GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 1

For teaching from 2010 For awards from 2012 (first examination 2011/2012)

GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE

SPECIMEN ASSESSMENT MATERIALS

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 3

Contents

Page Question Papers
English Literature Unit 1 (H.T.) English Literature Unit 2 a and b (H.T.) English Literature Unit 1 (F.T.) English Literature Unit 2 a and b (F.T.)

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Mark Schemes
English Literature Unit 1 (H.T.) English Literature Unit 2 a and b (H.T.) English Literature Unit 1 (F.T.) English Literature Unit 2 a and b (F.T.)

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INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question. 4. JD*(S-2011 Higher) Turn over. You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers.GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Higher Tier UNIT 1 Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2011 2 hours SECTION A Question 1. . Poetry 12 Pages 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 . Answer one question in Section A and the question in Section B. INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer both Section A and Section B. Of Mice and Men Anita and Me To Kill a Mockingbird I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Chanda’s Secrets SECTION B 6. 5.11 ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. 3. 2.

show how John Steinbeck presents Curley here. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). the harness room and the barn. Choose one of these settings and show how it is important to the novel as a whole. Of Mice and Men Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). (b) Steinbeck uses three specific settings on the ranch: the bunkhouse.[20] Or.2 SECTION A 1. (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. (c) How is the character of Candy important to the novel as a whole? [20] (Higher Unit 1) . and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. [10] Either.

’ He turned towards the door and walked out. ‘By Christ. so it’s that way. with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair.’ said Lennie softly. I think. ‘An’ you won’t let the big guy talk. ‘Let the big guy talk. He stiffened and went into a slight crouch. ‘We jus’ come in. What the hell are you gettin’ into it for?’ ‘We travel together. Went over to the cook-house.’ said George. Curley.’ He nodded slightly to Lennie. (Higher Unit 1) Turn over. is that it?’ ‘He can talk if he want to tell you anything. Curley stared levelly at him. ‘You the new guys the old man was waitin’ for?’ ‘We just come in.’ said Curley. George said: ‘S’pose he don’t want to talk?’ Curley lashed his body around. He wore a work glove on his left hand. nex’ time you answer when you’re spoke to.’ Lennie twisted with embarrassment. ‘Yeah.’ said George coldly. Lennie squirmed under the look and shifted his feet nervously. His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists.’ George was tense and motionless. a thin young man with a brown face.’ ‘I’ll try to catch him. His glance was at once calculating and pugnacious. ‘Oh. it’s that way. The swamper said: ‘He was here jus’ a minute ago.’ Lennie was looking helplessly to George for instruction. He glanced coldly at George and then at Lennie. and his elbows were still bent out a little.3 At that moment a young man came into the bunkhouse. and like the boss. . ‘Seen my old man?’ he asked. he’s gotta talk when he’s spoke to. His eyes passed over the new men and he stopped. he wore high-heeled boots. Curley stepped gingerly close to him. ‘Well.

How is the conflict between these two influences presented in the novel? [20] (Higher Unit 1) . show how Meera Syal creates mood and atmosphere here. (b) How is Meena’s father presented in the novel? [20] Or. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Punjabi and British.4 2. (c) Meena says she grew up under the influence of two cultures. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). [10] Either. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. Anita and Me Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c).

and did not look back until I had reached the haven of papa’s arms. Who was that? Who said that? Who had thought that all this time and why had I never known about it? And then another voice. Not some wogs’ handout. clouds of bluey-grey smoke wheezing from his exhaust. I knew he was trying to get to me and I began pushing forward. tell them Sam Lowbridge was my mate. son. ‘Wait! Sam!’ Uncle Alan puffed. a woman’s. ‘Sam Lowbridge. I could hear catcalls coming from all over the grounds. I knew she would not hold me or take my hand. We don’t give a toss for anybody else.5 Sam interrupted. ‘Wharrabout that then!’ she grinned. There must have been some mistake. is he?’ And then a rasping voice came from somewhere in the throng. When my ears had stopped ringing and I gradually returned to my body. yow bloody skinhead idiot! Bloody disgrace. (Higher Unit 1) Turn over.’ I jerked my head towards the sound. And give everything away to some darkies we’ve never met. I wanted to find these people. a sly grin curling the corners of his mouth: ‘Yow don’t do nothing but talk. This is our patch. who manoeuvred in and out of each other like a bunch of May-mad midges until they were nothing but annoying buzzy specks in the distance. not wanting to draw any more attention to himself or what had just happened. yow am a bloody stupid cow sometimes. the boy who had taught me how to shoot a fairground rifle.’ I said. . son! I’d be on my deathbed before that’d happen!’ Uncle Alan was half-running towards the gate.’ I felt as if I had been punched in the stomach. ‘Anger is good! But not used this way! Please! You’re going the wrong way!’ Sam aimed his moped straight at Uncle Alan who was now outside the gates. My legs felt watery and a hot panic softened my insides to mush. encountering a wall of solid backs and legs. Sam Lowbridge! Yow wanna good birching. ‘Listen! Don’t do this! Don’t turn all this energy the wrong way!’ Sam was not listening. Uncle Alan sat heavily down on the grass and rested his head on his arms. He was already revving up. who terrorised everyone else except me. making him jump back and stumble. towards Sam who was strolling back to his moped to the cheers and claps of his gang. He’s dead bloody hard. gripping his bottle of whisky like a weapon. Alan. yow do! Yow don’t talk for me. It was as if the whole crowd had turned into one huge eyeball which swivelled slowly between me and papa. Uncle Alan’s mouth was opening and closing like a goldfish. People were now crowding round papa. My mind was turning cartwheels. I was his favourite. “Uncle”. I wished I had stood next to papa. lad! Tell him some more!’ The sound had come from somewhere around Mr Ormerod. ‘Go on. and then he sped off up the hill followed by the rest of his three-wheeler lackeys. ‘You tell him. . my cheeks still felt warm and taut. Mr Ku-mar. I stared at him. straight into his eyes. Anita was tugging my sleeve as she held onto me. ‘Yow shuttit. offering condolences and back pats like he’d just come last in the annual church egg and spoon race. One of your supporters. Papa was staring into the distance. Reverend Ince whispered to him ‘Good work. he’s always been a bad-un . ‘Isn’t he bosting!’ ‘What?’ I croaked. in’t he?’ ‘Anita Rutter. ‘Yow don’t mind him. shrugging his shoulders.’ Papa smiled graciously at them. . I could feel Anita shifting beside me. seemingly unconcerned. I turned round to face her. He shifted from foot to foot and glanced away.

(a) Read the extract on the opposite page. (c) How does Harper Lee present the town of Maycomb in To Kill A Mockingbird? [20] (Higher Unit 1) . You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. To Kill a Mockingbird Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c).6 3. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). [10] Either. (b) How is the character of Calpurnia important to the novel as a whole? [20] Or. show how Harper Lee creates mood and atmosphere here.

when I left it. only furniture. She says what her papa do to her don’t count. ‘an’ she says – she was laughin’. I couldn’t do nothin’ for her. The witness smiled. another one. ‘Mr Finch. then at Mr Underwood sitting across the room.’ ‘I understand you. So I done what she told me. ‘What happened after that?’ ‘Answer the question. ‘What did you say then. but the afternoon sun had left the windows. ‘Well. and his eyes widened. then at the jury. you’ve sworn to tell the whole truth. ‘Naw suh. Mr Finch. and as it did the overhead lights went on in the courtroom.’ ‘What did he say?’ Tom Robinson swallowed again.’ This time Judge Taylor’s gavel came down with a bang.’ ‘Jumped on you? Violently?’ ‘No suh. “You think so?” I don’t think she understood what I was thinkin’ – I meant it was smart of her to save like that. and she says to just step on that chair yonder an’ git that box down from on top of the chiffarobe. sort of – she says they all gone to town to get ice-creams. Darkness had not come. He glanced at Atticus. that’s right smart o’ you to treat ’em. an’ nice of her to treat ’em. Will you tell it?’ Tom ran his hand nervously over his mouth. They all gone to town. but just when I say it Mr Ewell yonder hollered through th’ window.’ Tom Robinson shut his eyes tight. ‘Some-thin’ not fittin’ to say – not fittin’ for these folks’n chillun to hear–’ ‘What did he say. and he ran his hand over his face. I’ll kill ya. Mr Finch. “Kiss me back. an’ I say lemme pass. “Took me a slap year to save seb’m nickels.’ said Atticus. an’ I was just reachin’ when the next thing I knows she – she’d grabbed me round the legs.’ (Higher Unit 1) Turn over. Most as tall as the room. grabbed me round th’ legs. an’ I ask her what. ‘I said somethin’ like. I didn’t wanta harm her. ‘Tom. Go on. Tom? You must tell the jury what he said. ‘Then what did she do?’ The witness swallowed hard.7 Tom’s black velvet skin had begun to shine. She hugged me round the waist. ‘She reached up an’ kissed me ’side of th’ face. ’sturbed in that room. Tom. She says. but I done it. Mr Finch. I got down offa that chair an’ turned around an’ she sorta jumped on me.”’ Tom’s discomfort was not from the humidity. she – she hugged me.’ said Judge Taylor. She says she never kissed a grown man before an’ she might as well kiss a nigger. . I said I best be goin’. Judge Taylor quickly restored order. Tom?’ asked Atticus. why Miss Mayella. One-third of his cigar had vanished. She says. nigger.” I say Miss Mayella lemme outa here an’ tried to run but she got her back to the door an’ I’da had to push her. an’ she says oh yes I could. ‘He says you goddamn whore. I swear ’fore God. She scared me so bad I hopped down an’ turned the chair over – that was the only thing. An’ she said.’ ‘What happened after you turned the chair over?’ Tom Robinson had come to a dead stop. ‘I say where the chillun?’ he continued.’ ‘Not the same chiffarobe you busted up?’ Asked Atticus.

8 4. (b) Write about the town of Stamps and how it is presented in I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract show how Maya Angelou creates mood and atmosphere here. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. and how she learned to cope with these experiences. (c) Show how Maya Angelou makes the reader aware of her experiences of racism as she grew up. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). [20] Or. [10] Either. [20] (Higher Unit 1) .

But Sister Monroe’s voice had already reached the danger point. and said. pink tongue waving. He was not intimidated by his change of venue. I suppose. When the incident with Sister Monroe. like a summer rain. to give the members what they came for. across that square of stained boards. “I say. covered his mouth and whispered.” Sister Monroe hit him on the back of his head with her purse. Elder Thomas jumped into the sermon. But for weeks after.” I looked toward Momma. preach it” – in a whisper. Then suddenly. and Sister Monroe rounded the altar on his heels. out of his mouth. all we needed to send us into violent out-bursts of laughter was a whispered “Preach it. Sister Monroe broke through the cloud of people trying to hem her in. and flooded up to the pulpit. we had been too astounded to laugh.” Bailey said out loud. preach it!” Two deacons wedged themselves around Brother Jackson as a preventative measure and two large determined looking men walked down the aisle toward Sister Monroe. Bailey jogged my knee.” But Reverend Thomas didn’t intend to wait for that eventuality. preach it. She didn’t stop this time but continued immediately to the altar. and Bailey nudged me again. followed by the deacons. Twice. I saw the ushers from the left side of the church near the big windows begin to move discreetly. his teeth fell. which we always called simply “the incident. toward Sister Monroe’s bench. ushers. He continued preaching and moving. some unofficial members and a few of the bigger children. “I say. preach it. Sister Monroe echoed him loudly. he pushed my knee.” had taken place. so as Sister Monroe approached the pulpit from the right he started descending from the left. and she sizzled somewhere to the right behind me. like pallbearers. actually his teeth jumped. determined. “I say. “Hot dog” and “Damn” and “She’s going to beat his butt. bound for Elder Thomas. Just as the elder opened his mouth. which put him almost in our laps. over the collection table. hoping that a look from her would root me safely to my sanity. But for the first time in memory Momma was staring behind me at Sister Monroe. crying “I say. no. . While the sounds in the church were increasing. (Higher Unit 1) Turn over. Before he could bring his lips together.9 Sister Monroe’s fuse was already lit. “Preach it!” There were a few smothered giggles from the children’s section. Elder Thomas made the regrettable mistake of increasing his volume too. I supposed that she was counting on bringing that emotional lady up short with a severe look or two. He finally stopped right in front of the collection table.” Anyway. “Great God of Mount Nebo.

[10] Either. Chanda’s Secrets Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). show how Allan Stratton creates mood and atmosphere here.10 5. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. (c) Show how Chanda gradually comes to realise the truth about AIDS in her family and in the community. (b) How are rumours and superstitions important to the novel as a whole? [20] Or. [20] (Higher Unit 1) . (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c).

I want her to have a grave marked with its own little fence and canvas top. no grazing of livestock. The winding dirt roads are filled with potholes. This is what Sara will have. as the Chevy bounces along.11 The cemetery is a rocky field on the outskirts of town. There’s a row of eight fresh graves. Each brick marks a grave. I’m sorry God. Sara’s being buried in the northeast corner. (I’m sorry God. ‘Raetsho yoo ko ke godimong. The dead have disappeared as if they never lived. forgive me. Mourners hop off pickup trucks and search for their dead. our priest climbs to the top of Sara’s mound and delivers a scripture reading about eternal life. forgive me. so I can leave toys for her without them disappearing. A date’s scrawled in black paint. Mr Bateman says we’re the third one down.’ I know we can never afford to buy her a headstone. I want there to be a gate and a lock. but I want to save for a memorial.’ I whisper. her name soldered in wire at the front. too. past a metal sign announcing township bylaws for behaviour: no screaming. We’re not alone. no defacing or stealing memorials. ‘Sara. But I don’t care. It only opened last year but already it’s almost full. As we join the priest in chanting the prayer. Meanwhile.” Everyone bows their heads except for me. forgive me. about a ten-minute walk from Esther’s parents. the earth piled high at the head of each hole. or other indecent behaviour.) The priest starts the Lord’s prayer. Last rainy season. ‘forgive us. I’m more afraid the bouncing may break Sara’s coffin. and the fences bent out of shape the moment the graves collapsed in the rainy season. I stare at this field covered with bricks. Funerals are already in progress on either side. So did the tow trucks that came to pull them out. But suddenly I’m scared it’s just something priests make up to take away the nightmares. Mama says memorials are just another way to make the undertakers rich. I want to believe in God and Sara being with the ancestors. (Higher Unit 1) Turn over. hearses got stuck in them. I’m sorry God. In the distance I see the dust of other processions driving through the gates. We drive through a gate in the barbed-wire fence. Papa’s and my brothers’ lost their canvas tops years ago. Today. shouting. . There’s not even room for a name. A fight breaks out over who’s supposed to be in holes five and six. We pull up to the site.

rain Fall softly. At my door’s a square of yellow corn caught up by its corners and shaken. to order and dust the tumbled rooms and find my face in the glass. . I had thought to work on the Abbey* stage or have my name in a book. 6. • your responses to the poems. blow me from here With your fiercest wind Let me float across the sky ‘Til I can rest again Fall gently. the way they are organised. Reproduced from Still I Rise by kind permission of Virago Press (Higher Unit 1) Overheard in County Sligo I married a man from County Roscommon and I live in the back of beyond with a field of cows and a yard of hens and six white geese on the pond. Storm.12 SECTION B Spend about 1 hour on this section. leaf and stone Star shine. • how they are written – words and phrases you find interesting. You may write about each poem separately and then compare them. rain. Think carefully about the poems before you write your answer. In the second. I ought to feel I’m a happy woman for I lie in the lap of the land. dewdrops And cool my brow again. and I married a man from County Roscommon and I live in the back of beyond. Gillian Clarke * Abbey: A well-known theatre in Dublin Reproduced by kind permission from Selected Poems by Gillian Clarke. Overheard in County Sligo. a black woman speaks about her life in the southern states of the USA. or still the crowd with a look. to see my thought on the printed page. [20] Woman Work I’ve got the children to tend The clothes to mend The floor to mop The food to shop Then the chicken to fry The baby to dry I got company to feed The garden to weed I’ve got the shirts to press The tots to dress The cane to be cut I gotta clean up this hut Then see about the sick And the cotton to pick. curving sky Mountain. • the mood or atmosphere of the poems. snowflakes Cover me with white Cold icy kisses and Let me rest tonight. Sun. published by Carcanet Press Limited 1996. or make comparisons where appropriate in your answer as a whole. sunshine Rain on me. a woman speaks about her life in Ireland. Maya Angelou © Maya Angelou 1978. and so on. Woman Work. oceans. Shine on me. moon glow You’re all that I can call my own. In the first of the following poems. You may wish to include some or all of these points: • the content of the poems – what they are about. Write about both poems and their effect on you. • the ideas the poets may have wanted us to think about. and the road runs down through the open gate and freedom’s there for the taking. Show how they are similar and how they are different. But I turn to fold the breakfast cloth and to polish the lustre and brass.

JD*(S2012-Higher) . (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Question 2. You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers. Answer on one text in each question.GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Higher Tier UNIT 2a (Literary heritage drama and contemporary prose) Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2012 2 hours Question 1. Turn over.11 12 13 14 15 16 ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Othello Much Ado About Nothing An Inspector Calls Hobson’s Choice A Taste of Honey Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha Heroes Never Let Me Go About a Boy Resistance Pages 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 . INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer Question 1 and Question 2. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question.

(i) Read the extract on the opposite page. (ii) Why does Othello kill Desdemona? [20] Or.2 QUESTION 1 Answer questions on one text. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (a) Othello Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). What does it reveal about their relationship? [10] Either. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how lago and Cassio speak and behave here. (iii) How does Shakespeare present the character Iago to an audience throughout the play? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) .

let us call thee devil! What was he that you followed with your sword? What had he done to you? I know not. if thou hast no name to be known by. are you hurt. to make me frankly despise myself. and what remains is bestial. and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed. I will ask him for my place again: he shall tell me I am a drunkard. such an answer would stop them all. come. . O God. unless you repute yourself such a loser. you are too severe a moraller. revel. lieutenant? Ay. There is more sense in that than in reputation. Exclaim no more against it. Marry. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition. My reputation. but you are now well enough. but nothing distinctly: a quarrel. so drunken. my reputation! As I am an honest man. Had I as many mouths as Hydra.3 IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO What. pleasance. Come. To be now a sensible man. I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself. reputation! O. and he’s yours. One unperfectness shows me another. man!–there are ways to recover the general again. mend it for your own good. past all surgery. and so indiscreet an officer. good wine is a good familiar creature if it be well used. How came you thus recovered? It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place to the devil wrath. I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so light. Come. God forbid! Reputation. But since it is as it is. I had thought you had received some bodily wound. that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! – that we should with joy. As the time. and applause transform ourselves into beasts! Why. Sue to him again. oft got without merit and lost without deserving. You have lost no reputation at all. but nothing wherefore. Is’t possible? I remember a mass of things. by and by a fool. the place. reputation. IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. What. Drunk! And speak parrot! And squabble! Swagger! Swear! And discourse fustian with one’s own shadow! O thou invisible spirit of wine. You are but now cast in his mood – a punishment more in policy than in malice – even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion. and the condition of this country stands. and the ingredience is a devil. lago. I could heartily wish this had not befallen.

Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Claudio and Don Pedro speak and behave here. [20] Or. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). What impressions would an audience receive of their characters? [10] Either. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (ii) Show how Shakespeare presents the development of the relationship between Beatrice and Benedict. (iii) How does Shakespeare present the character Don John to an audience throughout the play? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) .4 (b) Much Ado About Nothing Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii).

thou lovest. Hath Leonato any son. your Highness now may do me good. and that war-thoughts Have left their places vacant. If thou dost love fair Hero. And tire the hearer with a book of words. Thou wilt be like a lover presently. And I know we shall have revelling tonight: I will assume thy part in some disguise. And take her hearing prisoner with the force And strong encounter of my amorous tale. What need the bridge much broader than the flood? The fairest grant is the necessity. Saying I liked her ere I went to wars. My love is thine to teach. And in her bosom I’ll unclasp my heart. And tell fair Hero I am Claudio. Was’nt not to this end That thou began’st to twist so fine a story? How sweetly you do minister to love. Claudio? O my lord. That liked. Teach it but how. my lord? No child but Hero: she’s his only heir. And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn Any hard lesson that may do thee good. she shall be thine. Look what will serve is fit. cherish it. I looked upon her with a soldier’s eye. That know love’s grief by his complexion! But lest my liking might too sudden seem. Then after. Dost thous affect her. And I will break with her an with her father And thou shalt have her. But now I am returned. CLAUDIO DON PEDRO CLAUDIO DON PEDRO CLAUDIO DON PEDRO (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. . I would have salved it with a longer treatise. When you went onward on this ended action. All prompting me how fair young Hero is. to her father will I break: And the conclusion is. in their rooms Come thronging soft and delicate desires.5 CLAUDIO DON PEDRO My liege. but had a rougher task in hand Than to drive liking to the name of love. ‘Tis once. In practice let us put it presently.

Why do you think it is still popular today. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). in the 21st century? Remember to support your answer with reference to the text. and was written in the mid 1940s. How could it affect an audience’s feelings towards him? [10] Either. Birling to an audience throughout the play? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . [20] Or. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page.6 (c) An Inspector Calls Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (ii) An Inspector Calls is set in 1912. (iii) How does JB Priestly present the character of Mrs. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Gerald speaks and behaves here.

y’know. . BIRLING GERALD (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. (At telephone. But the point is– this sergeant was dead certain they hadn’t any inspector at all like the chap who came here. I asked him about this Inspector Goole and described the chap carefully to him. Sorry to ring you up so late. . Mr Arthur Birling here . cleanshaven. eh? Yes. please. Oh. Roberts – Birling here. Are you certain? I’m almost certain. . a new man . you were right. G-O-O-L-E . BIRLING MRS. it makes all the difference. yes . BIRLING MRS. B.) I see . That man definitely wasn’t a police inspector at all. I passed it off by saying I’d been having an argument with somebody. (excitedly) By Jingo! A fake! (triumphantly) Didn’t I tell you? Didn’t I say I couldn’t imagine a real police inspector talking like that to us? Well. Of course! BIRLING GERALD BIRLING MRS. . no. Good night. We’ve been had.) I was going to do this anyhow. well. . (To others as he waits. What is it? (slowly) The man wasn’t a police officer. tall. No. (He puts down the telephone and looks at the others. (beginning to move) I’m going to make certain of this. (At telephone. This makes a difference. B. just a little argument we were having here. that settles it. . . . dear. Careful what you say. GERALD BIRLING GERALD (excitedly) You know something. . He never even looked like one. . . You didn’t tell him– (cutting in) No. . . What are you going to do? Ring up the Chief Constable . .7 BIRLING GERALD MRS.) Brumley eight seven five two. He never talked like one.Colonel Roberts. B. He swore there wasn’t any Inspector Goole or anybody like him on the force here. GERALD BIRLING MRS. In fact. Goole. (excitedly) Good lad! You asked about him.) Colonel Roberts. B.) There’s no Inspector Goole on the police. . . B. As Gerald says – we’ve been had. . (now at telephone) Of course. . That’s what I came back to tell you. I’ve had my suspicions all along. There isn’t any such inspector. . I felt it all the time. (Here he can describe the appearance of the actor playing the INSPECTOR. but can you tell me if an Inspector Goole has joined your staff lately . I met a police sergeant I know down the road.

You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) How are Maggie’s sisters. [10] Either.8 (d) Hobson’s Choice Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). show how it reveals the relationship between Maggie and Willie at this point in the play. [20] Or. (ii) Hobson’s Choice is subtitled “A Lancashire Comedy”. To what extent do you find it “a comedy”? Support your answer with reference to the text. important to the play as a whole? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Vicky and Alice. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract.

I’d be feared to go in them fine places. what? It seems to me to point one way. and it’s got to come out some time. But I never – I know you never. mopping his brow. (Moves to trap. What dost want me for? To invest in. I’ve watched you for a long time and everything I’ve seen.9 MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE When are you going to leave Hobson’s? Leave Hobson’s? I – I thought I gave satisfaction. Will Mossop? You heard what Mrs Hepworth said. I thought you were axing me to wed you. or it ’ud not be left to me to do the job like this.) I’m feeling queer-like. Miss Maggie. the other’s the bad boots other people make and I sell. you’re my man. I’ve liked. Miss Maggie? Will Mossop. I’ll be getting back to my stool. We’re a pair. and I’m not leaving till I’m made. I think you’ll do for me. Don’t you want to leave? Not me. by gum! And you the master’s daughter. WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE (Higher-Unit 2) . Miss Maggie. What keeps you here? Is it the – the people? I dunno what it is. (getting up. (He sits in arm-chair. My brain and your hands ’ull make a working partnership. Well? Well.) (stopping him): You’ll go back when I’ve done with you. You know the wages you get and you know the wages a bootmaker like you could get in one of the big shops in Manchester. Six months I’ve counted on you. I said you were a fool. I’m used to being here. You’re a wonder in the shop. What way is that? You’re leaving me to do the work. Don’t you want to get on. But I have. I’ll – I’ll sit down. relieved): Partnership! Oh. Then I’m a loyal fool. Turn over. Well. And you’re a marvel in the workshop. my lad. You’re a business idea in the shape of a man. I’ve been at Hobson’s all my life. What way. that’s a different thing. I am. Will Mossop. Nay. I’ve got no head for business at all. Do you know what keeps this business on its legs? Two things: one’s good boots you make that sell themselves.

(ii) Why do you think Shelagh Delaney called her play A Taste of Honey? To what extent do you find it an appropriate title for the play? [20] Or. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Peter and Helen speak and behave here. How does it create mood and atmosphere for an audience? [10] Either.10 (e) A Taste of Honey Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) How does Delaney present the character of Geof to an audience throughout the play? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii).

Oh.] “Little Josephine. come here. [Sings. well. are you coming for a few drinks or aren’t you? The pubs aren’t open yet. . can I? His name was Oedipus. Cut the dirty stories! But I only scratched out one of mine. What’s the matter everybody? Look at the sourfaced old bitch! Well..] Who’s this? Oh. I can’t carry him out. [There is a loud crash in the kitchen. no! Who’s he? President of the local Temperance Society! [singing]: “Who’s got a bun in the oven? Who’s got a cake in the stove?” Leave her alone. the father? Oh Christ. . singing. come on . everybody. There she is. Helen. outside! Ah! The erring daughter. Now come on. Peter. Well. HELEN: PETER: HELEN: JO: PETER: JO: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: (Higher-Unit 2) . Did I ever tell you about the chappie who married his mother by mistake? I said get him out of here. go to hell! I’ve got nothing to say . bubble belly! Before I shut it for you.. . Shut up. Now.] Mary. [PETER enters. of course! Where are the drinks. . Who’s the lily? Look at Helen. . Go on. don’t mind me! [Notices GEOF again. [seeing GEOF]: What’s this. Lana? [He falls into the kitchen. you’re a big girl now. he was a Greek I think.] And the light of the world shone upon him. Do you mind getting out of here? Shut your mouth. Hey! [To GEOF.] Cheer up.] “Getting to know you. the old bag turned out to be his mother . are you coming or not? Turn over. . Don’t point your bloody finger at me. come on.” Where d’you keep the whisky? They haven’t got any. have your blasted family reunion. I said I’d only be a few minutes and I’ve only been a few minutes. getting to know all about you . Well. His breath smells.11 PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: GEOF: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: JO: PETER: What the hell’s going on? Do you expect me to wait in the filthy street all night? I told you to stay outside. for God’s sake! So he scratched out both his eyes.” Jo. if she doesn’t look like a bloody unrestored oil painting. I am back.

He’d hit her again and I saw him. –What do you want. I’d been coming in to tell him. He looked at her. he didn’t slam it. I was up for Liverpool. The way he shut the door. waiting. I saw her falling back. I was too late. I sobbed once and that was all. and he saw me. And I went back in and watched Liverpool winning. then went. Either. and I could hear my heart pumping the blood to the rest of me. then he was gone. My mouth opened and a roar started but it never came. as well as getting the drink of water. I thought I was. [10] I never got the chance to run away. I thought he was. (a) Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (ii) Show how Paddy’s relationship with Sinbad is presented throughout the novel. Something. –Thank you very much. He looked at me. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). too early for fighting. He didn’t have a suitcase or even a jacket. And a pain in my chest. I walked in for a drink of water. [20] Or. He unmade his fist. She wasn’t holding her shoulder or anything. –D’you hear me!? In the kitchen. He didn’t. I thought he was going to put her back to where she’d been before he hit her. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). He thumped her on the shoulder. for being there. He was going to say something to me. –A drink of water. It was daylight out still. He closed it behind him – I saw him in the glass. He waited for a few seconds. [20] . He didn’t slam it. He didn’t slam the door even a bit. I saw him in the glass. I just knew: he wasn’t coming back.” Show how Roddy Doyle presents both the warmth and cruelty in Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. I said. except it was the front door and we only used the front door when people came. My ma filled my mug at the sink. he said. (iii) (Higher-Unit 2) Paddy’s world has been described as being “full of warmth and cruelty. The Big Match was on and Liverpool were beating Arsenal. He left first. I wanted to say Sorry. It was Sunday. show how Roddy Doyle suggests Paddy’s feelings here. He went red. I cheered when the final whistle got blown but no one come in to look. My da spoke. but I knew. He looked like he was in trouble. I was supposed to cry.12 QUESTION 2 Answer questions on one text. like he was going down to the shops. –How’s the match going? –They’re winning. I took the mug from my ma. He just closed it. –Great. his hands moved. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. (i) Read the extract below. love? It was my ma.

Despite the heat. silent as he gazed at me over his shoulder. (i) Read the extract below. and the way he is presented in the novel? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). the piazza on Nicole’s second floor tenement remained vacant. People moved as if in a slowmotion movie. he asked: ‘Why are you here all the time?’ I shrugged. the heat almost visible in the air. The windows were open to allow cooler air to enter the tenement but no one came or went. [10] A heat wave gripped Frenchtown. in your opinion? [20] Or. Either. venturing sometimes into the yard. squinting against the sun. kept away from the street during those times. Yes. The boy waited a moment for my reply then pedalled back into his yard. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). hoping that I might catch a glimpse of her coming or going or at a window. gathering on front lawns and piazzas in the evening after the shops closed. . hoping for a breeze to cool them off. He went into the house and did not come out again. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. ‘Waiting. I haunted Sixth Street at all hours. I wanted to say. purposely avoiding even in my mind that terrible word: what had actually happened to her.’ ‘Are you the bogey man?’ he asked. after their shifts were over.13 (b) Heroes Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). For three days. Finally. Men walked slowly as they went off to work in the shops as weary-looking in the morning as they were late in the day. Nicole’s father left the tenement to go to the shop just before seven o’clock in the morning and returned shortly after five in the afternoon and I avoided him. standing across the street and looking up at the second floor of Nicole’s house. show how Robert Cormier creates mood and atmosphere here. scratching his chin. A small boy in the house across the street from Nicole’s rode his bicycle endlessly on the sidewalk and gazed at me occasionally as I waited. (ii) To what extent is Heroes an effective title for this novel. (iii) What do you think of Larry LaSalle. A kind of bogey man who does terrible things like letting his girl get hurt and attacked.

All along the fence. [10] I found I was standing before acres of ploughed earth. There was a fence keeping me from stepping into the field. then turned back to the car. and I was now standing here in front of it. I wasn’t sobbing or out of control. flapping about. because this was Norfolk after all. to drive off to wherever it was I was supposed to be. feeling the wind coming across thos empty fields. with whom do you have the most sympathy and why? Show how Kazuo Ishiguro’s presentation of your chosen character creates sympathy for him or her. Either. and I half-closed my eyes and imagined this was the spot where everything I’d ever lost since my childhood had washed up. Tommy and Ruth. the flapping plastic in the branches. and it was only a couple of weeks since I’d lost him. and gradually get larger until I’d see it was Tommy. (ii) Of the three central characters. maybe even call. and if I waited long enough. I just waited a bit. torn plastic sheeting and bits of old carrier bags. and I could see how this fence and the cluster of three or four trees above me were the only things breaking the wind for miles. as I stood there looking at that strange rubbish. with two lines of barbed wire. all sorts of rubbish had caught and tangled. too. that I started to imagine just a little fantasy thing. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. in your opinion? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). a tiny figure would appear on the horizon across the field. (iii) How effective a title is Never Let Me Go. I could see. That was the only time. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). especially along the lower line of wire. I was thinking about the rubbish.14 (c) Never Let Me Go Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). show how Kazuo Ishiguro presents mood and atmosphere here. Up in the branches of the trees. and he’d wave. Kathy. It was like the debris you get on a seashore: the wind must have carried some of it for miles and miles before finally coming up against these trees and these two lines of wire. the shore-line of odd stuff caught along the fencing. [20] Or. (i) Read the extract below. The fantasy never got beyond that – I didn’t let it – and though the tears rolled down my face.

(iii) (Higher-Unit 2) Write about Fiona. it seemed to him. and even if she did it wouldn’t make a whole lot of difference. got taught by their parents at home. And all the time it got nearer and nearer to the morning. but more or less every morning for the rest of his life. . 12. and the way she is presented in the novel. Everyone went to school.41. That would be OK. (ii) Or. and the morning after that. That was it. 1. when he had got as far away from school and reality as it was possible to go. Which of these stories interests you the more. and the morning after that and . anyway. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i).15 (d) About A Boy Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). and why? [20] Turn over.31 . he supposed. he knew that much. 11. Better than OK. show how Nick Hornby suggests Marcus’s thoughts and feelings here. but his mum couldn’t do that because she went out to work. well. He’d still be who he was. and leave him in exactly the place he had started from. and they said he got taught in a caravan sort of thing by a private tutor. all the way to a caravan in Hollywood and. She wasn’t going to move him to another school. or for baggy trousers. or even through. which meant that if he were Macaulay Culkin he could pay his mum to teach him. .55. maybe even more. whenever he had been upset about anything before. then it would be the weekend. There was no way round it. but not being right for school was a big problem. Unless he paid her to teach him – but she’d told him not long ago that she got three hundred and fifty pounds a week from her job. (i) Read the extract below. thump him on the head. But if being Macaulay Culkin meant being good at drama. He couldn’t believe he was going to have to go back there the next morning. Which was why he wanted to be Macaulay Culkin. because he hated standing up in front of people. Every time he woke up his first thought was that there must be some kind of way past. just about. because his legs were too short). He was going to have to go to school tomorrow. They’d had something about him on Saturday-morning TV once. . this horrible feeling. . . for a moment. or round. Marcus’ mother. and that. 11.55. he was reasonably happy.19. Three hundred and fifty pounds a week! Where was he going to get that kind of money from? Not from a paper round. Which was why he was never going to be Macaulay Culkin in a thousand years. there had usually turned out to be some kind of answer – one that mostly involved telling his mum what was bothering him. All that night he thought like boomerangs fly: an idea would shoot way off into the distance. Some kids. he knew. let alone in the next few days. Which was why he hated school. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). because Macaulay Culkin probably got three hundred and fifty pounds a week. Either. The only other kind of person he could think of who didn’t go to school was the Macaulay Culkin kind. then forget it: he was crap at drama. because he was too shy. But there wasn’t anything she could do this time. then it would begin the return journey. He could tell from the luminous hands of his dinosaur clock: 10.35. Not secondary schools. was the basic problem. 12. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. He just wasn’t right for schools. And how could you explain that to any-one? It was OK not to be right for some things (he already knew he wasn’t right for parties. [10] During the night after his first day Marcus woke up every half-hour or so. [20] About a Boy tells the story of Marcus and the story of Will.

16 (e) Resistance Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) To what extent is Resistance an effective title for this novel. that glimpse. waiting for a train to take them into Newport. however much she’d tried to forget it. [10] It was her birthday. As it was. as if for the first time. they would wait on the platform for the fast train carrying troops from the training fields of west Wales up to London and the ports of the south coast. show how Owen Sheers suggests Sarah’s feelings here. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. But Sarah didn’t even have that. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (i) Read the extract below. (ii) Or. they’d always had something: letters. Just an empty vigilance for some sign. dressed as if for a dance. forever facing up to their blank answer. the pain of her solitude. Even the women whose husbands had gone to war. Childless. The train didn’t stop at Newport. Not for the first time. as ever. She’d once seen a crowd of these women down at the station in Pandy. Twenty-seven years old. In death he would have given her an answer. Not because of what he’d done. There was nowhere she could go in the hope of seeing Tom. their cheeks rouged and their lips bright red. No reports she could read with her heart in her mouth. days of leave. Just the afternoon before she’d ridden Bess up on the hill and watched a pair of crows circle and dance about each other in the air. But these women always went to watch it pass. Abandoned in a world gone sour. their lovers. It was often a hopeless journey but the women still went. Either. some hidden message and her long rides up on the hills. she just had nothing. just gave a couple of blasts on its whistle and steamed on through. They were wearing their best dresses. just for the chance. but instead of what he’d done. Just for the chance of seeing the faces of their husbands. Even the carrion crows who ate the eyes of her dead ewes had companionship while she. and the way he is presented in the novel? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . had just the blood-pulse of the wind in her ears and the heat of Bess’s neck to keep her company. in your opinion? [20] What do you think of Albrecht. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). she felt. When they’d landed they’d rubbed shoulders and Sarah had felt again. as the long line of carriages clattered and rushed past them trailing its heavy plume of steam. nothing to celebrate. There was. And no letters she could wait for. She would have known where he was. she’d wanted Tom dead. There. She hadn’t mentioned it to any of the other women and she’d tried not to even mention it to herself.

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer Question 1 and Question 2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Question 2. JD*(S2012-Higher) .11 12 13 14 15 16 ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers. Answer on one text in each question.GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Higher Tier UNIT 2b (Contemporary drama and literary heritage prose) Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2012 2 hours Question 1. Turn over. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) The History Boys Blood Brothers A View From The Bridge Be My Baby My Mother Said I Never Should Silas Marner Pride and Prejudice A Christmas Carol Lord of the Flies Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 .

[20] Or. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (ii) For which of the boys in The History Boys do you have the most sympathy? Show how the presentation of your chosen character creates sympathy for him. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii).2 QUESTION 1 Answer questions on one text. (a) The History Boys Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. (iii) How does Alan Bennett present education in The History Boys? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Irwin speaks and behaves here. What does it reveal about his character? [10] Either.

Because you should realise that so far as the Cenotaph and the Last Post and all that stuff is concerned. Trench warfare. Poetry is good up to a point. Our overall conclusion is that the origins of the Second War lie in the unsatisfactory outcome of the First.’ Which. right . Try this for size. Though there’s no reason why we should want war. (with more certainty) Yes. Passchendaele. It’s not so much lest we forget. Inflation. Yes. . True. since Wilfred Owen says men were dying like cattle. Haig particularly. Oxford. the First World War gets the thumbs-down. A photograph on every mantelpiece. ‘hecatombs’. . Humiliation of Germany at Versailles. (doubtfully) Yes. And all this mourning has veiled the truth. tick them all off. Saint Wilfred Owen couldn’t wait to get back to his company. IRWIN POSNER DAKIN IRWIN CROWTHER LOCKWOOD TIMMS AKTHAR TIMMS DAKIN POSNER CROWTHER AKTHAR TIMMS IRWIN TIMMS IRWIN SCRIPPS IRWIN DAKIN IRWIN DAKIN IRWIN LOCKWOOD IRWIN (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. Bristol welcomes you with open arms. On both sides. He was a butcher. then? What about them? If you read what they actually say as distinct from what they write. Mass unemployment. The Somme. But it’s all true. Donkeys. Nothing in it for us. . . . as you all seem to have read somewhere . there’s no better way of forgetting something than by commemorating it. Manchester longs to have you. sir. First class. Internal disorder. Sir? You were the one who was morally superior about Haig. Ruhr and the Rhineland. as lest we remember. Barrenness of the strategy. sir. . Adds flavour. Collapse of the Weimar Republic. So what about the poets.3 Classroom So we arrive eventually at the less-than-startling discovery that so far as the poets are concerned. sir. the body count. . And Dakin. If Haig had had any sense he’d have had him disinterred and shot all over again for giving comport to the enemy. The Rise of Hitler! So. What else? Come on. Others nod. These are facts. Re-drawing of national borders. Siegfried Sassoon was a good officer. is the appropriate word. You can walk into Leeds. Stupidity of the generals. but no need to look so smug about it. Better stand back and let Germany and Russia fight it out while we take the imperial pickings. no the real enemy to Haig’s subsequent reputation was the Unknown Soldier. No. Both of them surprisingly blood thirsty. Anybody know what it means? ‘Great public sacrifice of many victims. but at least he delivered the goods. . and I have just read seventy papers all saying the same thing and I am asleep . And . originally of oxen. Germany does not want war and if there is an arms race it is Britain who is leading it. What has that got to do with it? What has that got to do with anything? Let’s go back to 1914 and I’ll put you a different case. most of them seem to have enjoyed the war. Why do we not care to acknowledge them? The cattle. We have the mountains of dead on both sides. But I am a fellow of Magdalen College. . We still don’t like to admit the war was even partly our fault because so many of our people died.

(ii) How does Russell present the character of Linda to an audience throughout the play? [20] Or. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) Write about the way the theme of social class is presented in Blood Brothers. [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . How does it create mood and atmosphere for an audience? [10] Either. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how the characters speak and behave here.4 (b) Blood Brothers Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page.

That’s why we’re doing it. His mother hugs him and his father produces a toy gun for him. but if. I just – it’s not me. it’s Edward. . EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS Mummy. MRS LYONS goes to answer the door. I’ve told you. MRS LYONS gets up and goes to her husband. MRS JOHNSTONE turns and goes into her house at the end of the song. I don’t want – I don’t want him growing away from you. how do you spell bogey man? Mm? Bogey man? (laughing) Edward. seizes it and ‘shoots’ his father. If we complete this. MRS LYONS settles herself in an armchair with a story book. EDWARD goes and sits with her. E DWARD and his father romp on the floor. Mummy will read the story. delighted. Jen. how do you spell bogey man? Ask mummy. calling EDWARD over to her. eh? (shouting) Mickey! MICKEY enters pursued by MRS LYONS MICKEY (Higher-Unit 2) MRS LYONS EDWARD MR LYONS Hi-ya. I’ve got to go to work for an hour. MRS LYONS MR LYONS Richard you didn’t say . MICKEY MRS LYONS MICKEY EDWARD (off) Does Eddie live here? (off) Pardon? (off) Does he? Is he comin’ out to play. Darling. Darling. we haven’t finished the story yet. I’m sorry. There’s no such thing as a bogey man. It’s a – a superstition. . . A doorbell is heard. Eddie. if we complete this merger I will. The sort of thing a silly mother might say to her children – ‘the bogey man will get you’. Must dash. . have more time. EDWARD MR LYONS Daddy . EDWARD. MR LYONS gets up and walks towards the door. the firm will run itself and I’ll have plenty of time to spend with you both. Will he get me? Edward. I’ve got our Sammy’s catapult. Y’ comin’ out? Turn over. MR LYONS joining them and sitting on the arm of the chair. Daddy.5 EDWARD reaches his home and walks in. I’ll see you later now. EDWARD goes to the bookshelf and leafs through a dictionary. there’s no such thing. I promise you. You should spend more time with him. who spiritedly ‘dies’ to E DWARD’s great amusement. whever did you hear such a thing? I’m trying to look it up. . MR LYONS exits. Edward.

(ii) To what extent do you feel sympathy for Eddie Carbone? [20] Or. show how Arthur Miller creates mood and atmosphere for an audience here. Write about one of these emotions and how it is presented in A View From The Bridge. [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . jealousy. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. anger. (iii) There are many emotions in this play: love. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). [10] Either. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii).6 (c) A View From The Bridge Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). hatred.

then go. God bless your children CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. and I said what I’m gonna say. The priest won’t wait. It’s her wedding. and don’t you ever forget it. Katie. nobody! Shut up. Whatever happened we all done it. You. Go.) You’re gonna come with me! I can’t Katie. Eddie! Eddie! (To CATHERINE) Then we all belong in the garbage. Don’t say that. There’ll be nobody there from her family. For my sister let me go. He’s gonna come here and apologize to me or nobody from this house is goin’ into that church today. (as though hurt) Look. Eddie. . In the garbage he belongs! EDDIE seems about to pick up the table and fling it at her.) Now go. I can’t . Catherine. BEATRICE No. we’re supposed to be there already. You be on my side or on their side. God bless you. I’m goin’ for my sister. . . go to your wedding. that’s all. and me too. Now if that’s more to you than I am. Katie! (She turns CATHERINE around. Beatrice. (She goes to CATHERINE.7 CATHERINE enters from bedroom. CATHERINE BEATRICE EDDIE Its after three. Beatrice. (suddenly) Who the hell do you think you are? Sssh! You got no more right to tell nobody nothin’! Nobody! The rest of your life. I been arguin’ with you all day already. I’ll stay home. How can you listen to him? This rat! (shaking CATHERINE) Don’t you call him that! (clearing from BEATRICE) What’re you scared of? He’s a rat! He belongs in the sewer! Stop it! (weeping) He bites people when they sleep! He comes when nobody’s lookin’ and poisons decent people. But don’t come back.

[10] Either. show how Amanda Whittington creates mood and atmosphere for an audience here.8 (d) Be My Baby Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) Be My Baby has been described as “intensely touching. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). in your opinion? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . (ii) How does Whittington present the character of Matron to an audience throughout the play? [20] Or.” What features of the play may make it touching for an audience. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page.

Mary. It was a girl. MATRON holds the teddy bear as ‘Be My Baby’ plays to blackout. You don’t want to feel the cold. . I’ll follow you down. Is Father . Mary. Mary? Mother. Father took the opportunity to decorate your room. For Lucy. Button up. For Queenie. You’re a big girl. . Well? Not really. no less. Exit QUEENIE. Shall I show you out? She knows the way. Glad to hear your Aunt’s on the mend. I’d rather you took it. now. Mother. Exit MRS ADAMS. I kept her warm ’til morning. So she doesn’t forget. . I’ve spoken to the bank. Matron. Mary? It’s all right. Turn over. If you say so. No. MARY puts on her coat. MATRON takes the teddy bear. Come along. This Monday? City centre branch. Mother. You will be. My baby. The taxi’s waiting. I’m not ready. It’s over. Nearly done. I’ll bring her down. Mary. Then let me help you. Nearly done? Not quite. The End. MARY puts the Dansette and records on QUEENIE’s bed. You start a new job on Monday. We’ve been rather busy since you’ve been away. I held her. Time to go home MARY hands her teddy bear to MATRON. How was your journey? Rather slow. I liked it where I was.9 MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MATRON MATRON MARY MATRON MARY MATRON MARY (Higher-Unit 2) Enter MATRON and MRS ADAMS. MRS ADAMS gets MARY’s coat and holds it open for her. Exit MARY.

(iii) How does Charlotte Keatley show changes in women’s lives during the twentieth century in My Mother Said I Never Should? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (ii) What do you think of Margaret and the way she is presented in the play? [20] Or.10 (e) My Mother Said I Never Should Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Jackie speaks and behaves here. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. What does it reveal about her feelings? [10] Either.

you must believe that! (Pause) He said he’d leave his wife. but I knew he wouldn’t. we’d agreed. did exercises went to clinic. . if you’ve failed once. his wife was taking a photo. . I’m going to Oldham. Quite a few of my friends do. . . . There were power cuts. . . (With difficulty) Asked her. it won’t show much. the youngest was only four . (She stops) A Punjabi man answered. I kept waking in the night to feed you . A week . She wanted to make it all better. –picked me up and said you’ll be all right now. (Pause) “It’s a girl”. (Higher-Unit 2) Turn over. . (Pause) It doesn’t matter how much you succeed afterwards. I think they live in Leeds now. .11 ROSIE JACKIE If you were really my mum you wouldn’t have been able to give me away! How dare you! (She goes to hit Rosie but cannot) You’re at the centre of everything I do! (A slight pause) Mummy treated me as though I’d simply fallen over and cut my knee. Rosie. I remember the books that come out that winter–how to succeed as a single working mother – fairy-tales! (Pause) Sandra and Hugh have a family now. Rosie? . so we took a bus to Didsbury. . She was the one who wanted it kept secret . (Pause) It was a very cold winter after you were born. . Sandra and Hugh thought I was inhuman. your father. Rosie. in the flat . . separate lives. pine kitchens. it was trendy. . (Pause) I took you to Lyme Park one day. I saw his name in the Guardian last year. I wanted to bring you up. there were two children. . (Pause) After you’d gone . . (Emphatically) He loved me. . He sent money. the lift wasn’t working–(She stops) That was the night I phoned Mummy. With effort) Graham . . Then I went back to art school. (She smiles irresistibly)– After you’d gone I tried to lose that memory. an article about his photographs . said he was sorry . Dad says I can. he had to be in Liverpool. . there were no lights in the tower blocks. . to live with Gran – Great-Gran. made a change from concrete. I knew he had an open fire. . (Pause. he loved you. (Angrily) For the first time in my life I took care of myself–refused joints. I rang the bell. he was buying ice-creams. (Quietly) . they’d moved. I WANTED you. (She gestures) Sit down on the swing. (Silence) He couldn’t be there the day you were born. . big gardens. I couldn’t keep the room warm. He was married. only I never knew why. across the lake. By the time we got back to Hulme it was dark. (Pause) I could give you everything now. I saw them together. Jackie hesitates JACKIE I’m frightened. Pause ROSIE I used to hate you. . (Pause) I tried! I couldn’t do it. .

and all influences. and there was love between the child and the world–from men and women with parental looks and tones. and he listened docilely. (i) Read the extract below. either for young or old. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). thinks of the rain and sunshine. In old days there were angels who came and took men by the hand and led them away from the city of destruction. that he might come to understand better what this life was. (ii) Or. There was love between him and the child that blent them into one. for the little child had come to link him once more with the whole world. for fifteen years. so that they look no more backward. (iii) How is Lantern Yard important to the novel as a whole? [20] How is the relationship between Nancy and Godfrey presented in the novel? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) .12 QUESTION 2 Answer questions on one text. and the hand may be a little child’s. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). the sense of bereavement was too heavy upon him for the old thrill of satisfaction to arise again at the touch of the newly-earned coin. or to guard leaf and bud from invading harm. from which. But yet men are led away from threatening destruction: a hand is put into theirs. and asks industriously for all knowledge that will help him to satisfy the wants of the searching roots. to the red lady-birds and the round pebbles. We see no white-winged angels now. with which he could have no communion: as some man who has a precious plant to which he could give a nurturing home in a new soil. Silas began now to think of Raveloe life entirely in relation to Eppie: she must have everything that was a good in Raveloe. [10] No child was afraid of approaching Silas when Eppie was near him: there was no repulsion around him now. Either. he had stood aloof as from a strange thing. in relation to his nursling. drawing his hope and joy continually onward beyond the money. which leads them forth gently towards a calm and bright land. And now something had come to replace his hoard which gave a growing purpose to the earnings. show how George Eliot creates mood and atmosphere here. (a) Silas Marner Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. The disposition to hoard had been utterly crushed at the very first by the loss of his long-stored gold: the coins he earned afterwards seemed as irrelevant as stones brought to complete a house suddenly buried by an earthquake.

Darcy had been standing near enough for her to overhear a conversation between him and Mr. His character was decided. Either. Such amiable qualities must speak for themselves. You know how I detest it. but not handsome enough to tempt me. and I dare say.’ ‘I certainly shall not. declined being introduced to any other lady. (ii) How does Jane Austen present Mr. Mr. whom it would not be a punishment to me to stand up with. very agreeable. and spend the rest of the evening in walking about the room. he looked for a moment at Elizabeth. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you. was sharpened into particular resentment. Darcy. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles. he was lively and unreserved. You had much better dance. looking at the eldest Miss Bennet. for you are wasting your time with me. (iii) (Higher-Unit 2) How does Jane Austen present the theme of marriage in Pride and Prejudice? [20] Turn over. Darcy here. Your sisters are engaged. most disagreeable man in the world. ‘I must have you dance. till catching her eye. (i) Read the extract below. Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room. Bennet.’ ‘Which do you mean?’ and turning round. At such an assembly as this. I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. Darcy danced only once with Mrs. Bingley.13 (b) Pride and Prejudice Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). it would be insupportable. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Jane Austen presents the character of Mr. ‘Come. who came from the dance for a few minutes. and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield. Mr. was angry that the ball closed so early. Darcy walked off. . and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings towards him.’ Mr Bingley followed his advice. and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.’ cried Bingley. and there is not another woman in the room. What a contrast between him and his friend! Mr. ‘She is tolerable. Hurst and once with Miss Bingley.’ ‘I would not be so fastidious as you are. by the scarcity of gentlemen. Amongst the most violent against him was Mrs. How does it influence the reader’s attitude towards him? [10] Mr. danced every dance.’ ‘You are dancing with the only handsome girl in the room. Bennet’s relationship with his daughters in the novel? [20] Or. Darcy. to sit down for two dances. who is very pretty. by his having slighted one of her daughters. whose dislike of his general behaviour. Elizabeth Bennet had been obliged. as I have this evening.’ said Mr. ‘Oh! she is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you. and during part of that time. and everybody hoped that he would never come there again. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). ‘for a kingdom! Upon my honour.’ said he. He was the proudest. and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty. to press his friend to join it. unless I am particularly acquainted with my partner. he withdrew his own and coldly said. speaking occasionally to one of his own party. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i).

(i) Read the extract below. round which a party of ragged men and boys were gathered: warming their hands and winking their eyes before the blaze in rapture. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). The Lord Mayor. gave orders to his fifty cooks and butlers to keep Christmas as a Lord Mayor’s household should. its overflowing sullenly congealed. Poulterers’ and grocers’ trades became a splendid joke: a glorious pageant. The water-plug being left in solitude. in the stronghold of the might Mansion House. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. The cold became intense. became invisible. and had lighted a great fire in a brazier. proffering their services to go before horses in carriages. In the main street. while his lean wife and the baby sallied out to buy the beef. biting cold. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (ii) Show how Dickens presents the hardships of life in 19th century London in A Christmas Carol. and struck the hours and quarters in the clouds. at the corner of the court. some labourers were repairing the gas-pipes. stirred up to-morrow’s pudding in his garret.14 (c) A Christmas Carol Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). The ancient tower of a church. and turned to misanthropic ice. and conduct them on their way. whose gruff old bell was always peeping slily down at Scrooge out of a gothic window in the wall. The brightness of the shops where holly sprigs and berries crackled in the lamp heat of the windows. Either. Foggier yet. [10] Meanwhile the fog and darkness thickened so. [20] Or. show how Charles Dickens creates mood and atmosphere here. made pale faces ruddy as they passed. with which it was next to impossible to believe that such dull principles as bargain and sale had anything to do. and even the little tailor. whom he had fined five shillings on the previous Monday for being drunk and blood-thirsty in the streets. (iii) How does Dickens present Scrooge’s changing character in A Christmas Carol? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . with tremulous vibrations afterwards as if its teeth were chattering in its frozen head up there. searching. and colder. that people ran about with flaring links. Piercing.

“before things––” He stopped. And in the middle of the. [20] Turn over. Jolly good show. Like the Coral Island. For a moment he had a fleeting picture of the strange glamour that had once invested the beaches. “We saw your smoke. and waited. with filthy body. The tears began to flow and sobs shook him. (iii) A review of Lord Of The Flies said “William Golding knows exactly what boys are like. He gave himself up to them now for the first time on the island.15 (d) Lord of the Flies Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). then changed his mind and stood still.” Ralph looked at him dumbly. . A little boy who wore the remains of an extraordinary black cap on his red hair and who carried the remains of a pair of spectacles at his waist.” To what extent do you agree? Remember to support your answer with detailed reference to the text. matted hair. What do you think of Jack and the way he is presented in the novel? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) . He turned away to give them time to pull themselves together. great. (ii) Or. (i) Read the extract below. The officer. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). the other little boys began to shake and sob too. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. and the fall through the air of the true. and you don’t know how many of you there are?” “No. “Who’s boss here?” “I am.” said the officer as he visualized the search before him.” said Ralph. “I know. show how William Golding creates mood and atmosphere here. “We were together then––” The officer nodded helpfully. shuddering spasms of grief that seemed to wrench his whole body. How many of you are there?” Ralph shook his head. sir. allowing his eyes to rest on the trim cruiser in the distance. His voice rose under the black smoke before the burning wreckage of the island. . was moved and a little embarrassed. and unwiped nose. surrounded by these noises. Either. [10] The officer turned back to Ralph. Ralph wept for the end of innocence.” said Ralph loudly. “We’ll take you off.” “I should have thought. the darkness of man’s heart. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). wise friend called Piggy. “I should have thought that a pack of British boys–you’re all British aren’t you?–would have been able to put up a better show than that–I mean––” “It was like that at first. But the island was scorched up like dead wood–Simon was dead–and Jack had . and infected by that emotion. started forward. The officer looked past him to the group of painted boys.

It was tennis-players and the yellow seasick trams grinding down Cathedral Road. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i).’ asked Philip. [10] June the first was our agreement. quite ostentatiously I can tell you. This was all a long time ago: I was ten years high and I lived in South Wales. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). Suddenly Keith said. I could.’ she said. Keith. ‘I can’t smell anything. Perhaps it was the odour of sin or the past remains of previous tenants. Keith Thomas’s home was no exception and I was sniffing. story. show how Dannie Abse creates mood and atmosphere here. so you can leave as soon as you’ve eaten ’em. (ii) Or. and school teacher (old Knobble-knees) rubbing off chalk from the blackboard like a nasty day from the calendar. (iii) “A funny. It was the end of a school day where we left our carved initials. I ate bread and butter and jam and Welsh cakes. We walked hardly together for we were enemies. There everything was different. Keith and his mother. (i) Read the extract below. and Keith sniffed and sniffed louder and louder. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. .’ said his mother. It came in that year with all sunshine and the windows open and the neighbours’ radio. I tipped the tea over the tablecloth and grew redder .16 (e) Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). sad. Miss Morgan. ‘Please. drawing air through their nostrils. ‘Blow your nose. Other people’s houses have a strange smell.” To what extent do you agree with this description of Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve? [20] How does Abse present his mother’s relationships with her sons as they grew up? [20] (Higher-Unit 2) .’ I said. an interlude in our constant campaign of being mean to each other. in the wooden desk. They just stood there. ‘can I have my yo-yo back? I won’t talk again during lessons. ‘There’ll be bananas and cream. ‘Is there something burning?’ I went very red when the others sniffed.’ ‘I like bananas and cream. Either.’ she said. heads cocked. our day of peace. for it was our day of peace. . ‘Mind how you cross the road. hurt and momentous.’ Keith had asked me to his house for tea. ‘What’s the matter?’ Keith’s mother asked. of masterful vilification. more alive somehow.

Poetry 12 Pages 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 . JD*(S-2012 Foundation) Turn over. You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers. INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer both Section A and Section B. 2. . INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question. 5.GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Foundation Tier UNIT 1 Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2011 2 hours SECTION A Question 1. 4.11 ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. 3. Answer one question in Section A and the question in Section B. Of Mice and Men Anita and Me To Kill a Mockingbird I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Chanda’s Secrets SECTION B 6.

You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. the way he speaks and behaves at different times in the novel. [20] (Unit 1) . his relationships with other characters. the harness room. (b) In Of Mice and Men there are three main places on the ranch: the bunkhouse. [20] Or. Of Mice and Men Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). [10] Either.2 SECTION A 1. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Curley speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. and the barn. (c) What do you think of Candy? Think about: • • • his job on the ranch. Choose one of these places and write about it. Explain how what happens there is important in the novel. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c).

3 At that moment a young man came into the bunkhouse. ‘You the new guys the old man was waitin’ for?’ ‘We just come in. ‘Let the big guy talk. he wore high-heeled boots. I think. He glanced coldly at George and then at Lennie. nex’ time you answer when you’re spoke to. Lennie squirmed under the look and shifted his feet nervously. ‘By Christ. Curley stared levelly at him.’ said Lennie softly. (Unit 1) Turn over. ‘We jus’ come in. ‘Well. George said: ‘S’pose he don’t want to talk?’ Curley lashed his body around. He wore a work glove on his left hand. He stiffened and went into a slight crouch. His eyes passed over the new men and he stopped. a thin young man with a brown face. Went over to the cook-house.’ said George coldly. ‘An’ you won’t let the big guy talk. His arms gradually bent at the elbows and his hands closed into fists.’ He turned towards the door and walked out. and his elbows were still bent out a little. The swamper said: ‘He was here jus’ a minute ago. Curley stepped gingerly close to him.’ said George. with brown eyes and a head of tightly curled hair. ‘Oh. it’s that way. . What the hell are you gettin’ into it for?’ ‘We travel together. and like the boss.’ He nodded slightly to Lennie.’ Lennie twisted with embarrassment.’ said Curley.’ ‘I’ll try to catch him. is that it?’ ‘He can talk if he want to tell you anything. he’s gotta talk when he’s spoke to. ‘Seen my old man?’ he asked. His glance was at once calculating and pugnacious. ‘Yeah. so it’s that way.’ Lennie was looking helplessly to George for instruction. Curley.’ George was tense and motionless.

[20] (Unit 1) . the influence of Nanima. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). (b) What do you think about Meena’s father? Think about: • • • his life in India. the influence of other people. Think about: • • • • • her homelife. [20] Or. Then answer the following question: What does this extract show you about Meena’s feelings? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [10] Either. Anita and Me Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). the way he speaks and behaves at different times in the novel. the influence of her parents. anything else you think important.4 2. (c) Write about how Meena was influenced by her Punjabi background as she grew up. his life in England. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). (a) Read the extract on the opposite page.

and did not look back until I had reached the haven of papa’s arms. tell them Sam Lowbridge was my mate. ‘Wharrabout that then!’ she grinned. ‘Go on. Uncle Alan sat heavily down on the grass and rested his head on his arms. It was as if the whole crowd had turned into one huge eyeball which swivelled slowly between me and papa. I knew he was trying to get to me and I began pushing forward. the boy who had taught me how to shoot a fairground rifle. We don’t give a toss for anybody else. I wished I had stood next to papa. People were now crowding round papa. My mind was turning cartwheels. offering condolences and back pats like he’d just come last in the annual church egg and spoon race. I could hear catcalls coming from all over the grounds. When my ears had stopped ringing and I gradually returned to my body. ‘Sam Lowbridge. yow am a bloody stupid cow sometimes. Papa was staring into the distance. I turned round to face her. towards Sam who was strolling back to his moped to the cheers and claps of his gang. Mr Ku-mar. I was his favourite. He was already revving up. who manoeuvred in and out of each other like a bunch of May-mad midges until they were nothing but annoying buzzy specks in the distance. I knew she would not hold me or take my hand. He’s dead bloody hard.5 Sam interrupted. and then he sped off up the hill followed by the rest of his three-wheeler lackeys. ‘Yow don’t mind him. .’ I felt as if I had been punched in the stomach. yow do! Yow don’t talk for me. ‘Yow shuttit. Not some wogs’ handout. He shifted from foot to foot and glanced away. I could feel Anita shifting beside me. in’t he?’ ‘Anita Rutter. who terrorised everyone else except me. a woman’s. (Unit 1) Turn over. ‘You tell him. One of your supporters. a sly grin curling the corners of his mouth: ‘Yow don’t do nothing but talk.’ I said. lad! Tell him some more!’ The sound had come from somewhere around Mr Ormerod. encountering a wall of solid backs and legs. This is our patch. Who was that? Who said that? Who had thought that all this time and why had I never known about it? And then another voice.’ I jerked my head towards the sound. shrugging his shoulders. yow bloody skinhead idiot! Bloody disgrace. is he?’ And then a rasping voice came from somewhere in the throng. ‘Listen! Don’t do this! Don’t turn all this energy the wrong way!’ Sam was not listening. gripping his bottle of whisky like a weapon. . Reverend Ince whispered to him ‘Good work. son! I’d be on my deathbed before that’d happen!’ Uncle Alan was half-running towards the gate. making him jump back and stumble. my cheeks still felt warm and taut. . Sam Lowbridge! Yow wanna good birching.’ Papa smiled graciously at them. I wanted to find these people. ‘Anger is good! But not used this way! Please! You’re going the wrong way!’ Sam aimed his moped straight at Uncle Alan who was now outside the gates. Anita was tugging my sleeve as she held onto me. ‘Isn’t he bosting!’ ‘What?’ I croaked. My legs felt watery and a hot panic softened my insides to mush. There must have been some mistake. “Uncle”. Uncle Alan’s mouth was opening and closing like a goldfish. not wanting to draw any more attention to himself or what had just happened. clouds of bluey-grey smoke wheezing from his exhaust. And give everything away to some darkies we’ve never met. son. I stared at him. he’s always been a bad-un . ‘Wait! Sam!’ Uncle Alan puffed. straight into his eyes. seemingly unconcerned. Alan.

the way Scout describes the town. her place in the local community. Think about: • • • • her place in the Finch household. the town where Scout. the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the novel.6 3. her relationships with other characters. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). [10] Either. Jem and Atticus live? Think about: • • • some of the people who live there. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Tom Robinson speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. some of the events that happen there. (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. (b) Write about the character of Calpurnia and her importance in the novel. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). (c) What impressions do you have of Maycomb. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [20] Or. [20] (Unit 1) . To Kill a Mockingbird Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c).

‘Tom. Tom? You must tell the jury what he said. I swear ’fore God.7 Tom’s black velvet skin had begun to shine.” I say Miss Mayella lemme outa here an’ tried to run but she got her back to the door an’ I’da had to push her. an’ I was just reachin’ when the next thing I knows she – she’d grabbed me round the legs.’ Tom Robinson shut his eyes tight. an’ I say lemme pass. He glanced at Atticus. and she says to just step on that chair yonder an’ git that box down from on top of the chiffarobe. Mr Finch. . and his eyes widened. An’ she said. “Took me a slap year to save seb’m nickels.’ ‘What happened after you turned the chair over?’ Tom Robinson had come to a dead stop. ‘Then what did she do?’ The witness swallowed hard. she – she hugged me. She scared me so bad I hopped down an’ turned the chair over – that was the only thing. ’sturbed in that room. an’ she says oh yes I could. only furniture. an’ nice of her to treat ’em. Darkness had not come. another one. that’s right smart o’ you to treat ’em. sort of – she says they all gone to town to get ice-creams. So I done what she told me. but just when I say it Mr Ewell yonder hollered through th’ window.’ said Atticus. an’ I ask her what. Mr Finch. “You think so?” I don’t think she understood what I was thinkin’ – I meant it was smart of her to save like that.’ ‘I understand you. and he ran his hand over his face. ‘She reached up an’ kissed me ’side of th’ face.’ This time Judge Taylor’s gavel came down with a bang. why Miss Mayella. Mr Finch. Tom?’ asked Atticus. ‘What happened after that?’ ‘Answer the question. you’ve sworn to tell the whole truth. when I left it. but I done it. I didn’t wanta harm her. ‘He says you goddamn whore. One-third of his cigar had vanished. ‘Mr Finch. I said I best be goin’. nigger. She says she never kissed a grown man before an’ she might as well kiss a nigger. ‘Some-thin’ not fittin’ to say – not fittin’ for these folks’n chillun to hear–’ ‘What did he say.’ ‘Not the same chiffarobe you busted up?’ Asked Atticus. ‘Well. then at Mr Underwood sitting across the room. I got down offa that chair an’ turned around an’ she sorta jumped on me.”’ Tom’s discomfort was not from the humidity. Most as tall as the room. They all gone to town. and as it did the overhead lights went on in the courtroom. Go on. then at the jury. The witness smiled. She says what her papa do to her don’t count. but the afternoon sun had left the windows. Tom. “Kiss me back. She hugged me round the waist. Will you tell it?’ Tom ran his hand nervously over his mouth. ‘an’ she says – she was laughin’. ‘I say where the chillun?’ he continued.’ ‘Jumped on you? Violently?’ ‘No suh. ‘What did you say then. I’ll kill ya.’ (Unit 1) Turn over.’ ‘What did he say?’ Tom Robinson swallowed again.’ said Judge Taylor. grabbed me round th’ legs. I couldn’t do nothin’ for her. She says. ‘I said somethin’ like. Judge Taylor quickly restored order. ‘Naw suh. She says.

and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). [10] Either. anything else you think important. [20] (Unit 1) . (c) Write about some of Maya’s experiences of racism that she describes in I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings and explain how she coped with them. (b) What have you found out about the town of Stamps from your reading of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings? Think about: • • • the people who live there. (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. [20] Or.8 4. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). Then answer the following question: What impressions do you get of the church service here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. some key events that Maya Angelou writes about.

He continued preaching and moving. no. pink tongue waving. She didn’t stop this time but continued immediately to the altar. and said. I saw the ushers from the left side of the church near the big windows begin to move discreetly.” I looked toward Momma. over the collection table. hoping that a look from her would root me safely to my sanity. crying “I say. he pushed my knee. across that square of stained boards. and she sizzled somewhere to the right behind me. Just as the elder opened his mouth. so as Sister Monroe approached the pulpit from the right he started descending from the left. “I say.” Bailey said out loud. Sister Monroe broke through the cloud of people trying to hem her in. and Bailey nudged me again. followed by the deacons. “Hot dog” and “Damn” and “She’s going to beat his butt. preach it. all we needed to send us into violent out-bursts of laughter was a whispered “Preach it. and Sister Monroe rounded the altar on his heels.” Anyway. He finally stopped right in front of the collection table. I supposed that she was counting on bringing that emotional lady up short with a severe look or two. He was not intimidated by his change of venue. Elder Thomas made the regrettable mistake of increasing his volume too. and flooded up to the pulpit. covered his mouth and whispered. Sister Monroe echoed him loudly. preach it!” Two deacons wedged themselves around Brother Jackson as a preventative measure and two large determined looking men walked down the aisle toward Sister Monroe. like pallbearers.9 Sister Monroe’s fuse was already lit. (Unit 1) Turn over. actually his teeth jumped. But Sister Monroe’s voice had already reached the danger point. Before he could bring his lips together. Bailey jogged my knee. Elder Thomas jumped into the sermon. some unofficial members and a few of the bigger children. When the incident with Sister Monroe. preach it. out of his mouth. toward Sister Monroe’s bench. his teeth fell.” But Reverend Thomas didn’t intend to wait for that eventuality. ushers.” Sister Monroe hit him on the back of his head with her purse. bound for Elder Thomas. “Preach it!” There were a few smothered giggles from the children’s section. Then suddenly. But for weeks after. to give the members what they came for. which put him almost in our laps. we had been too astounded to laugh. determined. “I say. Twice. like a summer rain. While the sounds in the church were increasing. preach it” – in a whisper.” had taken place. I suppose. “I say. which we always called simply “the incident. But for the first time in memory Momma was staring behind me at Sister Monroe. . “Great God of Mount Nebo.

Write about some rumours and superstitions in the novel and explain the effect they have on characters. Chanda’s Secrets Answer part (a) and either part (b) or part (c). (c) Chanda only gradually comes to understand the truth about the AIDS epidemic and its effect on her family and community. Write about some of the ways in which she comes to this understanding. and explain why you find them effective. [20] (Unit 1) . (b) Rumours and superstitions are important in Chanda’s Secrets.10 5. and about 40 minutes on part (b) or part (c). [10] Either. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (a). (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Write about words and phrases you find effective in creating these thoughts and feelings. [20] Or.

(I’m sorry God. A fight breaks out over who’s supposed to be in holes five and six. forgive me. Each brick marks a grave. the earth piled high at the head of each hole. no defacing or stealing memorials. Funerals are already in progress on either side. about a ten-minute walk from Esther’s parents. But I don’t care. ‘Sara. shouting.’ I whisper. As we join the priest in chanting the prayer. Meanwhile. I’m sorry God. We’re not alone. In the distance I see the dust of other processions driving through the gates. as the Chevy bounces along. I’m sorry God. I want her to have a grave marked with its own little fence and canvas top.’ I know we can never afford to buy her a headstone. Mourners hop off pickup trucks and search for their dead. There’s not even room for a name. too. but I want to save for a memorial. So did the tow trucks that came to pull them out. so I can leave toys for her without them disappearing. There’s a row of eight fresh graves. It only opened last year but already it’s almost full. The dead have disappeared as if they never lived. Mama says memorials are just another way to make the undertakers rich. hearses got stuck in them. But suddenly I’m scared it’s just something priests make up to take away the nightmares. ‘Raetsho yoo ko ke godimong. no grazing of livestock. forgive me. A date’s scrawled in black paint. ‘forgive us. forgive me. or other indecent behaviour. past a metal sign announcing township bylaws for behaviour: no screaming.) The priest starts the Lord’s prayer. We drive through a gate in the barbed-wire fence. (Unit 1) Turn over. I stare at this field covered with bricks. Mr Bateman says we’re the third one down. I’m more afraid the bouncing may break Sara’s coffin. her name soldered in wire at the front. Sara’s being buried in the northeast corner.” Everyone bows their heads except for me. Last rainy season. I want to believe in God and Sara being with the ancestors. We pull up to the site. I want there to be a gate and a lock. Papa’s and my brothers’ lost their canvas tops years ago. Today. This is what Sara will have. our priest climbs to the top of Sara’s mound and delivers a scripture reading about eternal life. .11 The cemetery is a rocky field on the outskirts of town. and the fences bent out of shape the moment the graves collapsed in the rainy season. The winding dirt roads are filled with potholes.

They just rummage about In chrysanthemums1 No one expects them To have their Teetotal2. Maya Angelou ©Maya Angelou 1978. In the first of the following poems.3 Daphne Schiller 1 2 chrysanthemums: a flower Teetotal: someone who never drinks alcohol 3 dahlia: a flower . Shine on me. dewdrops And cool my brow again.S. Clean carpets. 6. Feed the rabbits. They don’t need Clean sheets. They enjoy an undeserved reputation Which frightens the boldest child. Woman Work. We both crawl out of bed But there the likeness ends. You may wish to include some or all of these points: • the content of the poems – what they are about. a black woman speaks about her life in the southern states of the U. rain. Earwigs can snap their pincers at life And scurry about being quite irresponsible. snowflakes Cover me with white Cold icy kisses and Let me rest tonight. • your responses to the poems. Earwigs don’t have to Feed their children. rain Fall softly. Clean clothes. Next time I feel hysterical I’ll bite a hole in dahlia. Write about both poems and their effect on you. blow me from here With your fiercest wind Let me float across the sky ‘Til I can rest again Fall gently. moon glow You’re all that I can call my own. sunshine Rain on me. I Had Rather Be A Woman. Reproduced from Still I Rise by kind permission of Virago Press (Unit 1) I Had Rather Be A Woman I had rather be a woman Than an earwig But there’s not much in it sometimes.12 SECTION B Spend about 1 hour on this section. and so on. curving sky Mountain. a woman expresses her feelings about her life. Feed the dishwasher.A. • the mood or atmosphere of the poems. or make comparisons where appropriate in your answer as a whole. • the ideas the poet may have wanted us to think about. leaf and stone Star shine. vegetarian Mothers-in-law To stay for Christmas. Feed the cat. Think carefully about the poems before you write your answer. A clean bill of health. Storm. You may write about each poem separately and then compare them. oceans. • how they are written – words and phrases you find interesting. Or to feel a secret thrill At the thought of extending the kitchen. Sun. Show how they are similar and how they are different. the way they are organised. In the second. [20] Woman Work I’ve got the children to tend The clothes to mend The floor to mop The food to shop Then the chicken to fry The baby to dry I got company to feed The garden to weed I’ve got the shirts to press The tots to dress The cane to be cut I gotta clean up this hut Then see about the sick And the cotton to pick.

You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers. .11 12 13 14 15 16 ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Othello Much Ado About Nothing An Inspector Calls Hobson’s Choice A Taste of Honey Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha Heroes Never Let Me Go About a Boy Resistance Pages 2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 . INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer Question 1 and Question 2. Answer on one text in each question. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question.GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Foundation Tier UNIT 2a (Literary heritage drama and contemporary prose) Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2012 2 hours Question 1. Unit 2) Turn over. JD*(S2012-Found. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Question 2.

You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (ii) At the beginning of the play Othello loves and marries Desdemona. • the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the play. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). Think about: • his relationship with Othello. • his relationships with other characters. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Either. [20] Unit 2 . [20] Or. at the end of the play he kills her. (a) Othello Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii).2 QUESTION 1 Answer questions on one text. Write about some of the important turning points in their relationship that led to this tragic end. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way lago and Cassio speak and behave here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (iii) Write about Iago.

revel. There is more sense in that than in reputation. but nothing distinctly: a quarrel. you are too severe a moraller. . What. the place. by and by a fool. But since it is as it is. You are but now cast in his mood – a punishment more in policy than in malice – even so as one would beat his offenceless dog to affright an imperious lion. reputation! O. but nothing wherefore. reputation. To be now a sensible man. You have lost no reputation at all. lago. One unperfectness shows me another. How came you thus recovered? It hath pleased the devil drunkenness to give place to the devil wrath. and so indiscreet an officer. such an answer would stop them all. oft got without merit and lost without deserving. come. good wine is a good familiar creature if it be well used. to make me frankly despise myself. mend it for your own good. God forbid! Reputation. Is’t possible? I remember a mass of things. lieutenant? Ay. I could heartily wish this had not befallen. and applause transform ourselves into beasts! Why. and presently a beast! O strange! Every inordinate cup is unblessed. Exclaim no more against it. I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself. Had I as many mouths as Hydra. pleasance. that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains! – that we should with joy.3 IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO What. My reputation. so drunken. my reputation! As I am an honest man. I will rather sue to be despised than to deceive so good a commander with so light. I had thought you had received some bodily wound. but you are now well enough. man!–there are ways to recover the general again. and what remains is bestial. and he’s yours. Drunk! And speak parrot! And squabble! Swagger! Swear! And discourse fustian with one’s own shadow! O thou invisible spirit of wine. and the condition of this country stands. are you hurt. IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO CASSIO IAGO Unit 2 Turn over. Sue to him again. past all surgery. Marry. I will ask him for my place again: he shall tell me I am a drunkard. O God. As the time. let us call thee devil! What was he that you followed with your sword? What had he done to you? I know not. unless you repute yourself such a loser. Come. Come. Reputation is an idle and most false imposition. if thou hast no name to be known by. and the ingredience is a devil.

Read the extract on the opposite page. Think about: • his relationship with other characters.4 (b) Much Ado About Nothing Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). • the way he behaves. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). [20] Or. (ii) Write about the relationship between Beatrice and Benedict and explain how it changes at different points in the play. [20] Unit 2 . and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. • the way he speaks. [10] Either. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (iii) Write about Don John. Then answer the following question: (i) What do you think of the way Claudio and Don Pedro speak and behave here? Give reasons for what you say.

In practice let us put it presently. All prompting me how fair young Hero is. What need the bridge much broader than the flood? The fairest grant is the necessity. Look what will serve is fit. and that war-thoughts Have left their places vacant. And I know we shall have revelling tonight: I will assume thy part in some disguise. your Highness now may do me good. she shall be thine. And tire the hearer with a book of words. But now I am returned. Then after. And take her hearing prisoner with the force And strong encounter of my amorous tale. Thou wilt be like a lover presently. to her father will I break: And the conclusion is. I would have salved it with a longer treatise. That know love’s grief by his complexion! But lest my liking might too sudden seem. If thou dost love fair Hero. Dost thous affect her. CLAUDIO DON PEDRO CLAUDIO DON PEDRO CLAUDIO DON PEDRO Unit 2 Turn over. My love is thine to teach. Saying I liked her ere I went to wars. in their rooms Come thronging soft and delicate desires. ‘Tis once. thou lovest. . And I will break with her an with her father And thou shalt have her. cherish it. And in her bosom I’ll unclasp my heart. When you went onward on this ended action.5 CLAUDIO DON PEDRO My liege. Hath Leonato any son. Claudio? O my lord. I looked upon her with a soldier’s eye. Teach it but how. Was’nt not to this end That thou began’st to twist so fine a story? How sweetly you do minister to love. And tell fair Hero I am Claudio. And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn Any hard lesson that may do thee good. but had a rougher task in hand Than to drive liking to the name of love. That liked. my lord? No child but Hero: she’s his only heir.

Why do you think it is still popular today. the messages of the play. Birling. and was written in the mid 1940s.6 (c) An Inspector Calls Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). [20] Or. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). • the way she speaks and behaves with her children. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Gerald speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (ii) An Inspector Calls is set in 1912. (iii) What do you think about Mrs. the way the characters speak and behave at different points in the play. [20] Unit 2 . in the 21st century? Think about: • • • • what happens. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). [10] Either. • the way she speaks and behaves with the Inspector. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Birling? Write about: • the way she speaks and behaves with Mr. what makes the play exciting and dramatic for an audience.

B. . . .) Colonel Roberts. . That man definitely wasn’t a police inspector at all. BIRLING MRS. . (At telephone. Good night. (beginning to move) I’m going to make certain of this. . I asked him about this Inspector Goole and described the chap carefully to him. BIRLING GERALD Unit 2 Turn over. . (excitedly) By Jingo! A fake! (triumphantly) Didn’t I tell you? Didn’t I say I couldn’t imagine a real police inspector talking like that to us? Well. .) I was going to do this anyhow. BIRLING MRS. . (He puts down the telephone and looks at the others. As Gerald says – we’ve been had. B. He never even looked like one. I felt it all the time. well. (now at telephone) Of course. B. GERALD BIRLING MRS. No. y’know. . dear. cleanshaven. I passed it off by saying I’d been having an argument with somebody.) I see . G-O-O-L-E . Careful what you say. that settles it. tall. Roberts – Birling here. Oh. We’ve been had. . That’s what I came back to tell you. What is it? (slowly) The man wasn’t a police officer. it makes all the difference. You didn’t tell him– (cutting in) No. Mr Arthur Birling here . What are you going to do? Ring up the Chief Constable . . Goole. . He never talked like one. (excitedly) Good lad! You asked about him. GERALD BIRLING GERALD (excitedly) You know something. . Sorry to ring you up so late.) Brumley eight seven five two. . I met a police sergeant I know down the road. just a little argument we were having here. There isn’t any such inspector.Colonel Roberts. He swore there wasn’t any Inspector Goole or anybody like him on the force here. (At telephone.) There’s no Inspector Goole on the police. This makes a difference. .7 BIRLING GERALD MRS. . Of course! BIRLING GERALD BIRLING MRS. I’ve had my suspicions all along. you were right. (Here he can describe the appearance of the actor playing the INSPECTOR. Are you certain? I’m almost certain. B. But the point is– this sergeant was dead certain they hadn’t any inspector at all like the chap who came here. but can you tell me if an Inspector Goole has joined your staff lately . . In fact. please. a new man . (To others as he waits. yes . no. B. . eh? Yes.

(ii) Write about two or three parts of the play that you think an audience would find particularly amusing. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. the way they speak and behave with Willie Mossop. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings about the relationship between Maggie and Willie as you read this extract? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i).8 (d) Hobson’s Choice Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). the way they speak and behave with their father. and explain why they would have that effect. (iii) What do you think about Maggie’s sisters. [20] Unit 2 . Vicky and Alice? Think about: • • • • the way they speak and behave with Maggie. Hobson. [20] Or. [10] Either. the way they speak and behave with other characters.

I am. what? It seems to me to point one way. I’ve watched you for a long time and everything I’ve seen. the other’s the bad boots other people make and I sell.) I’m feeling queer-like. (He sits in arm-chair. I’ll be getting back to my stool. Don’t you want to get on. Will Mossop? You heard what Mrs Hepworth said. Do you know what keeps this business on its legs? Two things: one’s good boots you make that sell themselves. I’ve got no head for business at all. WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE Unit 2 . my lad. Miss Maggie. I’d be feared to go in them fine places. My brain and your hands ’ull make a working partnership. Six months I’ve counted on you. Miss Maggie. Will Mossop. Miss Maggie? Will Mossop. I’ve been at Hobson’s all my life. or it ’ud not be left to me to do the job like this. Well? Well. Nay. I’ve liked. I said you were a fool. Turn over. (Moves to trap. What way. I thought you were axing me to wed you. Then I’m a loyal fool. you’re my man. I’ll – I’ll sit down. What keeps you here? Is it the – the people? I dunno what it is. and I’m not leaving till I’m made. Well. that’s a different thing. What way is that? You’re leaving me to do the work. What dost want me for? To invest in. I’m used to being here. relieved): Partnership! Oh. mopping his brow. You’re a wonder in the shop. We’re a pair. by gum! And you the master’s daughter. I think you’ll do for me. and it’s got to come out some time. But I never – I know you never. And you’re a marvel in the workshop.) (stopping him): You’ll go back when I’ve done with you.9 MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE WILLIE MAGGIE When are you going to leave Hobson’s? Leave Hobson’s? I – I thought I gave satisfaction. You know the wages you get and you know the wages a bootmaker like you could get in one of the big shops in Manchester. You’re a business idea in the shape of a man. Don’t you want to leave? Not me. But I have. (getting up.

Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Peter and Helen speak and behave here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. • Jo’s relationships with the Boy and Geof. (ii) Why do you think Shelagh Delaney called her play A Taste of Honey? Think about: • some of the events that happen in the play. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. [20] Unit 2 . • anything else you think important. [20] Or. [10] Either. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). (iii) Which character do you have most sympathy for and why? Think about: • • • • what happens to your chosen character in the play.10 (e) A Taste of Honey Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). why you feel the most sympathy for him/her. your chosen character’s relationships with others. the way your chosen character speaks and behaves.

getting to know all about you . Shut up. come on. don’t mind me! [Notices GEOF again. Do you mind getting out of here? Shut your mouth. Don’t point your bloody finger at me. His breath smells.” Where d’you keep the whisky? They haven’t got any. Did I ever tell you about the chappie who married his mother by mistake? I said get him out of here. well. Now. no! Who’s he? President of the local Temperance Society! [singing]: “Who’s got a bun in the oven? Who’s got a cake in the stove?” Leave her alone. come on .] “Little Josephine. HELEN: PETER: HELEN: JO: PETER: JO: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: Unit 2 . Cut the dirty stories! But I only scratched out one of mine. the father? Oh Christ. [Sings. Well. of course! Where are the drinks. singing. go to hell! I’ve got nothing to say . Well. Go on..] And the light of the world shone upon him.” Jo. bubble belly! Before I shut it for you. There she is. Lana? [He falls into the kitchen.] “Getting to know you.] Who’s this? Oh. the old bag turned out to be his mother . are you coming for a few drinks or aren’t you? The pubs aren’t open yet. are you coming or not? Turn over. [There is a loud crash in the kitchen. [PETER enters. I am back. [seeing GEOF]: What’s this.] Cheer up. for God’s sake! So he scratched out both his eyes. Oh. I can’t carry him out. .11 PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: GEOF: HELEN: PETER: HELEN: PETER: JO: PETER: What the hell’s going on? Do you expect me to wait in the filthy street all night? I told you to stay outside. . you’re a big girl now. Peter. .. What’s the matter everybody? Look at the sourfaced old bitch! Well. Hey! [To GEOF. . can I? His name was Oedipus. Now come on. . have your blasted family reunion. come here. everybody. Helen. Who’s the lily? Look at Helen. . outside! Ah! The erring daughter. I said I’d only be a few minutes and I’ve only been a few minutes.] Mary. if she doesn’t look like a bloody unrestored oil painting. he was a Greek I think.

the way they speak and behave at different points in the novel. waiting. –Great. I took the mug from my ma. –What do you want. he didn’t slam it. Something. I was up for Liverpool. –D’you hear me!? In the kitchen. and explain why these times were important to him. and I could hear my heart pumping the blood to the rest of me. My da spoke. I walked in for a drink of water. He looked at her. I just knew: he wasn’t coming back. He thumped her on the shoulder. She wasn’t holding her shoulder or anything. –A drink of water. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. He didn’t slam the door even a bit. he said. The Big Match was on and Liverpool were beating Arsenal. Either. He unmade his fist.” Write about a time of warmth and a time of cruelty that you feel were important to Paddy as he grew up. (iii) Unit 2 their relationship at the start of the novel. like he was going down to the shops. He left first. My mouth opened and a roar started but it never came. It was Sunday. [20] Paddy’s world has been described as being “full of warmth and cruelty. I said. I was too late. but I knew. I thought I was. He was going to say something to me. And I went back in and watched Liverpool winning. and he saw me. except it was the front door and we only used the front door when people came. I saw her falling back. [20] . for being there. He looked like he was in trouble. (a) Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). then he was gone. He didn’t have a suitcase or even a jacket. I saw him in the glass. Think about: • • • • Or. He didn’t. He looked at me. [10] I never got the chance to run away. He waited for a few seconds. I sobbed once and that was all. as well as getting the drink of water. I thought he was. –How’s the match going? –They’re winning. I cheered when the final whistle got blown but no one come in to look. My ma filled my mug at the sink. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). I’d been coming in to tell him. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). And a pain in my chest. I was supposed to cry. his hands moved. He didn’t slam it. He went red. He just closed it. then went. The way he shut the door. It was daylight out still. (ii) Write about the relationship between Paddy and Sinbad. the way their relationship develops and changes. He closed it behind him – I saw him in the glass. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Paddy speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. too early for fighting. I thought he was going to put her back to where she’d been before he hit her.12 QUESTION 2 Answer questions on one text. I wanted to say Sorry. He’d hit her again and I saw him. –Thank you very much. love? It was my ma. (i) Read the extract below. the reasons for the way their relationship develops and changes.

For three days. • anything else you think important. the heat almost visible in the air. hoping for a breeze to cool them off. The windows were open to allow cooler air to enter the tenement but no one came or went. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for your answer and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [10] A heat wave gripped Frenchtown. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). Finally. Yes. standing across the street and looking up at the second floor of Nicole’s house.13 (b) Heroes Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). hoping that I might catch a glimpse of her coming or going or at a window. People moved as if in a slowmotion movie. purposely avoiding even in my mind that terrible word: what had actually happened to her. He went into the house and did not come out again. . A small boy in the house across the street from Nicole’s rode his bicycle endlessly on the sidewalk and gazed at me occasionally as I waited. kept away from the street during those times. A kind of bogey man who does terrible things like letting his girl get hurt and attacked. • the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the novel. Either. silent as he gazed at me over his shoulder. squinting against the sun. ‘Waiting. after their shifts were over. Despite the heat. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (ii) Why do you think Robert Cormier decided to call his novel Heroes? Think about: • what happens in the novel. • different views of heroes in the novel. Men walked slowly as they went off to work in the shops as weary-looking in the morning as they were late in the day. I wanted to say. scratching his chin. the piazza on Nicole’s second floor tenement remained vacant. I haunted Sixth Street at all hours. • the way he is regarded by others. venturing sometimes into the yard. (i) Read the extract below. he asked: ‘Why are you here all the time?’ I shrugged. The boy waited a moment for my reply then pedalled back into his yard. Unit 2 [20] [20] Turn over. gathering on front lawns and piazzas in the evening after the shops closed. Or.’ ‘Are you the bogey man?’ he asked. Nicole’s father left the tenement to go to the shop just before seven o’clock in the morning and returned shortly after five in the afternoon and I avoided him. (iii) What do you think of Larry LaSalle? Write about: • his relationships with young people in the town.

the flapping plastic in the branches. Up in the branches of the trees. then turned back to the car. or Ruth? Give reasons for your choice. and he’d wave. feeling the wind coming across thos empty fields. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). and I was now standing here in front of it. maybe even call. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. the teachers. [10] I found I was standing before acres of ploughed earth. as I stood there looking at that strange rubbish. to drive off to wherever it was I was supposed to be. torn plastic sheeting and bits of old carrier bags. and if I waited long enough. and I could see how this fence and the cluster of three or four trees above me were the only things breaking the wind for miles. All along the fence. (iii) What impressions do you get of Hailsham School? Think about: • • • • what happens there. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. with two lines of barbed wire. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii).14 (c) Never Let Me Go Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). It was like the debris you get on a seashore: the wind must have carried some of it for miles and miles before finally coming up against these trees and these two lines of wire. (i) Read the extract below. and it was only a couple of weeks since I’d lost him. a tiny figure would appear on the horizon across the field. the children who live there. especially along the lower line of wire. The fantasy never got beyond that – I didn’t let it – and though the tears rolled down my face. I could see. Tommy. and I half-closed my eyes and imagined this was the spot where everything I’d ever lost since my childhood had washed up. I just waited a bit. I was thinking about the rubbish. (ii) For whom do you have the most sympathy: Kathy. that I started to imagine just a little fantasy thing. because this was Norfolk after all. and gradually get larger until I’d see it was Tommy. [20] Unit 2 . how the school is described. That was the only time. There was a fence keeping me from stepping into the field. the shore-line of odd stuff caught along the fencing. all sorts of rubbish had caught and tangled. too. [20] Or. Either. I wasn’t sobbing or out of control. flapping about.

The only other kind of person he could think of who didn’t go to school was the Macaulay Culkin kind. She wasn’t going to move him to another school. And all the time it got nearer and nearer to the morning. [10] During the night after his first day Marcus woke up every half-hour or so. That would be OK. • the way she speaks and behaves at different times in the novel.15 (d) About a Boy Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). . because he hated standing up in front of people. Every time he woke up his first thought was that there must be some kind of way past. And how could you explain that to any-one? It was OK not to be right for some things (he already knew he wasn’t right for parties. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). anyway. and that. There was no way round it. he supposed. 12. • your chosen character’s relationships with others. he knew. That was it. then forget it: he was crap at drama. Which was why he wanted to be Macaulay Culkin. Some kids. because his legs were too short). Which was why he hated school. it seemed to him. and the morning after that.31 . and leave him in exactly the place he had started from. was the basic problem. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. (ii) What do you think of Fiona. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Which was why he was never going to be Macaulay Culkin in a thousand years. thump him on the head. Or.55. he knew that much. But if being Macaulay Culkin meant being good at drama. 11. all the way to a caravan in Hollywood and. [20] Unit 2 Turn over. and even if she did it wouldn’t make a whole lot of difference. 1. . He just wasn’t right for schools. Better than OK. Marcus’s mother? Think about: • her relationship with Marcus. Not secondary schools. got taught by their parents at home. and the morning after that and . he was reasonably happy.55.19. let alone in the next few days. just about.35. Three hundred and fifty pounds a week! Where was he going to get that kind of money from? Not from a paper round. Either. Unless he paid her to teach him – but she’d told him not long ago that she got three hundred and fifty pounds a week from her job. . maybe even more. and why? [20] Think about: • what you learn about your chosen character from their story. 12. (i) Read the extract below. They’d had something about him on Saturday-morning TV once. He’d still be who he was. for a moment. or for baggy trousers.41. . • her relationships with other characters. . He couldn’t believe he was going to have to go back there the next morning. but more or less every morning for the rest of his life. He could tell from the luminous hands of his dinosaur clock: 10. Which of these stories interests you the more. (iii) About a Boy tells the story of Marcus and the story of Will. or round. Everyone went to school. All that night he thought like boomerangs fly: an idea would shoot way off into the distance. because Macaulay Culkin probably got three hundred and fifty pounds a week. this horrible feeling. and they said he got taught in a caravan sort of thing by a private tutor. But there wasn’t anything she could do this time. which meant that if he were Macaulay Culkin he could pay his mum to teach him. whenever he had been upset about anything before. because he was too shy. there had usually turned out to be some kind of answer – one that mostly involved telling his mum what was bothering him. but not being right for school was a big problem. • why your chosen character’s story interests you. then it would be the weekend. or even through. He was going to have to go to school tomorrow. but his mum couldn’t do that because she went out to work. then it would begin the return journey. 11. well. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (ii). when he had got as far away from school and reality as it was possible to go.

16 (e) Resistance Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i), and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (i) Read the extract below. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings about Sarah here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [10] It was her birthday, however much she’d tried to forget it. She hadn’t mentioned it to any of the other women and she’d tried not to even mention it to herself. There was, she felt, nothing to celebrate. Twenty-seven years old. Childless. Abandoned in a world gone sour. Just the afternoon before she’d ridden Bess up on the hill and watched a pair of crows circle and dance about each other in the air. When they’d landed they’d rubbed shoulders and Sarah had felt again, as if for the first time, the pain of her solitude. Even the carrion crows who ate the eyes of her dead ewes had companionship while she, as ever, had just the blood-pulse of the wind in her ears and the heat of Bess’s neck to keep her company. Not for the first time, she’d wanted Tom dead. Not because of what he’d done, but instead of what he’d done. In death he would have given her an answer. She would have known where he was. As it was, she just had nothing. Even the women whose husbands had gone to war, they’d always had something: letters, days of leave. She’d once seen a crowd of these women down at the station in Pandy. They were wearing their best dresses, their cheeks rouged and their lips bright red, waiting for a train to take them into Newport. There, they would wait on the platform for the fast train carrying troops from the training fields of west Wales up to London and the ports of the south coast. The train didn’t stop at Newport, just gave a couple of blasts on its whistle and steamed on through. But these women always went to watch it pass, dressed as if for a dance. Just for the chance of seeing the faces of their husbands, their lovers, as the long line of carriages clattered and rushed past them trailing its heavy plume of steam. It was often a hopeless journey but the women still went, just for the chance, that glimpse. But Sarah didn’t even have that. There was nowhere she could go in the hope of seeing Tom. No reports she could read with her heart in her mouth. And no letters she could wait for. Just an empty vigilance for some sign, some hidden message and her long rides up on the hills, forever facing up to their blank answer. Either, (ii) What do you think of Albrecht? Write about: • • • • Or, (iii) Why do you think Owen Sheers decided to call his novel Resistance? Think about: • the situation described in the novel; • people who show different types of resistance in the novel; • anything else you think important. [20] his relationship with other Germans; his relationships with Sarah; his relationships with other characters; his behaviour at different parts of the novel, including the end. [20]

Unit 2

GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE
Foundation Tier UNIT 2b (Contemporary drama and literary heritage prose) Specimen Assessment Materials For teaching from 2010 For examination from 2012 2 hours

Question 1. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) Question 2. (a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

The History Boys Blood Brothers A View From The Bridge Be My Baby My Mother Said I Never Should Silas Marner Pride and Prejudice A Christmas Carol Lord of the Flies Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve

2-3 4-5 6-7 8-9 10 - 11 12 13 14 15 16

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS Twelve page answer booklet. INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES Answer Question 1 and Question 2. Answer on one text in each question. INFORMATION FOR CANDIDATES The number of marks is given in brackets after each question or part-question. You are reminded that assessment will take into account the quality of written communication used in your answers.

JD*(S2012-Found. Unit 2)

Turn over.

2

QUESTION 1 Answer questions on one text. (a) The History Boys Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i), and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Irwin speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [10] Either, (ii) Write about the boy in The History Boys for whom you have the most sympathy. Explain why you have the most sympathy for him. [20]

Or, (iii) What impression of education do you get from the play The History Boys? Think about: • • • • the school the boys attend; the teachers; the boys’ hopes and ambitions; anything else you think important. [20]

Unit 2

The Somme. tick them all off. Poetry is good up to a point. Both of them surprisingly blood thirsty. But I am a fellow of Magdalen College. Manchester longs to have you. Barrenness of the strategy. the body count. Others nod. Trench warfare. most of them seem to have enjoyed the war. And all this mourning has veiled the truth. Nothing in it for us. Try this for size. So what about the poets. Because you should realise that so far as the Cenotaph and the Last Post and all that stuff is concerned. . We have the mountains of dead on both sides. (doubtfully) Yes. Better stand back and let Germany and Russia fight it out while we take the imperial pickings. right . Saint Wilfred Owen couldn’t wait to get back to his company. And . He was a butcher. sir. sir. What else? Come on. Stupidity of the generals. originally of oxen. . is the appropriate word. then? What about them? If you read what they actually say as distinct from what they write. . These are facts. sir. Oxford. ‘hecatombs’. and I have just read seventy papers all saying the same thing and I am asleep . Inflation. We still don’t like to admit the war was even partly our fault because so many of our people died. Germany does not want war and if there is an arms race it is Britain who is leading it. IRWIN POSNER DAKIN IRWIN CROWTHER LOCKWOOD TIMMS AKTHAR TIMMS DAKIN POSNER CROWTHER AKTHAR TIMMS IRWIN TIMMS IRWIN SCRIPPS IRWIN DAKIN IRWIN DAKIN IRWIN LOCKWOOD IRWIN Unit 2 Turn over. Re-drawing of national borders. . It’s not so much lest we forget. there’s no better way of forgetting something than by commemorating it. as lest we remember. First class. but at least he delivered the goods.’ Which. Humiliation of Germany at Versailles. Bristol welcomes you with open arms. . Collapse of the Weimar Republic. On both sides. Siegfried Sassoon was a good officer. Internal disorder. Ruhr and the Rhineland. You can walk into Leeds. Yes. Though there’s no reason why we should want war. True. Haig particularly. What has that got to do with it? What has that got to do with anything? Let’s go back to 1914 and I’ll put you a different case. The Rise of Hitler! So. as you all seem to have read somewhere . Why do we not care to acknowledge them? The cattle. Anybody know what it means? ‘Great public sacrifice of many victims. Our overall conclusion is that the origins of the Second War lie in the unsatisfactory outcome of the First. . Adds flavour. If Haig had had any sense he’d have had him disinterred and shot all over again for giving comport to the enemy. no the real enemy to Haig’s subsequent reputation was the Unknown Soldier. Mass unemployment. . And Dakin. the First World War gets the thumbs-down. No. A photograph on every mantelpiece.3 Classroom So we arrive eventually at the less-than-startling discovery that so far as the poets are concerned. Donkeys. But it’s all true. but no need to look so smug about it. . . (with more certainty) Yes. since Wilfred Owen says men were dying like cattle. Passchendaele. Sir? You were the one who was morally superior about Haig.

(i) Read the extract on the opposite page.4 (b) Blood Brothers Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). and an adult. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (ii) What do you think about the way Linda speaks and behaves at different parts of the play: when Linda is a child. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. [10] Either. (iii) Write about the different ways Mickey and Edward are brought up. at the end? [20] Or. and the effects these differences have on them both. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). [20] Unit 2 . a teenager.

Jen. Edward. There’s no such thing as a bogey man. there’s no such thing. who spiritedly ‘dies’ to E DWARD’s great amusement. Darling. calling EDWARD over to her. I’ll see you later now. I don’t want – I don’t want him growing away from you. I’ve got our Sammy’s catapult. E DWARD and his father romp on the floor. MICKEY MRS LYONS MICKEY EDWARD (off) Does Eddie live here? (off) Pardon? (off) Does he? Is he comin’ out to play. MR LYONS exits. it’s Edward. You should spend more time with him. but if. The sort of thing a silly mother might say to her children – ‘the bogey man will get you’. I promise you. MRS LYONS MR LYONS Richard you didn’t say . Daddy. have more time. EDWARD goes and sits with her. If we complete this. Mummy will read the story. I’ve told you. A doorbell is heard. Darling. EDWARD. MRS JOHNSTONE turns and goes into her house at the end of the song. It’s a – a superstition. Y’ comin’ out? Turn over. MRS LYONS goes to answer the door. MR LYONS joining them and sitting on the arm of the chair. EDWARD goes to the bookshelf and leafs through a dictionary. MRS LYONS gets up and goes to her husband. MR LYONS gets up and walks towards the door. . . Eddie. eh? (shouting) Mickey! MICKEY enters pursued by MRS LYONS Unit 2 MRS LYONS EDWARD MR LYONS MICKEY Hi-ya. I’m sorry. how do you spell bogey man? Ask mummy. . if we complete this merger I will. I’ve got to go to work for an hour. delighted. Will he get me? Edward. we haven’t finished the story yet.5 EDWARD reaches his home and walks in. His mother hugs him and his father produces a toy gun for him. . whever did you hear such a thing? I’m trying to look it up. That’s why we’re doing it. I just – it’s not me. the firm will run itself and I’ll have plenty of time to spend with you both. EDWARD MR LYONS Daddy . seizes it and ‘shoots’ his father. how do you spell bogey man? Mm? Bogey man? (laughing) Edward. EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS EDWARD MRS LYONS Mummy. MRS LYONS settles herself in an armchair with a story book. Must dash. .

[10] Either. Some people think that what happens is out of his control. • how the characters show your chosen emotion or emotions. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. [20] Think about: • the characters involved. hatred. anger. his relationship with Beatrice. (iii) There are many emotions in this play: love. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. jealousy. What do you think? [20] Think about: • • • • Or. his relationship with Catherine. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). Choose one or two of these emotions and write about two or three parts in the play where your chosen emotion or emotions are shown. Then answer the following question: What to you think of the way Catherine speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the play. (ii) Some people think that Eddie Carbone had only himself to blame for what happens at the end of the play.6 (c) A View From The Bridge Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). his relationships with Marco and Rodolpho. Unit 2 .

Katie. Eddie. But don’t come back. There’ll be nobody there from her family. Katie! (She turns CATHERINE around. (She goes to CATHERINE. I been arguin’ with you all day already. You be on my side or on their side.) Now go. Now if that’s more to you than I am. God bless you. go to your wedding. Whatever happened we all done it. I’m goin’ for my sister. that’s all. It’s her wedding. Catherine. Don’t say that. He’s gonna come here and apologize to me or nobody from this house is goin’ into that church today. Eddie! Eddie! (To CATHERINE) Then we all belong in the garbage. I’ll stay home. and don’t you ever forget it. . and me too. God bless your children CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE BEATRICE CATHERINE Unit 2 Turn over. BEATRICE No. . nobody! Shut up. In the garbage he belongs! EDDIE seems about to pick up the table and fling it at her. Beatrice. then go. we’re supposed to be there already.7 CATHERINE enters from bedroom. Go. Beatrice. and I said what I’m gonna say. (suddenly) Who the hell do you think you are? Sssh! You got no more right to tell nobody nothin’! Nobody! The rest of your life. For my sister let me go. The priest won’t wait.) You’re gonna come with me! I can’t Katie. You. (as though hurt) Look. . I can’t . CATHERINE BEATRICE EDDIE Its after three. How can you listen to him? This rat! (shaking CATHERINE) Don’t you call him that! (clearing from BEATRICE) What’re you scared of? He’s a rat! He belongs in the sewer! Stop it! (weeping) He bites people when they sleep! He comes when nobody’s lookin’ and poisons decent people.

(ii) What are your thoughts and feelings about Matron and the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the play? [20] Or. Then answer the following question: How do you think an audience would respond to the way the characters speak and behave here? Give reasons for what you say. Explain why you think your chosen parts would have these effects on an audience. Write about one part that you think an audience would find funny. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (iii) Be My Baby is both funny and sad. and one part that you think an audience would find sad.8 (d) Be My Baby Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). [20] Unit 2 . [10] Either. (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii).

I’ve spoken to the bank. You don’t want to feel the cold. . I’ll follow you down. No. Mary. For Queenie. I kept her warm ’til morning. Is Father . Mother. The End. Glad to hear your Aunt’s on the mend. now. no less. MATRON takes the teddy bear. We’ve been rather busy since you’ve been away. For Lucy. I’ll bring her down. MARY puts the Dansette and records on QUEENIE’s bed. Come along. Then let me help you. So she doesn’t forget. Exit MRS ADAMS. I’m not ready. My baby. It’s over. I’d rather you took it. Mary? Mother. If you say so. You start a new job on Monday. Button up. Nearly done. Turn over. Shall I show you out? She knows the way. Matron. MATRON holds the teddy bear as ‘Be My Baby’ plays to blackout. Mary. It was a girl. . Time to go home MARY hands her teddy bear to MATRON. Nearly done? Not quite. Exit MARY.9 MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MRS ADAMS MARY MATRON MARY MRS ADAMS MATRON MATRON MARY MATRON MARY MATRON MARY Unit 2 Enter MATRON and MRS ADAMS. Exit QUEENIE. . Mother. Father took the opportunity to decorate your room. Mary. I liked it where I was. You’re a big girl. This Monday? City centre branch. Well? Not really. Mary? It’s all right. The taxi’s waiting. I held her. MRS ADAMS gets MARY’s coat and holds it open for her. How was your journey? Rather slow. MARY puts on her coat. You will be.

You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. • the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the play.10 (e) My Mother Said I Never Should Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). [20] Or. and remember to support what you say with words and phrases from the extract. (ii) What do you think of Margaret? Think about: • her relationship with Doris. (iii) Write about some of the changes in women’s lives during the 20th century that are shown in My Mother Said I Never Should and explain the effect they have on some of the characters. [20] Unit 2 . • her relationship with Jackie. • her relationship with Rosie. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Jackie speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. [10] Either.

said he was sorry . Dad says I can. (She smiles irresistibly)– After you’d gone I tried to lose that memory. there were two children. so we took a bus to Didsbury. She wanted to make it all better. . Jackie hesitates JACKIE I’m frightened. . I couldn’t keep the room warm. separate lives. . . . Rosie? . . (Pause) I could give you everything now. he had to be in Liverpool. . (Emphatically) He loved me. By the time we got back to Hulme it was dark. I think they live in Leeds now. Sandra and Hugh thought I was inhuman. . Quite a few of my friends do. I rang the bell. it was trendy. they’d moved. your father. He was married. I saw his name in the Guardian last year. . . across the lake. in the flat . (Pause) I took you to Lyme Park one day. Rosie. (Pause) It doesn’t matter how much you succeed afterwards. I remember the books that come out that winter–how to succeed as a single working mother – fairy-tales! (Pause) Sandra and Hugh have a family now. his wife was taking a photo. an article about his photographs . . . (With difficulty) Asked her. . (She gestures) Sit down on the swing. you must believe that! (Pause) He said he’d leave his wife. (Pause) It was a very cold winter after you were born. . . we’d agreed.11 ROSIE JACKIE If you were really my mum you wouldn’t have been able to give me away! How dare you! (She goes to hit Rosie but cannot) You’re at the centre of everything I do! (A slight pause) Mummy treated me as though I’d simply fallen over and cut my knee. Then I went back to art school. (Angrily) For the first time in my life I took care of myself–refused joints. (Pause) “It’s a girl”. only I never knew why. She was the one who wanted it kept secret . . . I’m going to Oldham. Unit 2 Turn over. . there were no lights in the tower blocks. I wanted to bring you up. (Pause) I tried! I couldn’t do it. . (She stops) A Punjabi man answered. the youngest was only four . did exercises went to clinic. made a change from concrete. big gardens. . . but I knew he wouldn’t. (Quietly) . I knew he had an open fire. –picked me up and said you’ll be all right now. I kept waking in the night to feed you . (Pause. (Silence) He couldn’t be there the day you were born. (Pause) After you’d gone . he was buying ice-creams. I saw them together. . the lift wasn’t working–(She stops) That was the night I phoned Mummy. He sent money. if you’ve failed once. pine kitchens. A week . Rosie. Pause ROSIE I used to hate you. he loved you. it won’t show much. There were power cuts. . I WANTED you. to live with Gran – Great-Gran. With effort) Graham .

and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). or to guard leaf and bud from invading harm. And now something had come to replace his hoard which gave a growing purpose to the earnings. from which. the end of the story. for fifteen years. (ii) Write about Nancy Lammeter and the way she speaks and behaves. [20] what happened there. [10] No child was afraid of approaching Silas when Eppie was near him: there was no repulsion around him now. thinks of the rain and sunshine. for the little child had come to link him once more with the whole world. But yet men are led away from threatening destruction: a hand is put into theirs. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). so that they look no more backward. in relation to his nursling. and there was love between the child and the world–from men and women with parental looks and tones. (i) Read the extract below. Silas began now to think of Raveloe life entirely in relation to Eppie: she must have everything that was a good in Raveloe. In old days there were angels who came and took men by the hand and led them away from the city of destruction. her feelings about adopting a child. the discovery of Godfrey’s secret. and all influences. and asks industriously for all knowledge that will help him to satisfy the wants of the searching roots. (a) Silas Marner Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). the way Lantern Yard is described. Either. to the red lady-birds and the round pebbles. We see no white-winged angels now. he had stood aloof as from a strange thing. (iii) Write about Lantern Yard and its importance to Silas Marner’s story. The disposition to hoard had been utterly crushed at the very first by the loss of his long-stored gold: the coins he earned afterwards seemed as irrelevant as stones brought to complete a house suddenly buried by an earthquake. and the hand may be a little child’s. . There was love between him and the child that blent them into one. which leads them forth gently towards a calm and bright land. You may wish to think about: • • • • Or. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Silas and Eppie’s return to Lantern Yard at the end of the novel. the sense of bereavement was too heavy upon him for the old thrill of satisfaction to arise again at the touch of the newly-earned coin. and he listened docilely. with which he could have no communion: as some man who has a precious plant to which he could give a nurturing home in a new soil. drawing his hope and joy continually onward beyond the money.12 QUESTION 2 Answer questions on one text. Silas Marner’s relationships with people there. Think about: • • • • Unit 2 [20] her engagement to Godfrey Cass. Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. either for young or old. that he might come to understand better what this life was.

looking at the eldest Miss Bennet. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Mr. and everybody hoped that he would never come there again. ‘Come. His character was decided.’ ‘You are dancing with the only handsome girl in the room. Write about it. Your sisters are engaged. speaking occasionally to one of his own party.’ ‘I certainly shall not. very agreeable. but not handsome enough to tempt me. ‘I must have you dance. as I have this evening. Mr. was sharpened into particular resentment. You had much better dance. Darcy speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. ‘She is tolerable. to press his friend to join it. he withdrew his own and coldly said. for you are wasting your time with me. his relationships with his daughters. was angry that the ball closed so early. and I dare say. Elizabeth Bennet had been obliged.’ Mr Bingley followed his advice. and spend the rest of the evening in walking about the room. He was the proudest.[10] Mr.13 (b) Pride and Prejudice Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii).’ said he. by his having slighted one of her daughters. and there is not another woman in the room. Do let me ask my partner to introduce you. Such amiable qualities must speak for themselves.’ ‘Which do you mean?’ and turning round. You had better return to your partner and enjoy her smiles. and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings towards him. who is very pretty. explaining why you find it interesting. his opinions of his daughters’ marriages. Amongst the most violent against him was Mrs. and I am in no humour at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. who came from the dance for a few minutes. (ii) Write about Mr. his relationship with his wife. and there are several of them you see uncommonly pretty.’ cried Bingley. till catching her eye. Choose either a successful or an unsuccessful marriage in the novel you find interesting. I hate to see you standing about by yourself in this stupid manner. anything else you think important. What a contrast between him and his friend! Mr. (i) Read the extract below. Mr. Bennet and the way he speaks and behaves. Bennet. You may wish to think about: • • • • Or. Bingley. and during part of that time. it would be insupportable. whose dislike of his general behaviour. and talked of giving one himself at Netherfield. Darcy danced only once with Mrs.’ said Mr. to sit down for two dances. I never met with so many pleasant girls in my life. by the scarcity of gentlemen. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). Darcy walked off. Darcy had been standing near enough for her to overhear a conversation between him and Mr. unless I am particularly acquainted with my partner. danced every dance. he was lively and unreserved.’ ‘I would not be so fastidious as you are. declined being introduced to any other lady. ‘Oh! she is the most beautiful creature I ever beheld! But there is one of her sisters sitting down just behind you. At such an assembly as this. Darcy. [20] Turn over. Bingley had soon made himself acquainted with all the principal people in the room. he looked for a moment at Elizabeth. ‘for a kingdom! Upon my honour. You know how I detest it. [20] Unit 2 . (iii) There are some successful and some unsuccessful marriages in Pride and Prejudice. Hurst and once with Miss Bingley. Darcy. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. whom it would not be a punishment to me to stand up with. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). Either. most disagreeable man in the world.

(iii) Explain how and why Scrooge changes at different points in A Christmas Carol. and conduct them on their way. The ancient tower of a church. whom he had fined five shillings on the previous Monday for being drunk and blood-thirsty in the streets. Piercing. the way different characters speak and behave. (i) Read the extract below. The cold became intense. and had lighted a great fire in a brazier. (ii) What impressions do you get of life in 19th century London from your reading of A Christmas Carol? [20] Think about: • • • • Or. [20] the lives of the characters. the way London is described in the novel. round which a party of ragged men and boys were gathered: warming their hands and winking their eyes before the blaze in rapture. and turned to misanthropic ice. Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have when you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. and struck the hours and quarters in the clouds. whose gruff old bell was always peeping slily down at Scrooge out of a gothic window in the wall. Either. its overflowing sullenly congealed. became invisible. some labourers were repairing the gas-pipes. in the stronghold of the might Mansion House. The water-plug being left in solitude. In the main street. with tremulous vibrations afterwards as if its teeth were chattering in its frozen head up there. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). that people ran about with flaring links. searching. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Unit 2 . and colder. at the corner of the court. gave orders to his fifty cooks and butlers to keep Christmas as a Lord Mayor’s household should. and even the little tailor. Foggier yet. Poulterers’ and grocers’ trades became a splendid joke: a glorious pageant.[10] Meanwhile the fog and darkness thickened so. while his lean wife and the baby sallied out to buy the beef. The brightness of the shops where holly sprigs and berries crackled in the lamp heat of the windows. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). anything else you think important. stirred up to-morrow’s pudding in his garret. proffering their services to go before horses in carriages. biting cold. with which it was next to impossible to believe that such dull principles as bargain and sale had anything to do. made pale faces ruddy as they passed. The Lord Mayor.14 (c) A Christmas Carol Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii).

with filthy body. Jolly good show. Give reasons for what you say. “We’ll take you off. “I should have thought that a pack of British boys–you’re all British aren’t you?–would have been able to put up a better show than that–I mean––” “It was like that at first. and the fall through the air of the true.” Write about some incidents from the novel that you think either support or do not support this statement. The officer. started forward. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). Or. was moved and a little embarrassed. The officer looked past him to the group of painted boys. But the island was scorched up like dead wood–Simon was dead–and Jack had . • the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the novel. Ralph wept for the end of innocence. matted hair. [20] Turn over. “Who’s boss here?” “I am. surrounded by these noises. [20] Unit 2 . and you don’t know how many of you there are?” “No.” “I should have thought. (ii) What do you think about Jack? Think about: • the way he treats the other boys. shuddering spasms of grief that seemed to wrench his whole body. and unwiped nose. For a moment he had a fleeting picture of the strange glamour that had once invested the beaches. then changed his mind and stood still. • the way he is described. “I know. He turned away to give them time to pull themselves together. . How many of you are there?” Ralph shook his head. allowing his eyes to rest on the trim cruiser in the distance. sir. wise friend called Piggy. And in the middle of the. His voice rose under the black smoke before the burning wreckage of the island. [10] The officer turned back to Ralph. Like the Coral Island. “before things––” He stopped. and waited. He gave himself up to them now for the first time on the island. Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say.” said the officer as he visualized the search before him. “We saw your smoke.” said Ralph. Either. and infected by that emotion. A little boy who wore the remains of an extraordinary black cap on his red hair and who carried the remains of a pair of spectacles at his waist. . and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). the other little boys began to shake and sob too.” Ralph looked at him dumbly. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (iii) A review of Lord of the Flies said “William Golding knows exactly what boys are like. (i) Read the extract below. The tears began to flow and sobs shook him. great. the darkness of man’s heart.15 (d) Lord of the Flies Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii).” said Ralph loudly. “We were together then––” The officer nodded helpfully.

Keith Thomas’s home was no exception and I was sniffing. ‘Please.’ said his mother. • how she behaves. our day of peace. Keith and his mother.’ I said. Think about: • how she speaks. heads cocked.’ Keith had asked me to his house for tea. sad. [10] June the first was our agreement.’ ‘I like bananas and cream. story. I tipped the tea over the tablecloth and grew redder . ‘What’s the matter?’ Keith’s mother asked. Then answer the following question: What impressions of Dannie’s life do you get when you read this extract? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. It was the end of a school day where we left our carved initials. Other people’s houses have a strange smell. more alive somehow.’ she said. I ate bread and butter and jam and Welsh cakes. There everything was different. ‘Blow your nose. quite ostentatiously I can tell you. so you can leave as soon as you’ve eaten ’em. (ii) Write about Dannie’s mother. It came in that year with all sunshine and the windows open and the neighbours’ radio. ‘Is there something burning?’ I went very red when the others sniffed. I could. Suddenly Keith said. (i) Read the extract below. Keith. They just stood there. hurt and momentous. drawing air through their nostrils. .’ asked Philip. and school teacher (old Knobble-knees) rubbing off chalk from the blackboard like a nasty day from the calendar. It was tennis-players and the yellow seasick trams grinding down Cathedral Road. an interlude in our constant campaign of being mean to each other.16 (e) Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve Answer part (i) and either part (ii) or part (iii). for it was our day of peace. [20] [20] Unit 2 . ‘Mind how you cross the road.” Choose one part of the story you find sad. Write about them. explaining why they had that effect on you. and Keith sniffed and sniffed louder and louder. Either. and about 40 minutes on part (ii) or part (iii). in the wooden desk. We walked hardly together for we were enemies. and one you find funny. You are advised to spend about 20 minutes on part (i). and her relationships with her sons as they grew up. of masterful vilification. ‘can I have my yo-yo back? I won’t talk again during lessons. Perhaps it was the odour of sin or the past remains of previous tenants. Miss Morgan. . This was all a long time ago: I was ten years high and I lived in South Wales. ‘I can’t smell anything. Or. ‘There’ll be bananas and cream. (iii) Ash on a Young Man’s Sleeve has been described as “a funny.’ she said.

Signal this in the margin by a remark like "getting somewhere" or "not quite there". "I think I know what s/he means". first examination Summer 2011 UNIT 1 HIGHER TIER MARKING GUIDELINES GENERAL 1. for this examination. using the criteria. Avoid the temptation of saying to yourself. be referred to me for a second opinion: write Refer to C.E. Remember that your mark at the end of the exercise must tally with the skills which you have identified. assessment can be problematic. Expression Where problems with presentation seriously impede communication. but without looking for what might have been presented or for what you might have written in the candidate's place. There must always be a comment at the end of each section (including the poetry question). independent responses. These remarks will be based on the criteria established by the C. New examiners have been provided with marked scripts to illustrate this procedure. 3. . All the questions provide opportunities for candidates to make informed. Remarks An ongoing series of remarks in the margin throughout the script is vital. boldly at the top of the script and follow the instructions above. 2. Confused or vague expression is often a result of faulty understanding or appreciation of a point a candidate is trying to make. This should not simply echo the mark but indicate the salient features of the candidate's performance. In such cases the candidate should.E.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 93 GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Specimen assessment materials First teaching September 2010. after discussion with your team leader. and awarding credit. These remarks will be mainly your identifications of skills as they appear. You must evaluate what is offered by the candidate. and such opportunities need to be upheld in your marking. Marking positively Please approach the marking of scripts with an open mind and mark positively.

evaluating writers' different ways of expressing meaning and achieving effects Relate texts to their social. cultural and historical contexts. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for Section A parts (b) & (c) you should give twice as much weight to AO4 as to AO1. themes and settings Make comparisons and explain links between texts. . structure and form contribute to writers' presentation of ideas. explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times AO2 AO3 AO4 5. select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations Explain how language.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 94 4. Assessment objective coverage in Unit 1 Assessment objective A01 A02 A03 A04 Section A (a) Section A (b) and (c) Section B In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for Section A part (a) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. Assessment objectives AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively.

structure and form (AO2) Making links and comparisons (AO3) 2-4 5-9 5-7 1014 8-10 1520 . social/cultural and and ability to move from the at the highest level. connections and themes and settings to affect comparisons between the reader. select and evaluate relevant ideas are conveyed theme and style. show a clear understanding of social/cultural and historical contexts. discuss thoroughly. ideas and at the highest level. i) 0 1 ii) iii) 0 1-4 Critical response to texts (AO1) Social. There will be few errors in grammar. create effects. historical contexts. Able to relate details of text to literary background and explain how texts have been / are influential at different times. or what is written is totally irrelevant to the text or not worthy of credit. punctuation and spelling. make assured make apt selection of are able to relate texts are able to evaluate exploration and details for cross to own and others' characters/relationships and evaluation of the ways reference. feeling are conveyed make subtle points of comment on consistently handle texts with through language. use of specialist vocabulary will be limited and/or not always appropriate. are able to explain the relate texts to own and understand and demonstrate structure and form. historical context is relevant to understanding the texts(s) Expression will be reasonably clear and the answer will have a basic structure. historical contexts. at the highest level. how meanings and and comparisons of historical context. give simple unfocused expression of preference. tentative judgements. and historical contexts (AO4) Nothing written. links confidently. punctuation and spelling will contain errors but these will not be intrusive. There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. show increasingly impact of texts. Language. Each successive description assumes demonstration of achievements in lower bands. comparison and probe importance of confidence. have a clear grasp of probe the sub-text with clear appreciation of begin to explore links social/cultural and increasing confidence. It is recognised that work will not always fit neatly into one of the descriptions. stylistic effects. social/cultural and to relevant aspects of the particular features of select some obvious historical contexts. Expression will be mainly clear and fluent and the answer will be quite well structured. and structure combine to subject. social/cultural and begin to select relevant detail. specific to the general: make assured Awareness of literary convey ideas persuasively analysis of stylistic tradition shown. characters and relationships. Expression will be clear and fluent and the answer will be well structured. relevance and impact of others' experience. specialist vocabulary will be used appropriately. text. difference. make increasingly assured show appreciation of make a sustained show a clear selection and incorporation of how writers use discussion of links and understanding of relevant detail. begin to see how texts increasingly thoughtfully.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 95 BAND CRITERIA The following descriptions have been provided to indicate the way in which progression within the four criteria is likely to occur. meaning. through language. specialist vocabulary will be used mainly appropriately. aspects of style and some evaluation of contexts more securely. are able to identify and at the highest level. attitudes/motives. punctuation and spelling and lack of structure are likely to impede communication on occasions. You are asked to place work initially within a band and then to fine-tune using the marks within the band. convey ideas clearly and appropriately. support. begin to be able to textual details. and cogently with apt textual features. and make simple links and connections awareness of make generalised reference comments on between texts. texts. cultural. features of similarity and begin to be aware how paraphrasing. the text. character and the have been influential. make a personal response to comments about when required. experience. theme. echoing and style and structure. how writers use ideas. There will be little evidence of specialist vocabulary. Errors in grammar. have an overview structure and form. generalised points of comparison on textual background. make more detailed reference see how different compare and make are able to set texts in to text. language to achieve comparisons between social/cultural and are able to speculate/offer specific effects. Grammar. texts. rely on a narrative approach may make begin to make simple make simple comments with some misreadings. display some understanding are able to recognise make straightforward show a limited of main features.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 96

SECTION A 1. Of Mice and Men (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract, show how John Steinbeck presents Curley here. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Brief responses, with simple comments about Curley. Simple comments on his place in ranch in USA in the 1930s. Answers will tend towards reorganisation, with some discussion of Curley for 3 -4. May show some awareness of his place in ranch in USA in the 1930s. Discussions of Curley will be more focused, with relevant detail from the extract to support judgements. May show some understanding of his role in ranch in USA in the 1930s. For 6 -7 answers will be typified by sustained discussion of Curley and how he is presented in this extract. Answers will be assured, evaluative and analytical, and may well show a clear understanding of his role in ranch in USA in the 1930s.

8-10 marks

(b)

Steinbeck uses three specific settings on the ranch: the bunkhouse, the harness room and the barn. Choose one of these settings and show how it is important to the novel as a whole. Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Patchy, simple narrative. Simple awareness of ranch life in 1930s USA. Answers will be dependent on relatively simple narrative, with some discussion and awareness for 7 - 9. Some awareness of ranch life in 1930s USA. Answers will still be narrative driven, but use of knowledge of the text will be more focused and selective. Some understanding of context of ranch life in 1930s USA. For 12 -14 answers will be more sustained, with thorough discussion of the chosen setting and its importance. Answers will be cogent and astute, with assured use of relevant detail. There will be a confident understanding of the importance of the chosen setting to the novel as a whole, and appreciation of context of ranch life in 1930s USA.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks

15-20 marks

(c) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

How is the character of Candy important to the novel as a whole? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be based on simple, general narrative, and show basic awareness of 1930s ranch life in USA and its impact on Candy. Answers will tend to be general and based on partial narrative, with some discussion and awareness of Candy for 7 - 9. There will be awareness of how Candy reflects 1930s ranch life in USA. Answers will still be narrative dependent, but with apt focus on key areas of the text. For 12 -14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful, with an emerging appreciation of Candy's importance within the context of 1930s USA. Answers will be evaluative, assured, and, perhaps, for 18 – 20, original, with the issue of Candy's importance addressed with some success. There will be appreciation of how Candy represents society in 1930s USA.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 97

2.

Anita and Me (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract, show how Meera Syal creates mood and atmosphere here.

0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks

Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Brief responses, with simple comments on the racist attitudes and their effects as shown in the extract. Answers will be dependent on paraphrase to a certain extent, with awareness/empathy for 3 - 4. There will be awareness of the racist attitudes and their effects as shown in the extract. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract and of the racist attitudes and their effects as will be thorough and thoughtful. Answers will be assured, analytical, and show real appreciation of Syal's creation of mood and atmosphere, within the context of the racist attitudes and their effects on characters.

(b) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks

How is Meena's father presented in the novel? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be narrative driven and brief, with only a simple sense of Meena's father and his life as an immigrant. Answers will be narrative driven, with an awareness of Meena's father and how he is presented. There will be an awareness of his status as an immigrant in British society. Answers will reveal some understanding of Meena's father and how he is presented, and will be confident in use of text. For 12 – 14 answers will be sustained, revealing an understanding of character and events, within the context of his status as an immigrant in British society. Answers will be assured and evaluative in terms of chosen detail. There will be clear appreciation of how he has been affected by his experiences in both India and Britain.

15-20 marks

(c)

Meena says she grew up under the influence of two cultures, Punjabi and British. How is this conflict between these two influences presented in the novel? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Responses will be general and simple, revealing a sketchy knowledge of the text. There will be very simple awareness of the two cultures. Answers will be dependent on relatively simple narrative, with some discussion and awareness of the conflict between the two cultures for 7 - 9. Answers will still be narrative driven, but use of knowledge of the text will be more focused and selective. For 12 – 14 answers will be more sustained, with thorough discussion of the influences of the two cultures. The issue of presentation will probably be addressed only implicitly, however. Answers will be cogent and astute, with assured use of relevant detail and the "how" part of the question addressed with assurance.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks

15-20 marks

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 98

3.

To Kill a Mockingbird (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract, show how Harper Lee creates mood and atmosphere here.

0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks

Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Brief responses, and simple comments on Tom Robinson, and a simple awareness of his situation. Answers will be dependent on paraphrase to a certain extent, with awareness of /empathy for his situation for 3 - 4. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. Answers will show some understanding of Tom's situation. Answers will be assured, analytical, and show real appreciation of Harper Lee's creation of mood and atmosphere, within the context of Tom's situation.

(b) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks

How is the character of Calpurnia important to the novel as a whole? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be simple and general, based on a sketchy knowledge of the text. There will be a simple understanding of her role. Answers will tend to be general and based on partial narrative, with some discussion and awareness of Calpurnia in her role as a black woman in the Finch household for 7 -9. Answers will still be narrative dependent, but with apt focus on key areas of the text. For 12 -14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful, with an emerging appreciation of Calpurnia's importance, within the context of her role as a black woman in the Finch household. Answers will be evaluative, assured, and, perhaps, for 18 – 20, original, with the issue of Calpurnia's importance addressed with some success. There will be a clear appreciation of her role as a black woman in Maycomb life.

15-20 marks

(c) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks

How does Harper Lee present the town of Maycomb in To Kill A Mockingbird? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be typified by simple, patchy narrative, and a basic awareness of life in 1930s Alabama. Answers will be narrative driven, with some discussion of 1930s Alabama for 7 -9. Answers will still be narrative driven, but more focused, and judgements will be supported by apt detail. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful, with discussion of Maycomb and its presentation as a town in 1930s Alabama in the novel. Answers will be assured and evaluative, and, perhaps, for 18 – 20, original, with the issue of how Maycomb is presented clearly addressed. There will be a clear appreciation of how Maycomb may represent 1930s Alabama

15-20 marks

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (c) Show how Maya Angelou makes the reader aware of her experiences of racism as she grew up. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. with better coverage of relevant areas of the text and for 12 – 14 will be thoughtful and thorough. Nothing written.4. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be more focused. Answers will be brief and patchy in knowledge of the town of Stamps. with some discussion of the town of Stamps for 7 9. Answers will still be narrative driven. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. Answers will be simple and general. but more focused. and. general comments on Angelou's experience of racism. with awareness/empathy for 3 . with a context of the cultural background of the extract. analytical. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. revealing some understanding of racism in Angelou's life. Answers will be narrative driven. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be assured. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful. and judgements will be supported by apt detail. with clear overview and insight into the presentation of racism and its impact on Angelou. Expect only simple. Answers will be assured.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 99 4. There may be some awareness of the cultural background of the church service. Answers will be dependent on paraphrase to a certain extent. with the issue of how Stamps is presented clearly addressed. There will be simple comments on the cultural background of the church service. Nothing written. but will show an awareness of racism in Angelou's life. and may include some understanding of the cultural background of the extract. Answers will be assured and evaluative. and show real appreciation of Angelou's creation of mood and atmosphere. and how she learned to cope with these experiences. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Answers will be narrative driven and probably underdeveloped. (b) Write about the town of Stamps and how it is presented in I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings. original. perhaps. with discussion of Stamps and its presentation in the novel. show how Maya Angelou creates mood and atmosphere here. for 18 -20. or nothing worthy of credit.

Answers will be evaluative and assured. within the context of its cultural background. simple narrative. and will show an appreciation of Chandra's gradual understanding of AIDS and its impact on her family and community. Answers will be dependent on simple judgements and some discussion of rumours and superstitions. and show some understanding of its cultural background. assured response. Answers will be assured. and show real appreciation of Stratton's creation of mood and atmosphere. (c) Show how Chanda gradually comes to realise the truth about AIDS in her family and in the community. Answers will reveal a more secure knowledge of the text. perhaps. but will use it more selectively to support judgements and for 12 – 14 will be thoughtful and thorough. Answers will be based on narrative. Answers will be based on a general retelling of the story. with simple reference to local rumours and superstitions. or parts of it. Answers will still be dependent on narrative. originality for 18 – 20. perhaps. or nothing worthy of credit. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. or nothing worthy of credit. with awareness/empathy for 3 -4. Answers will be dependent on paraphrase to a certain extent.14 will be detailed and thoughtful. Answers will be simple and general. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . There will be a clear overview of the role of local rumours and superstitions as presented in the novel. Patchy. (b) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks How are rumours and superstitions important to the novel as a whole? Nothing written. analytical. with an understanding of Chandra's responses to AIDS in her community . supporting judgements with apt detail and for 12 . Nothing written. with. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 100 5. with basic reference to AIDS in the novel. or nothing worthy of credit. with some discussion of Chandra's responses to AIDS in her community for 7 . originality for 18 – 20. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. at a relatively simple level. There will be some awareness of the cultural background. show how Allan Stratton creates mood and atmosphere here. Chanda's Secrets (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Selection of apt detail will support an evaluative. showing some understanding of the role of rumours and superstitions. with simple comments on the cultural background. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements.9. with.

and themes of the poems as well as their similarities and differences. with simple and basic points of comparison. Focused and thoughtful discussion of the detail of both poems with clear points of comparison made. Woman Work / Overheard in County Sligo Write about both poems and their effect on you. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. Simple general comments on the poems. atmosphere. . or nothing worthy of credit. Emerging discussion and awareness of the mood. Assured appreciation and analysis of both poems. with confident and appropriate links and comparisons.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 101 SECTION B 6. Probably very brief. Show how they are similar and how they are different.

.

Avoid the temptation of saying to yourself. boldly at the top of the script and follow the instructions above. "I think I know what s/he means". for this examination. This should not simply echo the mark but indicate the salient features of the candidate's performance. In such cases the candidate should. 2. These remarks will be based on the criteria established by the C. Expression Where problems with presentation seriously impede communication. All the questions provide opportunities for candidates to make informed. 3.E. assessment can be problematic. and such opportunities need to be upheld in your marking. You must evaluate what is offered by the candidate.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 103 GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Specimen assessment materials First teaching September 2010. and awarding credit. independent responses. There must always be a comment at the end of each section (including the poetry question). These remarks will be mainly your identifications of skills as they appear. Confused or vague expression is often a result of faulty understanding or appreciation of a point a candidate is trying to make. but without looking for what might have been presented or for what you might have written in the candidate's place. Signal this in the margin by a remark like "getting somewhere" or "not quite there". be referred to me for a second opinion: write Refer to C. using the criteria. first examination Summer 2012 UNIT 2 a and b HIGHER TIER MARKING GUIDELINES GENERAL 1. Remarks An ongoing series of remarks in the margin throughout the script is vital. . New examiners have been provided with marked scripts to illustrate this procedure. after discussion with your team leader.E. Remember that your mark at the end of the exercise must tally with the skills which you have identified. Marking positively Please approach the marking of scripts with an open mind and mark positively.

explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times AO2 AO4 5. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for parts (ii) & (iii) you should give twice as much weight to AO2 as to AO1. structure and form contribute to writers' presentation of ideas.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 104 4. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for parts (ii) & (iii) you should give twice as much weight to AO4 as to AO1. select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations Explain how language. (ii) (iii) EWI literary heritage (i) (ii) (iii) . Literary Heritage In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for part (i) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. cultural and historical contexts. Assessment objectives AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively. Assessment objective coverage in Unit 2 a and b Contemporary (i) A01 A02 A04 Contemporary In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for part (i) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. themes and settings Relate texts to their social.

show increasingly clear appreciation of how meanings have a clear grasp of social/cultural and historical context. It is recognised that work will not always fit neatly into one of the descriptions. Awareness of literary at the highest level. There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. Candidates: Candidates: Candidates: display some understanding of main features. are influential at different times. ideas and feeling are conveyed through are able to identify and comment on importance of attitudes/motives. structure and form. characters and relationships. language. may make generalised comments about stylistic effects. Candidates: Candidates: Candidates: make increasingly assured selection and show appreciation of how writers use language to show a clear understanding of social/cultural and historical incorporation of relevant detail. discuss thoroughly. and increasingly thoughtfully. There will be little evidence of specialist vocabulary. relevant to understanding the texts(s) Expression will be reasonably clear and the answer will have a basic structure. punctuation and spelling and lack of structure are likely to impede communication on occasions. and ideas are conveyed through language. social/cultural and historical contexts. have an overview and ability to move features. understand and demonstrate how writers use ideas. are able to recognise and make simple comments on show a limited awareness of social/cultural and historical make generalised reference to relevant aspects of particular features of style and structure. contexts. are able to evaluate characters/relationships and meaning. achieve specific effects. specialist vocabulary will be used mainly appropriately. contexts. Errors in grammar. make assured exploration and evaluation of the ways are able to relate texts to own and others' experience. use of specialist vocabulary will be limited and/or not always appropriate. MARKS i) ii) iii) 0 0 1 1-4 Language. punctuation and spelling. show a clear understanding of from the specific to the general: social/cultural and historical contexts. begin to see how texts have been influential. are able to speculate/offer tentative judgements. . consistently handle texts with at the highest level. cultural. select and evaluate relevant textual details. convey ideas clearly and appropriately. and form. punctuation and spelling will contain errors but these will not be intrusive. the text. Expression will be clear and fluent and the answer will be well structured. or what is written is totally irrelevant to the text or not worthy of credit.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 105 BAND CRITERIA The following descriptions have been provided to indicate the way in which progression within the four criteria is likely to occur. probe the sub-text with increasing confidence. make simple comments on textual background. see how different aspects of style and structure combine are able to set texts in contexts more securely. make assured analysis of stylistic tradition shown. specialist vocabulary will be used appropriately. 8-10 15-20 Expression will be mainly clear and fluent and the answer will be quite well structured. and historical contexts (AO4) Critical response to texts (AO1) 2-4 5-9 5-7 10-14 Nothing written. Grammar. to create effects. echoing and paraphrasing. at the highest level. Candidates: Candidates: Candidates: make more detailed reference to text. structure and form (AO2) Social. Able to relate details of convey ideas persuasively and cogently with apt text to literary background and explain how texts have been / textual support. structure begin to be able to relate texts to own and others' experience. You are asked to place work initially within a band and then to fine-tune using the marks within the band. There will be few errors in grammar. Each successive description assumes demonstration of achievements in lower bands. begin to be aware how social/cultural and historical context is begin to select relevant detail. Candidates: Candidates: Candidates: rely on a narrative approach with some misreadings. make a personal response to the text. confidence. themes and settings to affect the reader.

Answers will be brief and general based on simple narrative. Answers will be based on simple narrative. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Answers will be dependent on fairly simple narrative with an awareness and some understanding of the character of Iago.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 106 UNIT 2a QUESTION 1 (Literary heritage) a) Othello (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. cogent and well argued. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful supported by solid knowledge of the text. be flexible in judging what is offered to candidates and judge according to the matrix and to the knowledge and understanding shown. For 12 – 14 this will be rooted in a detailed discussion of characters and relationships supported by apt detail. Interpretation of Iago's character will be assured and evaluative. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the play to support discussion of Othello's motives. with basic discussion of Iago and Cassio for 3 -4. or nothing worthy of credit. perhaps original.9. (iii) How does Shakespeare present the character Iago to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written. with personal responses to character(s) and perhaps empathy for 7 . and at the top. Candidates will use a sound knowledge of the text to support their discussion of Iago. Answers will be carefully considered and evaluative. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Iago and Cassio speak and behave here. Simple general comments on characters. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be dependent on simple patchy narrative. (ii) Why does Othello kill Desdemona? As with all open questions. Answers will be dependent on simple re-telling. or nothing worthy of credit. assured and evaluative. What does it reveal about their relationship? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. Answers will be more focused and detailed with apt discussion of each character and their behaviour. Discussion of characters will be closely read.

20 may be original. and for 18 20 may be original. Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple. Answers will be more focused and supported by apt detail. What impressions would an audience receive of their characters? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.9. For 12 – 14. interpretation of Don John's character will be rooted in a detailed discussion of characters and relationships. Answers will be based on simple reorganisation/paraphrase. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) How does Shakespeare present the character Don John to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. Candidates will use a sound knowledge of the text to support their interpretation of Don John. or nothing worthy of credit. Interpretation of Don John's character will be assured and evaluative. (ii) Show how Shakespeare presents the development of the relationship between Beatrice and Benedict. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Claudio and Don Pedro speak and behave here. Answers will reveal a secure and selective knowledge of the play to support discussion of the characters and their relationship. Answers will be astute and evaluative and for 18 . assured and analytical. Answers will be reliant on narrative with some basic discussion of the relationship for 7 . and for 6 -7 will be thorough and thoughtful. Answers will be dependent on simple general story telling. Nothing written. supported by apt detail. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . or nothing worthy of credit. patchy narrative. Answers will be closely read. with empathy/some discussion for 3 -4.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 107 b) (i) Much Ado About Nothing Read the extract on the opposite page. Simple general comments. For 12 – 14. Answers will be dependent on fairly simple narrative with an awareness and some understanding of the character of Don John. discussion of the relationship will be detailed and thoughtful.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 108 c) An Inspector Calls (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Gerald speaks and behaves here. How could it affect an audience's feelings towards him? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Simple general comments on the character. Candidates will re-tell the extract and make simple comments on the character. Answers will be more detailed and focused with selection of relevant detail and, for 6 – 7, thoughtful. Answers will be assured and evaluative with close focus on the detail of the extract.

(ii)

An Inspector Calls is set in 1912, and was written in the mid 1940s. Why do you think it is still popular today, in the 21st century? Remember to support your answer with reference to the text.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple patchy narrative. Answers will tend to be general, probably dependent on simple narrative, but with some awareness and emerging discussion of reasons for 7 -9. Answers will probably be narrative driven but with more focus on key areas of text to support opinion. For 12 – 14, answers will be sustained, supported and thoughtful in their consideration of the question. Answers will be carefully considered and evaluative with perhaps originality for 18 20.

(iii)

How does J B Priestley present the character of Mrs Birling to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple narrative. Answers will be dependent on simple narrative with an awareness and some understanding of the character of Mrs Birling. Candidates will support their interpretation of Mrs Birling with relevant detail from the text. For 12 – 14 understanding of the character will be rooted in a detailed discussion of characters and relationships supported by apt references to the text. Interpretation of Mrs Birling's character will be assured and evaluative and at the top may be original.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 109 d) Hobson's Choice (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract, show how it reveals the relationship between Maggie and Willie at this point in the play. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Simple straightforward discussion of characters (perhaps more on one than the other). Answers will be dependent on re-telling the events of the extract with empathy and some discussion for 3 - 4. Discussion of Maggie and Willie will be more focused with relevant detail from the extract to support judgements. For 6 -7 answers will contain sustained and thoughtful discussion of Maggie and Willie as revealed in the extract. Answers will be assured evaluative and closely read.

(ii)

Hobson's Choice is subtitled "A Lancashire Comedy". To what extent do you find it "a comedy"? Support your answer with reference to the text. Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Simple general narrative. Answers will be reliant on narrative with some discussion of comedy emerging for 7 -9. Discussion will be more focused and knowledge of the text more secure. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful supported by solid knowledge of the text. Answers will be carefully considered and evaluative with perhaps originality for 18 – 20.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

(iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

How are Maggie's sisters, Vicky and Alice, important to the play as a whole? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be based on simple, patchy narrative, with simple judgements. Answers will tend to be general probably dependent on simple narrative but with some awareness and emerging discussion for 7 -9. Answers will probably be narrative driven but with apt focus on key areas of the text. For 12 – 14 answers will be thoughtful and thorough with an emerging understanding of the sisters' importance. Answers will be evaluative, assured and perhaps, at the top, original with their importance addressed with some success.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 110 e) A Taste of Honey (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Peter and Helen speak and behave here. How does it create mood and atmosphere for an audience? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Simple general comments on the characters – quite likely more on one than the other. Answers will probably be dependent on simple paraphrase with some discussion and empathy for 3 -4. Answers will be more detailed and focused with selection of relevant detail to support judgements. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful Answers will be closely read, assured and evaluative.

(ii)

Why do you think Shelagh Delaney called her play A Taste of Honey? To what extent do you find it an appropriate title for the play?

As with all open questions be flexible in judging what is offered by candidates and judge according to the matrix. There's no 'right answer'! 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be based on a simple, partial retelling of all, or parts of, the play. Answers will tend to be general probably dependent on simple narrative but with some awareness and emerging discussion for 7 -9. Candidates will use a sound knowledge of the text to support their views. For 12 – 14 answers will be thoughtful and thorough. Answers will be astute and evaluative and, at A*, may be original.

(iii)

How does Delaney present the character of Geof to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be underdeveloped, and based on simple narrative. Answers will be dependent on fairly simple narrative with an awareness and some understanding of the character of Geof. Candidates will use a sound knowledge of text to support their interpretation of Geof. For 12 – 14, understanding of Geof's character will be rooted in a sound discussion of character and relationships, supported by apt detail. Interpretation of Geof's character will be assured and evaluative and for 18 - 20 may be original.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

and. Answers will be cogent and astute. Answers will still be narrative driven. with assured use of relevant detail and the 'how' part of the question addressed with assurance for 18 . with awareness and empathy for 7 . with some discussion and awareness for 3 . Answers will be brief and patchy in knowledge of the relationship between Paddy and Sinbad. however. Answers will be narrative driven. with simple comments on the characters. (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks Show how Paddy's relationship with Sinbad is presented throughout the novel. Answers will still be narrative driven. The issue of presentation will probably be addressed only implicitly. Answers will tend towards reorganisation. may be original.7 Answers will be assured and analytical.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 111 QUESTION 2 (Contemporary) a) Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (i) Read the extract below.20. or nothing worthy of credit. and thoughtful and thorough for 6 . Answers will be more focused in their discussion of Paddy's feelings. Answers will be astute and evaluative. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. for 18 – 20. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. but use of knowledge of the text will be more focused and selective. with some discussion and empathy for 3 4. Answers will be brief. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Answers will be dependent on relatively simple narrative.9. 15-20 marks (iii) Paddy's world has been described as being "full of warmth and cruelty. show how Roddy Doyle suggests Paddy's feelings here. but increasingly assured in use of selected detail. Answers will be limited and general. For 12 – 14 answers will be more sustained." Show how Roddy Doyle presents both the warmth and the cruelty in Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha.4. Nothing written. with thorough discussion of the relationship between Paddy and Sinbad. or nothing worthy of credit. Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit.

(ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks To what extent is Heroes an effective title for this novel. with some discussion and awareness for 7 . Answers will be evaluative. based on a general re-telling of parts of the story. original. Simple comments based on probably patchy narrative. discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. with thorough discussion of the character of La Salle. Discussion will be more focused and supported by apt detail. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. For 12 – 14. What do you think of Larry La Salle. Answers will be narrative driven. assured. Answers will be closely read. evaluative and analytical. however. and. in your opinion? Nothing written. and simple comments on what is happening.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 112 b) Heroes (i) Read the extract below. with assured use of relevant detail. but use of knowledge of the text will be more focused and selective. answers will be thorough and thoughtful. For 12 – 14. with some discussion/awareness for 7 – 9.9. or nothing worthy of credit. Brief responses. perhaps. with some awareness and empathy for 3 4. but with apt focus on key areas of the text. For 6 – 7. Answers will tend to be underdeveloped. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. show how Robert Cromier creates mood and atmosphere here. Simple brief answers. for 18 – 20. assured. Answers will be cogent and astute. Answers will still be narrative dependent. answers will be more sustained. and the way he is presented in the novel? Nothing written. Answers will be dependent on relatively simple narrative. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will still be narrative driven. 15-20 marks . The issue of presentation will probably be addressed only implicitly.

Tommy and Ruth. answers will be thorough and thoughtful. general narrative. For 6 – 7. show how Kazuo Ishiguro presents mood and atmosphere here. and use the matrix as a guide. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. be receptive to a range of responses. and why? Show how Kazuo Ishiguro's presentation of your chosen character creates sympathy for him or her.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 113 c) Never Let Me Go (i) Read the extract below.20. Answers will be more focused in their discussion and will be supported by apt detail. Answers will probably operate on the level of simple paraphrase. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. For 12 – 14. be receptive to a range of responses. or nothing worthy of credit. answers will be detailed and thoughtful. Answers will be based on simple. answers will be thorough and thoughtful. Brief responses. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. or nothing worthy of credit.4. Answers will be narrative driven. approach with an open mind. for 18 . with some discussion of their chosen character for 7 . and use the matrix as a guide. (iii) How effective a title is Never Let Me Go. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. approach with an open mind. original. with some empathy/awareness for 3 .9. with whom do you have the most sympathy. perhaps. Answers will be simple and general. Answers will show detailed knowledge of the text with assurance. with some discussion/awareness for 7 . For 12 – 14. but with apt focus on key areas of the text. and. assured.9. Answers will be evaluative. in your opinion? As with all open questions. and will be astute and evaluative. Answers will still be narrative dependent. . Kathy. Answers will be based on narrative. Answers will be closely read and analytical. and simple comments. As with all open questions. (ii) Of the three central characters. or nothing worthy of credit.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks Nothing written. answers will be more sustained in their discussion and more assured in their use of selected detail. patchy narrative. with some discussion of Fiona for 7. Marcus' mother. Discussion will be more focused and supported by apt detail. Answers will be dependent on narrative. discussion of Fiona will be thoughtful and detailed. and simple comments on what is happening. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be astute. Answers will be astute. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be closely read. show how Nick Hornby suggests Marcus's thoughts and feelings here.9. discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. Answers will be typified by simple. Answers will still be narrative driven. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. simple narrative. for 18 . evaluative and analytical. and why? As with all open questions. but use of the text will be more selective.9. or nothing worthy of credit. For 6. assured. Answers will tend to be underdeveloped. 15-20 marks . Answers will be narrative dependent. For 12 – 14. with some awareness and empathy for 3 4. About A Boy tells the story of Marcus and the story of Will. perhaps. Brief responses. (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Write about Fiona. Which of these stories interests you the more. evaluative and assured. Answers will be more focused in their discussion of Fiona. with discussion emerging for 7 . Nothing written. be receptive to a range of ideas here. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. evaluative and well considered. Judge according to the matrix.20. For 12 – 14.7.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 114 d) About a Boy (i) Read the extract below. Patchy. and supported by apt detail. with originality. and the way she is presented in the novel.

or nothing worthy of credit. and. Simple brief answers. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. for 18 – 20. discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. The issue of presentation will probably be addressed only implicitly. perhaps. (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks What do you think of Albrecht. assured. with thorough discussion of the character of Albrecht. answers will be more sustained. and simple comments on what is happening. in your opinion? Nothing written. For 6 – 7. Brief responses. Simple comments based on probably patchy narrative. with some awareness and empathy for 3 4. with some discussion/awareness for 7 – 9. . 15-20 marks (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks To what extent is Resistance an effective title for this novel. Answers will be cogent and astute. however. based on a general re-telling of parts of the story. but use of knowledge of the text will be more focused and selective. Answers will still be narrative driven. Discussion will be more focused and supported by apt detail. with some discussion and awareness for 7 . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. show how Owen Sheers suggests Sarah's feelings here.9. Answers will be evaluative. For 12 – 14. assured. evaluative and analytical. answers will be thorough and thoughtful.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 115 e) Resistance (i) Read the extract below. For 12 – 14. and the way he is presented in the novel? Nothing written. with assured use of relevant detail. Answers will still be narrative dependent. or nothing worthy of credit. or nothing worthy of credit. but with apt focus on key areas of the text. original. Answers will be narrative driven. Answers will be dependent on relatively simple narrative. Answers will tend to be underdeveloped. Answers will be closely read.

Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Irwin speaks and behaves here. or nothing worthy of credit. assured and evaluative (ii) For which of the boys in The History Boys do you have the most sympathy? Show how the presentation of your chosen character creates sympathy for him. with basic discussion of Irwin for 3 . Answers will be more focused and detailed. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgments. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the play to support their discussion of the character(s). with a sound case developed for the chosen character. Answers will be based on narrative. original.9. Answers will be narrative driven. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks How does Alan Bennett present education in The History Boys? Nothing written. 15-20 marks . Answers will rely on simple retelling. answers will be detailed and thoughtful.9. Nothing written. Answers will be simple and general.20. Answers will be more focused. and with confident and apposite use of supporting detail.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 116 UNIT 2b QUESTION 1 (Contemporary) a) The History Boys (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. and based on simple.4. perhaps. and for 18 . answers will be sustained and thoughtful. with personal responses to character(s) and empathy emerging for 7 . Answers will be cogent. Answers will be underdeveloped. For 12 – 14. with some discussion based on characters for 7 . or nothing worthy of credit. For 12 – 14. well argued. evaluative and assured. Simple comments and general narrative. with apt discussion of Irwin's character and his behaviour Discussion of Irwin will be closely read. patchy narrative. What does it reveal about his character? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be astute.

For 12 – 14.9. 8-10 marks (ii) How does Russell present the character of Linda to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written. but will include highlighting of specific detail. analytical. with clear appreciation of Russell's techniques. and. understanding of Linda's character will be rooted in a detailed discussion of her character and her relationships. Simple general comments. at the top end. Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgments. account taken of the second part of the question. with some appreciation of the creation of mood and atmosphere Answers will be assured. or nothing worthy of credit.20. with some discussion based on characters for 7 . Answers will be based on simple. perhaps. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how the characters speak and behave here. with an awareness and some understanding of the character of Linda. . Answers will be general. with little. and dependant on relatively simple narrative/ reorganisation. Answers will be based on narrative. if any. How does it create mood and atmosphere for an audience? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks Nothing written. For 12 -14. patchy narrative. Simple. Answers will be more focused. Discussion of Linda's character will be assured and evaluative. evaluative and assured. perhaps original. and for 18 . For 6 -7. original. Answers will be dependent on fairly simple narrative. Candidates will use a sound knowledge of the play to support their discussion of Linda. supported by apt detail. patchy narrative. Answers will be astute. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Write about the way the theme of social class is presented in Blood Brothers. answers will be sustained and thoughtful.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 117 b) Blood Brothers (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Answers will still be reliant on narrative. answers will be thoughtful and thorough. or nothing worthy of credit.

Answers will still be reliant on narrative. Write about one of these emotions and how it is presented in A View From The Bridge. analytical. For 12 – 14. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgements about characters and chosen emotion. show how Arthur Miller creates mood and atmosphere for an audience here. answers will be thoughtful and thorough. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the play to support their discussion of Eddie. but will include highlighting of specific detail. or nothing worthy of credit. or nothing worthy of credit.9. and for 18 – 20. answers will be sustained and thoughtful. Answers will be narrative driven. hatred. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. Answers will be general. discussion of Eddie will be thorough and thoughtful. astute and assured. jealousy. general comments on Catherine. or nothing worthy of credit. For 6 – 7. anger. Simple comments and general narrative. Simple. For 12 – 14. Responses will be general and simple. with clear appreciation of Miller's techniques 8-10 marks (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks To what extent do you feel sympathy for Eddie Carbone? Nothing written. with some straightforward discussion of character(s) for 7 . Answers will be based on narrative. Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . and dependant on relatively simple narrative/ reorganization. original. with some appreciation of the creation of mood and atmosphere Answers will be assured. Answers will be evaluative. Answers will be evaluative and assured. with detailed discussion of characters and relationships and chosen emotion. revealing a sketchy knowledge of the text. (iii) There are many emotions in this play: love.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 118 c) A View from the Bridge (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks Nothing written. with some discussion of Eddie for 7 – 9. Answers will be more focused.

Answers will be general. general comments. answers will be thorough and thoughtful. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be narrative driven. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgements. with some discussion and personal response for 7-9. but will include highlighting of specific detail. Simple. with some appreciation of the creation of mood and atmosphere Answers will be assured. 8-10 marks (ii) How does Whittington present the character of Matron to an audience throughout the play? Nothing written.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 119 d) Be My Baby (i) Read the extract on the opposite page.9. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks Nothing written. in your opinion? Nothing written. Answers will be more sustained and reveal an increasing understanding of character and relationships. with clear appreciation of Whittington's techniques. and for 18 . Answers will be more focused. with clear overview and insight. For 6 – 7. Expect only simple.20. answers will be thoughtful and thorough." What features of the play may make it touching for an audience. with an awareness and some understanding of Matron's possible views of characters and events for 7 . show how Amanda Whittington creates mood and atmosphere for an audience here. or nothing worthy of credit. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. analytical. general comments on characters. original. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Answers will be evaluative and assured. Answers will be based on simple narrative. For 12 -14. Answers will still be reliant on narrative. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Be My Baby has been described as "intensely touching. and dependant on relatively simple narrative/ reorganization. Answers will be based on narrative. Answers will be carefully considered and evaluative. with general reference to the text. or nothing worthy of credit.

Answers will be narrative driven.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 120 e) My Mother Said I Never Should (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. original. and will be astute and evaluative. simple narrative. For 12 – 14 answers will be sustained and thoughtful. discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful Answers will be assured and analytical (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks What do you think of Margaret and the way she is presented in the play? Nothing written. What does it reveal about her feelings? 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be more focused. For 12 – 14. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will use detailed knowledge of the text with assurance. Answers will be based on a general retelling of the story. Answers will be more focused in their discussion of Jackie's feelings. with some discussion and empathy for 3 4. Brief responses and simple comments. Answers will be evaluative and assured. and supported by apt detail. answers will be detailed and thoughtful in their discussion of Margaret. and for 18 – 20. 15-20 marks (iii) How does Charlotte Keatley show changes in women's lives during the twentieth century in My Mother Said I Never Should? Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . with some discussion based on characters for 7 -9. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgments. or parts of it. with some discussion of Margaret for 7 – 9. Patchy. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Jackie speaks and behaves here. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will tend towards reorganization. Answers will be based on narrative. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be more focused in their discussion of Margaret. For 6 – 7.

Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. with little. . Answers will be narrative driven with an awareness and some understanding of Nancy and Godfrey's relationship. with the issue of 'importance' clearly addressed. For 12 – 14. Answers will reveal clear understanding of the relationship. or nothing worthy of credit. Brief responses. discussion of the extract will be thorough and detailed. For 6 -7. Candidates will track through the extract selecting and highlighting relevant detail. Answers will be narrative driven and brief. with discussion of the importance of Lantern Yard. for 18 – 20. (ii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks How is the relationship between Nancy and Godfrey presented in the novel? Nothing written. based on a general retelling of parts of the story Answers will be based on simple narrative and judgements. show how George Eliot creates mood and atmosphere here. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Simple brief answers. if any. original. Answers will tend towards reorganisation.20. Answers will be assured and evaluative. or nothing worthy of credit. and for 18 . Answers will still be narrative driven but more focused. with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. sense of Nancy and Godfrey's relationship. (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks How is Lantern Yard important to the novel as a whole? Nothing written. answers will be thorough and thoughtful.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 121 QUESTION 2 (Literary heritage) a) Silas Marner (i) Read the extract below. perhaps. with some awareness of mood and atmosphere for 3 -4. and judgements will be supported by apt detail. and. For 12 – 14 answers will be sustained. Answers will be assured and analytical. with some discussion for 7 -9. along with apt detail from the text. Answers will be evaluative and assured. or nothing worthy of credit.

(ii) How does Jane Austen present Mr Bennet's relationship with his daughters in the novel? Nothing written. Then answer the following question: Look closely at how Jane Austen presents the character of Mr. with some discussion for 7 . with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgements. with some discussion of Darcy. originality for 18 20 and perhaps an addressing of 'how'. Answers will be simple and general. Answers will be narrative driven with an awareness and some understanding of Mr Bennet. Answers will be carefully considered and evaluative with. or nothing worthy of credit.9. if any. with little. empathy for 3. Darcy here. How does it influence the reader's attitude towards him? 0 marks 1 mark U 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.20. and for 18 . perhaps. Answers will be closely read and analytical. showing a sensitive understanding of Darcy. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks How does Jane Austen present the theme of marriage in Pride and Prejudice? Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be based on narrative. For 12 . original. Answers will reveal clear understanding of Mr Bennet's relationships. sense of Mr Bennet. For 12 . or nothing worthy of credit. For 6-7 answers will be detailed and thoughtful. Answers will be evaluative and assured.4.14 Answers will be thoughtful and sustained. probably. Answers will be more focused.14 answers will be sustained. . Answers will be narrative driven and brief. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. Responses will be simple and general Answers will probably operate on the level of simple paraphrase.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 122 b) Pride and Prejudice (i) Read the extract below. along with apt detail form the text. and.

Answers will be more selective and focused. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful. with some awareness of mood and atmosphere for 3 . or nothing worthy of credit. and discussion of Scrooge and the changes to his character more focused. Answers will be narrative dependent. evaluative and well considered. with the issue of the changes to Scrooge's character discussed with sensitivity. selecting and highlighting relevant detail. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be dependent on re-telling. Candidates will track through the extract. with 'how' clearly addressed for 18 20.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 123 c) A Christmas Carol (i) Read the extract below. (ii) Show how Dickens presents the hardships of life in 19th century London in A Christmas Carol. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) How does Dickens present Scrooge's changing character in A Christmas Carol? Nothing written. Answers will still be narrative driven but the use of the text will be more selective. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. show how Charles Dickens creates mood and atmosphere here. For 6 -7 candidates will discuss the detail of the extract. Answers will be astute. with discussion emerging for 7 . with apt use of the text. Nothing written. Answers will be based on simple narrative and judgements with some discussion for 7 -9. Patchy simple narrative.9.4. Answers will be closely read. Answers will be patchy simple narrative. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be evaluative and well considered. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. For 12 – 14 answers will be more sustained in their discussion of Scrooge's changing character. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . assured and analytical. showing an emerging appreciation of mood and atmosphere. Brief responses with simple comments on what is happening in the extract.

(iii) A review of Lord Of The Flies said "William Golding knows exactly what boys are like. with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. Answers will be evaluative and appreciative with.4. or nothing worthy of credit. perhaps. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks .GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 124 d) Lord of the Flies (i) Read the extract below. Answers will be simple and general. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract.14 will be thorough and thoughtful." To what extent do you agree? Remember to support your answer with detailed reference to the text. or nothing worthy of credit. (ii) What do you think of Jack and the way he is presented in the novel? As with all open questions be receptive to a range of possible opinions here and mark according to the matrix 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. simple narrative Answers will be based on simple narrative and judgements. with some discussion for 7 -9. show how William Golding creates mood and atmosphere here. Discussion will be more focused and supported by apt detail and for 6 -7 will be thorough and thoughtful. Answers will be dependent on reorganisation. Nothing written. originality for 18 -20 with 'to what extent' clearly addressed. Brief responses. Answers will be narrative driven. Answers will be closely read. with awareness emerging for 7 . Answers will be more selective and focused. with apt use of the text and for 12 .9. Patchy. or nothing worthy of credit. with apt detail to support judgements and for 12 -14 will be thorough and thoughtful. assured and analytical. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Discussion of Jack and his presentation will be evaluative and well argued with confident use of the text and revealing insight into Jack's role. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text. with awareness of mood and atmosphere for 3 .

with awareness/empathy for 3 -4. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text. perhaps." To what extent do you agree with this description of Ash On A Young Man's Sleeve? Nothing written. Answers will be simple and general. along with apt detail from the text. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) "A funny. Answers will be convincing in terms of chosen detail. with apt detail to support judgements. Answers will be narrative driven with awareness emerging at 7 . with an awareness and some understanding of Dannie's mother's relationships. analytical and show real appreciation of Abse's creation of mood and atmosphere. Answers will be narrative driven and brief. Answers will be dependent on paraphrase to a certain extent. show how Dannie Abse creates mood and atmosphere here.9.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 125 e) Ash on a Young Man's Sleeve (i) Read the extract below. Answers will be evaluative and appreciative with. story. Answers will be assured. For 12 – 14 answers will be thorough and thoughtful. Candidates will select and highlight detail in order to support their judgements. Then answer the following question: With close reference to the extract. For 6 -7 discussion of the extract will be thorough and thoughtful. or nothing worthy of credit.20. with little. For 12 -14 answers will be sustained. if any. Answers will reveal clear understanding of Dannie's mother's relationships. sad. sense of Dannie's mother's relationships. Brief responses. or nothing worthy of credit. standpoint and voice. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. (ii) How does Abse present his mother's relationship with her sons as they grew up? Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Answers will be narrative driven. originality for 18 . or nothing worthy of credit. with simple comments on what is happening in the extract.

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using the criteria. Avoid the temptation of saying to yourself. You must evaluate what is offered by the candidate. . Marking positively Please approach the marking of scripts with an open mind and mark positively. There must always be a comment at the end of each section (including the poetry question).GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 127 GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Specimen assessment materials First teaching September 2010. but without looking for what might have been presented or for what you might have written in the candidate's place. This should not simply echo the mark but indicate the salient features of the candidate's performance.E. "I think I know what s/he means". after discussion with your team leader. 3. boldly at the top of the script and follow the instructions above. and awarding credit. All the questions provide opportunities for candidates to make informed. These remarks will be mainly your identifications of skills as they appear. for this examination. first examination Summer 2011 UNIT 1 FOUNDATION TIER MARKING GUIDELINES GENERAL 1. independent responses. 2. In such cases the candidate should. Confused or vague expression is often a result of faulty understanding or appreciation of a point a candidate is trying to make. Remember that your mark at the end of the exercise must tally with the skills which you have identified. Signal this in the margin by a remark like "getting somewhere" or "not quite there". Expression Where problems with presentation seriously impede communication. assessment can be problematic. New examiners have been provided with marked scripts to illustrate this procedure. and such opportunities need to be upheld in your marking. Remarks An ongoing series of remarks in the margin throughout the script is vital.E. These remarks will be based on the criteria established by the C. be referred to me for a second opinion: write Refer to C.

.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 128 4. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for Section A parts (b) & (c) you should give twice as much weight to AO4 as to AO1. Assessment objectives AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively. explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times AO2 AO3 AO4 5. Assessment objective coverage in Unit 1 Assessment objective A01 A02 A03 A04 Section A (a) Section A (b) and (c) Section B In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for Section A part (a) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. themes and settings Make comparisons and explain links between texts. cultural and historical contexts. select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations Explain how language. structure and form contribute to writers' presentation of ideas. evaluating writers' different ways of expressing meaning and achieving effects Relate texts to their social.

There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. ii) iii) 0 1-4 Language. or what is written is totally irrelevant to text. use of specialist vocabulary will be limited and/or not always appropriate. specialist vocabulary will be used generally appropriately. begin to explore links and comparisons of theme and style. and historical (AO2) (AO3) contexts (AO4) Nothing written. Candidates: show a limited awareness of social/cultural and historical contexts. character and the impact of texts. Candidates: compare and make some evaluation of subject. 5-7 Candidates: are able to recognise and make simple comments on particular features of style and structure. echoing and paraphrasing. and increasingly thoughtfully. begin to select relevant detail. cultural. make a personal response to the text. or not worthy of credit. structure and form Making links and comparisons Social. discuss thoroughly. have a clear grasp of social/cultural and historical context. punctuation and spelling and lack of structure are likely to impede communication on occasions. themes and settings to affect the reader. convey ideas clearly and appropriately. show increasingly clear appreciation of how meanings and ideas are conveyed through language. . punctuation and spelling will contain errors but these will not be intrusive. specialist vocabulary will be used mainly appropriately. characters and relationships. understand and demonstrate how writers use ideas. theme. Each successive description assumes demonstration of achievements in lower bands. begin to see how texts have been influential. begin to be aware how social/cultural and historical context is relevant to understanding the texts(s) Candidates: are able to set texts in contexts more securely. structure and form. give simple unfocused expression of preference. Grammar. i) Critical response to texts (AO1) 0 1 Candidates: may make generalised comments about stylistic effects. There will be little evidence of specialist vocabulary. It is recognised that work will not always fit neatly into one of the descriptions. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Candidates: make simple comments on textual background.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 129 BAND CRITERIA The following descriptions have been provided to indicate the way in which progression within the four criteria is likely to occur. 2-4 5-9 Candidates: rely on a narrative approach with some misreadings. 8-10 15-20 Candidates: make more detailed reference to text. select some obvious features of similarity and difference. 10-14 Candidates: display some understanding of main features. Expression will be reasonably clear and the answer will have a basic structure. Candidates: begin to make simple points of comparison when required. probe the sub-text with increasing confidence. are able to explain the relevance and impact of connections and comparisons between texts. Candidates: see how different aspects of style and structure combine to create effects. make generalised reference to relevant aspects of the text. Errors in grammar. There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. You are asked to place work initially within a band and then to fine-tune using the marks within the band. Expression will be mainly clear and fluent and the answer will be quite well structured. Candidates: make straightforward links and connections between texts. select and evaluate relevant textual details. begin to be able to relate texts to own and others' experience. Expression will be generally clear and fluent and the answer will be well structured.

Answers at this level will address the bullet points with some success. with some discussion of Curley for 6-7 which may show an awareness of his role on the ranch in 1930s USA. with simple awareness of ranch life in 1930s USA. Secure knowledge of the text will be shown. (b) In Of Mice and Men there are three main places on the ranch: the bunkhouse. Of Mice and Men (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. An emerging awareness of Candy and his importance in the novel. or nothing worthy of credit. Explain how what happens there is important in the novel. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on simple. Clear and detailed discussion of Curley as he is revealed in the extract.the way he speaks and behaves at different times in the novel.14. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. with simple comments about Curley. Nothing written.his job on the ranch . with an awareness of how Candy reflects ranch life in 1930s USA. . and select relevantly in order to support judgements. the harness room. with some discussion of the chosen place and events that happen there for 12 . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.his relationships with other characters . and will reveal an emerging understanding of Candy within the context of 1930s USA. More focus and selection. Some awareness of ranch life in 1930s USA. simple narrative. Choose one of these places and write about it. which may include simple awareness of his place on the ranch in 1930s USA. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Curley speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text. May include some understanding of his role on the ranch in 1930s USA. Emerging discussion. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy. and the barn. general narrative and show a basic awareness of 1930s ranch life in USA and its impact on Candy. as well as some understanding of the context of ranch life in 1930s USA.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 130 SECTION A 1. with some successful discussion of events that happen in the chosen place and of their importance to the novel. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (c) What do you think of Candy? Think about: . or nothing worthy of credit.

20. with an awareness of Meena's father.her homelife . with simple comments on the effect the racist attitudes have on Meena. Answers will reveal some understanding of Meena's father and how he is presented. within the context of his status as an immigrant in British society. answers will be sustained.anything else you think important. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses.the influence of Nanima . revealing a sketchy knowledge of the text. or nothing worthy of credit. and will be confident in use of text. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be narrative driven and brief. and with a very simple awareness of the two cultures. There will be an awareness of his status as an immigrant. or nothing worthy of credit. More focus and empathy. (b) What do you think about Meena's father? Think about: . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. General references to his experiences in India and England.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 131 2.14. . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Responses will be general and simple. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. with some discussion and awareness of Meena's character and her responses to the racism shown in the extract for 6-7.the way he speaks and behaves at different times in the novel. Then answer the following question: What does this extract show you about Meena's feelings? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Think about: .the influence of other people . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. Well focused character discussion of Meena's responses to the racism shown in the extract supported by selected detail. Answers will be more focused.his life in England . revealing an understanding of character and events.the influence of her parents . and an understanding of how Meena was influenced by her Punjabi background.his life in India . Anita and Me (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. For 18 . Answers will take some note of some of the bullet points and there will be some discussion of Meena and her background for 12 . with the bullet points addressed with some success. Answers will be detailed and considered. (c) Write about how Meena was influenced by her Punjabi background as she grew up. with only simple comments about Meena's father.

and include discussion of Maycomb. or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. with some discussion of Tom Robinson for 6 -7 and awareness of his situation. .her place in the Finch household . Clear and detailed discussion of Tom Robinson as revealed in the extract. and simple comments on Tom Robinson. including a simple awareness of his situation. (c) What impressions do you have of Maycomb. Answers will be detailed. and there will be some discussion/awareness of Calpurnia and her role as a black woman in the Finch household for 12 – 14. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be detailed.the way Scout describes the town 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. More focus and selection. and clear focus on the question. Think about: .her relationships with other characters . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. based on a sketchy knowledge of the text and with a simple understanding of her role.some of the events that happen there .the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the novel. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail. and will include some understanding of Calpurnia's status as a black woman in the Finch household as well as her role in the Maycomb community. Bullet points will be addressed with some success. To Kill A Mockingbird (a) Read the extract on the opposite page.14. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. but with some discussion and awareness of Maycomb in 1930s Alabama for 12 . revealing a sound knowledge of the text. with the bullet points addressed with some success.some of the people who live there . and a basic awareness of life in 1930s Alabama.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 132 3. or nothing worthy of credit. patchy narrative. Jem and Atticus live? Think about: . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be typified by simple. Answers will still be based on relatively simple narrative. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Tom Robinson speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. Answers will be simple and general. Answers will take some account of the bullet points. revealing some understanding of his situation.her place in the local community . the town where Scout. (b) Write about the character of Calpurnia and her importance in the novel.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 133 4. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What impressions do you get of the church service here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail. Answers will be simple and general and may include simple comments on the cultural background of the church service Emerging selection, and, for 6 - 7, some discussion and awareness, perhaps of the cultural background of the church service Answers will be detailed, and discussion will be supported by aptly selected references, and may include some understanding of the cultural background of the extract.

(b)

What have you found out about the town of Stamps from your reading of I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings? Think about: - the people who live there - some key events that Maya Angelou writes about - anything else you think important.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be brief and patchy in knowledge of the town of Stamps. Answers will be more focused, with some discussion of the town of Stamps for 12 14. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the text, used to back a focused discussion of the town of Stamps. Bullet points will be addressed with success.

(c)

Write about some of Maya's experiences of racism that she describes in I Know Why The Caged Bird SIngs and explain how she coped with them. Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Expect only simple, general comments about Angelou's experiences of racism. Answers will be more focused, with some discussion of Angelou's experiences of racism for 12 - 14. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the text, used to back judgements of Angelou's coping with racism.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 134 5. Chanda's Secrets (a) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Write about words and phrases you find effective in creating these thoughts and feelings, and explain why you find them effective. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general, with simple comments on the cultural background. At this level expect emerging selection, and, for 12 - 14, some discussion and empathy and awareness of the cultural background. Answers will be more detailed, and supported by apt references to the text within the context of its cultural background.

(b)

Rumours and superstitions are important in Chanda's Secrets. Write about some rumours and superstitions in the novel and explain the effect they have on characters. Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on a general retelling of the story, or parts of it, with simple reference to local rumours and superstitions. More focus with some discussion of rumours and superstitions for 12 - 14. Sound and focused discussion of rumours and superstitions based on a solid knowledge of the text.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

(c)

Chanda only gradually comes to understand the truth about the AIDS epidemic and its effect on her family and community. Write about some of the ways in which she comes to this understanding. Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy, simple narrative, with basic reference to AIDS in the novel. Emerging discussion of Chanda's responses to AIDS in her community, with some focus for 12 - 14. Secure discussion of Chanda's responses to AIDS in her community, rooted in the text, with a sound focus on the question.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 135 SECTION B 6. Woman Work / I Had Rather Be A Woman Write about both poems and their effect on you. Show how they are similar and how they are different. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written, or nothing worthy of credit. Very little written, with what is written mainly irrelevant to the poems. Simple general comments on the poems. Probably very brief, with simple and basic points of comparison. Emerging discussion and awareness of the mood, atmosphere, and themes of the poems, as well as their similarities and differences. Focused and thoughtful discussion of the detail of both poems, with clear points of comparison made.

.

Remember that your mark at the end of the exercise must tally with the skills which you have identified. These remarks will be based on the criteria established by the C. and such opportunities need to be upheld in your marking. but without looking for what might have been presented or for what you might have written in the candidate's place. "I think I know what s/he means". All the questions provide opportunities for candidates to make informed. independent responses. This should not simply echo the mark but indicate the salient features of the candidate's performance. Signal this in the margin by a remark like "getting somewhere" or "not quite there". . There must always be a comment at the end of each section (including the poetry question). Confused or vague expression is often a result of faulty understanding or appreciation of a point a candidate is trying to make. 3. New examiners have been provided with marked scripts to illustrate this procedure. Expression Where problems with presentation seriously impede communication. Remarks An ongoing series of remarks in the margin throughout the script is vital. for this examination. boldly at the top of the script and follow the instructions above. Avoid the temptation of saying to yourself. You must evaluate what is offered by the candidate. first examination Summer 2012 UNIT 2 a and b FOUNDATION TIER MARKING GUIDELINES GENERAL 1. assessment can be problematic.E. using the criteria.E. 2. In such cases the candidate should. be referred to me for a second opinion: write Refer to C.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 137 GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE Specimen assessment materials First teaching September 2010. Marking positively Please approach the marking of scripts with an open mind and mark positively. These remarks will be mainly your identifications of skills as they appear. after discussion with your team leader. and awarding credit.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 138 4. (ii) (iii) EWI literary heritage (i) (ii) (iii) . Literary Heritage In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for part (i) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. cultural and historical contexts. explain how texts have been influential and significant to self and other readers in different contexts and at different times AO2 AO4 5. Assessment objective coverage in Unit 2 a and b Contemporary (i) A01 A02 A04 Contemporary In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for part (i) you should give equal weight to AO1 and AO2. Assessment objectives AO1 Respond to texts critically and imaginatively. structure and form contribute to writers' presentation of ideas. themes and settings Relate texts to their social. select and evaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and support interpretations Explain how language. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for (ii) & (iii) you should give twice as much weight to AO2 as to AO1. In determining the appropriate mark band and fine-tuning to a specific mark for parts (ii) & (iii) you should give twice as much weight to AO4 as to AO1.

begin to be able to relate texts to own and others' experience. It is recognised that work will not always fit neatly into one of the descriptions.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 139 BAND CRITERIA The following descriptions have been provided to indicate the way in which progression within the four criteria is likely to occur. make generalised reference to relevant aspects of the text. Expression will be generally clear and fluent and the answer will be well structured. Language. Candidates: see how different aspects of style and structure combine to create effects. specialist vocabulary will be used mainly appropriately. There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. There will be little evidence of specialist vocabulary. 810 1520 Candidates: make more detailed reference to text. show increasingly clear appreciation of how meanings and ideas are conveyed through language. Social. Expression will be mainly clear and fluent and the answer will be quite well structured. convey ideas clearly and appropriately. echoing and paraphrasing. have a clear grasp of social/cultural and historical context. themes and settings to affect the reader. characters and relationships. structure and form (AO2) Nothing written. and increasingly thoughtfully. use of specialist vocabulary will be limited and/or not always appropriate. select and evaluate relevant textual details. specialist vocabulary will be used generally appropriately. understand and demonstrate how writers use ideas. Candidates: make simple comments on textual background. or what is written is totally irrelevant to text or not worthy of credit. discuss thoroughly. make a personal response to the text. You are asked to place work initially within a band and then to fine-tune using the marks within the band. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Candidates: may make generalised comments about stylistic effects. punctuation and spelling will contain errors but these will not be intrusive. and historical contexts (AO4) MARKS i) ii) iii) 0 0 1 1-4 Critical response to texts (AO1) Errors in grammar. Expression will be reasonably clear and the answer will have a basic structure. cultural. begin to select relevant detail. 2-4 5-9 Candidates: rely on a narrative approach with some misreadings. 5-7 1014 Candidates: display some understanding of main features. structure and form. Candidates: are able to recognise and make simple comments on particular features of style and structure. Each successive description assumes demonstration of achievements in lower bands. probe the sub-text with increasing confidence. punctuation and spelling and lack of structure are likely to impede communication on occasions. begin to see how texts have been influential. . There will be some errors in spelling or punctuation. Candidates: show a limited awareness of social/cultural and historical contexts. begin to be aware how social/cultural and historical context is relevant to understanding the texts(s) Candidates: are able to set texts in contexts more securely. Grammar.

or nothing worthy of credit. .the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the play. Think about: . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be brief and general based on simple narrative. or nothing worthy of credit. More focus with some discussion/empathy for 6 . Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Iago and Cassio speak and behave here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Nothing written. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be more focused with some discussion for 12 . at the end of the play he kills her. (ii) At the beginning of the play Othello loves and marries Desdemona. Answers will be detailed and engaged.his relationship with Othello.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 140 UNIT 2a QUESTION 1 (Literary heritage) a) Othello (i) Read the extract on the opposite page.his relationship with other characters. with some discussion of characters and relationships for 12 . Answers will be thoughtful and show close reading.14. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general comments on Iago and Cassio. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.14. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be dependent on simple patchy narrative. Answers will be more focused. . Write about some of the important turning points in their relationship that led to this tragic end.7. Answers will be rooted in a sound knowledge of the play and reveal some understanding of the dynamics between the characters. . or nothing worthy of credit. representing a valid reading of Iago's character. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Write about Iago.

0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.14. Think about: . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be dependent on simple general story telling. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple.14. with some discussion for 12 . Nothing written. (ii) Write about the relationship between Beatrice and Benedict and explain how it changes at different points in the play. patchy narrative.his relationship with other characters.the way he behaves. Answers will still be based on fairly simple narrative but will have more focus and some discussion of the characters' relationship for 12 . rooted in a sound knowledge of the text. and provide a valid reading of Don John's character. . or nothing worthy of credit.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 141 b) Much Ado About Nothing (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. . Answers will be more focused. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Claudio and Don Pedro speak and behave here? Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Answers will be based on a sound knowledge of the text and will present a sensible discussion of the characters' changing relationship. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general comments about Claudio and Don Pedro. Judgements will be well considered and supported by detail from the text.7. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Write about Don John. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be thoughtful and considered. . More focus and discussion with some discussion/empathy for 6 . or nothing worthy of credit.the way he speaks.

(iii) What do you think about Mrs Birling? Write about: . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple narrative. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.the way she speaks and behaves with the Inspector. .what makes the play exciting and dramatic for an audience. or nothing worthy of credit. in the 21st century? Think about: . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.what happens .the messages of the play . . and was written in the mid 1940s. or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. As with all open questions be flexible in judging what is offered. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be underdeveloped and based on simple patchy narrative. More focus with some discussion for 6 . . or nothing worthy of credit.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 142 c) An Inspector Calls (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Gerald speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Why do you think it is still popular today.7. (ii) An Inspector Calls is set in 1912. Answers will be based on a sound knowledge of the text. but there will be some discussion of characters and relationships for 12 . Answers will still be based on narrative at a fairly simple level.the way she speaks and behaves with her children. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general comments on Gerald.the way she speaks and behaves with Mr Birling. and the bullet points addressed with some success. Answers will be considered.14 and more use of the bullet points.14. Answers will be thoughtful and based on some aptly selected detail. Answers will be dependent on narrative but there will be emerging discussion for 12 .the way the characters speak and behave at different points in the play . rooted in a solid knowledge of the text. and represent a valid reading of Mrs Birling's character.

or nothing worthy of credit. or nothing worthy of credit. (ii) Write about two or three parts of the play that you think an audience would find particularly amusing. do not expect them both to be covered equally. patchy narrative. Vicky and Alice? Think about: .the way they speak and behave with Willie Mossop . or nothing worthy of credit. the two characters may well not be treated equally. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general narrative. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) What do you think about Maggie's sisters. Again. with some apt focus.the way they speak and behave with their father. with some discussion of Vicky and Alice. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. . Nothing written.14. again.the way they speak and behave with Maggie . The bullet points will be addressed with some success. to support sensible discussion of Vicky and Alice.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 143 d) Hobson's Choice (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple straightforward discussion of characters (perhaps more on one than the other). with simple judgements particularly at 7 -9. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings about the relationship between Maggie and Willie as you read this extract? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. with some relevant discussion for 12 . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.the way they speak and behave with other characters. Answers will have a clearer focus. Hobson . Answers will be more focused. Answers will be detailed and thoughtful revealing a sound knowledge of the text. Emerging discussion of characters and relationship. and more heed taken of the bullet points for 12 . and your judgements should be based on the answers as a whole.14. Detailed consideration of the characters and their relationship. and explain why they would have that effect. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on simple.

Answers will still be based on narrative at a fairly simple level. the play. Answers will be detailed. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general comments on the characters – quite likely more on one than the other.anything else you think important. and more use of the bullet points. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.your chosen character's relationship with others. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on a simple. with some discussion for 6 .14. treatment of the two characters may not be equal. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. but there will be some discussion and awareness for 12 . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general.some of the events that happen in the play . revealing a sound knowledge of the text. . Answers will be thoughtful and based on some aptly selected detail. and the bullet points addressed with some success. Answers will be considered.Jo's relationships with the Boy and Geof . The two characters may not be treated equally. or nothing worthy of credit. or parts of. or nothing worthy of credit.7.why you feel most sympathy for him/her. .GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 144 e) A Taste of Honey (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. with clear focus on the question. . however. but there will be emerging discussion at D. (ii) Why do you think Shelagh Delaney called her play A Taste of Honey? Think about: . Answers will be dependent on narrative. rooted in a solid knowledge of the text. partial retelling of all. . (iii) Which character do you have most sympathy for and why? Think about: . Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Peter and Helen speak and behave here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract.the way your chosen character speaks and behaves.what happens to your chosen character in the play. More focused.

" Write about a time of warmth and a time of cruelty that you feel were important to Paddy as he grew up. some discussion and empathy. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. empathy and some discussion for 12 .their relationship at the start of the novel . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be brief. through aptly selected detail. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the text. Emerging selection. (ii) Write about the relationship between Paddy and Sinbad. with some discussion and empathy for 12 -14. for 6 . Think about: . Nothing written. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be limited and general. Clear and detailed discussion of Paddy as revealed in the extract.7. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the text. or nothing worthy of credit.the reasons for the way their relationship develops and changes . Answers will be more focused. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. with simple comments on Paddy. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . and. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be brief and patchy in knowledge of the relationship between Paddy and Sinbad. and explain why these times were important to him.14. (iii) Paddy's world has been described as being "full of warmth and cruelty. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Paddy speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit. with awareness. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.the way they speak and behave at different points in the novel. used to back judgements. Answers will be more focused.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 145 QUESTION 2 (Contemporary) a) Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (i) Read the extract below.the way their relationship develops and changes .

Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for your answer and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple comments based on probably patchy narrative. with some discussion of La Salle. (iii) What do you think of Larry La Salle? Write about: . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text in an aptly supported discussion of Albrecht. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract. (ii) Why do you think Robert Cormier decided to call his novel Heroes? Think about: . Thoughtful discussion. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.the way he is regarded by others.different views of heroes in the novel . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple brief answers.anything else you think important.what happens in the novel . Answers will be more focused. . or nothing worthy of credit. More focus and selection. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. and simple comments on what is happening. with some discussion for 6 . or nothing worthy of credit. or nothing worthy of credit.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 146 b) Heroes (i) Read the extract below. particularly for 12 14. with clearer focus and some apt selection. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Simple discussion.the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the novel. rooted in the text.7.his relationship with young people in the town. . . based on a general re-telling of parts of the story.

Answers will be more focused. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. Clear and detailed discussion. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.14.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 147 c) Never Let Me Go (i) Read the extract below.how the school is described. general narrative. or nothing worthy of credit.the children who live there . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Answers will be detailed. . with some discussion and empathy. (ii) For whom do you have the most sympathy: Kathy. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. and with clear focus on the question. revealing a sound knowledge of the text. More focus and selection. Answers will still be based on relatively simple narrative. and simple comments.the teachers .what happens there . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on simple. or nothing worthy of credit. or Ruth? Give reasons for your choice. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) What impressions do you get of Hailsham School? Think about: . with some discussion of the chosen character. Answers will be based on a sound knowledge of the text. Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. Tommy. with apt selection of detail to support judgements. but with some discussion and awareness for 12 .

7. and simple comments on what is happening. and why? Think about: . . with some discussion. empathy for 12 . More focus and selection.why your chosen character's story interests you. Which of these stories interests you the more. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.her relationships with other characters . Marcus's mother? Think about: .the way she speaks and behaves at different times in the novel. More focus. (iii) About A Boy tells the story of Marcus and the story of Will.14. some empathy for 12 . or nothing worthy of credit. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract. with some discussion for 6 . simple narrative. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit.what you learn about your chosen character from their story . revealing a sound knowledge of the text. Thoughtful discussion. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be typified by simple. based on sound knowledge of the text. Answers will still be based on relatively simple narrative. with sound coverage of the bullet points. and. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. Answers will be detailed.her relationship with Marcus . (ii) What do you think of Fiona. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. patchy narrative. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 148 d) About a Boy (i) Read the extract below. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. but do not expect coverage of all the bullet points at this level. perhaps.14.your chosen character's relationships with others . or nothing worthy of credit. and clear focus on the question. but with some discussion and.

with clearer focus and some apt selection. or nothing worthy of credit. with some discussion for 6 . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. particularly for 12 14.anything else you think important. Simple discussion. including the end. with some discussion of Albrecht. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract.his behaviour at different parts of the novel. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings about Sarah here? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. rooted in the text.people who show different types of resistance in the novel . based on a general re-telling of parts of the story. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple comments based on probably patchy narrative. Thoughtful discussion. (ii) What do you think of Albrecht? Write about: . or nothing worthy of credit. (iii) Why do you think Owen Sheers decided to call his novel Resistance? Think about: . and simple comments on what is happening. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text in an aptly supported discussion of Albrecht. or nothing worthy of credit.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 149 e) Resistance (i) Read the extract below.the situation described in the novel .his relationship with Sarah . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.his relationship with other Germans . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. More focus and selection. Answers will be more focused. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. .his relationships with other characters . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple brief answers.7.

and the bullet points will be addressed with some success . guided by the bullet points. At this level expect emerging selection. and some discussion of the chosen character(s) for 12 . any character may be chosen. Explain why you have the most sympathy for him. for 6. or nothing worthy of credit. but there will be more focus. As with any open question.7.14. (ii) Write about the boy in The History Boys for whom you have the most sympathy. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. patchy narrative. Answers will be more selective. for 12-14. Answers will be relevant and considered. be flexible in judging what is offered. and based on simple. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. Answers will be more detailed. or nothing worthy of credit.the school the boys attend . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general. and supported by apt references to the text. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple comments and general narrative. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be underdeveloped. with some discussion. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. and some candidates may discuss all characters before coming to a conclusion.the boys' hopes and ambitions . and. some discussion and empathy. (iii) What impression of education do you get from the play The History Boys? Think about: . or confine their discussion to their chosen character. Answers will still be narrative dependent.the teachers .GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 150 UNIT 2b QUESTION 1 (Contemporary) a) The History Boys (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Irwin speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text. or nothing worthy of credit.anything else you think important. rooted in a sound knowledge of the text.

Answers will be more focused. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Sensible discussion. Nothing written. at the end? Nothing written. with an awareness of Linda's role for 12 . with little. patchy narrative. Answers will be more focused. More focused. Then answer the following question: What are your thoughts and feelings as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Write about the different ways Mickey and Edward are brought up. and the effects these differences have on them both. patchy narrative. although still dependent on straightforward narrative. account taken of the second part of the question. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on simple. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks .7. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple general comments. if any. with some discussion for 6 . as an adult. or nothing worthy of credit. or nothing worthy of credit.14. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple. Sensible judgements will be supported by apt detail from the text (ii) What do you think about the way Linda speaks and behaves at different parts of the play: when Linda is a child.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 151 b) Blood Brothers (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. supported by relevant references to the text. Answers will show a detailed knowledge of the text and select relevant material.

Answers will take some note of some of the bullet points and there will be some discussion of Eddie and his relationships for 12 . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple comments and general narrative. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple.14. with some discussion. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. revealing a sketchy knowledge of the text.his relationships with Marco and Rodolpho . Answers will be closely read and thoughtful. with some discussion and empathy for 6 . with the bullet points addressed with some success.the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the play. (ii) Some people think that Eddie Carbone had only himself to blame for what happens at the end of the play. guided by the bullet points.his relationship with Beatrice . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. general comments on Catherine. anger. Answers will be more focused.how the characters show your chosen emotion or emotions. Choose one or two of these emotions and write about two or three parts in the play where your chosen emotion or emotions are shown.the characters involved . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Responses will be general and simple. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Catherine speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. Answers will reveal a sound knowledge of the text.7. Answers will be detailed and considered. Some people think that what happens is out of his control. What do you think? Think about: . Think about: .his relationship with Catherine . or nothing worthy of credit. hatred. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. (iii) There are many emotions in this play: love. for 12 . or nothing worthy of credit. .14. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. jealousy. Answers will be more selective.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 152 c) A View From The Bridge (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. and the bullet points will be addressed with some success.

Then answer the following question: How do you think an audience would respond to the way the characters speak and behave here? Give reasons for what you say. Answers will be more focused. Write about one part that you think an audience would find funny. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Expect only simple. and one part that you think an audience would find sad. general comments on characters. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. general comments.7. Answers will be more focused. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks (iii) Be My Baby is both funny and sad. Answers will reveal a secure knowledge of the text. and use sensible examples to support judgements. Answers will be closely read and thoughtful. Nothing written. with only a vague sense of Matron. Answers will be more focused. (ii) What are your thoughts and feelings about Matron and the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the play? Nothing written. with some discussion for 12 -14. with some awareness of Matron's part in events for 12 . Explain why you think your chosen parts would have these effects on an audience. Answers will address the second part of the question with some success.14.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 153 d) Be My Baby (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be rooted in a solid knowledge of the text. or nothing worthy of credit. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on simple. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . answers will reveal some understanding of Matron and her part in events. with some discussion and empathy for 6 . At this level. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple. patchy narrative. or nothing worthy of credit.

and supported by apt detail (iii) Write about some of the changes in women's lives during the 20th century that are shown in My Mother Said I Never Should and explain the effect they have on some of the characters.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 154 e) My Mother Said I Never Should (i) Read the extract on the opposite page. or nothing worthy of credit. (ii) What do you think of Margaret? Think about: . Clear and detailed discussion of the Jackie's character.14. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written.her relationship with Rosie . Nothing written. or parts of it. Emerging discussion. or nothing worthy of credit. Answers will be narrative driven. Answers will be more focused. simple narrative. with some discussion of character (s) for 12 . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses and simple comments. Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Jackie speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say. with solid knowledge of the text used to support judgments. with awareness and some discussion of Jackie. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be based on a general retelling of the story. or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . and remember to support what you say with words and phrases from the extract. with some discussion of Margaret for 12 -14 Answers will be more focused in their discussion of Margaret.her relationship with Doris . More focus and selection. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. particularly for 6 – 7.her relationship with Jackie .the way she speaks and behaves at different points in the play.

Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be narrative driven and brief. or nothing worthy of credit. Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. (ii) Write about Nancy Lammeter and the way she speaks and behaves. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract. understanding of Nancy. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Simple brief answers. with some discussion and empathy for 6 .Silas Marner's relationships with people there . with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. You may wish to think about: .GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 155 QUESTION 2 (Literary heritage) a) Silas Marner (i) Read the extract below.the end of the story. based on a general retelling of parts of the story Simple discussion. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. and show a detailed knowledge of the text.7. with clearer focus and some apt selection Thoughtful discussion rooted in the text. with some understanding of Nancy's character. Answers will have a clear understanding of Nancy and her attitudes. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. perhaps focused on character.her feelings about adopting a child . if any. with little. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses.the discovery of Godfrey's secret . .her engagement to Godfrey Cass . More focus and selection. Think about: . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. (iii) Write about Lantern Yard and its importance to Silas Marner's story.what happened there .the way Lantern Yard is described. or perhaps mood and atmosphere. Answers will be more focused.Silas and Eppie's return to Lantern Yard at the end of the novel .

and reveal a sound knowledge of the text. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be narrative driven and brief. if any.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 156 b) Pride and Prejudice (i) Read the extract below. Answers will be more focused.anything else you think important. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Responses will be simple and general Answers will be more selective.7. Discussion of the character will be clear and detailed.his relationships with his daughters . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. explaining why you find it interesting. Darcy speaks and behaves here? Give reasons for what you say.14. understanding of Mr Bennet. but with some discussion and awareness for 12 . with little. Answers will show a clear understanding of Mr Bennet.his relationship with his wife . Choose either a successful or an unsuccessful marriage in the novel you find interesting.his opinions of his daughters' marriages . or nothing worthy of credit. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. Answers will be detailed. (iii) There are some successful and some unsuccessful marriages in Pride and Prejudice. with an awareness and some understanding of Mr Bennet. Answers will still be based on relatively simple narrative. or nothing worthy of credit. with some discussion and empathy for 6 . Then answer the following question: What do you think of the way Mr. or nothing worthy of credit. Write about it. revealing a sound knowledge of the text and with clear focus on the question. You may wish to think about: . Nothing written. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. (ii) Write about Mr Bennet and the way he speaks and behaves.

Simple discussion. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy simple narrative. rooted in the text. rooted in the text. or nothing worthy of credit. Emerging discussion and more selection with some discussion/empathy for 12 . 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. with clearer focus and some apt selection Thoughtful discussion. or perhaps mood and atmosphere. with some discussion and empathy for 6 . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . More focus and selection. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract perhaps focused on character. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be patchy simple narrative. Nothing written. Secure discussion.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 157 c) A Christmas Carol (i) Read the extract below.the lives of the characters .14.the way different characters speak and behave .7. Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have when you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit.the way London is described in the novel .anything else you think important. (ii) What impressions do you get of life in 19th century London from your reading of A Christmas Carol? Think about: . (iii) Explain how and why Scrooge changes at different points in A Christmas Carol.

Clear and detailed discussion of the extract. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written.the way he is described. or nothing worthy of credit.14. simple narrative More focus. Nothing written. with some discussion and. for 12 . and remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract. "William Golding knows exactly what boys are like. Thoughtful discussion. Give reasons for what you say. or nothing worthy of credit." Write about some incidents from the novel that you think either support or do not support this statement. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. with sound coverage of the bullet points. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Patchy.7. (iii) A review of Lord of the Flies said. Answers here will be typified by detailed and relevant reference to the text to support judgements. with some discussion and empathy for 6 . or nothing worthy of credit. perhaps focused on character. More focus and selection.the way he treats the other boys . Then answer the following question: What thoughts and feelings do you have as you read this extract? Give reasons for what you say.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 158 d) Lord of the Flies (i) Read the extract below. with some selection of apt detail and some discussion and awareness for 12 . Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses.14. but do not expect coverage of all the bullet points at this level. or perhaps mood and atmosphere. (ii) What do you think about Jack? Think about: . with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general. Answers will be more focused. some empathy.the way he speaks and behaves at different points in the novel . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . based on sound knowledge of the text.

how she speaks. Answers will be detailed. . 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks Nothing written. or nothing worthy of credit. explaining why they had that effect on you. with some awareness of Dannie's mother and her relationships with her sons. Think about: . but with some discussion and awareness for 12 . with simple comments on what is happening in the extract. revealing a sound knowledge of the text. and show a detailed knowledge of the text. if any. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be narrative driven and brief. Write about them. and with clear focus on the question. 0 marks 1 mark 2-4 marks 5-7 marks 8-10 marks Nothing written. More focus and selection. Clear and detailed discussion of the extract.14." Choose one part of the story you find sad. sad. Answers will still be based on relatively simple narrative. Nothing written. with little. or nothing worthy of credit. Then answer the following question: What impressions of Dannie's life do you get when you read this extract? Remember to support your answer with words and phrases from the extract.how she behaves. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Brief responses. Very brief with hardly any relevant detail Answers will be simple and general. (iii) Ash on a Young Man's Sleeve has been described as "a funny. 0 marks 1-4 marks 5-9 marks 10-14 marks 15-20 marks . with some discussion and empathy for 6 . Answers will have a clear sense of Dannie's mother and her relationships.GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 159 e) Ash on a Young Man's Sleeve (i) Read the extract below.7. (ii) Write about Dannie's mother and her relationship with her sons as they grew up. understanding of Dannie's mother's relationships with her sons. Answers will be more focused. and one you find funny. story. or nothing worthy of credit.

GCSE English Literature Specimen Assessment Materials 160 ASSESSMENT GRID GCSE English Literature Assessment Objectives Raw Marks (Actual) AO1 AO2 AO3 AO4 Unit 1 Section A (a) Section A (b) (c) Section B Total Marks Total Mark QWC 10 5 7 5 17 AO1 5 13 5 10 AO2 5 13 5 13 23 AO2 10 10 AO3 20 20 13 AO4 10 10 AO3 13 AO4 20 20 50 Unit 2 Contemporary (i) Conte'rary (ii) (iii) EWI LH (i) EWI LH (ii) (iii) Total Marks 5 7 5 7 24 AO1 10 20 10 20 60 Unit 3 Task Total Marks 10 10 40 40 WJEC GCSE in English Literature SAMs (2010)/ED 29.09 .9.

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