The first-ever Water CoP Retreat held on 18 June 2010 at the ADB Headquarters was a rewarding experience. A total of 59 colleagues participated, dressed in colorful outfits, including 11 from Resident Missions. This included 6 RM colleagues who were visiting headquarters for safeguards training (3 from IRM, 2 from PRCM, and 1 from LRM). The water team of 5 colleagues at VRM joined through video meeting and Lotus Sametime, ably led by Hubert Jenny, and Tadashige Kawasaki from ADB Institute flew in from Tokyo. Overall, 19 women and 40 men participated. From the 6 RM colleagues joining, 5 were women. See the program.

A new way to communicate. CoP members were offered the chance to participate

through Lotus Sametime, the first time the CoP has used this program for an event. Some RM colleagues had expressed an interest to join but encountered some practical problems, such as SLRM's unexpected closure last Friday because of political celebrations in the area. For the first time, six large screens were used to show video link, live interactions on Lotus Sametime, a loop of key messages and visuals from CoP activities in the past year, presentations, and compiled results of discussions.

Participants started the Retreat by reflecting individually on "What question lies at the heart of your work?". Many of the participants reflected on their contribution to the development agenda. The questions raised were mostly on how to improve their work and how to contribute to sustainable development and economic growth in the countries they work in. Members showed a strong desire to enhance their knowledge and to share their knowledge with other members and their network. See the  individual responses.

 

The next activity was to reflect on different roles in dealing with clients, comparing themselves with a home doctor, which is the analogy used by Presidents since ADB's establishment in 1966. The votes of red and green stickers for 4 options showed that CoP members saw their roles evolving from “giving medicine” and “advising on behavior change” towards “working in partnership with clients” to cocreate solutions that address today's water challenges.

Participants then made new connections with CoP colleagues they didn't know well, or at all. Through lively one-on-one discussions, they explored each other's strengths and water leadership qualities, as well as passions and hobbies outside work. See their descriptions and photos.

Substantive discussion followed, in 4 groups, on opportunities to unlock the potential of the Water CoP to work more closely with clients and partners. Members shared a rich diversity of views on the topic. On one hand, they highlighted opportunities in RMs to form water teams and partner with clients in government working groups, for which they needed some CoP support. On the other hand, they also expressed a need for more discussion among CoP members themselves to complement the current practice of listening to speakers at the Catchment sessions. See their group and individual suggestions.

 

Resuming after lunch, group discussions focused on the draft Water Operations Framework for 2011-2020, which had been circulated the day before the Retreat. Members showed a great interest to contribute to the further development of the Framework, seeing this as a core activity for the CoP to be involved in. Participants engaged in a rich discussion and explored the draft Framework from the perspective of clients, partners, and stakeholders. Several strategic questions emerged from the comments of the participants. A note on “Voices from the Water CoP Retreat” provides the summary of recommendations from the retreat participants and was discussed by the Water Committee after the retreat.

Participants then wrapped up with brief personal reflections, followed by closing remarks by CoP Chair Amy Leung, before continuing discussions over cocktails. See the photos.

The Retreat was organized by RSDD's Wouter Lincklaen Arriens with support from Alan Baird, Audrey Esteban, Gladys Franco, Ellen Pascua, and Ramon Alikpala and the COP's Water Team in RSDD. Kay Choe, Alan Baird, Jingmin Huang, and Florian Steinberg facilitated the discussion in working groups. Wouter Lincklaen Arriens moderated the plenary sessions.

Comments and further suggestions are welcome and can be sent to water@adb.org.

 

 

 

What question lies at the heart of your work?
Responses from the Water CoP Retreat

Summary 1. How can we deal with clients and partners effectively?

• • • • • •

What are the expectations of our clients? Have I met these expectations? What have I contributed to help the clients meet their objectives? Can we match expectations of our clients with projects/programs we are offering? How can I contribute to improve effectiveness, efficiency and quality? How can ADB best help the government manage the country's water resources in a sustainable manner? How can we share good information effectively among network?

2.

Is my work contributing to the development agenda?

• • •

• •

What then, must we do to provide a healthy, dignified and meaningful existence for the human community while protecting the integrity and sanctity of the living world and all beings that we share it with? Have I made such an impact that others will pick up from where I have left off and will my effort be acknowledged? How to make the project/activities sustainable? No matter how little the benefit is, if it is sustainable and we keep on working, the world will change. However, if the project/ activities are not sustainable, no matter how great it is at the beginning, we will not get anything in the long term and we work in vain. How can I add value to the work I am involved in? What difference can I make by working on each assignment? How can I make the life of people better? How can I make the economy more efficient

 

through economically viable investment projects in the water sector? How can projects provide clean water at affordable price in a sustainable way?

3.

What are the water issues we should address?

• • • • • •

How can we improve people's access to and effective use of productive resources while ensuring sustainability of those resources? How can we bring in the marginalized sectors for them to benefit these resources? How can we address underlying causes of poverty that act as barriers to development? How do we improve food security and economic well-being for the rural populations we work with? How can we mainstream IWRM into national or river basin water policy level and project level? What can ADB do to help the rural people to realize the water scarcity issue and use the key resource in a better and sustainable way?

4.

What can the Water CoP do to enhance our contribution to the water sector?

• • • • • •

How can ADB become a good environment for learning on all levels? How can we promote innovative and unconventional approaches to environmental services so that they become mainstream and contribute to inclusive and sustainable development? How can we get people to participate more, be involved, and share with the water CoP? How to coach water CoP members to be water LEADERS? How can we work together for each other? How can we make best use of existing knowledge and resources to address the concerns of the water sector?

 

In Detail – Individual Contributions

1.

How can we deal with clients and partners effectively?

• • • • • • • • • 2.

How can ADB best help the government manage the country's water resources in a sustainable manner? Have I done my work correctly and efficiently? Have I met the expectations of clients? What have I contributed to help the clients meet their objectives? What are the expectations of our clients? Is it financial resources (money); technical assistance (knowledge)? Each day, I always ask myself what I have learned from my daily work and how that can be shared and contributed to water security in the DMCs. What do clients need from ADB/the project manager? How can I better serve their needs? How can we share good information effectively among network? Recognizing and concurring with ADB's objective; how can I contribute to improve effectiveness, efficiency and quality? Am I doing the right things in view of attaining the ultimate goal of development agenda of each project/country? Can we match expectations of our clients with projects/programs we are offering? Is my work contributing to the development agenda?

• • •

How can we ensure that our work in water adds value, stimulates change and compliments "big picture" agendas? Does my work contribute to God's will? Are we doing the best in response to the need of our country and also protecting the environment at the same time?

 

• • • • • • •

• • •

What can I do to lead ADB colleagues in innovative solutions in the design and implementation of water projects? How do I make a difference for the better? How to leap-frog to a better, more sustainable future for developing world one major step at a time? What then, must we do to provide a healthy, dignified and meaningful existence for the human community while protecting the integrity and sanctity of the living world and all beings that we share it with? How can we improve our lives while taking care of our planets environment and finite resources? Have I made such an impact that others will pick up from where I have left off and will my effort be acknowledged? How to make the project/ activities sustainable? No matter how little the benefit is, if it is sustainable and we keep on working, the world will change. However, if the project/ activities are not sustainable, no matter how great it is at the beginning, we will not get anything in the long term and we work in vain. What positive impact can I make? How can I add value to the work I am involved in? (What difference can I make by working on each assignment? How can I make the life of people better? How can I make the economy more efficient through economically viable investment projects in the water sector? How can projects provide clean water at affordable price in a sustainable way? What are the water issues we should address?

3.

• • • • • •

Is there still huge population suffering from water scarcity? Why can people not use water more wisely? How to mainstream IWRM into national or river basin water policy level and project level? How can we reduce poverty in Asia-Pacific? How can we improve people's access to and effective use of productive resources while ensuring sustainability of those resources? How can we bring in the marginalized sectors for them to benefit these resources? How can we address underlying causes of poverty that act as barriers to development?

 

• • •

How can we provide all people access to water and sanitation in a sustainable manner to improve lives- particularly those who have limited access to resources? Sustainability? Equitable access? Conservation and wise use of resources? How do we improve food security and economic well-being for the rural populations we work with? What can ADB do to help the rural people to realize the water scarcity issue and use the key resource in a better and sustainable way? What can the Water CoP do to enhance our contribution to the water sector?

4.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

How can ADB become a good environment for learning on all levels? What can ADB contribute to close the gap between the poor and the rich? How can we make best use of existing knowledge and resources to address the concerns of the water sector? How can we bring innovative approaches in the work we do? What is the relative value of different options to improve people's welfare? How can I use and develop my knowledge to improve the system/ the world and enjoy my work? How can we promote innovative and unconventional approaches to environmental services so that they become mainstream and contribute to inclusive and sustainable development? How we can rise up and disseminate information? How do get people to participate more, be involved, and share with the water CoP? How do we develop innovative thinking in water sector? How can I apply the knowledge and experiences gained through my working years; to help protect natural resources such as water courses? How to coach water CoP members to be water LEADERS? How can we work together for each other? How should I strengthen/renew my knowledge in the sector through internal (ADB) or external channel?

 

 

1. Giving medicine to fix broken parts.

2. Advising how to change behavior.

3. Questioning the assumptions for behavior.

4. Partnering to let go and enter new identity.

Note: Pink dots refer to “Where I am now” Green dots refer to “Where I want to be”

 

 

Alan Baird Water Supply and Sanitation Specialist, RSID

Ki-Hee Ryu Head, Project Administration Unit, SEAE

Strength: Networking Water Leadership Quality: Broad perspective on the water sector Hobbies: Soccer Passion: Doing things differently

Strength: Implementation and field operation, experience in resident missions. Water Leadership Quality: Indepth knowledge and skills on how to fix and implement projects. Hobbies: Sunday school teacher Passion: Seeing opportunity to provide benefits to people and appreciating the opportunity to do so

Amy Leung EASS Director and Water CoP Chair

Koichi Takano Water Resources Management Specialist, RSID

Strength: Long experience/ exposure with water; very organized and timely

Strength: Civil engineering, water resources. Water Leadership Quality:

 

Water Leadership Quality: Water sector experience in PRC, enjoys working with people. Hobbies: Reading, yoga Passion: Traveling; Managing people to spot something new Antoine Kunth Infrastructure Specialist, SETU

Knowledge of various countries, i.e., Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines. Hobbies: Reading books, guitar Passion: Tennis

Lan Wang Project Officer (urban Development), PRCM

Strength: Accurate and comprehensive approach to handling problems. Responsive to clients and colleagues needs. Water Leadership Quality: Engaging in in-depth consultation with all stakeholders involved. Hobbies: Golf, football, traveling, social gathering, international politics Passion: Discovering the world and its incredible diversity Anupma Jain Social Sector Specialist, SEEW

Strength: Understanding of local situation, good in project implementation. Water Leadership Quality: Passion for and willingness to contribute to social sector development. Hobbies: Table tennis, swimming Passion: Improving the lives of people Jingmin Huang Urban Development Specialist, EASS

Strength: Ability to analyze policy, including social sector, to

Strength: Civil engineering,

 

address the grassroots level problem in the public policy. Water Leadership Quality: Adapts policy reforms to local situations by pilot testing and identifying bottlenecks. Hobbies: Football, cricket and painting Passion: Making a difference on the lives of people Arnaud Heckman Urban Development Specialist, EASS

flexibility and imagination. Water Leadership Quality: Understanding of present realities and what are practical future solutions. Hobbies: Reading Passion: Water - it stands for justice

Marc Ebarvia Sanitation Specialist, RSID

Strength: Open-minded, flexible but authoritative when needed. Water Leadership Quality: Makes key decisions, based on profound and well-researched options. Hobbies: Judo (black belt), rugby, tennis, traveling, history, human science, social gathering Passion: Trying exciting and new experiences

Strength: Guide and empower groups to develop shared vision. Water Leadership Quality: Step back first for analysis then offer well considered suggestions then help develop consensus. Hobbies: Reading books Passion: Writing articles

 

Charles Rodgers Water and Climate Change Specialist, RSID

Norio Saito Urban Development Specialist, SAUD

Strength: Water and climate change, quick understanding of numbers and quick to get the big picture. Water Leadership Quality: Can provide scientific and technical knowledge that can help influence decision makers. Hobbies: Reading, hiking Passion: Justice, fairness, guiding decisions Carola Donner-Reichle Senior Advisor (Capacity Building and Social Development), RSOD

Strength: Project design through stakeholder consultation, fostering ownership of interventions. Water Leadership Quality: Responsive to client needs. Hobbies: Basketball Passion: Supporting clients towards sustainable development

Randall Jones Natural Resources Economist, CWEN

Strength: Conceptualizing strategies and policies, working well with others, networking, lobbying. Water Leadership Quality: Experience with UN, government

Strength: Good mix of technical and economic skills in water management. Water Leadership Quality: Strong understanding of the need for change by government and partners.

 

ministries and line agencies. Hobbies: Music and books Passion: Harmony in society

Hobbies: Camping, fishing, guitar, hunting Passion: Making a difference in helping poor communities and societies Raushan Mamatkulov Urban Development Specialist, EASS

Chris Morris Head, NGO and Civil Society Center

Strength: Communication and partnership with a variety of stakeholders. Water Leadership Quality: Matured experiences in Southeast Asia. Hobbies: Spending time with my children Passion: To see changes in behavior and approach to reaching stakeholders Chris Wensley Lead Professional (Water Resources), SEAE

Strength: Financail management/analysis. Water Leadership Quality: Achieving efficiency, economy. Hobbies: Spending time with my family; sports Passion: Sports, esp. football

Rehan Kausar Infrastructure Specialist, SEEW

Strength: Attention to detail. Water Leadership Quality:

Strength: Multinational cultural background, strong people’s skills.

 

Experience in various countries. Hobbies: Hiking, sailing, outdoor activities Passion: Seeing the impact of work on people's lives

Water Leadership Quality: Energy background. Hobbies: Playing tennis; audiophile Passion: Watching action movies Shanny Campbell Social Development Specialist, SANS

Cindy Malvicini Senior Water Resources Management Specialist, SANS

Strength: Facilitation of decisions. Water Leadership Quality: Client-orientation. Hobbies: Running, biking, time with kids Passion: Community development Drazen Kucan Senior Urban Development Specialist, CWUS

Strength: Safeguards. Water Leadership Quality: Understanding of the user/clients. Hobbies: Reading books Passion: People

Tadashige Kawasaki ADB Institute

Strength: Results-focused, technically equipped. Water Leadership Quality:

Strength: Strong legal understanding of water sector issues and practical knowledge. Water Leadership Quality:

 

Bringing together resources to get the work done. Hobbies: Hiking, skiing Passion: Delivering solutions

Strong government experience and knowledge of multilateral operations and solid water background. Hobbies: Badminton; activities with my children Passion: Traveling abroad, meeting new people

Eri Honda Senior Urban Development Specialist, SETU

Sisavanh Phanouvong Senior Project Implementation Officer, LRM

Strength: Experienced in urban development in Asia. Water Leadership Quality: A very experienced person who knows how to work with different partners and clients. Hobbies: Scuba diving Passion: Working with people

Strength: Agriculture and natural resource sector, irrigation, livelihood development, deep knowledge of culture, EAs and domestic systems. Water Leadership Quality: Water resources. Hobbies: Listening to music, playing clarinet and piano Passion: Taking initiative to open up the path

 

Florian Steinberg Senior Urban Development Specialist, SETU

Siti Hasanah Project Officer (Urban Development & Water Supply), IRM

Strength: Urban planning, multisector experience. Water Leadership Quality: Understanding of technical, social, financial and institutional dimensions of urban development. Hobbies: Tennis, golf, music (jazz, modern) Passion: Traveling, visiting historical city centers, culture Gyongshim An Urban Development Specialist, EASS

Strength: Focus/results oriented. Water Leadership Quality: Experienced in water projects. Hobbies: Reading, watching movies Passion: Investigation, research and finding out causes

Ryutaro Takaku Water Resources Engineer, CWEN

Strength: Delivers on time. Water Leadership Quality: Ability to deliver expectations from clients and colleagues. Hobbies: Physical exercise, hiking

Strength: Solid engineering. Water Leadership Quality: Has held senior government positions and understands DMC clients. Hobbies: Kendo (martial arts) Passion: To witness farmer

 

Passion: To deliver effectively Helena Lawira Project Implementation Officer (Water Sector), IRM

benefit from irrigation projects Tomoo Ueda Senior Evaluation Specialist, IED2

Strength: Environment, water quality experience. Water Leadership Quality: Has a fresh view. Hobbies: Swimming, walking/jogging Passion: Better water management in Indonesia

Strength: Eight years with ADB. Seeing good side of people and respect for Asian culture. Water Leadership Quality: Experienced in urban development. Hobbies: Watching movies, listening to music, eating good food Passion: Interested in people

In-Ho Keum Lead Professional (Urban Services), CWUS

Stephen Blaik Senior Water Supply and Sanitation Specialist, PAHQ

Strength: Extensive experience in the water sector in PRC, Southeast Asia and now Central Asia. Water Leadership Quality: Good coordination, knowledge of various countries.

Strength: Helping clients achieve goals. Water Leadership Quality: Ability to listen and offer solutions. Hobbies: Sailing, skiing

 

Hobbies: Golf Passion: Water for all Javier Coloma Brotons Urban Development Specialist (Water Supply and Sanitation), SEEW

Passion: Delivering sustainable and equitable solutions Xin Shen Project Officer (Agriculture and Natural Resources), PRCM

Strength: Engineering, technical skills needed to develop various modes of PPP contracts. Water Leadership Quality: Influence others by showing concrete achievements. Hobbies: Sports, music, taking pictures Passion: Focusing on work that deliver impacts and achievements, thus appreciated Kathie Julian Principal Urban Development Specialist (PPP), CWUS

Strength: Enthusiasm and dedication. Water Leadership Quality: Building trust with counterparts. Hobbies: Table tennis, badminton Passion: Seeing results in communities she is working with

Wouter Lincklaen Arriens Lead Professional (Water Resources Management), RSID

Strength: Intelligent design, effectiveness, significant ability to influence deliverables. Water Leadership Quality:

Strength: Inspire and provide vision. Water Leadership Quality: Innovative ideas provided,

 

Consistently promotes reforms, understands the big sector picture. Hobbies: Scuba, skiing, trekking Passion: Delivering solutions to developing world Kay Choe Lead Professional (Water and Urban Development), SAUD

positive outlook, avoid negativity. Hobbies: Play saxophone, mind mapping Passion: Helping others unlock their potential Yaozhou Zhou Water Resources Management Specialist, EAAE

Strength: Strong economics background and capability to measure value of project initiatives and justify investments. Water Leadership Quality: Good communication skills and motivation. Hobbies: Listening to music, leisure traveling Passion: Love for the work and simple enjoyment in delivering more outputs; Believing in what she does

Strength: Strong technical water engineering skills. Water Leadership Quality: Strong understanding of client needs and team work. Hobbies: Swimming, tennis, relaxing by the beach Passion: Enjoys application of development to help poor communities

 

 

Activity 4: Summary

What is the Water CoP to you? The Water CoP…

• • • • • •

Has always been a voluntary group of ADB staff dedicated towards the implementation of ADB's Water for All policy. Has started to improve synergy with other CoPs this year by co-organizing several joint activities on cross-cutting areas and topics Should meet more often, perhaps during lunch, to strengthen the feeling of community. Should take peer review as an activity into consideration. Can make its resources be more accessible to members. Can definitely have more room for participation, especially for RM colleagues. Can be both an information resource and a networking mechanism within ADB and with ADB’s clients and partners

How can the Water CoP get organized to involve clients and partners? The Water CoP can…

• • •

Establish a good information gateway that would leverage relevant information, staff, and resources for its 2 clients: ADB staff and external clients Improve the website, expand e-newsletter subscription base, and explore further applications (Web 2.0) of modern technology Explore partners’ participation, particularly champions, in CoP meetings and other activities

 

In Detail – Individual Contributions

What is the Water CoP to you? How do you relate to the CoP? What is its purpose? What are we trying to accomplish?

The Water CoP…

• •

Has always been a voluntary group of ADB staff dedicated towards the implementation of ADB's Water for All policy. • Is participation in the water CoP voluntary? Yes, it is voluntary • Has both advantages and disadvantages as it creates additional workload that could take away some of the enthusiasm from individual work Has started to improve synergy with other CoPs this year by co-organizing several joint activities on cross-cutting areas and topics • Need to combine activities with other CoPs to address linkages – interdisciplinary nature and cross-cutting areas Should meet more often, perhaps during lunch, to strengthen the feeling of community. • CoP needs to be strengthened internally, how about a weekly gathering over lunch? • there are already existing 'ethnic groups' meeting regularly in the canteen • Water CoP has tried many different meeting hours; and currently meetings are held in the morning --- may also try lunchtime presentations • We need to open first among ourselves, within the ADB's water circle, within the water CoP Should take peer review as an activity into consideration. • Peer reviews as activity of water CoPs? Upside – additional knowledge and strengthen work of members; downside – additional workload Can make its resources be more accessible to members. • The water CoP has resources, but are you happy on how the CoP involves its members?

 

• •

Can definitely have more room for participation, especially for RM colleagues. • Not enough RM participation Can be both an information resource and a networking mechanism within ADB and with ADB’s clients and partners Is an instrument to get closer to clients / bridge the gap as the CoP is an important platform for starting dialogues Is an instrument for interacting with other people in the sector, ; for reaching out, connecting RM staff at the project administration level to ADB HQ Is good information source Provides important information that can be of value to individual work Can be both information resource and networking mechanism for within and outside ADB

How can the Water CoP get organized to involve clients and partners?

The Water CoP can…

Establish a good information and networking gateway that would leverage relevant information, staff, and resources for its 2 clients: ADB staff and external clients Leverage information, staff, and resources for its 2 clients: ADB staff and external clients Find better ways of sharing information (technical solutions for sharing internal "bank-only" information and documents to clients who need it) Encourage ADB staff/specialists to be sufficiently available to clients, i.e. need to establish a good information system/gateway (perhaps not as an in-house program) Open up to external audience/clients, leveraging what it has in terms of materials, resources, staff, etc. Understand what its audience values; what is relevant to its clients There is scope to improve ways to sell product to ADB clients; Need to advertise more Need to include ADB's big markets – PRC and IND Need to target decision-makers Need to have better machinery for publicity activities Room for improvement in dissemination

 

Strengthen dissemination of KPs Look into networking practice and information dissemination in more detail Establish better communication system between RM staff and HQ staff to better coordinate workplans Not be a one-way channel of information. Need comprehensive change of mindset To involve clients and partners, they will want to be involved only if there is value for them. How to give value? Partners – governments, NGOs, water companies, funding agencies, large industrial users of water, private sector, research institutions How can ADB set itself apart from other organizations? Lots of partners already. How can ADB involve the partners more? How can it support them more? Water touches everyone’s lives. ADB engagement has evolved from 10 years ago from simply water supply and sanitation to climate change issues today. Water is certainly a complicated issue. Ow can opeing op the CoP to outsiders improve ADB’s work? 2 levels – build up the CoP knowledge and , improve operations with clients Expanding it too much may dilute the impact of CoP and more resources and energy necessary Knowledge exchange between ADB divisions is very important. Strengthen information exchange internally first before going external. Water CoP should look at Urban CoP format where better exchange between divisions/individuals is practiced. Expansion to external participation should be gradual What is the role of partners? Is there interest? Bringing in partners should be mutually beneficial to both ADB and partners. How does ADB benefit by opening up the CoP? Be selective on the institutions that will be included in the expansion. Not necessarily to be members, but may be invited to share. Perhaps CoP can share experiences by going out. ADB as Knowledge Hub vs ADB CoP Improve the website, expand e-newsletter subscription base, and explore further applications (Web 2.0) of modern technology Need to improve website – right now it is difficult to find projects Need to further expand subscribers of newsletter Explore further applications of modern technology eg. online low-cost interactive programs/seminars)

 

Use of skype? Strengthen ADB's FB and u-tube Explore partners’ participation in CoP meetings and other activities Explore for EAs presenting during water CoP meetings? Explore link-up with government officials during water CoP meetings? Twinning which is highly successful and cost-effective can be an area for ADB's continued support Need to strengthen regional workshops and study visits, including increased participation Coaching to be included in training events? Qualify what “opening up” means How do you fund external CoP members to CoP event? Partners may not necessarily want to become CoP members. They are really looking for a platform to interact with ADB. Should there be conditions for an external partner to become a member of the CoP? Distinguish partnership agreements and CoP for knowledge sharing There should be a mechanism to improve knowledge upgrading in the CoP/ADB Staff. Panel of expert to provide “training” to staff Formal cooperation with other international donors RMs to develop networks in each country but not all RMs have water specialists Send more people in the field to get champions involved Important to get perspectives from people on the ground Disseminate how ADB can support champions

 

  Review of the Draft Water Operations Framework 2011-2020

Voices from the Water CoP Retreat
Participants discussed the draft Framework from the perspectives of ADB staff, clients, and partners. They appreciated the opportunity to review the paper and are keen to actively engage in the further formulation of such a framework. They welcomed many of the insights articulated in the paper, and put forward additional suggestions for further developing the framework. The suggestions are summarized below: 1. Providing space for recognizing achievements of clients, partners and ADB. The present draft is thin on the work done by clients, partners and ADB itself over the past years. Maybe a revised version later could consider adding a section that recognizes what has been achieved and how that can be built upon? Such section may also touch upon ADB’s work on partnerships and/or collaboration with partners, including the work with financing partners for the Water and Financing Partnership Facility. This may help to entice clients and partners to buy into the framework and seek expanded collaboration with ADB. 2. Highlighting the crisis but recognizing the need to validate data. The intention to highlight the water supply-demand gap revealed by the McKinsey Report is understood considering the objective of the framework to call attention to the crisis that the region is facing. However, the framework may need to allow for further validation of such data noting that India had asked McKinsey for re-computation. 3. Offering menu of options to clients. One size doesn’t fit all, and it is expected that the later version of the framework would clarify what menu of options it offers its clients to choose from. For that, a program with a menu of options may be called for. 4. Building on existing studies to improve implementation. The paper makes a case for significant investment in further country water assessment studies by ADB. It is assumed that such work will build upon existing studies, including by other organizations, and the focus will be more on filling the gaps. It is also assumed that where warranted, further studies will be done with mandated partner organizations, including knowledge centers. Many participants expressed need for helping clients to implement existing policies and programs (the “how” question), smartly supported by benchmarking and capacity development.

5. Tempering the focus on higher efficiencies. The call for improving water use efficiencies is supported and it is suggested that it be complemented by equal, if not more, focus on conservation in all uses. There were suggestions to further refine the strategy for promoting higher efficiencies in agriculture to take into account the need to distinguish efficiency at field, system and basin levels – a fundamentally important issue that may be difficult for ADB to achieve. It is also suggested that variation in country and local conditions be considered when promoting efficiencies. 6. Setting realistic expectations from private sector participation. Stimulating increased participation of private sector is supported. However, in the light of ADB’s weak performance to date in private sector water operations, and the dearth of examples in rural areas in the developing world (not just Asia), participants suggested that expectations for private sector participation be set more carefully and worded in a manner that empowers governments to move ahead with promoting PSP while taking the views of civil society into account. 7. Maximizing existing capacities and expanding them. Further discussions on making better use of ADB’s existing capacities are needed, as well as in agreeing which capacities should be further expanded and how. The Water Committee and CoP should be encouraged to take an active part in the discussion considering that it’s them who will benefit from improved capacities. 8. Agreeing how ADB should convey the message about the social and economic value of water. The paper’s focus on the economic approach to water use efficiency is understood. However, due to sensitivities attached to promoting water as an economic good, it may be prudent to be consistent with what the Water for All policy espouses, that is, “water is a socially vital economic good” and sustainable development and IWRM approaches must stress the need for water management to balance economic, social and environmental outcomes. 9. Providing for resources to support demand management approaches. The shift in paradigm that the paper is trying to promote requires resources to be invested in labor intensive work for policy reforms, behavior changes, institutional reform, within the social and political economy. It is suggested that the costs associated with this type of work be included.

 

10. Development and management of a regional water information system. The system being developed for Africa involves expertise from France, which has invested heavily in improving data and information sharing and management in its own country. It is suggested that the setting of up such a system consider the capacity gap in ADB to undertake such task and the option to maximize strengths of knowledge partners and UN organizations who could do a better job. Participants commented that a regional system, if established, could usefully also include information on virtual water trade. 11. Addressing issues missing from the paper. The following issues may be included: (i) poor and vulnerable communities and reaching the MDGs and beyond; (ii) sanitation; (iii) more emphasis on disaster risk management; (iv) more emphasis on groundwater; (v) the Pacific DMCs; (vi) involving ADB Institute, and (vii) reflecting approaches for IWRM in river basins that have already been developed with partners. The important roles of ADB’s Water CoP in the coming years should also be reflected in the framework itself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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