You are on page 1of 15

08 

 
May 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis 
 
This document overviews the level of support received by respondents to a community survey 
regarding the formation of a ‘fair fares’ policy by Translink. 
 
Although written and designed by David Bremner, a volunteer community activist, the survey was 
publicly open and responses were invited from Translink, Queensland Rail and Translink bus 
operators (including Southern Cross Transit, Hornibrook, Kangaroo Bus Lines, Bus Link Qld, Bus Qld, 
Mt Gravatt Coaches, Brisbane Buslines, Surfside and Veolia).  Responses were also sought from 
community‐based organisations such as ‘Communities Advocating Sustainable Transport’ and ‘Rail 
Back on Track’. 
 
Over 100 responses were received within two weeks demonstrating a strong community desire for 
the formation of a fair fares policy. 
 
This analysis demonstrates a consensus viewpoint of those respondents as to a good basis upon 
which any fares policy should be based. 
 

David Bremner, Urban Planner/ Community Activist 
Brisbane, South East Queensland 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  1 

 
Table of Contents 
Overview ........................................................................................................................... 1 
Introduction....................................................................................................................... 2 
Section 1 ‐ Use of public transport and payment method ................................................... 3 
What factors contribute to your choice to use, either Go card, cash or pre‐purchased tickets?...... 5 
Section 2 ‐ Fare Policy Principles......................................................................................... 5 
Overview of Principles...................................................................................................................................................... 5 
Principle 1. Fair fares ........................................................................................................................................................ 5 
Open text comments – Fair fares................................................................................................................................... 5 
Principle 2. Fares that encourage the use of public transport ........................................................................ 6 
Open text comments ­ Fares that encourage public transport usage........................................................... 6 
Principle 3. Smart fares .................................................................................................................................................... 7 
Open text comments ­ Smart fares ............................................................................................................................... 7 
Principle 4. Financially secure funding for improved services....................................................................... 7 
Open text comments ­ Financially secure funding................................................................................................. 8 
Section 3 ‐ Fare Policy Aims................................................................................................ 8 
Section 4 ‐ Actions for Implementation .............................................................................. 8 
Section 5 ‐ Additional Open Text Question Responses........................................................ 9 
How can Translink promote users to switch to Go card over the next 2‐3 years................................... 9 
Additional comments about Translink and the quality of services in the region................................... 9 
Section 6 ‐ Petition ........................................................................................................... 10 
Suggested Fair Fares Policy Diagram................................................................................. 12 
Recommendations ........................................................................................................... 13 
Conclusion ....................................................................................................................... 13 
 

Overview 
This survey was designed and written by David Bremner, an urban planner and community 
activist. The survey was conducted via the internet using an online survey tool.  The aim of the 
survey was firstly to educate respondents about the potential benefits of the Go card and 
secondly to produce a consensus viewpoint that could be submitted to Translink and the 
Government on the need for a formal fair fares policy. 

The need for the survey has resulted from the rushed implementation of the Translink Go card 
and the inadequacy of the Go card fare structure. Many users have faced significant issues with 
the equipment (sensor errors, programming errors, clock time setting errors) which have 
resulted in them being charged a higher than normal fare. Additionally many users have faced a 
‘hidden’ fare increase simply by switching to the Go card due to the lack of daily, weekly or 
monthly ticket products.  Long distance passengers (who travel more than 10 zones) have also 
had a previous discount taken away. 

Each of these facts highlights the need for a formal and fair, fares policy. As Translink is 
currently continuing to advertise and push forward with the Go card implementation, it is 
‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  1 

 
extremely important that all of these actions being undertaken by Translink occur within an 
established policy framework. Decisions must be made in a consistent and fair manner.  The 
ongoing success of the Go card, and the planning positives to be delivered will only happen with 
the full support of the community and public transport users. 

Introduction 
The survey was viewed 158 times, started 128 times and completed by 101 respondents. 

The survey was conducted on the internet and anyone could respond. The link was emailed to 
personal associates, Translink, QR, several bus operators and community organisations 
including Rail Back on Track and Communities Advocating Sustainable Transport. 

There was a slight bias in the gender of respondents with 61% being male and 39% female. 

 
 

The age of respondents is indicated in the graph below: 

 
 
 

Section 1 ‐ Use of public transport and payment method 
When asked about the frequency of payment types 53% respondents either ‘always’ or 
‘frequently’ paid for services by cash.  Only 14% of respondents never pay by cash.  In response 
to the same question 48% ‘always’ or ‘frequently’ pay by ‘pre‐purchased ticket (10 trip, weekly, 
monthly or other)’ however 48% said they ‘never’ pay ‘by Go card’.   

Therefore a large proportion of the survey respondents could become prime Go card customers. 
Many of these people currently do not own or frequently use that method of payment.  Although 
not quantifiably supported, a theme of dissatisfaction with Go card as it is currently priced and 
implemented is supported in the open text responses throughout the survey.  This is contrasted 
with a generally positive outlook on the potentials of the Go card. 

Frequency of method of travel: 

 
 

How frequently do you use each of the following methods to pay for public transport services in 
South East Queensland? 

A. By cash (when boarding or on the platform) 

B. By Go card 

C. By pre‐purchased tickets (eg 10 trip, weekly, monthly) 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  3 

 
 

 
 
 

What factors contribute to your choice to use, either Go card, cash or pre‐
purchased tickets? 
• Reliability 

Respondents indicated that they were holding off using Go card while the system bugs were 
being resolved, and those who were currently using the system were dissatisfied with the 
number of errors and penalty fees 

• Finances 

Respondents indicated a desire to have a fixed monthly outlay or daily or weekly limits. 

• Confusion 

Some respondents found the system confusing to use, difficult to tag on and off and difficult to 
use the ticket vending machines 

Section 2 ‐ Fare Policy Principles 
Overview of Principles 
The survey proposed that Translink should create a ‘fair fares’ policy that was based upon the 
following four principles: 

1. Fair fares 
2. Fares that encourage the use of public transport 
3. Smart fares 
4. Financially secure funding for improved services. 

Each of these principles listed a number of components all of which had a high level of support 
by the survey respondents. In this section of the survey, respondents were asked to indicate 
their level of support from ‘Strongly Agree’ through to ‘Strongly Disagree’ on a five point Likert 
scale. 

The table below lists the statement made, the averaged value between 1 to 5 it scored across the 
participants (where 1 represents ‘Strongly Agree’) and the combined percentage of respondents 
who chose either ‘Strongly Agree’ or ‘Agree’. 

Principle 1. Fair fares 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Concessions for youth, students, pensioners and low income earners 1.413 95.19%
Fares offer value-for-money and are affordable to the community 1.456 87.38%
Stable fares with price increases maintained at or below CPO 1.544 89.32%
Passengers are promoted to use smart card with better deals and not 1.602 87.38%
punished for using paper tickets
 

Open text comments – Fair fares 
• Fare increases above CPI may be supported 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  5 

 
Most respondents indicated a high level of support for the statement that fare increases should 
be kept as low as possible and no greater than the consumer price index, however some 
respondents acknowledged the immense task at hand and thought that increases above CPI 
may be warranted as long as these were clearly tied to service improvements. Such a rise would 
also need to be demonstrated within the context of an increasing government subsidy. 

• Fares should encourage the use of public transport over the private motor vehicle 

Respondents indicated a strong desire that the historic underfunding of public transport, and 
continuing overfunding of public roads should be addressed. Many respondents indicated that 
the benefits of public transport are often ignored along with the hidden costs of road usage 
(carbon emissions, death toll, congestion etc). 

• Low income people should receive concession fares 

Students, youth, pensioners and low income earners should all receive concession fares while 
children should receive free fares. 

• Short journeys are currently too highly priced 

Most journeys by car are very short, yet short journeys by public transport are very expensive a 
possible solution to this could involve inner zones of free travel in the centres of Brisbane, Gold 
Coast, Redcliffe etc based upon the Perth free travel zone. 

• Go card needs to be a smart card 

Go card should charge all equivalent paper ticket discounts such as daily, weekly and monthly 

• Financial incentives are important in gaining a significant and early uptake of Go 
card. 

Service efficiencies on buses should pay for discounts on tickets. Users, Translink and operators 
all benefit from customers using Go card, and thus significant discounts should be used to 
promote users to switch to Go card. 

Principle 2. Fares that encourage the use of public transport 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
A payment system that is easy to use and understand 1.308 99.04%
Discounts for higher use and longer journeys 1.398 94.17%
Price guarantee – travelling by smart card will always be the cheapest 1.461 87.25%
alternative
New and improved frequent user scheme for pre-paid smart cards 1.578 81.37%
Cheaper off-peak travel 1.712 83.65%
New monthly post-paid ‘caps’ and other fare packages 1.728 78.64%
Special offers 1.971 73.79%
 

Open text comments ‐ Fares that encourage public transport usage 
• Go card must be cheaper than paper equivalents to promote its uptake and usage 

• Go card requires a daily cap 

• Go card should guarantee to be the cheapest method of payment for public 
transport services 
 

It needs to be easy for the community to use, this doesn’t mean it can’t offer different types of 
product (such as daily, weekly, monthly etc) 

• Infrequent but consistent users should receive a discount 

Many of the current users of 10 Trip Saver tickets such as students, working mothers, part time 
workers who travel four to eight times a week deserve a discount yet receive non under the 
current frequent user scheme. 

• System errors need to be resolved 

Go card should offer a viable alternative prior to the removal of 10 Trip Saver tickets from BT 
buses 

Principle 3. Smart fares 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Service improvements planned with better information about 1.440 95.00%
passenger demand
An integrated system of payment across trains, buses, ferries and in 1.534 90.29%
future, taxis
A growing funding base to meet growing demands 1.578 87.25%
Smart fares promote greater community use of public transport 1.598 83.33%
A system that manages demand by giving discounts for off-peak travel 1.693 83.17%
and re-allocates resources in real-time
 

Open text comments ‐ Smart fares 
• Taxis could be included in the future 

The convenience of Go card would only increase by allowing for the metered balance of taxis in 
South East Queensland to be paid for by pre­paid credit stored on the Translink Go card. 

• Government subsidy should continue to be the major source of revenue, not fares 

The goal of public transport fares should not be to pay outright for the operation of services as 
these should be predominantly funded through government subsidy as all users of the transport 
system benefit from them (ie those who use cars and drive trucks benefit from those who catch 
the bus and as such should contribute to the financial operation of public transport services) 

Principle 4. Financially secure funding for improved services 
‘Strongly
Statement Score Agree’ or
‘Agree’
Secure funding for an improving system 1.475 93.07%
Ease of administration and reduced cash handling costs 1.696 85.29%
A stronger negotiation position with service providers 1.743 81.19%
Inter and intra-generationally responsible funding 1.792 77.23%
Reduced ticket fraud and fare evasion 1.892 74.51%

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  7 

 
Open text comments ‐ Financially secure funding 
• Secure funding is important to maintain services and implement service 
improvements 

• Fare evasion needs to be dealt with sensitively and not punitively 

Fare evasion needs to be controlled however the method of which this occurs needs to be dealt 
with sensitively.  Large amounts of money should not be spent enforcing and policing a low 
level of fare evasion as those funds could be better spent on service improvements. Passengers 
do not like to be made to feel like criminals and most recognise their responsibility to have a 
valid ticket. 

Section 3 ‐ Fare Policy Aims 
Respondents to the survey were asked to rank in order of importance the following aims of any 
public transport fares policy.  The aims are listed in the order ranked by respondents.  The 
survey randomised the list for each different respondent, so what was at the top of the page for 
one respondent could have been at the bottom of the page for the next respondent. Thus there is 
no bias from respondents simply numbering the boxes in order displayed on the page. 

Rank Public transport fare policy aim Averaged


rank from 1
to 8
1st Provide affordable and financially equitable access to public transport 3.16
services
2nd Promote public transport as a viable alternative to private motor vehicle 3.51
travel
3rd Improve service quality, efficiency and reliability (particularly of buses) 3.70
via cashless boarding
4th Deliver integrated ticketing across all modes of public transport including 4.56
trains, buses, ferries as well as metered taxis
5th Achieve radical gains in the mode-share usage of public transport 4.88
6th Secure a stable and growing revenue base to fund an improving public 5.07
transport network
7th Achieve user input in policy formation and service improvements (eg 5.35
community consultation regarding 'fair fares')
8th Improve the quality of customer service via internet, phone and other 5.66
methods to improve community perceptions of public transport
  

Section 4 ‐ Actions for Implementation 
The following table includes the actions that were suggested for implementation of the fares 
policy.  Each of these actions was listed by the survey and have come from either existing policy 
documents or obvious problems with the current implementation and fare structure. The survey 
sought to determine which had the most support.  As such they have been ranked from most 
highly supported to least. These options were also randomized and thus this order accurately 
reflects the consensus view point of the survey respondents. 

Rank Actions that should be considered for implementation by Translink Averaged


level of
support
from 1 to 5
1st Reduce the cost of travel for smart card users with further discounts for 1.480
 

high-use and off-peak passengers


2nd Install smart card top-up and balance machines at all busway stations and 1.551
major interchanges
3rd Develop and offer for sale a larger range of fare packages on smart card 1.571
4th Explore options for free fares where the service arrives significantly late 1.612
5th Integrate Airtrain payment with Go card (either at existing cost or 1.649
preferably renegotiate contracts to allow integration with the zonal system
– perhaps at zone 17 or 18)
6th Implement a daily travel cap on smart card based on the zones and 1.729
journeys travelled that day
7th Maintain equitably priced paper tickets until smart card is broadly 1.732
accepted by the community, functioning at the required level and offering
a suite of products that match current and future user demands)
8th Maintain paper ticket price increases close to or below CPI 1.765
9th Implement a refund and contact process via the web portal and ensure all 1.806
valid refunds are processed within 15 business days
10th Improve usability of the 'value adding and ticket machines' especially for 1.823
use by bus passengers
11th Allow the sale of weekly paper tickets via the 'value adding and ticket 2.062
machines'
12th Expand Go card payment across all regional Qconnect public transport 2.031
networks
13th Rapidly develop and implement a post-paid monthly 'cap' option (this 2.156
could be based on mobile phone caps where a user selects their cap value
and receives a bigger discount the bigger the value, as such this would not
be zone dependant)
14th Introduce smart card (Go) payment for metered taxis in the Translink 2.505
coverage area
 

Section 5 ‐ Additional Open Text Question Responses 
How can Translink promote users to switch to Go card over the next 2‐3 years 
• Daily Caps 

• Weekly, Monthly travel cards or caps 

• Discounts for regular but intermittent users 

• Go card needs to be attractive in terms of cost, not just convenience to users to be 
widely accepted 

Additional comments about Translink and the quality of services in the region 
• Translink must progress the existing planned busway network as quickly as 
possible. If this means funding is diverted from road construction then that should 
occur. 

• Translink needs to fund additional and new rolling stock for the railways and 
progress extensions to the rail network 

• Translink must purchase and operate more buses 
‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  9 

 
• Translink needs to communicate with the community more clearly and needs to 
respond quickly and accurately to complaints and comments 

• Translink needs to improve late night services so that users do not need a car 

• The issues of reliability, infrequency and overcrowding need to be dealt with 
promptly 

• Community desire to see light rail in the inner city 

• Government needs to recognise public transport as an investment rather than cost 
and needs to prioritise funding for public transport over roads 

• Translink needs to engage the community when forming policy that affects them 

Section 6 ‐ Petition 
Of the 101 respondents who completed the survey, 56 wished to have their name and postcode 
recorded as having contributed towards the consensus viewpoint established by the survey.  
The list is as below: 

1. David Bremner, West End 4101 
2. Tim Homel, Yeronga 4104 
3. Sam Clifford, Wooloowin 4030 
4. Robert Dow 4076 
5. Jeffrey Addison, Palmwoods 4555 
6. Murray Henman, Corinda 4075 
7. Jeff Slattery, Eatons Hill 4037 
8. Andrew Albiston, Moorooka. 4105 
9. Stephanie Mills, Annerley 4103 
10. John Nightingale 
11. Louise Bremner Bardon 4065 
12. Peter Bremner, Bardon 4065 
13. Diana Wood, Indooroopilly, 4068 
14. Paula King, Bardon 4065 
15. Heather Horne, 4171 
16. Daniel Favier, Carina Heights, 4152 
17. Glenn Crompton, Nundah, 4012 
18. Andrew McLean, Oxley, 4075 
19. Lindna McInnes 4060 
20. Scott Graby, Fortitude Valley 4006 
21. Josh Campbell, 4113 
22. John McBratney, Carindale 
23. Kate Milne, Keperra, 4054 
24. Chris Campbell, Nambour 4560 
25. Rolf Kuelsen, Cannon Hill 4170 
26. Anthony Brumby, Pacific Pines 4215 
27. L van Heuzen, Cashmere, 4500 
28. Monterey Keys 4212 
29. Mike Hall, Ferny Grove, 4055 
30. Kate Matthews. Clayfield 4011 
31. Russell, Coopers Plains 4108 
32. anonymous, Hendra 4011 
33. Lisa Cory, Greenslopes 4121 
34. Tristan Peach, Spring Hill, 4000 
 

35. Daniel Young, Saint Lucia 4067 
36. E A Smith, West End 4101 
37. Bradley Smith, Greenslopes 4120 
38. Carol Rogers, Camp Hill 4152 
39. Peter Marquis‐Kyle, Highgate Hill 4101 
40. Glenn Wright, Kelvin Grove 
41. Clinton Roy, Highgate Hill 4010 
42. Paul Murdoch, Kangaroo Point, 4169 
43. Colin Sweett, Taringa 4068 
44. Bruce Purdon, Herston, 4006 
45. Rowena Shakes, Highgate Hill 4101 
46. anonymous 4102 
47. Bruce Dan, Hawthorne 4171 
48. Cynthia Lie, Toowong 4066 
49. anonymous 4013 
50. Darren Godwell, South Brisbane 4101 
51. Rob wilson, west End, 4101 
52. Anna Keenan, Aspley 4034 
53. Tony Cullum‐Brown 
54. Trent Everitt, West End 4101 
55. Greg Neill, Coorparoo, 4151 
56. Peter Mitterocker, Redland Bay 4165 
 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  11 

 
Suggested Fair Fares Policy Diagram 

 
 

Recommendations 
a) It is recommended that Translink develop a fair fares strategy with regard to community 
input and this submission.  The fare strategy must adequately address pricing issues, equity, the 
implementation of Go card and deliver a sustainable fare base (under the assumption that 
Government subsidy should provide the majority of operational funds for a public system that 
benefits the entire community and not just users). 

b) In regards to Go card, it is recommended to progress the following actions: 

• Immediate implementation of daily, weekly and monthly ticket types on Go 
• Resolution of technical bugs 
• Significant improvements need to be made to the ticket vending machines programming 
to allow their installation on all busway stations and at major bus interchanges and ease 
of use by bus passengers 

Conclusion 
The results of this survey clearly indicate a high level of support within the community for the 
need to resolve all outstanding issues (including an inequitable fare structure) with the Go card 
implementation and to formalise via community consultation, a formal Translink Fair Fares 
Policy.  It is noted that Translink’s Strategic Direction mentions the need for a fares strategy and 
the current Transport Operations Bill will require the formation of a fares strategy once this 
legislation becomes law and this supported.  However, it is proposed that any fares strategy 
must consistently respond to issues of social equity not in some vague sense, but in the everyday 
application of policy and the price levels at which fares are set.  It is clear to the community that 
the recent implementation of Go has seriously failed this criterion.  The stealth fare increases of 
25% to 30% clearly do not constitute a fair implementation of a fare system that should bring 
about significant savings. 

‘Fair Fares’ Survey Analysis  13