box W00827    Includes  Western  States  Gas  and  Electric  Co.  Fixed  Capital  1923  Accounts.  Contains  construction  ledger  for  El  Dorado  Division,  April  1922‐January  1926.  Under  commissary  supplies  has  end  of  month  date,  e.g.  April  30,  1922.  Lists  vouchers  with  costs  but  generally  leaves  the  description  category  blank,  except  occasionally  “stores.”  Similarly,  freight  &  transportation or supplies usually description [location] left blank except when for Twin Lakes.  Work  broken  down  by  type  “stripping”,  “cleaning”,  ‘excavation”,  etc.  Puts  labor  cost  total  by  month;  not  broken  down  more  than  that  for  each  category.  Some  expense  broken  out  in  field  offices; e.g., E. Bennett, rental of horses. .    Box 015278    Appraisal of Western States Gas & Electric for 1931, adjusted to 1927/28. Does not provide  information  on  1922  construction  work  camps  but  provides  detailed  descriptions  of  buildings  for other projects such as the operator’s residence No. 2398 at Finnon Reservoir (American River  Project) and value of buildings at Twin Lake and Silver Lake.    Box W02025    Contains  basically  a  library  of  articles  new  and  old  on  PG&E  and  its  activities.  Includes  PG&E  Place  Names,  compiled  by  Virginia  Borland  in  1957;  various  histories  of  PG&E  and  its  corporate  predecessors;  a  PG&E  organization  history;  a  typescript  “Hydro‐Electric 

 

A‐4

  Development, 1895–1925, Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Subsidiaries; and photocopies  of  numerous  magazine  and  other  articles  beginning  in  1915.  At  first  glance,  nothing  on  construction camps but potentially useful for historic context.    Box 069727    Western  States  Gas  &  Electric  Records,  1916–1932.  Files  for  1921–1922  have  nothing  on  construction  camps.  Box  contains  a  variety  of  copies  of  the  publication  “PG&E  Progress”  including  some  in  the  mid  1920s.  One  contained  a  section  called  “On  the  Job  with  the  ‘Old  Timers.’”  If  interviews  or  information  on  “Old  Timers”  was  a  regular  feature,  it  could  be  a  potentially useful source to browse.    Box W01859    Contains  a  wide  collection  of  early  manuals  and  catalogs.  Not  relevant  for  construction  camps  per  se,  put  useful  for  identification  of  artifacts  found  in  the  field,  particularly  those  pertaining  to  early  electrical  supplies  such  as  porcelain  insulators.  Also  contains  a  small  pamphlet  “Rules  and  Regulations  for  employee,  PG&E,  1912  [some  general  rules,  but  mainly  operations  instructions]  and  a  Manual  of  Working  Conditions  for  Employees  on  Daily  and  Weekly Rates, effective October 1, 1937.    Photographs    Didn’t look at photographs because previously had been done. During computer searches  found numerous references to photographs of the El Dorado Project in the early 1920s including  Boxes W00226; W00742; W00743 W00744; W00745; and W02176.   

 

A‐5

 

BOXES CHECKED THAT DID NOT CONTAIN USEFUL INFORMATION 
    Archive  Boxes  that  were  searched  for  information  on the 1922  Construction  Camps in  El  Dorado that did not contain useful information are set forth below. Some of the boxes contained  unorganized materials or hundreds of files with no index indicating which file the information  would be. In those instances it was determined that it would be like looking for a needle in a  haystack and thus it would not be productive to search those files. The abbreviation GM stands  for “General Maintenance File.”   
BOX  W00468  W00468  W00469  W00474  W00826  W00833  W01064  W01093  W01191  W01204  W02017  W04142  W04683  002153  003598  004130  004131  004133  004436  004683  004684  004684  005197  005711  009890  011625  012544  014159  015340  015350 
 

BOX  015351  015352  022132  023348  026010  026010  028020  029225  034039  034328  035061  035470  032721, GM 11554  048361  032835, GM 15553  050263  032963, GM 19849  051729, GM 45 5990  063332  067486  067487  069683  069726  034276, GM 57332  034342, GM 59406  053075, GM 174526  058474, GM 180443  058476, GM 180475  058749, GM 181506  085897, GM 176075 

BOX  085974, GM 176642  085983, GM 176755  086035, GM 176979  086201, GM 178425  086206, GM 178523  086208, GM 178556  086347, GM 179389  0266894  0269165, GM 59406  086203, GM 178469; 178471  051747, GM 456528  051810, GM 457734  051968, GM 460091  052040, GM 461549  052103, GM 462716  052146, GM 463240  052149, GM 463318  052322, GM 465748  052404, GM 467133  052411, GM 467287  052462, GM 467966  052525, GM 468939  052681, GM 470990  052710, GM 471706  052818, GM 473108  052835, GM 473513  052233, GM 464769; 464773  052875, GM 473949; 473950  052945, GM 475149; 475384; 475393   

 

A‐6

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.