TRAINING OF TRAINERS (ToT) WORKSHOP IN POLICY ENGAGEMENT AND ADVOCACY FOR CIVIL SOCIETY ACTORS IN WEST AFRICA

WORKSHOP REPORT

WACSI Secretariat, Accra, Ghana.

9 – 18 December, 2009.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................................... 2 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2.0 3.0 Objectives ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Opening Remarks ............................................................................................................................. 3 Expected Outcomes .......................................................................................................................... 4 Methodology........................................................................................................................................ 4

IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS ............................................................................................................... 5 PROJECT NARRATIVE................................................................................................................................... 5 3. 1 3.2 Project Activity................................................................................................................................... 5 Achievements..................................................................................................................................... 5 ToT preparation assignment [Nov/Dec 2009...................................................................... 6 Orientation workshop [9 December, 2009]......................................................................... 6 Policy engagement and advocacy workshop [10-13 December 2009] .................... 7 Workshop on the theory and practice of PPW training [15-18 Dec 2009]........... SECSION 1: SECTION 2: SECTION 3: 7 Training themes: ............................................................................................................................... 8 Understanding the Context of Policy Advocacy and Writing......... 8 Structuring and developing a coherent Policy paper........................... 8 Developing a targeted Advocacy Planning Framework (APF) ....... 9

4.0

TRAINING OF TRAINERS WORKSHOP.................................................................................................. 6 4. 1 4. 2 4.3 4.4 4.5

5.0 6.0

INTERNAL/EXTERNAL FACTOR THAT HAVE AFFECTED THE PROJECT DESIGN......... 10 Conclusion .................................................................................................................................................... 12

Annexes Project objectives and achievement (matrix)........................................................................................................13 Programme Agenda .................................................................................................................................................... 14 List of Trainer Candidates ..................................................................................................................................... 16 List of Participants ................................................................................................................................................... 16

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1.0

INTRODUCTION

The West Africa Civil Society Institute (WACSI), in collaboration with the Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiative (LGI) of the Open Society Institute (OSI) and the Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) organised a Training of Trainers (ToT) workshop in Policy Engagement and Advocacy for twenty (20) civil society actors in West Africa. The overall objective of the training was to provide civilian actors across West Africa with practical skills and techniques in policy formulation, analysis, and influencing to enhance their individual and institutional ability to engage in policy discourse, interact with policy makers and influence public policy making processes. The 9-days ToT utilised the wide experience and expertise of LGI’s policy advocacy course director/trainer with the anticipation to augment the role of civil society as an indispensable partner in the promotion of good governance, democracy, peacebuilding and participatory development processes. 1.1 Objectives The specific objectives of the ToT were to: Develop a cadre of regional experts in policy advocacy training and delivery; Enhance the capacity of civil society actors to engage and influence policy processes; Improve the skills in designing collaborative lobbying frameworks; Develop strategies for policy writing and advocacy skills; and Provides policy advocacy training for up to 100 selected West African policy actors in English and French 1.2 Opening Remarks

Executive Director of WACSI, Ms. Thelma Ekiyor, The training was declared opened by the Executive Director of WACSI (Ms. Thelma Ekiyor) on behalf of WACSI and OSIWA. She introduced the two institutions to the participants by commending the commitment of the institutions towards the formalization and finalization of the project. The Executive Director acknowledged the moral and financial support received from LGIOSI since the commencement of the projects’ pilot stage in October 2008 and to OSIWA for partfunding the implementation of the project. In her speech, Ms. Ekiyor emphasized the urgent need for such training in the sub-region. Specifically, she reiterated that the training is in response to the indentified gap and shortage of Policy influencing and advocacy skills within civil society. Ms. Ekiyor said, the training was timely, and had attracted right trainer candidates, as the major objective was to build a cadre of regional experts in Policy Advocacy. Ms. Ekiyor mentioned that the future success of the project will be measured through the onward delivery/replication of the trainings at community levels across the region. The Executive Director saluted the trainer candidates for passing through such a stringent selection process; and encouraged them to stay committed, and ensure they participate in all the 7 stages designed for the certification and future training assignments. Finally, she commended WACSI staff for their
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dedication through project implementation process. She stated that 15 months of hardwork has come into fruition with the commencement of the ToT. Representative from LGI-OSI, Mr. Young Eoin (Facilitator/Trainer and Course Director) The LGI Facilitator in attendance (Mr. Young) gave a welcome speech on behalf of the Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiative (LGI) of the Open Society Institute (OSI). He highlighted the rationale for LGI’s involvement in the tripartite as a result of the successful pilot training in Policy advocacy which was held in October 2008. Mr. Young said, the partners thought it that the best way to adapt and transfer the long established training programme to the West African sub-region was to put together team of local trainers through a regional CSO capacity development hub (i.e. WACSI). Mr. Young expressed his satisfaction on the calibre of participants available for the training, reinstating their depth of knowledge and wealth of experience in the national and regional policy processes as a viable asset for the 9-days training. Mr. Young who is also the policy advocacy course director for LGI reiterated the assurance that the goal of the ToT i.e. “to equip participant with strategic insight, skills and resources to design policy relevant advocacy campaigns and communication tools that delivers a compelling policy position and achieve desired policy objectives”. Finally, Mr. Young concluded by stating that candidate should make use of the training days to sharpen their skills and learn new techniques in policy advocacy and influencing processes. He said the trainer should not only be committed to the certification process alone but should have passion for the onward replication and domestication across the sub-region. 1.3 Expected Outcomes The expected outcomes were: Selected civil society actors have better understanding of complex policy environment; Advocacy and lobbying skills of civil society actors are enhanced; Analytical and writing skills of civil actors is enhanced; Potentials for developing policy briefs, undertaking policy research are developed; Strategies for policy influencing and actor networking is developed; and Regional pool of policy advocacy trainers developed. 1.4 Methodology The ToT adopted active participation as the cornerstone of the methodology employed with emphasis on the analysis of authentic sample policy papers and case studies, including knowledge application and skills to participants’ own policy advocacy and writing contexts. Other methodological approaches adopted during the training include: a learner-centred method in an interactive environment; learning-by-doing approach (experiential learning); pairing and small group work (including practical exercises) to facilitate peer interaction; and;
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Role of participant as informed and responsible adult learners and the role of trainer as facilitators. 2.0 IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS Phase two of the policy advocacy project -Training of Trainers (ToT) stage commenced in the last quarter of 2009 with the overarching goal to build a core cadre of regional trainers with the capacities to replicate and deliver policy advocacy trainings at an appreciable level of quality. The training was designed to equip the local (West African) training team with the critical insight required to adapt the policy advocacy syllabus and training materials to suit the local context. The collaborating institutions i.e. WACSI/OSIWA/OSI-LGI commenced the process by launching a Call for Application. The call which attracted over 50 applications was followed by a stringent short-listing process (including a 40 – 50 minutes telephone conference interview conducted by LGI and WACSI). 10 out of the 20 shortlisted applicants were selected as possible trainer candidate qualified to undertake the ToT training that was held in December 9–18, 2009 having met the following criteria; Practical experience in strengthening the capacity of civil society actors on policy influencing; A record of involvement in key policy advocacy initiatives in the sub region; and Evidence of the ability to replicate the training to broad- based actors 3.0 PROJECT NARRATIVE 3.1 Project Activity WACSI intensified her existing advocacy strategies in influencing public policy particularly through the adoption of a proactive and non-conventional process. In 2009, WACSI entered into a formalised partnership with the LGI-OSI with the support of the OSIWA, to develop a policy advocacy training project that seek to enhance the capacity of a selected cadre of civil society actors to be more effective, influential and sustain policy engagement. The project which was designed in response to the identified skills deficiency in policy influencing within CSO across the region, and the absence of strategic policy engagement dimensions in the initiatives of civil society commenced in October 2008 with a pilot training in policy advocacy for about 16 civil actors. With the overall objective to provide CSOs with requisite skills and techniques in policy formulation, analysis and influencing to enhance their individual and institutional ability to engage in policy discourse, interact with policy makers and influence policy formulation processes. The demand-driven and context based capacity development training was designed to strengthen the competencies of civil society actors to develop and run targeted policy engagement and advocacy action with clear policy change objectives. 3.2 Achievements The training realised one of its major aim by establishing a team of 10 local trainers who will embark on the implementation of the second phase (Event 2) of the project from February April 2010 by replicating the training acquired to at least a 100 civil actors across the sub5

region specifically in the four (4) selected countries in West Africa i.e. Liberia, Senegal, Cote D’Ivoire and Nigeria. (Please see annex 1) The 9-day ToT training examined diverse critical components of Policy Advocacy concept; the training treated practical strategies and techniques requisite to understanding and engagement of policy makers; accessing or generating rigorous policy evidence; packaging policy recommendations for different audiences; relevance of CSOs policy process engagement; the importance of active networks in policy engagement; and the need to communicate with a range of partners in a policy process. Participants were exposed to the fundamental component of policy making including agenda setting, policy formulation, decision-making, implementation, monitoring and evaluation as well as skills that will enable actors to function effectively in difficult policy environments, interact objectively with policy makers and influence policy positions, approaches and behaviours within their communities. Specifically, the ToT course touched on the following technical areas of policy engagement and Advocacy: Designing Lobbying Frameworks; Building Effective Coalitions and Partnerships; Solidifying the Capacity to Engage Through Suitable Advocacy Roles; Effective Strategies and Communication Tools for Policy Advocacy; Analytical Skills in Policy Development; Appreciation and Understanding of Policy Formulation and Influencing; and Writing Effective Policy Papers to Influence Decision-Making. 4.0 TRAINING OF TRAINERS WORKSHOP The delivery of the training was executed in a structured, interactive and highly practical manner in the following four (4) stages: ToT preparation assignment [Nov/Dec 2009] ToT orientation workshop [9 Dec 2009] Participation/observation of Policy Advocacy Workshop [10-13 Dec 2009] Workshop on the theory and practice of Policy Advocacy Training [15-18 Dec 2009] 4.1 ToT preparation assignment [Nov/Dec 2009 The ToT commenced with a preparatory assignment for all trainer candidate with the aim to give candidates critical insight into the conceptual foundations that drive the design and delivery of the policy advocacy training programme. The assignment contained set of reference materials to be read, analysis and reflection tasks/exercises. More specifically, the preparation activity will provided candidates with the opportunity to analyse: 1. The key policy writing resource that is the foundation of the training; 2. The types of policy papers that are presented as the key policy advocacy communication tools; 3. The approach to advocacy planning presented in the programme; and 4. The LGI methodology.
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The preparatory assignment analysed the relevance of each training element, provided a link to the policy advocacy training curriculum and illustrates the theoretical and practical framework that drives key decisions made in the design and delivery of the training. 4.2 Orientation workshop {9 December, 2009} The orientation day had the objective to “familiarise the trainer candidates with the supported experiential approach to trainer education adopted throughout the ToT course”. The one day orientation also created a platform for the trainer candidates and facilitator to exchange idea and share information on relevant policy issues across the West African. 4.3 Policy engagement and advocacy workshop [10-13 December 2009] The ToT workshop included in its syllabus a 4-day training workshop in Policy Engagement and Advocacy {stage 3 of the ToT process}, with the goal to build the advocacy capacity of participants and deepen their knowledge and skills in policy engagement/influence and advocacy, and share best strategies and approaches for required policy influencing in all stages of policy process in West Africa. The training had in attendance 10 regionally selected civil actors as participants and 10 trainer candidates as observer participants (See Annex 1: list of participants). At the end, the training ensured that participants gained deep insight into the public policy perspective at the core of framing policy advocacy-oriented communication tools and offered in-depth understanding on how policy paper, as a well-known policy communication tool can support an evidence-based decision-making process. Also captured during the training was the strategic approach required in planning an advocacy campaign: i.e. the Advocacy Planning Framework (APF). 4.4 Workshop on the theory and practice of Policy Advocacy Training [15-18 Dec 2009] The last four days of the ToT was focused on building candidates’ insight into the key theoretical foundations and practical training principles necessary to prepare for and conduct the policy advocacy training. This section equipped candidate’s with skills, knowledge and critical insight required to adapt the policy advocacy syllabus and training materials to suit the local context at an appreciable standard. All activities and exercise undertaken during this section projected the LGI approach, methods and resources of training in policy advocacy. The facilitator reiterated the relevance of context-awareness while conducting policy advocacy training, thus, he recommended that candidates adopt indigenous samples and cases to accentuate their point in the forthcoming onward replication training. The training specifically touched on the following core areas:  Reflection on policy advocacy workshop;  Presenting the policy paper as a purposeful communication tool;  Building insight into the structure and text of different types of policy papers;  Introducing the principles of policy advocacy and the Advocacy Planning Framework (APF);  Designing and delivering effective workshops; and  Organising and preparing for the next steps in the ToT.
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4.5 Training themes/methodology The training was delivered using lecture format with PowerPoint projection, interspersed with discussions using indigenous examples (context-specific) role plays, group works and breakout sections for group exercises. Questions, issues, as well as attempts to seek clarification or further understanding were used as a basis for discussions and emphasis on some core points. The participants seized the opportunity to contextualised trained policy influencing and advocacy approaches, practices, and techniques in West Africa. The level of diversities within the participant provided room for individual experience sharing and group learning based on the level of awareness and involvement in policy processes As part of the methodology used in delivering the training, participants undertook both individual and group exercises which further enhances the trainers understanding of the training concept and issues discussed under each theme. Participants were clustered into groups to brainstorm during the exercise on writing effective policy paper and policy brief; purpose of communication in advocacy and campaign; the nature of policy-making process; and the structure of a coherent policy paper as documented in activity 6, 7, 8, and 9 respectively. Specifically, The 4-Days Training Consist of 12 Sections and delivered on three (3) major themes. These Include Understanding The Context Of Policy Advocacy And Writing; Structuring And Developing A Coherent Policy Paper; and Developing A Targeted Advocacy Planning Framework. SECTION 1: Understanding the Context of Policy Advocacy and Writing This section examined the contextual factors which frame policy advocacy campaigns and shape policy papers as purposeful communication tools used in the policy-making process. Participants were required to examine the nature of public policy in their different countries and approaches often adopted in policy-making processes. The facilitator submitted that the different aspects of the policy network should be seen and included as a way of framing the policy paper. Finally, the section captured lessons on the different types of policy papers commonly used in the policy-making community, i.e. the policy study and policy brief. SECTION 2: Structuring and developing a coherent Policy paper The second section provided participants with a systematic approach to build insight into the purpose and features of the common structural elements of both Policy study and Policy brief. The section emphasized the relevance of gaining in-depth insight into the key structural elements which are fundamental to achieving the purpose of every policy paper. The facilitator highlighted the key structural elements of a policy paper as the most crucial component. Key structural element of a policy paper: - Problem description; - Policy options; and - Conclusion and recommendations. Participants were required to complete a comparative analysis of the context, purpose and structure of a sample policy study and a policy brief from the provided manual ‘LGI training guidebook’. The different approaches to the layout of policy papers in term of its effectiveness
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in capturing the attention of potential audiences and facilitating the delivery of the intended messages were accentuated. Participants had a constructive interaction with the facilitator; they identified and discussed range of issues and possible solutions that would enable CSOs achieve the objectives of writing an effective context-specific coherent policy papers or policy briefs. SECTION 3: Developing a targeted Advocacy Planning Framework (APF) Key elements in building up an advocacy plan to maximize the chances of achieving policy influence were the central focus of this section. The concept of Advocacy in a policy context was richly dwelt on. The facilitator opened the section by defining the concept of Advocacy in a policy context and further analyzes the different roles that policy actors often choose to play in their advocacy activities. During this section, participants were given the opportunity to share past experiences by reflecting on the role(s) they had played or plan to play in their own advocacy activities, bearing in mind their respective local context and practices. After this exercise (Group discussion), the Advocacy Planning Framework (APF) was introduced as a tool to outline key elements of planning a targeted advocacy campaign. Participants were required to apply the APF tool practically using their local policy context. Finally, the different approaches to constructing convincing advocacy messages for target stakeholders were analysed using 1 of the activity provided in the handbook (Activity 13). At the end, the facilitator summarized the 4-days training by re-instating major points made, specifically on clarification of concepts. Advocacy was categorized as a mean of targeting audience in a policy making process, and a way of getting a voice in the target debates in a convincing way. Context was stressed to be a crucial factor in advocacy. There was a concession among participants that policy processes differ from country to country, thus, transferring best practice from one policy making process may be misleading, though the approach to planning advocacy camping was accepted to be transferrable. Other skills and knowledge acquired during the training section include; - Strategies for increasing the likelihood of achieving desired policy influence in the writing and using of policy papers; - Insight into the structure and advocacy purposes of policy study and policy brief; - The differences between traditional academic writing and applied real world policy writing; - The nature of persuasive advocacy messages; and - Focus and objective for an advocacy campaign targeting a local policy context

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5.0 

INTERNAL /EXTERNAL FACTOR THAT HAVE AFFECTED THE PROJECT DESIGN

December Training of Trainers: Reduction in the numbers of training days from 109days There was a reduction of 1day in the proposed number of days needed for the implementation of the December training. According to the approved budget, the training was supposed to be delivered within 10days i.e. 9–19 December 2009 (10days). However, it was delivered 9–18 December 2009 (9days). WACSIs’ meeting with LGI facilitator succeeded in reducing the number of proposed break days from 2 to 1. 1. 2. 3. 4. TOT orientation Workshop for 10 trainer candidates Policy Advocacy training for 10 participants (10 observers) Break-day for facilitator TOT workshop on theory and Practice of Policy Advocacy workshop 1 day 4 days 1 day (formerly 2) 4 days

Thus, some components in the approved budget such as days of accommodation, meals and incidental allowance, lunch break were all reduced by 1 day. The final figure of the activity budget was also affected by these changes. * Please see attached approved activity budget  Phase 3 (Event 2): In-country implementation The contract signed and forwarded by OSIWA highlighted Guinea as one of the in country where the in-country training (onward replication) will take place, thus making the countries fiver (5) i.e. Nigeria, Liberia, Senegal, Cote D’Ivoire and Guinea. This is a new development as the number of in-country training had always been four (4) i.e. Nigeria, Liberia, Senegal and Cote D’Ivoire. Also, there is no reflection of Guinea in the submitted, signed and counter-signed budget for project implementation. However, it was proposed that Guineans be invited to participate at the training scheduled for Cote D’ivoire April 5–9, 2010 in order to satisfy this development.  Availability of LGI trainers for 3 in-country training ONLY Prior to the ToT implementation in December, 2009, the LGI facilitators (Eoin and Lisa) stressed their ability and availability to evaluate and certify the 10 trainer candidates in 3 incountry trainings. Thus, they (LGI) offered to be present at the Nigeria, Liberia and Senegal training where the ToT candidates would have trained 70 civil actors: 30, 25, and 15 respectively and also get certified. With the absence of LGI trainers, and to make-up the expected number of civil actors (100) to be trained as stated in the proposal, it is suggested that the two (2) francophone trainers who would have been certified at the Senegal training be hired as consultant to deliver the training in Cote D’Ivoire for 20 civil actors (including Guineans). Development, Review and localization of a context-specific policy influencing training toolkit In the course of the ToT implementation, there was the recognition to develop and include indigenous (West African) case studies, exercises and role plays, suitable to enrich the content of the toolkit in order to achieve its objectives for West African civil actors. Six (6) of the trainer candidates offered to undertake these tasks with a $300 (Three hundred USD only) as consultant fee. The token fee was proposed to cover for the time/resources spent and ownership (intellectual property). Though, no budget line was created for this in the approved budget, thus it was considered as an ‘unforeseen expenditure’, The fund to cover this unforsee 
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expenditure was however, to realised from the savings made from the December ToT as a result of the reduction in number of training days.  Facilitation fee for the Trainer candidates (10 candidates) The issue of facilitation fee was raised by the trainer candidates during the ToT in December. The trainers highlighted that the time and energy to train 100 civil actors is costly to their respective organization considering their position and responsibilities to be neglected for 8 days. After much deliberation, there was a consensus by all parties present i.e. WACSI (represented by the former Executive Director and Policy Advocacy officer) and LGI facilitator (Eoin), that a token fee of $200 (two hundred USD only) per day be paid as honorarium to the trainers as a way of getting their commitment all through the replication process for each selected country. This development (trainers’ facilitation fee) has been included in the activity budget drafted for each country.  Terms of Fund Transfer/Release (Need for a quick review) The restructuring that occurred in the Implementation Plan will not be able to accommodate the approved terms of funds transfer/release. Changes in implementation plan such as 1) LGIs availability to cover ONLY 3 in-country trainings within a month from February 17 to March 20, 2010 i.e. to validate/certify the trainers during the replication process, 2) Need for trainers to train in pairs and 3) trainers tight schedules amongst other things has reduced the life span of the project. From the present implementation Plan the project is expected to come to an end with the last in-country scheduled for April 5-9, 2010 in Abidjan, Cote D’ivoire. 20 actors including Guineans are expected to benefit from the training. This is against the approved project plan with a 1 year life span (December 2009 to December 2010). In order to facilitate the current implementation plan, there is an urgent need to fast-track the terms of fund transfer/release in order to suit the new stipulated dates/plan. (i.e. between February and April, 2010) * Please see current implementation plan attached

6.0 Conclusion and Way Forward The major objective of the ToT workshop - to develop a regional pool of trainers who could assist in replicating and localising the policy advocacy skills across West Africa was realized to a large extent following the 9days training. The relevance and impact of the training was highly appreciated by the participants who confirmed the existing deficiency in CSOs advocacy work. The participants commended the tripartite for conceptualizing such an initiative that seek to strengthen and reposition civil society as an indispensable partner in the promotion of good governance, democracy, peacebuilding and participatory development processes. Overall, the participants appreciated the importance of the workshop, adding that it was timely, educative, informative, though highly intensive. WACSI/OSIWA/LGI was commended for creating such platform for civil actors to build their competencies in advocacy issues. The following recommendations were made:  Negotiation is very crucial to all advocacy camping or policy influencing. Thus, it was recommended that future trainings includes topics on Negotiations and Mediation skills;

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Onward replication of the training was proposed to be extended to other countries in West Africa, particularly those with weak civil society such as Guinea, Niger, Mali, and the Manoriver region; Continuous engagement/facilitation practice will help the certified trainer to keep up with the training momentum, thus, the organizers were advised to put a structure of engagement in place; The trainer candidates should internalise the training handbook and acquaint themselves with training stages and approaches adopted in the delivery of workshop Trainer candidate should ensure that the trainings and skills acquired be utilised in their respective advocacy work. Platform should be created for other actors enhance their advocacy s train and enhance other actor advocacy skills at the community level.

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Annex 1:

Project objectives and achievements (matrix)
Achievements till date The process of developing a cadre of regional expert in policy advocacy commenced in the ToT of December, 2009. 10 trainer candidates were selected to go through the ToT training. The final phase of the ToT (i.e. the onward replication of the policy advocacy training to 100 civil actors at an appreciable standard) leading to the certification of the team of trainer candidate will be implemented in the Phase three (3) of the project scheduled for February – April, 2010. The trainer candidates are currently preparing for the final phase of the project (certification stage) These objectives were achieved in the policy advocacy training that held during the December ToT. The ToT offered as part of its syllabus a 4-days training targeted at enhancing CSOs skills and techniques in policy engagement and advocacy. 20 civil actors across the sub-region benefitted from this training- 10 trainer candidate and 10 participants. The training highlighted the importance of advocacy lobbying framework, actors and their expected roles in a policy process. Different policy writing strategies and advocacy skills were comprehensively discussed. Individual/group exercise, roles plays and experience sharing provided clearer understanding to trained skills. Concepts central to the section such as Advocacy, Dissemination, Lobbying, Campaigning, Advising and Activism were provided gripping clarification with notable examples. * These objectives will be further achieved during the onward replication of the policy advocacy training where 100 civil actors will be trained. To date, 20 civil actors have benefited from the training i.e. 10 trainer candidates and 10 participant during the December ToT. 80 civil actors are expected to be trained in the final phase of the project i.e. during the in-country training scheduled for Nigeria, Liberia, Senegal and Cote D’ivoire (to include Guineans) from February to April, 2010. The process of localizing the policy influencing toolkit commenced following the successful implementation of the ToT training in December 2009. The process is still on-going and will last through the interim period- period between Event 1 and 2 (i.e. 4 – 6 week after the ToT). The final product is expected to be available by the last week in February. * Training toolkit localization and case studies development are being developed by the trainer candidates on a consultancy basis. The translation process commenced at the end of the ToT. It’s currently in the last stage. * To be made available before the Dakar training

Objectives 1. Develop a cadre of regional experts in policy advocacy training and delivery

2. Enhance the capacity of civil society actors to engage and influence policy processes 3. Improve the skills in designing collaborative lobbying frameworks 4. Develop strategies for policy writing and advocacy skills 5. Provides policy advocacy training for up to 100 selected West African policy actor in English and French 6. Develop an indigenous (localised/context specific) policy influencing training toolkit for civil society actors in West Africa 7. Translation of policy influencing training toolkit into French for onward replication.

* The 10 trainer candidates and 10 participants were gathered from a broad section of civil society across the sub-region with representation from Benin, Nigeria, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Togo and Liberia.

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ANNEX 2 POLICY ADVOCACY TRAINING OF TRAINERS WORKSHOP FOR CIVILIAN ACTORS IN WEST AFRICA 9 -18 DECEMBER, 2009 WACSI Secretariat, Accra, Ghana DAILY SCHEDULE (December 9, 2010)
Date TIME ACTIVITY RESOURCE PERSONS

9th Dec

9.00- 9:30 9:30-10:00

REGISTRATION WELCOME MESSAGES/ INTRODUCTION OF PARTICIPANTS SECTION ONE TEA BREAK 1 SECTION TWO LUNCH BREAK WACSI, LGI-OSI OSIWA Eoin Young

10:00-11:00 11:00-11:30 11.30 – 13.30 13:00-14:30 14:30-16:30 16.30 – 17.00

Eoin Young

SECTION THREE TEA BREAK 2

Eoin Young

DAILY SCHEDULE (December 10 – 18, 2010)
Date TIME ACTIVITY RESOURCE PERSON Eoin Young

9.00 - 11:00 11:00-11:30 11:30 -13:00 13:00-14:30 14:30-16:30 16.30 – 17.00

SECTION ONE TEA BREAK 1 SECTION TWO LUNCH BREAK SECTION THREE TEA BREAK 2

Eoin Young

Eoin Young

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ANNEX 3 LIST OF PARTICIPANTS (10 ToT TRAINER CANDIDATES) POLICY ADVOCACY TRAINING OF TRAINERS WORKSHOP FOR CIVILIAN ACTORS IN WEST AFRICA
No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Name Margaret Ward Brew Malcolm Joseph Kaine D. Nwashili Mary Akua Tobbin Alhassan Mohammed Antoinette Lucky Mbrou Country Ghana Liberia Nigeria Ghana Ghana Togo Organisation Gender Studies and Human Rights Documentation Centre Center for Media Studies and Peace Building (CEMESP) Interfaith Coalition on AIDS & Development in Nigeria ActionAid Ghana – Rights and Voice Initiative Ghanaian Danish Community Programme (GDCP) Groupe de reflexion et d’action Femme Democratie et developpement/Centre de Recherche, d’Information et de Formation pour la Femme (GF2D/CRIFF) Campaign for Good Governance Actions for Genuine Democratic Alternatives (AGENDA) UNDP consultant on Niger Delta Centre for Ethnic & Conflict Studies West African Network for Peacebuilding (WANEP) Email abawardgh@yahoo.com malcolmjoseph2000@yahoo.com knwashili@yahoo.com matobbin@yahoo.co.uk maryt@ravighana.org gdcp@africaonline.com.gh manhassan67@yahoo.com princesselucky@yahoo.fr Gender F M M F M F

7 8 9 10

Christian Lawrence Jasper Cummeh Paul Bemshima Constant Gnacadja

Sierra Leone Liberia Nigeria Benin

christianlawrence2000@yahoo.com clawrence@slcgg.org Jasper_cummeh@freeagenda.org bemreen@yahoo.com gnaconstant@yahoo.fr cgnacadja@wanep.org

M

M M

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LIST OF PARTICIPANTS (10 POLICY ENGAGEMENT AND ADVOCACY TRAINING PARTICIPANTS)
No. Name 1. Christian T. L. PEAH 2. G. Andy Quamie 3. Nkiruka Nnaemego 4. Dr. Nosa Aladeselu Country Liberia Liberia Nigeria Nigeria Ghana Togo Liberia Nigeria Ghana Ghana Budapest Ghana Organisation Liberia institute of public opinion LIPO Kofi Annan Institute of conflict transformation and peace studies Fresh & Young Brain Development Initiative African Women Empowerment Guild (AWEG) Christian Care Organisation WILDAF TOGO / FLORAISON OSIWA Liberia OSIWA Nigeria Youth Involvement Foundation Empowerment Centre for Women & children LGI-OSI (Facilitator/Trainer) WACSI (Policy Advocacy Officer) Email peahchristian@yahoo.com andyquamie@aol.com; gflip2024@yahoo.com fbinaija@yahoo.com nosaaladeselu@yahoo.co.uk awerg95@yahoo.com dontos@yahoo.co.uk qclaire@yahoo.fr landerson@osiwa.org pocheikwu@osiwa.org youthinvolve@gmail.com push youth@gmail.com ecwcaswasi@yahoo.com young@policy.hu balogun.omolara@yahoo.com Gender M M F F M F F M M F M F

5. Obed Adonteng-Kissi 6. Claire Quenum 7. Lucrezia Thomas Anderson 8. Peter Ocheikwu 9. Frank Ebo Mensah 10. Aminata Ibrahim 11. Eoin Young 12. Omolara Balogun

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