EDMONTON GREEN

DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK STRATEGY

BUDD

DPU

UCL

MAR 2011

Working group members
Afraa Ali Veyom Bahl Silvia Chi Jiang Di Desirée Durousseau Alejandro Echeverría Rebecca Ellis Colin Hagans Satoru Iino Amy Leaman Azzurra Muzzonigro Ivana Nady McKenzie O’Neill Tatiana Pinto Tareq Razouk Marguerite Reinig Ifigenia Soula Jeremy Tran

Guidance from
Pushpa Arabindoo Camillo Boano Andrew Wade

Thanks to

Mark Furnival Ray Rogers Suzanne Johnson

Contents
0.0 Foreword 1.0 Context _1.1 Physical _1.2 Socio-Economic _1.3 Policy 2.0 Urban Design Analysis _2.1 Urban Grain & Land Use _2.2 Access _2.3 Massing & Density _2.4 Open Spaces _2.5 Building Typologies _2.6 Opportunities & Constraints 3.0 Vision & Principles _3.1 Vision _3.2 Objectives _3.3 Urban Design Principles 4.0 Development Framework _4.1 Development Framework Overview _4.2 Character & Opportunity Areas _4.3 Edmonton Green Town Centre _4.4 Fore Street _4.5 Cemeteries & Surroundings _4.6 Bounces Road & Surroundings _4.7 Church Street & Surroundings _4.8 Medical / Industrial Quarter 5.0 Phasing 6.0 Conclusions 7.0 References p. 05 p. 07

p. 15

p. 29

p. 33

1_ Vision 2_ Design Principles 3_ Access Strategies 4_ Public Realm Strategies 5_ Urban Structure Strategies p. 95 p. 101 p. 105

0.0
FOREWORD
Over the past two months, eighteen Master’s degree candidates at the Development Planning Unit, Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment, University College London investigated the urban fabric of Edmonton Green, Enfield with the intention of producing this report--a framework strategy for the area’s (re)development. As is detailed in Sections 1.0 and 2.0, Edmonton Green is beset by socio-economic and physical conditions that challenge the livelihoods, well-being and community cohesiveness of those who reside and work in the area. However, immense social diversity, deeply-rooted historical fabric, active town centres and varied character zones--alongside a new local Core Strategy--offer a tremendous foundation for regeneration. Our goal in this Development Framework Strategy is to outline the type and scope of interventions through which those facets already a part of Edmonton could serve as a catalysts for revitalized local livelihoods, reinvigorated local history and reenergized collective identity. London March 2011

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1.0
CONTEXT

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1.0 CONTEXT

1.1 Physical
The designated study area falls within the Enfield Borough, the northernmost borough of London and the sixth largest at 31 square kilometers. Enfield shares borders with three other boroughs: Barnet, Haringey and Waltham Forest and is limited to the north by the M25 motorway. Within the borough, the designated area extends over three inner wards, from north to south: Lower Edmonton, Edmonton Green and Upper Edmonton, these lie in the southeastern corner of the borough The area is serviced by Edmonton Green rail station, various bus routes, and the North Circular. To the east of the study area site is the River Lea. The Lea’s many tributaries have almost all been driven underground; however Salmons Brook and Pymme’s Brook emerge briefly in parks and urban streets; further revealing and celebrating their existence would add to the public realm. The site is divided by cross-cutting roads: the east-west flowing North Circular sub-divides the southern part of the site, its noisy and elevated nature dominates the housing in Upper Edmonton, creating a barrier to Lower Edmonton and the north.

Location of Edmonton within Enfield Borough and City of London

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CONTEXT PHYSICAL

1.0

Fore Street (A10) runs north towards the M25 and Hertfordshire beyond London, and south towards the City of London. This acts as a corridor cutting through the site and a major barrier to east-west movement, both physically and psychologically, especially for pedestrians and residents. Running alongside the A10 is the railway line further consolidating the prevention of movement owing to its lack of crossing points. This overwhelming focus on the car inhibits any social activity or attraction to visitors around these areas. As an outer London borough, density is lower and wider roads and greater green spaces afford a more open feel. However, visitors arriving at the train station may well be confused as to their orientation; the ‘centre’ is dominated by a shopping complex offering unpleasant internal passages and an ambiguity over its public/ private divisions. The vibrancy of the market within is mismatched with the blank outer walls and bleak pedestrian experience of the roads and bus station outside. As our report seeks to address the physical differences between the Edmonton area and Enfield borough as a whole are stark: the former being a neglected corner of the latter, and some radical rethinking is overdue as to how to readdress this imbalance.
Blank Outer Walls (Plevna Road) North Circular, Cross-cutting Divide

Connection of Edmonton to Surrounding Areas

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1.0 CONTEXT

1.2 Socio-Economic
Further to the Socio-Economic report previously submitted by the DPU to Enfield Council, we find here (for the purposes of the following recommendations on Urban Structure, Public Realm, and Access) three overarching issues (worklessness, housing burden, and crime), and a number of strengths which may respond to these issues (ethnic diversity, youth, and wellestablished communities) which contribute to the character of Edmonton. Often the issues and the strengths are two sides of the same coin. Below are listed three core issues which describe the character of the area, and inform our responses in the document which follows. The first is that the population predominates at both the young (under 19), and older (over 50) ends of the spectrum. The current rate of worklessness for 20-29 year old, signals a potential threat in the future towards increased worklessness as the population ages. However, as much a workless young population poses a threat to the area, there is a significant opportunity for the council to build environmental conditions under which the young people of Edmonton can thrive through expressions of culture, creativity, and entrepreneurship.

A similar dichotomy exists with respect to family composition. Edmonton’s family demographics are simultaneously significant for twoparent families and single-parent families as compared to London (as opposed to cohabiting couples). Bridging the gap between these demographics means focusing on the building of strong and cohesive community networks between families, whatever their composition. This is exemplified in space by looking at the housing types of different wards. For example, Lower Edmonton has more home ownership and terraced housing than Edmonton Green, which is characterized by council rentals. It becomes integral, then to consider family composition and housing type as correlated within the spatial interventions proposed. The final issues is with respect to housing and household stresses. The people of Edmonton in general spend a larger percentage of their wages and/or benefits on housing as compare to London. While unemployment is an evident marker of deprivation, the underemployed wrestle with economic instability, and have trouble planning deliberately for the future. This inflexibility is a potential threat as stresses to the local economy could cause serious derailment of the underemployed and those living paycheck to paycheck.

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CONTEXT SOCIO-ECONOMIC

1.0

Edmonton Green Town Centre

Angel Edmonton Centre

Crimes Reported

-

+ Intensity of crime

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1.0 CONTEXT

1.3 Policy
LONDON PLAN The London Plan centers on the principal of sustainable development. It sets out a series of criteria to promote sustainable development and secure social, environmental and economic objectives. It also provides a foundation for the future development of Enfield, identifying the following key objectives: • Be mindful of the impact London’s environment and cultural assets and health of local people as a result of development In coordination with other North London boroughs, deliver national Government’s priority for development, regeneration and transport improvements along the London-Stansted-CambridgePeterborough Corridor Ensure that the expansion of population expected in North London is accommodated in sustainable communities Prioritise the Edmonton Area for Regeneration for investment

Protect strategic industrial land where needed and manage the reuse of surplus industrial land Seek to enhance the quality of life, economy and environment of suburban London, maintaining and improving features that make London’s suburbs attractive; Increase access to the Blue Ribbon Network, which includes Salmons Brook located in Edmonton Green and other waterways in the Borough.

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CONTEXT POLICY

1.0

ENFIELD LDF The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act (2004) requires Enfield Council to replace the former Unitary Development Plan (UDP) with a new approach, the Local Development Framework (LDF). In addition, the Enfield Council also adopts Supplementary Planning Documents. The Core Strategy (2010) is the main document of the Local Development Framework. It sets the strategic vision and guiding principles for development in Enfield up to 2026. All subsequent Local Development Documents area to be develop in accordance with the Core Strategy. The London Plan classifies Edmonton as a ‘district centre’; therefore, Enfield Council’s plan is to be carried out accordingly. Specifically, the following features in chart below are included the Enfield Plan: Core Strategy 2010 – 2025 (Enfield, 2010, p. 8-9). The strategies outlined in this development framework strategy have been developed, in an attempt to comply with these national and local guidelines.

Summary of Enfield Plan: Core Strategy 2010-2025

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2.0
URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

Medium grain Mixed use Medium activity

Fine grain Single use Low activity

Mixed grain Mixed use High activity

Coarse grain Single use Low activity

Coarse grain Industrial Use Low Activity

Coarse grain Single use Low activity

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URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS URBAN GRAIN & LAND USE

2.0

2.1 Urban Grain & Land Use
Edmonton is burdened by an overwhelming coarse grain structure, which can be traced, in part, to streetscapes and farm plots that were in place by the late 1800s. The primary exception to this composition is the Garden City area, located alongside Pymme’s Park. New developments, including the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre, have done little to address the coarse fabric, which negatively impacts the vibrancy, safety and walkability of the site. However, Edmonton is also characterized by several active commercial districts and a strong overall land use mix, including residential, commercial, civic, religious, office, recreational, medical and industrial establishments. These land uses tend to be poorly integrated, as evident in the Medical/Industrial Quarter and by the presence of light industry in several predominantly residential areas. Nonetheless, along the High Streets and on several eastwest offshoots, such as Bounces Road and Church Street, land use mixing has effectively offset the limitations imposed by otherwise long, monotonous blocks. Finally, several vacant plots and derelict buildings are prime for development and for potential expansions of community-oriented land uses (e.g. community centres and job centres) which appear underrepresented on the site at present. The location of these opportunity sites, furthermore, allows for strategic enhancements along Fore Street in the somewhat under-utilized commercial corridor between the poles of Edmonton Green and Angel Edmonton. Recreational space is also clearly prioritized, though several parks are in need of stronger integration with their surroundings for use to be maximised.

Bounces Road near Montagu Road

Kimberley Road

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

2.2 Access
NON-MOTORIZED TRANSPORT Patterns The primary vertical and horizontal streets for vehicular movement (Fore Street, Church Street and Bounces Road, respectively) are also the primary access routes for pedestrian walking and cycling, given their clear legibility through Edmonton Green. Conflicts Given that the prime pedestrian streets are also the prime vehicular streets, they are difficult to negotiate for pedestrians, with priority having been given to vehicular movements, particularly on Fore Street and the North Circular. There is also a lack of clear bicycle lanes or marking. Pedestrian movements are also constricted horizontally, with limited crossing points across the railway line and through Edmonton Green Shopping center. PERSONAL VEHICULAR Patterns Vehicular patterns and access is oriented toward vertical movement, with the Fore Street providing primary vehicular access throughout Edmonton Green, along with Meridian Way. Montagu Road provides secondary vertical vehicular access throughout the site. North Circular Road provides the only continuous horizontal linkage throughout Edmonton Green, while Church Street and Bounces Road provides horizontal access through the western and eastern portions, respectively. Conflicts There are high rates of congestion on the aforementioned roads during peak travel periods, particularly on Fore Street. Fore Street along with the local street network also have high ratios of parking provision, with high rates of observed occupancy.

Vehicular movement in Fore Street

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URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS ACCESS

2.0

BUS Patterns There are 11 daytime bus lines and three night buses that travel through Edmonton Green. Most of the bus lines travel on Fore Street between Central London and Enfield Town, with a major interchange adjacent to Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. Commuters generally do not have to wait more than 10 minutes for buses on the main lines. Conflicts Horizontally-oriented bus service in Edmonton Green is weakest at the periphery of the site, particularly in the middle-section of the periphery. However, these are also the areas with the least dense housing, so additional routes do not have great demand. RAIL Patterns Edmonton Green contains two overground railway stations: Silver Street Station at the south of the site, and Edmonton Green Station near the shopping centre. The trains run at 15-minute intervals during peak travel periods, and at 30-minute intervals during non-peak travel periods. Conflicts While providing adequate vertical access to Edmonton Green, the rail network does not provide any horizontal access to or through Edmonton Green. During off-peak hours, travel to and from the stations must also be planned more carefully in order to avoid excessive wait times.
Bus R outes in Enfield

Bus Terminal at Edmonton Green Shopping Centre

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

2.3 Building Typologies
Most of Edmonton Green’s land allocation is dedicated for residential purposes, however commercial and industrial purposed structures exist as well. From terraced houses to semi-detached from town blocks to large-scale industrial buildings, there is a great sense of typology heterogeneity, which can mislead towards building fragmentation. The four appraisal areas also contain a wide variety of buildings dating back to the 15th Century. While some of the listed buildings like the war memorial and All Saints Church can be identified as potential landmarks in the area, they are not the most relevant for users of the site . Site analysis also point invariably to “buildings that can be easily be recognized and which aid on the orientation of the user.” (Cambridge Dictionary). This however, also means that landmarks can have a positive or negative effect on the zone. The clearest example being Edmonton Green Shopping Centre and the tower blocks behind it which serve to a certain extent as landmarks, but the typologies feel fragmented in relation to other parts of Edmonton Green. Edmonton Green’s building typologies do not correspond to a single style or epoch, rather to different time periods and architectural styles. However most of the residential area is characterized by to Terrace housing between Victorian England and World War 2.

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URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS BUILDING TYPOLOGIES

2.0

Due to poor regulations, there are many cases where the façade materials are altered indiscreetly by the owner, which damages the image of the street. Along with terraced housing, the next most common type is the semidetached house which is most commonly found south of Church Street and south of the Federation Cemetery. Post-war development is also present in the area, the most striking being the tower blocks next to Edmonton Green Shopping Centre, which along with the latter create a sense of discontinuity and disjunction on the existing styles within the designated area. These, however, are not the only remnants of post-war typologies, for along Fore Street there are isolated examples that further fragment the historical corridor. Edmonton Green also hosts a small but by no means less important industrial area. Southwest of the North Circular near the Middlesex Hospital, there are a considerable number of large footprint buildings, mostly for ilight industry, waste management and wholesale use. In all, from conservation areas and terraced housing to tower blocks and industrial space, Edmonton Green’s building typology does not correspond to only one style or period. Desired building cohesion is usually frustrated by unregulated change of material while the more historical parts are overlooked by post-war buildings.

Terrace House around Pymmes Park

Apartment Block near Fore Street

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

2.4 Massing & Density
EDMONTON GREEN SHOPPING CENTRE Positive The shopping center provides a prominent visual landmark in the area, due to its large massing, its location at the confluence of two key horizontal and vertical transport connections, and its integration of three 25-floor council estate blocks, which are the highest buildings in the area. The new construction and redevelopment at portions of the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre site have improved its aesthetic and corner definition at the Church Street and Fore Street roundabout. Negative The shopping centre remains aesthetically unappealing in many areas, and its massing dominates over nearby neighborhoods and reduces legible horizontal permeability. The blank walls at the eastern portion of the shopping centre create street canyons that feel isolated. In areas immediately north, south and west of the shopping centre low density housing, gaps in frontages, and the abundance of infrastructure devoted to parking contribute to a feeling of sprawl and fragmentation.
1-2 floors 3-5 floors 6-10 floors 10+ floors

FORE STREET Positive Fore Street south of the Edmonton Green serves as a prime commercial and transport corridor. It has some positive elements, including a few sections of blocks with optimal heights (3 to 5 floors). Many of the blocks front the street appropriately, with the buildings sitting at the edge of the sidewalk. The Angel Edmonton commercial corridor (south of North Circular Road) showing the most cohesive massing and density on Fore Street. Negative On the east side of Fore Street between North Circular Road and the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre, many of the buildings are set back too far from the street. There are also multiple gaps in frontages (including vacant lots). The council housing site immediately south of Edmonton Green Shopping Centre has low density footprints and poor urban form, in an area that is prime for mixed-use development.

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URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS MASSING & DENSITY

2.0

CHURCH STREET Positive This secondary commercial/transport corridor has a solid continuity in frontages, particularly on the eastern portion of the street. The primary gap in the urban from (an historic church) does not detract from the site, but rather adds to it, because of its historic significance, aesthetic appeal, and well-landscaped open space. Negative The western side of the street is dominated by terraced homes dominate, many of which have driveways in the front. Intersection corners on the street could also have improved definition. BOUNCES ROAD Positive Similar to Church Street, Bounces Road is also a secondary commercial/transport corridor, with solid frontages on its western portion (closest to Fore Street). Negative On the eastern portion of the street, there is discontinuity in frontages due to design of a council housing estate that borders the street. MEDICAL/INDUSTRIAL QUARTER Positive The buildings have large footprints and may be provide opportunities for loft-style or large commercial redevelopment. Even if redevelopment is not realistic, the site provides important employment opportunities and a character that can be enhanced with temporary or market based uses. Negative The site can feel isolated, particularly during non-business hours. It also provides poor pedestrian access to the mall on the western portion of the site, and the overall aesthetic appeal of the buildings is low (with many facades poorly maintained).
Improved Corner Definition / Appropiated Building Heights (Fore Street)

Dense Commercial Massing with Blank Walls Facing Terrace Housing

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

Deteriorated Edges

2.5 Open Spaces
The main strength of Edmonton Green is that is has a wide range of open space typologies for various uses and a range of facilities. The area is rich with green pockets especially in the housing estates. The award winning Pymmes Park has broad appeal and is centrally located. Other major parks in the area include those on Montagu Road and Bull Lane. The opportunities are mainly within the number of green spaces which could potentially be linked together in a green corridor. The principle weaknesses are the car dominated roads and inferior provision of pathways and connections for pedestrians. The north of the site is rather deficient of open spaces within the designated catchment area. The prevalence of deteriorated edges, surfaces and poor lighting increase the perception of crime and prevent people from utilizing some spaces to their potential.

Imposed Road Hierarchy

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URBAN DESIGN ANALYSIS OPEN SPACES

2.0

Whilst the Core Strategy for the area mentions ‘partnerships’: there is potential for interesting new ways of delivering, in particular greater community involvement leads to which will lead to an increased sense of pride and ownership. Taking caution with edges in particular, to clearly demarcate them (e.g. waterway and pathway), however not to a militant extent whereby a un-human grid is imposed from above. Although the amenity spaces especially within the estates are plentiful, they lack a clear sense of ownership and maintenance with some being used for fly tipping. Finally although creating new partnerships could potentially lead to great opportunities, private interests may affect service.

Diverse and Rich Open Space Typology

Lack of Ownership in Amenity Spaces

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2.0 ANALYSIS

URBAN DESIGN

2.6 Opportunities & Constraints
In this report we have sought to identify and appraise the primary strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to the Access, Public Realm and Urban Structure in Edmonton. Though these categories are presented in lists below, the format is not meant to imply that they are stagnant. Just as strengths that go unprotected can quickly become weaknesses, careful analyses can transform current threats into future opportunities OPPORTUNITIES Strengths • A good North South transport corridor, with the presence of a strong bus network running through Edmonton Green •
Opportunities

Recent mixed-use enhancements to Edmonton Green Town Centre Diverse land uses dispersed throughout the site Land use hierarchy that prioritises recreation and open space Conservation Areas reflecting the significant number of listed and historic buildings

• • •

Opportunities • Steady pedestrian movement on the site (albeit with potential for stronger pedestrian linkages) • Areas with long histories of substantial commercial and residential activity, including several key offshoots, replete with built heritage value Edmonton Green Shopping Centre functions as a central landmark with potential to contribute to the area’s cohesion Provision of council housing within close proximity to the hub of activity An industrial quarter with unique economic contributions and a character that can inspire contemporary community activities

• •

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OPPORTUNITIES & CONSTRAINTS

2.0

CONSTRAINTS Weaknesses • Poor horizontal linkages which hamper movement • • • • • • Infrequent public transport, particularly train services Car domination, where pedestrians and bicycles are hindered with the number of motorized vehicles. Poorly conserved, historical corridors reflecting a sense of fragmentation Varied construction materials reinforcing the sense of fragmentation outside the main commercial corridors Housing and apartment blocks with weak urban forms and poor connections to street grids Questionable mixed-use developments, such as large-scale light industrial developments juxtaposed alongside core residential areas An inverted character and movement pattern related to and resulting from the recently-regenerated Edmonton Green Shopping Centre An overwhelming coarse grain fabric contributing to feelings of insecurity and an over-reliance on motorized transport Poor integration of and connection between recreational spaces High unemployment and low level of entrepreneurship Elevated crime in most transited areas such as the shopping centre, Middlesex Hospital and schools

Constraints

• • •

Threats • Perceptions of insecurity in the area that deter pedestrian movements and developments • • • • • Potentially, development restrictions imposed by listed building status Council housing redevelopment proposals that may negatively impact vulnerable families Car-dominated streets that are dangerous for children, especially near poorly-planned parks and open spaces Broken railings and signs that pose threats to pedestrians and cyclists; poor maintenance Coarse grain that is, in some cases, firmly embedded into the urban fabric EDMONTON GREEN DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK STRATEGY |

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3.0
VISION & PRINCIPLES

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3.0 PRINCIPLES

VISION &

3.1 Vision

Envision Edmonton Green as a socially inclusive and spatially cohesive place with a thriving community and a strong local identity building on Edmonton’s unique architectural heritage, ethnic diversity, myriad land uses and extensive open spaces.

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VISION, OBJECTIVES & PRINCIPLES

3.0

3.2 Objectives
• Maximise use potential, quality and cohesion of existing infrastructures, open spaces, cultural landmarks and character areas Strengthen horizontal and vertical connections between commercial and transport zones, open spaces and historic sites Improve permeability and accessibility by supporting design strategies that prioritize pedestrian movements Improve safety of commercial, residential and open areas by promoting use and vitality Ensure (re)development is inclusive and oriented toward economic and social deprivation

3.3 Urban Design Principles
• • Build on the strengths and opportunities present in Edmonton Green’s existing urban fabric Promote varied, but cohesive land uses reflecting desires of diverse local communities, while putting in place structures necessary for regeneration Remain sensitive to historic value, while using history as a springboard for a revitalized and contemporary collective identity Create spaces and passageways that promote accessibility, community cohesion, and healthy lifestyles Promote design that is malleable and addresses local deprivations and development needs

• • •

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4.0
DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

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4.0 FRAMEWORK

DEVELOPMENT

Key
Priority 1 Zone Priority 2 Zone Priority 3 Zone Waterway Enhancements Key Local Connections Secondary Local Connections Major Thoroughfares Frontage Enhancements Historic Buildings Proposed New Developments Enhanced Public & Green Spaces

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DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

4.0

4.1 Development Framework Overview
The development framework diagram summarises the strategic interventions proposed for the six opportunity areas identified on the following pages. The framework provides for a hierarchy of interventions for improving social inclusion and spatial cohesion in order to enhance livelihoods and create a positive sense of place in Edmonton Green. MACRO LEVEL As the key landmark of Edmonton Green, enhancement of the Edmonton Green Town Centre is the highest priority in the development framework. Improvements to the public realm, urban structure, and pedestrian permeability of the site provide for an essential cohesive link to other areas of Edmonton Green, including four of the other opportunity areas targeted in this brief. In general, proposed improvements focus on: 1) improving the massing and human scale of the shopping centre through targeted additional development and redevelopment; 2) enhancing public sites and mixeduse provision both within the shopping complex and the areas immediately adjacent; and 3) ensuring improved horizontal permeability through the shopping centre, as well as improved linkages between shopping centre, the bus and rail station, and the nearby park. In addition, the macro level access strategy will reprioritise Fore Street for local vehicular traffic, and increase its pedestrian orientation, which will be complemented by improved horizontal pedestrian linkages and pathways to improve local flows between Fore Street and the eastern and western portions of the site. Traffic that needs to move quickly through Edmonton Green will be shifted to North Circular Road (horizontal traffic) and Meridian Way (vertical traffic). Such a strategy will ensure that all residents of Edmonton Green will have improved access to the rail and bus links and broader public corridors that are primarily concentrated on Fore Street. MESO LEVEL Fore Street, Church Street and the Medical/Industrial Quarter are regarded as second priority sites, with the potential to both enhance the “spine” of Edmonton Green (particularly Fore Street) as well as create additional local sites of interest to encourage increased circulation in Edmonton Green as a whole, thereby enhancing vitality and creating a sense of identity. A strong priority in these meso-level sites will be creating more cohesive links between historical sites and public spaces, as well as introducing new commercial and mixed-use developments to increase vibrancy, improve livelihoods and promote collective identity. MICRO LEVEL Bounces Road and Montagu Road in the northeast corner are third-level priorities. Improvements to these sites will seek to expand commercial activity, public spaces and pedestrian flows, thereby bringing development and vitality to these sites that have traditionally been excluded from development in the area. Impacts resulting from these developments may not have widescale impact, but they would improve spatial and social inclusion in targeted corridors.

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4.0 FRAMEWORK

DEVELOPMENT

Edmonton Green Town Centre

Church Street & Surroundings

Bounces Road & Surroundings Fore Street

Medical / Industrial Quarter

Cemeteries & Surroundings

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KEY CHARACTER & OPPORTUNITY AREAS

4.0

4.2 Key Character & Opportunity Areas
KEY CHARACTER AREAS Edmonton Green, at the moment, is delineated by arbitrary borders. Yet within this site, there are key character areas that offer the opportunity to create the sense of place needed for the community to thrive: Commercial Corridors Commercial corridors exist as a spine running through the middle of Edmonton Green (along Fore Street), with the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre providing a central landmark. Secondary east-west offshoots exist on Church Street and Bounces Road. Parks and Green Spaces Parks and open space exists throughout the site, including the award-winning Pymmes Park several smaller parks interspersed throughout Edmonton Green. While not a park, the cemetery also provides a large open space east of the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. Residential Areas Residential areas predominate in Edmonton, and are composed of council housing estates, private apartment blocks, terraced housing and Garden City-style housing. Along Fore Street, Church Street and Bounces Road, there are several mixed residential/commercial buildings. Light Industrial Sites Light industrial buildings are located primarily on the extreme southwest portion of Edmonton Green. Historic Areas Edmonton Green has a strong historical heritage, evident in its built enviroment. Concentrated principally along Church Street is the area´s unique historic corridor. KEY OPPORTUNITY AREAS To create a socially inclusive and spatially cohesive place, the prioritization of opportunity areas necessitates a focus on a diverse mix of character areas, thereby ensuring cohesion is enhanced through improved connectivity and coherence of the built environment, open spaces and historic sites. In addition, a diverse focus allows

for an integrated focus on improving social inclusion. Opportunity areas have been identified as follows: Opportunity Area 1: Edmonton Green Town Centre Edmonton Green Town Centre, while presenting significant challenges, also offers the key opportunity of creating a positive visual, psychological, social and economic landmark in center of Edmonton Green. Opportunity Area 2: Fore Street The improvement of Fore Street up to Edmonton Green Shopping Centre presents the opportunity of strengthening the ‘spine’ of Edmonton Green, creating a series of mixed-use housing, employment, service and leisure activities that draw people to the centre of the site. New horizontal linkages from Fore Street to the western portion of Edmonton Green could also improve local pedestrian access and flows to Fore Street, thereby increasing the area`s vitality. Opportunity Area 3: Cemeteries & Surroundings Pedestrian paths at the northern and southern sections of the cemetery offer the key opportunity of improving and securing horizontal pedestrian access on the western portion of Edmonton Green, with provision of direct access to Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. Opportunity Area 4: Bounces Road & Surroundings Bounces Street offers the opportunity of creating another local commercial district on the western portion of Edmonton Green, and improving the safety and integration of local residential communities. Opportunity Area 5: Church Street & Surroundings Church Street has the opportunity to function as a more intimate district, with the strong possibility for creating a local contemporary culture scene embedded within a revitalised historic setting alongside the nearby river. Opportunity Area 6: Medical/Industrial Quarter The industrial site at the southwest portion of Edmonton Green offers the opportunity to enhance spatial cohesion of the area through improvements in access, aesthetics and usage, maintaining its economic vitality, while building a local culture inspired by its caracter.

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4.0 FRAMEWORK

DEVELOPMENT

Key
Improved Structures New Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x
Proposed Interventions

Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

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OPPORTUNITY AREA ONE EDMONTON GREEN TOWN CENTRE

4.0

4.3 Opportunity Area One: Edmonton Green Town Centre

4.3.1 VISION We envision the Edmonton Green Town Centre as the heart of Edmonton, a vibrant site of community exchanges in open and inviting ‘plaza.’ With varied activities highlighting Edmonton’s diversity, the Town Centre can bring Edmonton together in a permeable, legible, and dynamic residential, commercial and cultural environment.

4.3.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access • Improve the legibility and movement of pedestrian movements to transform the Edmonton Green Shopping Center area to a welcoming landmark that encourages vitality and further exploration.

b. Public Realm Rooftop • Reactivate the roof terrace for leisure and entertainment events • Promote improve stairway access to reactive the use of rooftop terrace

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Promote land uses to spur economic growth while still serving the diverse commercial, office and residential needs and desires of local communities • Seek to integrate commercial centres with their residential surroundings, supporting cohesion among varied land uses and building scales

Roundabout • Ensure orientation and wayfinding through the roundabout intervention, reducing height of existing vegetatio and enhancing lighting Station • Assist orientation in and out the station • Park • Re-brand as a waiting park for station; benches, lighting, clock, coffee stand and newspaper rack Parking lot • Introduce visual buffer zone between park and ASDA; e.g. vegetation wall. • Promote art-oriented activities

Massing & Density • Ensure that new developments— built or open spaces—are sensitive to human scale • Promote massing changes at the shopping centre that increase its permeability

Building Typology • Give cohesion to the fragmented edges of the complex in order to enhance its accessibility and the perception of it as a physical catalyst at the urban level

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4.3.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • The rail station itself is targeted for aesthetic improvements, in order to create a more inviting and welcoming arrival point for people arriving in Edmonton Green. • Connectivity between the rail station, bus station and shopping center will be improved by repurposing the Fore Street roundabout for pedestrian traffic. Sight lines will be improved so that the bus station and shopping center entrance can be seen when existing the train station, and clear pedestrian walkways will be created through the roundabout. An additional crosswalk to the bus station will also be constructed north of the roundabout. The Fore Street park will have improved pedestrian paths.

Fo re

Key
New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

Existing Railway Station

Proposed Station with Integrated Commercial

Existing Roundabout

Proposed Roundabout with Pedestrian Paths

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Horizontal connectivity to the shopping center and to Fore Street will be improved by opening one of the railway arches for pedestrian access through the Fore Street park to the new neighborhood on the opposite side. At-grade pedestrian crossings should be installed from the cemetery pathway at the eastern section of the site to the pedestrian path that crosses between the Edmonton Green Shopping Center and Asda, in order to emphasize pedestrian movement and access between the east of the shopping centre and Fore Street and beyond. Any new construction at the North Mall should also allow for horizontal pedestrian pathways to established, thereby improving permeability.

Example of Rail Arch Pathway

Example Pedestrian Path for New North Mall

Example of New Development in North Mall Prioritising Pedestrian Movements

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Existing Sidewalk with Railing

Proposed Sidewalk with Free Movement

While Fore Street should remain open to vehicular traffic, it should be made more comfortable and inviting for pedestrian movement to improve its overall vitality and permeability. At-grade pedestrian crossings for side streets along Fore Street are proposed, along with widened sidewalks, removal of sidewalk railings, installation of cycle racks and reduction of on-street parking. In coordination with the London Cycling Master Plan, cycling lanes are proposed for street corridors that are not concentrated where heavy traffic is (this is the case for all six opportunity areas). Fore Street is proposed, however, to have an increased number of dedicated cycle racks, for those cyclists that access the street through the selection of improved horizontal pedestrian/cycling corridors. In addition, bike sharing schemes should be considered for key sites of heavy pedestrian traffic within Edmonton Green, including the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre.

Proposed Cycle Racks along Fore Street

Proposed Cycle Racks along Fore Street

Proposed Treatment of Fore Street to Enhance Pedestrian Orientation

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b. Vehicular Parking • Vehicular parking remains a necessity due to the mixed urban/ suburban nature of Enfield. With the Asda and Argos parking lot targeted for transformation into a plaza, it is recommended that parking be relocated to underneath the plaza (with the entrance on the west side of the existing lot). • With the proposed reduction of on-street parking on Fore Street as well, the construction of additional private parking garage have been targeted for two sites: one just north of the Edmonton Green station, as well as a second one on the redeveloped north mall site. In both cases, the parking garages should be integrated with the mixed-use development, including commercial sites on the ground floors, and be overall aethetically pleasing. The parking charges should be structured to be reasonable for visitors, but not so much so that they encourage driving over public transportation.

Existing Parking Lot at Edmonton Green Shopping Centre

Proposal for Mixed-Use Parking Garage

Proposal for Undergournd Parking and Entrance at the Repurposed Asda/Argos Parking Lot

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Rooftop at Present

Example improvements (also below)

4.3.4 PUBLIC REALM a. Shopping Centre Rooftop Reactivate the Rooftop for Leisure and Entertainment Events This area suffers from poor distinction between public and private spaces. This is due to the lack of visual indication of vibrant activities. This creates a space that is owned by nobody and not in use. We propose to transform this area into a café terrace, which provides a place of leisure. Green vegetation will be planted to create a sense of place. Further, this rooftop can also be turned into an extended part of the market especially during peak times such as weekends and holidays. Improve Stairway Access to Rooftop Currently, there is not sufficient of signage to help direct pedestrians to the site. Secondly, the stairway access to the rooftop is situated in a poor location that dilutes it as a public property. Therefore, a poorly defined public space gives rise to maintenance and management problems. We propose the redevelopment to aim to enhance staircase access to further define public realm.

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b. Market Intervention The covered market at the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre plays an important role in creating a high quality public realm. It is the place where a high number of local businesses are situated. Therefore, in efforts of increasing the vibrancy of Edmonton Green Shopping Centre, we propose the covered market to extend longer operating hours and open more days per week. Additionally, improvement of the pavement is also essential to enhance users’ experience. c. Fore Street/Hertford Roundabout The roundabout hinders the pedestrian flow between the train station and Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. Due to the inability to relocate or remove site, our strategies encompass: • Enhancing signage • • Widening up sidelines through the roundabout Reduce height vegetation of existing
Market at Present

• Enhance lighting. All aim to convert the roundabout into sensible public landmark that assists in pedestrian flow and safety improvements.

Market at Present

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d. Edmonton Green Station Improvements of the station in visual vibrancy, sense of security, and also ease of navigation are our top intervention strategies. First, we propose a fine-grained mix of uses on station frontages so that the public realm is lined with active flow of commuters to project a lively and interesting place. It is particularly important to promote a vertical mix of uses to create the concentration of life and vitality that heighten the station’s importance of as Edmonton Green’s transport hub. Secondly, to boost number of users, it is essential to create a sense of security especially at night by providing sufficient lighting and eliminating poorly lite corners. In addition, proper and routine maintenance work is also required to improve visual attraction. Lastly, the station suffers from poorly located signs. The picture in the left shows that the signs are located outside of train station. They are not within pedestrians’ first visual area when they get off the train. Installment of clear signage at proper location will aid pedestrians in navigation. Area of intervention: station and roundabout
Signage to Improve Legibility Intervention Area

Edmonton Green Station at Present

Example Station Improvements

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e. Parking Lot Repurpose Visual Buffer Zone Between Park and ASDA (e.g. vegetation wall) This area suffers from the lack of distinction between private and public space and limited area for public gathering. Our intervention plan proposes constructing a quality plaza where Edmonton Green community can come together and socialise. This will be built on existing parking lot outside ASDA. The new public plaza will be designed to accommodate to public events. At the same, to further distinguish the private and public spaces, we propose planting of low vegetation between the new plaza and ASDA to create a visual boundary. We aim to encourage a high standard of urban design that promotes a harmony between existing buildings and public realm. Highlighting Local History The plaza could also be named after local historic figures, such as writer Charles Lamb, who lived in Edmonton Green. Further, sidewalks and floors could be imprinted of with quotes by this literary figure as well as other

significant people in Edmonton Green. This is a gesture to embrace local heritage and legacy. Venue for Art-oriented Activities The aim of this strategy encourages permanent or temporary works of art visible to the general public, whether part of a building or freestanding. It can include sculpture, lighting effects, street furniture, paving railings and signs. We envision the plaza as an attractive public place for locals and visitors alike to meet and socialize. In addition, new flooring can be paved to enhance the experience of users. The plaza can become a heart of public activity in Edmonton Green, providing for community culture and arts events to flourish. Simply put, arts and culture events are a means to forge locals together to embrace a sense of community pride.

Example Public Realm Interventions

Art Activities Proposed

Green Wall Proposed

Area of Intervention: Parking Lot Repurpose

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f. Park We propose to re-brand the park, which is currently located outside the train station as a waiting park. This strategy should enhance the public realm of the station. Relaxing outdoor seating areas will be provided for commuters with installation of benches. Besides, our strategy also includes putting coffee and newspaper stands to accommodate to commuters’ need while waiting because there is none at the present. This provision of new high quality public realm that encompasses a cohesive network of spaces and routes that is accessible to all.

Proposed intervention for Railside Park

Area of intervention: Railside Park

Intervention area

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4.3.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. North Mall Redevelopment The Edmonton Green Town Centre has undergone significant transformations in the past five years. The construction of new multi-story mixed-use buildings on Broadway, a new central bus terminal and a new ASDA supermarket have drastically altered the built fabric of the town centre. These new constructions, however, have not successfully integrated either the built environment or the land uses of the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre with its surroundings. Furthermore, the North Mall remains a dilapidated vestige of a pre-regeneration town centre and sits on incomparably valued land in Edmonton. Over the longer-term, reconstructing parts of the North Mall can not only address the urban structure shortcomings of the existing Shopping Centre, but can also serve to further transform the town centre into a hub of economic growth and community identity. Such redevelopments are feasible while limiting displacement of any residential communities and preserving major commercial outlets as desired.

First, a New North Mall could have a changed building footprint. For example, setting the Mall further back from the new bus terminal and The Green can open public spaces that can soften the steep gradation of the existing structure. (This idea is discussed further on the following page.) Such enhancements could be supplemented with the use of building materials that offer a sense of transparency and connectedness to the street, thereby reorienting the Mall outwards and inviting people in. More importantly, a New North Mall could offer land uses that are underrepresented elsewhere in Edmonton. Community centres, entrepreneurship centres, job training facilities, kids’ play areas or day care centres--in addition to residences, office and retail--would provide people of all backgrounds reasons to come to Edmonton Green above and beyond their conventional shopping needs.

New Edmonton Green Shopping Centre Bus Terminal

North Mall

North Mall (on left, facing southeast from the Green, Fore Street)

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Potential Site for New Public Plaza

b. Public Plaza While the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre has formalized and rejuvenated the Edmonton Green Town Centre, it continues to suffer from poor integration with its residential, small-scale commercial and transportbased surroundings. The shopping centre is currently a retail locale; it does not serve as a cultural or community destination. From an urban structure perspective, this is the result of the impermeable, imposing big block structure of the shopping centre itself and the introverted nature of its commercial establishments. New constructions can certainly soften the gradation in building heights and massing, and introduce streetfacing commercial outlets. The imposition of the mall on the urban fabric, however, can also be softened in the shorter-term (and at lower cost) through the creation of new public spaces. Allocating land use for public use would create realms for people to gather, to linger, and thereby connect more intimately with the shopping centre complex. An area prime for such an intervention lies in between the new bus terminal and the existing North Mall. Instead of forcing and funneling pedestrian movement through the adjacent buildings into the covered market, a public space--replete with green areas and urban furniture-could serve as a focal point of a community experience in the town centre and create a softer introduction to the area’s commercial offerings. Softer structures--such as crafts, prepared food, or local produce markets--could also be introduced into a new public plaza, perhaps by offering existing market vendors the opportunity to sell goods outdoors at certain times during the week. Precedents include: the public plaza at the entrance to the British Library (London), a similarly imposing built structure on a similarly high-traffic vehicular pathway; the green square at Santana Row shopping centre (San Jose, United States); and the interior park at Liverpool One (Liverpool) though, evidently, on a much larger scale.

British Library, London

Santana Row, San Jose, United States

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c. Railway Arches The Edmonton Green Town Centre is dominated by the shopping centre, which, at present, feels somewhat incoherently transplanted into the area’s urban fabric. However, the shopping centre and the commercial corridor are focal points for the economic growth agenda in Edmonton. Part of the challenge for revitalizing the town centre, therefore, requires that spaces for economic activity be strengthened while the shopping centre be better connected to its immediate surroundings. The railway arches under the tracks leading to the Edmonton Green station present precisely such an opportunity. As has been done in Brixton (London), these arches can be converted into smaller-scale commercial establishments, such as cafes or restaurants. Without altering the existing infrastructure—in fact, building on its historic and industrial character—repurposing the railway arches can create new locales for economic activity. These contemporary spaces would extend commerce in the town centre to the west side of Hertford Road/Fore Street; better link Church Street, the train station and the shopping centre; and maximise the desirability and use potential of the green spaces to which they are adjacent.

Satellite Image (facing west from Edmonton Green Shopping Centre)

Railway Arches

Site for Railway Arch Developments

Brixton, London

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Potential site for Mixed-Use Liner Buildings

Proposed Liner Buildings and Parking Lot Repurpose

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d. Parking Lot Repurpose / Extroverted Developments While the opening of the ASDA supermarket in November 2008 brought new economic and retail opportunities to the town centre, the design of the store also served to further ingrain the introverted nature of the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. The entrances to the ASDA face the interior passageway of the market, while Plevna Road received a brick facade and Fore Street a large parking lot. This construction further embedded the fragmented edges of the town centre and the strong separation between residential and commercial, public and private realms. Furthermore, the parking lot--while important from an access perspective--underutilizes prime town centre space. (See Access interventions for alternative parking strategies.) In response, the parking lot could be repurposed as an extension of the Shopping Centre. In addition to the public realm and access changes previously described, liner buildings could be constructed along Fore Street and Plevna Road over the longer term. Mixed-use, multi-story buildings (while sensitive to ASDA signage) would expand economic opportunities and income generation, provide new housing, appropriately increase housing densities, and re-orient the town centre outwards with exteriorfacing commercial establishments. Space is more limited on Plevna Road, though, new constructions there could additionally serve to smooth built edges and clarify commercial offerings and civic facilities. Each of these interventions would also support efforts toward making time spent in the town centre a community experience instead of purely a commercial necessity. Importantly, reintegrating the Shopping Centre with its surroundings, increasing foot traffic, improving permeability and constructing the built environment to strengthen natural surveillance could also aid in addressing the high incidence of crime in the area.

Liverpool One, Liverpool

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Fore Street Vision (looking north)

Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk
Proposed Interventions Edmonton Green Shopping Centre

Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

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OPPORTUNITY AREA TWO FORE STREET

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4.4 Opportunity Area Two: Fore Street

4.4.1 VISION We envision Fore Street as a vibrant commercial, residential and public corridor. With heightened historic identity, revitalized community spaces and a recalibrated human scale, Fore Street can become both a thoroughfare and a destination—offering individuals and families spaces to work, live, shop and linger.

4.4.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access Overall • Creation of a pedestrianfriendly Fore Street in order to complement existing bus and vehicular connections, thereby contributing to the development of Fore Street as a place of and interest and with an identity, and not just a thoroughfare. • Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Increase the priority of pedestrian movements along Fore Street. • Improving horizontal pedestrian/ cycling connectivity between Fore Street and nearby Pymmes Park, in order to improve the spatial cohesion of this key commercial corridor and park. Reconnect street grids to Fore Street where possible.

b. Public Realm Rail-crossings • Implement pavement lights in the arches, in order to increase the security and create a more atractive way through General • Clear commercial street signs in front of listed buildings • Change pavement materials when in front of a significant historical building in order to make the people aware of the heritage Increase planting along Fore Street and at the same time improve the ecological quality of the area Provide resting areas along the street, e.g. below trees in order to make the corridor not only an space to go through but also a place to stay

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Maximize use potential of existing infrastructure, building spaces to support economic needs and community cohesion • Explore means to accommodate expected population growth while avoiding displacement of vulnerable, low-income groups

Massing & Density • Promote housing densities that take into consideration expected population growth, low-income needs and access for disabled and elderly people • Support construction massing that builds an appropriate gradation to existing structures Improve the continuity frontages along Fore Street of

• Vehicular Parking • While improving pedestrian priorisation and movements, ensure continued parking availability (private). • Improving Station • Utilise Silver Street Station to create both a more welcoming entry to and between Angel Edmonton and to Pymmes Park.

Building Typology • Integrate and hybridize the historical character of the area with its contemporary use

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4.4.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • While Fore Street should remain open to vehicular traffic, it should be made more comfortable and inviting for pedestrian movement. At-grade pedestrian crossings for side streets along Fore Street are proposed, along with widened sidewalks and reduced street parking. • Private vehicular raffic that needs to move through Edmonton Green more rapidly will be encouraged to use Meridian Way, which will have signal priorisation and advanced traffic demand management to encourage increased vehicular movements. In the area south of the shopping center, it is proposed that there be two vehicular lanes and two bus lanes, with minimal on street parking.

Fore St reet

Key
New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations
Existing Fore Street Proposal for Pedestrian Oriented Fore Street

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An additional horizontal pedestrian crossing opportunity across the railway has been identified. As the area is already elevated, an overhead crossing is proposed, which would provide easier access between Fore Street and Pymmes Park. Such a connection would allow for both walking pedestrians and cyclists to move easily between this key commercial corridor and the park, increasing the vitality of both and enhancing the sense of cohesion and place for all. In coordination with the London Cycling Master Plan, cycling lanes are proposed for street corridors that are not concentrated where heavy traffic is, which includes portions of southern Fore Street, as well as the eastern side of Pymmes Park up to Church Street. Cycle lanes should be installed in accordance with this plan, and bicycle sharing schemes should also be considered for key areas of Fore Street, including Silver Street Station, and Angel Edmonton (southern portion of Fore Street). This would encourage greater pedestrian circulation among local residents.

Proposal for Pedestrian and Cycling Path Toward the Park

Proposal for Pedestrian Path Toward the Park

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Existing private parking lot

Existing Fore Stree frontline

For the Council Housing proposed for redevelopment, the street grids should be reconnected to Fore Street, in order to restore permeability and legibility for pedestrian and vehicular movements. This would enhance horizontal vehicular and pedestrian movements in the area, including to an existing pedestrian-only railway passage and to the cemetery pathways.

b. Vehicular Parking • Redevelopment of the council housing estate should integrate aesthetically-pleasing parking garages with ground-floor commercial space, in order to accommodate the increased residence and visitor parking demand expected from this mixed-use development. • Sites for private parking garages along or adjacent to Fore Street have been identified to make-up for the loss of parking along Fore Street.

Proposal for mixed used development and parking garage

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c. Silver Street Station and North Circular Upgrades • At the Silver Street Station, an overhead pedestrian crossing across North Circular Road is proposed to be built, which will provide easier pedestrian access to and from the southern side of the road, as crossing at-grade is difficult due to the heavy and fast moving traffic on this road. • Upgrading of the aesthetics of the station of the station are also proposed, in order to provide a more welcoming environment for those arriving at the station. Together, these relatively simple interventions would improve pedestrian connectivity between the southern and northern sections of Edmonton Green, including between Angel Edmonton and Pymmes Park. Upgrade the North Circular and Fore Street to increase crossing legibility and its pedestrian orientation, while maintaing the need for heavy horizontal vehicular movements.

Pedestrian C rossing Overhead

Existing Station

Improvement of the Aesthetics of Station

Existent Intersection with North Circular

Proposal Intersection with North Circular

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Fore Street at Present

4.3.4 PUBLIC REALM Fore Street in Edmonton is poised to be not just a thruway to and from the neighbourhoods, major transit areas and shopping centre, but an area worth visiting. Our strategies propose strategies that truly improve the public realm, and make the area as a whole as well as the rail station not just a means to commute but also add pleasure while commuting. Designing public realm projects Fore Street to fit the community context can redefine underutilized land and reconnect the community not only to the shopping centre, but the rail station and surrounding areas through: • Use of pavement lighting • • • • Change of pavement materials Re-definition of arches Improved way-finding signage usage Use of benches for rest areas and

Example Improvements (also below)

• Planting of trees We want the major transects areas on Fore Street to have improved usage and visibility while aesthetically helping residents rediscover the ‘streets’ through movement by walking and cycling, allowing these areas to serve as open spaces for public connection

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Pymmes Park and garden cities along Fore Street have been underutilized due to poor maintenance and failure of connecting them into an attractive network of public realm. We see the potential in revitalization of these green spaces in suffice the community’s demand for high quality public realm. Our intervention strategies encompass a number of steps which resemble our plan for the parking lot outside ASDA. In particular, since situated in a rather strategic location, integrating Pymmes Park into part of the community’s life as a point of public gatherings such as farmers market (see picture) inadvertently increases the vibrancy of the area. Further, this can serve as the entry point for locals and visitors to explore the area’s green spaces. In addition, we propose to build pedestrian pathways that connect them with Pymmes Park to essentially create a cohesive collection of green spaces in this opportunity area, and ultimately enhance Edmonton Green’s public realm system.
Example I mprovements (also next picture)

Sweet Briar Green Road

Example Improvements

Pymmes Park

Open Space in Sweet Briar Green

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4.4.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. New Housing Developing new housing and redeveloping existing structures for mixed social, residential and economic uses enhances the diversity of uses and activities during different times a day and on weekdays and weekends. As a commercial corridor between Edmonton Green Shopping Centre and Angel Edmonton, Fore Street is composed of many buildings with commercial uses on the ground floor while the first floor is assigned to residential uses. This mixed use works well where applied but other parts of the street could benefit from higher densities. Particularly on the east side of Fore Street, a lack of density (some buildings set too far back from the street, gaps in frontages, poorly defined corners, constricted internal paths) should be addressed to make the area feel more dynamic and safe, reflective of the high activity levels along the Fore Street corridor. Providing a mix of social housing, private residential units and commercial units in line with access and public realm improvements can support the enhancement of Fore Street. However, any developments that reduce the quantity of low-income housing should be countered as best as possible with additional provisions nearby. In this respect, several vacant or derelict sites (as shown in the map to the side) offer opportunities to continue providing housing for vulnerable populations.

Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area

Possible Site for Mixed-use Commercial and Residential Development (Fore Street near corner of Osman Road)

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b. Repurposing Derelict Buildings & Improving Frontages Repurposing Derelict Buildings A qualitative analysis of commercial establishments on Fore Street shows a lack of community facilities such as job centres and spaces for community activities. Repurposing derelict buildings and vacant sites would not only improve the appearance of Fore Street but also provide buildings for mixed-use including community facilities that could strengthen social networks and community identification with Edmonton (see collage on right). Surveys with local residents can identify the types of land uses—such as community centres, job/employment centres, activities centres—would be most valued and utilised. Improving Building Frontages The great number of ground-floor commercial units has resulted in high activity frontages with signage that can feel overbearing and confusing. Overall, the scale, materials, textures and typologies of buildings on Fore Street are too varied for the street to offer continuity. By addressing building frontages and repurposing derelict buildings and vacant sites, the material consistency of Fore Street can be enhanced. Improving these frontages can streamline the look and feel of Fore Street while providing more clarity in terms of commercial offerings and better legibility in terms of different types of usage. Edmonton Green and Angel Edmonton have been established population centres since at least the 1880s with Fore Street functioning as the primary corridor link between them. Without diminishing businesses’ ability to advertise offerings, the historic quality of the local built environment can be heightened and preserved. Such improvements can, thereby, foster a stronger sense of local identity and pride.

Possible repurposing of derelict building as a community facility

Selected Vacant Site (Fore Street at Station House Mews)

Busy shop frontages detract from historic quality of buildings

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Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk
Proposed Interventions

Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

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4.5 Opportunity Area Three: Cemeteries & Surroundings

4.5.1 VISION We envision the Cemeteries and Surroundings as a secure and green environment, connecting people and activities across the Town Centre and Montagu Road. With small-scale commercial enhancements and improved urban furniture, the area can provide residents with strong local outlets and community spaces.

4.5.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access Overall • Enhance horizontal pedestrian and cycle permeability and legibility through the cemetery pathways, in order to increase inclusive access for all from the eastern side of Edmonton Green to the key commercial and transport area of Edmonton Green Town Centre. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Increase the vitality of the cemetery pathways by developing new feeder pathways that encourage inclusive local use, movement and vitality. • Ensure a legible pedestrian/ cycling connection that spans between Meridian Way to the Edmonton Green Shopping Center, Fore Street and beyond.

b. Public Realm New entrance to pathways • Create a transitional public open space at the entrance of the walk path from Church Street, Fore Street and the shopping centre and clarify the pedestrian routes through signal enhancement Southern pathway • Creation of leisure spots (activity nodes) along the pathway: coffee spot in Montagu Road and sitting area in Provident Park (half way up the hill) • Use different materials and textures to make a more dynamic and interesting walk-path from and towards Montagu Street Use the walls of the path as muralsm public art spaces for local community such as schools, youth, etc

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Use alterations to the built form to counteract the influence of coarse grain on crime and safety • Build on existing developments to create small-scale commercial hubs for local residents

Building Typology • Improve the quality and furnishment of residential buildings in order to enhance their perception as a lively and active place and dis-encourage crime acts.

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Cemet ery Pat

hway

4.5.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Along the cemetery pathways, new pedestrian linkages should be installed from the nearby housing estates. This would encourage greater local usage, thereby also improving vitality, movement and perceived safety on the pathways. • The cemetery pathways will be treated with markings for pedestrian walking movements, and for cycling movements, thereby creating a cohesive cycling link from Meridian Way to the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre. Bike sharing access should be introduced at areas of new mixeduse development along Montagu Road, thereby encouraging local cycle use of the pathways to and from other areas of Edmonton Green. From Meridian Way, a new pedestrian path and crossing should be constructed to connect to the cemetery pathways, thereby creating a clear pedestrian pathway from Fore Street to Meridian Way, and on to Upper Lee Valley (particularly for cyclists). Along with this, traffic calming at the crossing site from the cemetery pathway to Montagu Road should be installed, thereby allowing for easier pedestrian/cycling crossing.

Ce m

er et ay hw at yP

Key
New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations
Existing Path

Existing Sidewalk

Improvement on the Surrounds of Cemetery

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Current Entrance to North Pathway (Looking east from Edmonton Green Shopping Centre)

4.5.4 PUBLIC REALM a. New Entrance to Pathways By creating a transitional open space at the entrance of the walk path from the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre (and connecting to Church Street and Fore Street), it is expected to facilitate navigation towards and along the cemetery. It is envisioned to achieve this by enhancing signage around the nodal zone in order for the user to easily direct him or herself towards the pathways. This is as response to the fragmented navigation that the user confronts when coming out of the train station.

Example of Site Improvements

North Pathway Entrance

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b. Southern Pathway It is envisioned to attract people to the pathway for it to be a well-transited and desired place with some offer of leisure activities. In order to achieve this, it is proposed to place a coffee spot at the side of Montagu Road to draw people to the pathway coming from the east side. Further down, we suggest to create a sitting area in Provident Park half way up the hill, under the assumption that the pathway can be used not only as a transitional space, but also as a resting area.

Southern Path (Left: Southeast toward Montagu Road; Right: Northwest from Montagu Road)

Example of Pathway Improvements (also below)

Provident Park

Potential Leisure Locale at Montagu Road

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That said, new materials and textures in the pathways will serve to enhance the experience of the user, as well as filling up any aesthetical gaps existing along the path. Exciting materials will refer to other locations within the area to provide a sense of coherence. Doing this with the aid of designating the walls as public art spaces where youth, students, or other community members can participate, will reinforce sense of identity and provide a space to which the community can relate. The end goal is to create a visually engaging environment that reflects upon themes lived within Edmonton Green.

Southern Pathway

Example Improvements (also below left and below right)

Existing Urban Furniture

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4.5.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. Improving Salmons Brook / North Cemeteries Pathway An analysis of the entrance to the Salmons Brook and the northern cemeteries pathway revealed that the edges between the waterway and the footpath were deteriorated. Also, the boundary of the Federation Cemetery is visually unappealing; and the narrowness and linearity of the passageway is intimidating for users. In response, the entrances can be enhanced with maps and council information board (as with other major public spaces), and urban furniture could be enhanced to accomodate perhaps an interactive feature that can attract and engage passersby. The surfaces of footpath can also be improved to be suitable for a variety of climates as well as people of different abilities. The tributary of the Lea that runs along Salmons Brook should be enhanced, revitalizing the mosaics that enhance the aesthetics of the corridor and better distinguish its trajectory along the site. Moreover, the lack of natural surveillance, poor lighting and lack of ownership deter use of the space, or at a minimum, convey a sense of insecurity for pedestrians. Anonymity offers opportunity for crime; clear definitions of ownership and responsibility throughout the pathway and increased lighting can aid in addressing these concerns. To compensate for the lack of natural survalliance, two entrances into the site are proposed on Euesdon Close and Haynes Drive. Finally, a new public space could also bridge the pathway and the allotments alongside it. Opening a small portion of the allotments onto the pathway (and providing for replacement allotments nearby) or structuring stronger connections with the local park could also aid in opening the pathway, improving safety and reducing crime.

Haynes Drive Entrance to Salmons Brook

Seasonal Vegetation

Cross Section of Intervention Site

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b. Montagu Road The residential areas alongside Montagu Road generally lack small-scale convenience facilities and amenities, such as corner shops and local eateries. Though the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre is not far away, additional mixeduse developments (such as those near the intersection with Town Road) can fill this potential need and provide additional nodes of community and commercial activity in the eastern portion of Edmonton Green. These additions can also soften the character of Montagu Road, which at present is principally a high-speed thoroughfare at odds with the residential and recreational uses nearby. The People’s Supermarket is an example of how developments could integrate with the existing community, providing increased economic activity, improved vitality and strengthened community cohesion.

New Public Space New Public Space

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Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk
Proposed Interventions

Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

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4.6 Opportunity Area Four: Bounces Road & Surroundings

4.6.1 VISION We envision the Bounces Road area as a revitalized residential community with stronger spaces for public interaction, improved natural surveillance and enhanced connections to its streetscape.

4.6.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access Overall • Reinforce an already strong local pedestrian commercial corridor, in order to further complement its existing bus and vehicle connections and increase vitality on the street. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Enhance the pedestrian orientation of Bounces Road through small-scale improvements. •

b. Public Realm • Improve the conditions of the sidewalks in the mix land use area and residential area to provide a better framework for the activities performed there

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Target the relative decay of areas removed from Hertford Road • Promote mixed-use development to increase vitality and natural surveillance without disrupting residential communities

Massing & Density • Enhance the continuity and connectivity of frontages, particularly on the eastern side of Bounces Road • Use built or open space interventions to counteract steep gradations in massing

Building Typology • Upgrade the existing buildings and integrate them with ‘soft interventions’ of commercial units to stimulate the vitality of the area

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Bounce

s Road

4.6.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Introduce wider sidewalks where possible, in order to encourage the development of a local cafe scene, particularly on the eastern side of Bounces Road and the introduction of commercial offerings at the council housing site on the western side of the street. • Remove of sidewalk railing, install at-grade pedestrian crossings for side streets and introduce clear pedestrian crossings across the road in order to create a more pedestrian-friendly environment. Clear bicycle pathways should also be installed, per the guidance from the London Cycling Master Plan. In addition, bike sharing schemes should be installed on Bounces Road to encourage local cycling to and from this commercial corridor.

Key
New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

Existing Bounces Road

Proposal for more Pedestrian Environment

Existing Bounces Road

Proposal for Cycling Paths

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4.6.4 PUBLIC REALM The strategies for public realm around Bounces Road mainly focus on the general improvements near the commercial area. Better pavement long the road and side-walks is required especially in the commercial area in Bounces Road to improve its attractiveness for customers to enjoy the shopping and leisure activities better. Additionally, general lighting should also be enhanced in this area for the sense of security.
Bounces Road at Present

Example Bounces Road Improvements (and below)

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4.6.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. New Street-Facing Commercial Units The urban structure of the west and east sides of Bounces Road are dramatically different. While the west benefits from a consistent, unifying housing typology and street-facing mixed-use establishments, the east is in relative decline. Several housing blocs were constructed perpendicular to Bounces Road, resulting in degradations to the street edge and multi-story building facades imposed on residents and passersby. Housing was also constructed in varying scales—with row and terraced homes alongside mid- and high-rise housing blocs (as seen in the image on page 73). Though Hertford Road is a short walk away, the east side of the street also lacks small-scale convenience outlets for local residents. Promoting commercial outlets for local vendors in the area can help to address these concerns. As pictured, street-fac ing shops can reconnect and reorient the built environment toward the street. The lateral plane of the commercial units would also distract from the imposing verticality of the residential blocks, thereby improving their integration with their surroundings. Low-rise commercial units along the boundaries of the housing estates would follow the building line of the existing streetscape and improve the street edge. Finally, design considerations—such as lightweight constructions or semi-transparent frontage—would also create an informal buffer between the residential area and Bounces Road, providing a boundary without isolating the residential communities.

Bounces Road (Building Facades)

Interstate 76, Philadelphia (Building Facades)

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b. Murals on Housing Facades A primary challenge to the built fabric of this area are the imposing facades of seven nearly identical four-storey housing blocs constructed perpendicular to the Bounces Road. Though the entryways and windows face courtyards interspersed between each build, the constructions also confront the streetscape and limit a sense of connection with their surroundings. Reconstructions of the housing units would not only be disruptive to livelihoods, but are also not necessary to mitigate the negative effects of this housing design. Commissioning murals to be installed or painted on the building facades offer a simple, elegant and communityoriented strategy for redevelopment. Local artists would be given opportunities to visually represent their communities on high-profile sites, providing a seamless aesthetic connection between community and built form. A similar housing typology exists in Philadelphia, United States alongside a major highway that leads to the city’s international airport. There, local artists were commissioned to paint murals reflective of community members on the building facades. These murals provided immediate evidence of regeneration efforts underway and have become iconic images of the city.

c. Housing Refurbishments Finally, much of the social housing stock in Edmonton was constructed in the 1960s and 1970s but has not been refurbished. Here, Bounces Road housing serves as an example for improvements that could be considered throughout the site. Retrofitting low-income housing to improve interior quality and energy efficiency can be connected to stronger livelihood strategies and individual investment in homes and community spaces. Furthermore, at Bounces Road, under-utilised green space around the housing estates can be redesigned and/ or underused parking lots can be converted into secure open areas (as shown below). In conjunction with the new commercial units proposed, such spaces can offer a sense of privacy and imrpoved community spaces, while also providing framed and recognisable entrances to the housing estates.

Improved / Repurposed Public Spaces and Access Points

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Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations
Proposed Interventions

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4.7 Opportunity Area Five: Church Street & Surroundings

4.7.1 VISION We envision Church Street and its surroundings as the principle historic—and, thereby, cultural and communal— corridor. With improved walkways, signage and contemporary uses in historic settings, Church Street can become a springboard for a revitalized collective Edmonton identity.

4.7.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access Overall • Reinforce an already strong local pedestrian commercial and historic corridor, in order to further complement its existing bus and vehicle connections and increase vitality on the street. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Enhance the pedestrianorientation of Church Street through small-scale improvements. • Enhance the connection of Church Street to Salmons Brooke pathways, to create a more historically cohesive and intimate area, within close proximity to the major commercial Fore Street area.

b. Public Realm Salmons Brook • Take advantage of existing river and enhance it to make it an access route connecting with Church Street, such as providing raised decking for local residents General • Feature historical by introducing an informational map •

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Remain sensitive to historic value, while using history as a springboard for a revitalized and contemporary collective identity Massing & Density • Respect density and massing of existing historic buildings and surroundings Building Typology • Enhance the historical identity of the site by providing proper relevance to historical buildings, places and monuments by encompassing them into an overall strategy of awareness and knowledge

buildings attractive

Change pavement materials when in front of a significant historical buildings

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4.7.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Linkages and Pathways • Introduce wider sidewalks where possible, in order to encourage the development of a local cafe scene, particularly on the eastern side of Church Street where there are a number of listed buildings, as well as across from the historic church. • Introduce other small-scale pedestrian improvements, including removal of sidewalk railing, introduction of at-grade pedestrian crossings for side streets and clear pedestrian crossings across the road in order to create a more pedestrianfriendly environment. These treatments would focus specifically on the historic area of Church Street, in order to emphasise continuity between listed buildings and areas. Clear bicycle pathways should also be installed vertically through the area, per the guidance from the London Cycling Master Plan. In addition, bike sharing schemes should be installed on Bounces Road to encourage local cycling to and from this commercial corridor.

Key
New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

x

Bicycle Share Programme

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Widened sidewalks should also be installed vertically, thereby encourage pedestrian flows from Pymmes Park to the south and Church Street. Ensure the continuity of crossings and pavement treatments for Church Street and Salmons Brooke pathway, thereby connecting these spaces as a cohesive pedestrian path. At some points, pathways need to be reconstructed, including removal of walls that are currently blocking the pathways.

Existing Church Street Scene

Proposed Improvement of Church Street

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Proposed Intervention

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4.7.4 PUBLIC REALM Salmons Brook is a tributary of the River Lea flowing eastwards and revealing itself in a few locations within Church Street and its surroundings. It is, however, underutilised and often hidden behind trees or walls. We propose to make a feature out of the relaxing properties of flowing water for the enjoyment of those already living or working close to the river by reinforcing this ‘blue network’ for visitors in a coherent and easily read path which links the far west of the site to the central shopping area, while also highlighting the continued existence of the river as it flows along the cemeteries and its ultimate destination, the River Lea. Waterways have often been historically central to towns’ economic development, but only recently has there been as revival in celebrating waterfronts and river corridors as tools of regeneration (Rotherham, Birmingham, Castleford). The aim should be to strike a balance between controlling and allowing. This natural element should be inviting and treated as fun rather than a danger, at present it is handled as a nuisance to be diverted and hidden away; safety considerations are undermining communities. As Stockley’s intervention in Manchester demonstrates, the fear of water is unfounded if managed well: by placing stepping stones in a pond the visitors knew what to do.

We propose that at its westernmost end the river be exposed to Churchfields Recreation Ground in a beachlike fashion. This will create an exciting edge to this open space, which is currently little more than a field with the river hidden from view behind a row of trees. The ‘beach’ will continue, passing along the southern edge of the primary school, providing the school with an invaluable educational resource, a unique learning tool on river environments and biodiversity. This stretch may be conceptualised as ‘loud’: an exciting and interactive space for families. At the end of St. Joan’s Road the river is bridged before disappearing behind houses once again. This is a quiet residential area, and the intervention here will realise the critical role public realm plays for a community. Taking into consideration the height of the road we propose stepped/ slopped decking with seating overlooking the flowing river, with a smaller ‘fun’ footbridge linking to decking on the unused space on the opposite bank. The area can be imaginatively and colourfully lit highlighting the moving water. This is primarily for the enjoyment of the local residents in an area with little public space or places to congregate.

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Salmons Brook

Before the river disappears under the shopping centre it passes Edmonton family centre, an old coal-yard and a small weir. This site already feels spacious, historical and a welcome calm from the busy roundabout and bus station moments away. A children’s play scheme already exists in the clinic and so with some creative play equipment, benches and green landscaping this area can become a green oasis rivalling the surrounding heavy built environment and commercial buzz.

Subtle water-themed signage along the blue route directs visitors along with existing branding and the use of the blue metalwork gating/railing can be rolled out along the route. Concrete footpaths which cover the river may be paved creatively with water effects, while water features within the shopping centre and new public square remind visitors that a river flows beneath them.

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4.7.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. Improved Urban Communication The urban structure goal for Church Street is to transform a site with several historic buildings into a vibrant corridor of cultural and community activity inspired by its historic settings. With this in mind, the intervention aims to increase the value of the historic buildings, spaces and monuments by enhancing the collective awareness of their presence in the area. A dynamic system of urban communication, as represented in the images presented here, can connect the different and currently isolated sites into a broader network of places of historical interest. The use of different materials for paving and/or of different street lighting schemes may be useful strategies for this end. Alongside these improved connections, refurbishments including new urban furniture can promote active use of these places and catalyze the inclusion of history into every day lives by creating places for gathering and public events. Pedestrian flows would, thereby, also be augmented and prioritised. Finally, well-integrated panels explaining the historic value of these sites can heighten awareness and individual identification with local history. The purpose is to articulate the message of the preservation of history through its inclusion into Edmonton’s current life.

Key
Targeted Structures Immediate Impact Zones Medium Activity Area

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Key
New Structures Improved Structures Immediate Impact Zones Frontage Improvements High Activity Area Medium Activity Area Low Activity Area New/Enhanced Pedestrian Pathway Bus Route Bicycle Path Proposed Widened Sidewalk Enhanced Public Access Point Reconnected Street Grid

x Proposed Parking Scheme Locations

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OPPORTUNITY AREA SIX MEDICAL / INDUSTRIAL QUARTER

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4.8 Opportunity Area Six: Medical / Industrial Quarter

4.8.1 VISION We envision the Medical / Industrial Quarter as a centre of economic activity, but revitalized and reintegrated with the introduction of contemporary retail, recreational and community activities inspired by the industrial character of the built fabric.

4.8.2 DESIGN PRINCIPLES a. Access Overall • Improving permeability and legibility of this primarily industrial site to increase local circulation and movement, contributing to the sense of vitality needed for creation of local economic activities. Pedestrian Pathways and Linkages • Enhance permeability through and within the site, emphasizing connectivity between residential areas, Bull Lane Park and the Angel Edmonton Town Centre.

b. Public Realm • Introduce activities to the park • • • Create leisure and resting areas for the workers and hospital users Provide food and coffee spots Betterment of sidewalks leading to the park from hospital, such as ramp access and increase in zebra crossings Traffic calming interventions such as speed bumps

c. Urban Structure Urban Grain & Land Use • Maintain sensitivity toward the importance of industry for local economic output • Promote the cohesion of the multiple land uses in the area and the connection of local residential communities to them

Massing & Density • Massing and densities should remain sensitive to industrial and economic needs • Promote massing enhancements that can improve pedestrian permeability and communitybased uses of vacant industrial or open facilities

Building Typology • Promote the office and/or retail use by formalizing industrial frontages

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4.8.3 ACCESS a. Pedestrian Pathways and Linkages • Widen sidewalks and create clear pedestrian pathways through industrial sites on the area to increase local movement and permeability, thereby contributing to the vitality that would also be enhanced through urban structure and public realm improvements. • In coordination with the London Cycling Master Plan, cycling lanes should be installed along designated corridors in this opportunity area. Bicycle sharing schemes should also be considered for this opportunity area to increase l ocal circulation and to increase local residents access to Fore Street and Pymmes Park, as well as visitors from other areas of Edmonton Green.

Existing access to the park

Proposal

Existing aerial view

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4.8.4 PUBLIC REALM The intervention strategies for public realm in the Medical/Industrial quarter will mainly follow three focuses: (1) increasing the activity and utility of the green park at the southwest corner of this area; (2) improving the road and sidewalks quality along the Bull Lane, which acts as the major route connecting the North Middlesex Hospital with the park; (3) advancing the livability around the park by delivering a secure and inviting image. First, more activities will be introduced to the park in the southwest area. Some spaces along the west part of the park can be better designed for sports such as a soccer pitch as it is further from the roads leading to the park so safety can be ensured. In addition, cobble or plain pathways can be paved on part of the grass field or muddy routes (except the space for sports) leading people to walks and resting areas in the park. These walking routes can be designed intertwined connecting multiple entry points of the park along the Bull Lane. This also requires the entry points of the park to be redesigned with a more welcoming image to pedestrians instead of simple
Sample Site Additions

Queens Cafe, Queen Street

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banisters. Meanwhile, more leisure and resting areas inside the park should be created for the workers employed in this district as well as patients from the nearby hospital. Furthermore, food and coffee sites can be established around the park to form a complete set with the leisure and resting points especially for the workers coming out at meal time during workdays. This would in turn require better sanitation system to be set up in the park including more dustbins in sight. Second, quality of the road and sidewalks needs to be improved. Ramp accesses for patients and more zebra crossings will be established along the Bull Lane, and a special lane for patients in wheelchairs could be designed in the sidewalk space showing additional social attention and care towards those using the hospital. Meanwhile, the parking space along the sidewalks near the park’s side can probably be eliminated to increase the enjoyment for pedestrians to walk there. Moreover, better pavement materials for both the road and sidewalks should be used so the Bull Lane can become more pedestrian friendly while at the same time the durability

of the road can be secured with lower maintenance cost. Further, speed bumps can be used along the road as calming interventions in order to ensure the safety for pedestrians. Third, a secure and inviting image needs to be established around the park. Street art can be put to refurnish the walls of industrial sites facing the park direction along the Bull Lane, and the sidewalks leading to the park and the special wheelchair lane can be colored in order to create a vivid and inviting image. Also, general lighting should be improved along the Bull Lane especially around corners of industrial sites and the hospital to strengthen the sense of security.

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4.8.5 URBAN STRUCTURE a. Mobile Markets The first intervention utilizes the parking lots and wider streets as temporary, mobile markets. There are a number of local precedents for this activity such as the British traditions of carboot sales, chip trucks, and other food stands. We imagine weekend markets could also include mobile libraries, street performers and children’s activities.

1

2

3

4

5

Potential Sites for Mobile markets (as marked on the map above)

From Left to Right: Carboot Sale; Nivea Shop (for temporary marketing); Mobile Farmer’s Market

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b. Warehouse Market The second proposed intervention is a warehouse market to capitalise on the industrial character of the site. Precedents here include Atwater food market in Montreal, which is located on the now converted industrial strip along the Lachine Canal. The market extends outwards to the parking lot and also indoors on two floors. Other precedents include the Ferry building in San Francisco, the archways of which are reminiscent of some of the docking stations on our site, as well as the Eveleigh Farmers market in St. Louis, United States.

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2

3

Potential Sites for Warehouse Markets (as marked on the map above)

From Left to Right: Atwater Market in Montreal; San Francisco Ferry Market; Eveleigh Market in St. Louis, United States

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c. Renewed Frontages The third intervention addresses the underused frontages of the industrial area, which could be redeveloped for commercial or office uses to serve not only the residential community but also the workers at the warehouses and factories. For this we can draw on the precedent of Liberty Village in Toronto which is similarly an industrial area surrounded by low-income housing. There, strips of industrial fronts were rebuilt as outdoor cafes and shops frequented by both the people working in the area, and those living in the surroundings.

1

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Potential Sites for Commercial or Office Frontages (as marked on the map above)

Liberty Village (LVTO), Toronto, Canada.

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Short-Term Street Corridor Improvements Medium-Term Street Corridor Improvements Short-Term Site Specific Improvements Medium-Term Site Specific Improvements Long-Term Site Specific Improvements

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SHORT TERM (1 – 5 YEARS) Improvements are focused generally on: 1) creating more coherent, legible and aesthetically pleasing pedestrian spaces and pathways; and 2) minor improvements to the built environment that enhance vitality in the public realm. Street Corridor Improvements • Street improvements: at-grade pedestrian crossings on side streets; urban furniture; sidewalk treatments; improved lighting; improved signage; widening of sidewalks; • • • • • • Improve building facades and frontages to highlight history along commercial corridors Improve maintenance and waste collection along commercial corridors Improve building signage along commercial corridors Clear bicycle lanes on designated routes. Standardization of vehicular and bus lanes throughout Fore Street. Mark and connect historical sites on Church Street using urban furniture, varied paving materials and/or street lighting schemes. Specific Site Improvements • Refurbishing Edmonton Green park; introducing businesses under railway arches and a horizontal pedestrian path • • • • • • • • • • Re-routing of pedestrian pathways through refurbished Edmonton Green roundabout Renovate Edmonton Green Station Renovate Silver Street station with new overhead pedestrian pathway across North Circular Road Enhanced cemetery path materials and quality, with more inviting space and urban furniture Create new paths into cemetery pathways New pedestrian pathway linking cemetery to Meridian Way Creates nodes of activity and transitional public spaces at the periphery of the cemetery paths Commission murals on Bounces Road Repurpose industrial spaces for non-weekday use Promote mobile commercial outlets

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MEDIUM TERM (5 – 10 YEARS) Improvements are focused generally on: 1) larger-scale enhancements to the key commercial corridors, such as dedicated busways and new commercial frontages; and 2) larger-scale site improvements, such as new public plazas, mixed-use developments and new pedestrian railway crossings. Street Corridor Improvements • Extend market hours in key markets • • • • • Repurpose derelict buildings for community and economic uses along commercial corridors Elimination of parking on Fore Street; standardization of lanes through Fore Street Repurpose and re-orient commercial frontages on Fore Street Pedestrian-only weekends on the Angel-Edmonton section of Fore Street Signal prioritisation on Meridian Way to re-route heavy vehicular traffic travelling through Edmonton Green Specific Site Improvements • Construct a new public plaza across from the bus terminal • • • • • • • • • Constructing mixed-use liner buildings on Fore Street New private parking garages along Fore Street Introduce a new horizontal overhead railroad crossing from Fore Street to Pymmes Park Construct higher density mixed-use development in frontage gaps along Fore Street Support mixed-use development on Montagu Road Expand listed buildings to include smaller parishes Consider new commercial developments on Bounces Road Activate Salmons Brook with plazas and gathering spaces Formalize industrial frontages for office and/or retail uses

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LONG TERM (10+ YEARS) Long-term improvements are focused on large-scale site improvements, such as further redevelopment of the Edmonton Green Shopping Centre and council housing sites.

Specific Site Improvements • Pedestrianize Asda/Argos parking lot, with parking placed underground • • • Redevelop the north mall at Edmonton Green Shopping Centre Renovate shopping centre rooftop of Edmonton Green Shopping Centre Redevelop council housing estate south of Edmonton Green Shopping Centre into a mixeduse, mixed-income development. Reconnect street grid at redeveloped council housing site

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CONCLUSION

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The development framework for Edmonton Green was the result of an extensive urban analysis and design process. Initial research focused on assessing the strengths and weaknesses existing in Edmonton Green related to access, massing/density, open space, urban grain, typology, and socio-economic status. Theses studies were then combined into a comprehensive analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threatts in order to determine the key challenges and opportunities for the site, including their spatial implications and overlaps. From this analysis, the overall vision for the site was developed, and key opportunity areas selected. The site selections were not based purely on what areas exhibited the most challenges or the most apparent opportunities, but rather on what sites could be enhanced to create a cohesive sense of place in Edmonton Green to promote strengthened inclusion and integration in terms of spatial, historic, social and economic realms. To build this cohesive identity, the development framework includes a strong focus on improving the human scale, vitality and ease of pedestrian movement through the “spine” of Edmonton Green – Fore Street, Edmonton Green Town Centre, Church Street and Bounces Street – as well as additional localities that encourage circular and horizontal movements within the site beyond the traditional corridors. At the same time, the development framework aims to enhance community-based land uses, utilize derelict and vacant buildings to their full potential, and, where appropriate, outline longer-term strategies to transform the built environment.

Put together, the development framework creates enhanced nodes of activity and public spaces throughout Edmonton Green, giving residents an improved environment that reinforces local history and revitalizes collective identity, while also providing visitors reasons to come and explore. Ensuring that all who live and work in Edmonton benefit from proposed developments was a key priority. WIth this in mind, social inclusion is promoted through: 1) ensuring new developments and redeveloped sites include mixedincome housing; 2) enhancing the quality of existing council housing sites while maintaining their low-income housing focus; 3) promoting the growth of local economic activities and employment opportunities through the increased commercial offerings and spaces, including in areas currently neglected (such as the southwest industrial site); 4) enhancing the public realm throughout the opportunity areas, indiscriminate of local income levels; and 5) enhancing pedestrian access opportunities vertically and horizontally throughout the site, in order to give all residents improved access to the main transport and commercial corridors. Taken together, these interventions can lead to the fulfilment of the vision of Edmonton Green as a socially inclusive and spatially cohesive place with a thriving community and strong local identity that builds on Edmonton’s unique architectural heritage, ethnic diversity, myriad land uses and extensive open spaces.

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