Exercise 1. Discuss the following questions with your partner, your group, or your class. 1.

Which age groups are worst affected by unemployment in your country? 2. Do you know people who have recently lost their jobs? How do they get by? 3. Do people leave your country to find work in other countries? Where do they go? What sort of jobs do they get? 4. Are there many immigrant workers in your country? What sort of jobs do they do? 5. Do you know what the expression “run for the hills” means? Exercise 2. Read the article and fill in the missing information in the table below.

Name
Giannis Pantoulis Evi Papadimitriou Evgenia Tsakili

Age Previous Job / Studies Present Job

Moved from…

Moved to…

Exercise 3. Answer the following questions from the text. 1. How do the Greeks feel about their government’s efforts to reduce the country’s debt? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2. The financial crisis could also have a positive effect according to Evi Papadimitriou. What is that? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3. What countries or regions are many young Greeks now trying to emigrate to? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4. When was the last time a large number of Greeks left their country? What kind of jobs did they mostly do abroad? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5. How many Greeks posted their resumes with Europass last September? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6. What types of professionals are most in demand by the United Kingdom and Germany? ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… Exercise 4. Match the underlined words in the text with the definitions below and solve the crossword. Across
3. 5. 8. 9. 10. to give someone too much to deal with at one time (v) to leave your country in order to live in another country (v) not happening often or regularly (adj) making money (adj) a short document describing your education, previous jobs, etc., that you give an employer when you are applying for a job (n)

Down 1. not true or real (adj) 2. to persuade someone to do something or go somewhere by offering them something exciting (v) 3. someone whose job is to buy and sell shares in companies for other people (n) 4. the act of saving or rescuing something (such as a business) from money problems (n) 6. to increase faster and faster (v) 7. to change the direction of something to its opposite (v)
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Stockbroker Giannis Pantoulis never imagined himself crouching in the dirt tending to grapevines in a small town in central Greece. But that, he says, was before the financial crisis caused unemployment to spiral and major cities such as Athens to descend into chaos with daily protests and increased violence. "I could foresee that the massive bubble of fake growth, prosperity and wealth would one day burst and I wanted to get out before it happened," said Pantoulis, 40. Two years ago, he packed his wife, their two children and all their possessions into a truck and made the 50kilometre trip from the northern port city of Thessaloniki to Katerini. Looking down at his wine-stained hands, Pantoulis admits the journey has not been easy and the business will take years to become profitable. But he does not regret the move. "Initially everyone thought I was crazy to move back to my father's town and take up winemaking, but now they too are seeing that the big cities have nothing to offer," said Pantoulis. "Our politicians have failed us," he said. "I am not the only one who has had enough -- others are also looking to leave." Pantoulis is part of a growing number of Greeks returning to their ancestral villages to take up farming, as the country struggles with its most serious economic crisis since World War II.

Dimitris Michaelidis from the Young Farmers Association of Greece. "We are having a hard time keeping up with all the requests for information from people asking about what crops grow the best in a given area," he said. Evi Papadimitriou, 30, is among the estimated 60,000 Greeks who have joined the farming community in the past two years, reversing the trend of migration to the cities. Papadimitriou struggled to make ends meet after studying marketing in Athens, working at odd jobs unrelated to her field, before deciding to return to her parent's town of Arta, in north-western Greece, to start her own snail farm business. "I could no longer afford to stay in Athens ... so I took the risk – if I make just enough to cover what I need to live on I will be happy," said Papadimitriou. She believes the economic crisis may turn out to be a good thing as more and more young people will be forced to move to the countryside, bringing abandoned villages and towns back to life.

agencies with resumes of mainly young people from all over Europe, 13,300 Greeks sent in their resumes in September, compared to 2,200 the same month in 2008. More than 63 per cent where under the age of 30. "I could not get a job here and I just do not see things getting any better for several more years to come," said biologist Evgenia Tsakili, 27, who found work as a laboratory researcher on the eastern Mediterranean island of Cyprus. An October seminar on Australia's migration policy and visa procedures organized by its embassy in Athens caused its website to be backlogged with thousands of applications. In Frankfurt, officials at the World Council of Hellenes Abroad, a group that represents and assists the Greek diaspora, said they have been swamped with requests for information on employment in Germany. "Every day we get calls, the majority of which are young professional people between 30-35 years old who are unemployed, seeking our advice and help about working in Germany," Giorgos Amarantidis from the council said in a phone interview. He estimates that 4,000 people have emigrated to Germany in the last three months, the majority without finding work. "Greek doctors are being lured to the United Kingdom and Germany is asking for technical professionals such as engineers," said Amarantidis, who emigrated to Germany in the mid-1980s. "Young Greek people are coming here terrorized by the state that Greece is in and for their future," he said. "They tell us that they have no trust in the country's system and that they will not go back."

Many educated, young Greeks are now also seeking to emigrate to the United States, Australia, other parts of the Europe or the Middle East. More than five decades ago, hundreds of thousands of poor farmers and blue-collar workers left Greece to seek a better life abroad, The government's efforts to reduce most of them working in factories or Greece's massive debt and qualify for restaurants. international bailout loans have been met with anger and disappointment During the prosperous 1980s and as Greeks endure cuts to salaries, 1990s, a large number opted to pensions and benefits amid rising return. Others were lured back by costs. Greece's economic success after joining the euro and jobs opening up "As more and more people lose their as Athens prepared to host the 2004 jobs they are looking for a stable line Olympic Games. of work and cheaper lifestyle ... something which will put food on the According to Europass, which table, and farming offers this," said provides employers and employment ATHENS, Oct 31, 2011
[text taken from http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story.asp?storyid={c0045859-5348-4225-b128-b3d6b02313ef} ]

ANSWER KEY Exercise 1. Discuss the following questions with your partner, your group, or your class.
1. Which age groups are worst affected by unemployment in your country? 2. Do you know people who have recently lost their jobs? How do they get by? 3. Do people leave your country to find work in other countries? Where do they go? What sort of jobs do they get? 4. Are there many immigrant workers in your country? What sort of jobs do they do? 5. Do you know what the expression “run for the hills” means? Exercise 2. Read the article and fill in the missing information in the table below.

Name
Giannis Pantoulis Evi Papadimitriou Evgenia Tsakili

Age Previous Job / Studies
40 30 27 stockbroker marketing biologist

Present Job
winemaking business snail farm business laboratory researcher

Moved from…
Thessaloniki Athens -

Moved to…
Katerini Arta Cyprus

Exercise 3. Answer the following questions from the text. 1. How do the Greeks feel about their government’s efforts to reduce the country’s debt? They feel angry and disappointed as they endure cuts to salaries, pensions and benefits amid rising costs. 2. The financial crisis could also have a positive effect according to Evi Papadimitriou. What is that? More and more young people will be forced to move to the countryside, bringing abandoned villages and towns back to life. 3. What countries or regions are many young Greeks now trying to emigrate to? The United States, Australia, other parts of the Europe (such as the UK, Germany) or the Middle East. 4. When was the last time a large number of Greeks left their country? What kind of jobs did they mostly do abroad? More than five decades ago. They mostly worked in factories or restaurants. 5. How many Greeks posted their resumes with Europass last September? 13,300 6. What types of professionals are most in demand by the United Kingdom and Germany? Doctors and technical professionals such as engineers. Exercise 4. Match the underlined words in the text with the definitions below and solve the crossword. Across
3. 5. 8. 9. 10. to give someone too much to deal with at one time (v) to leave your country in order to live in another country (v) not happening often or regularly (adj) making money (adj) a short document describing your education, previous jobs, etc., that you give an employer when you are applying for a job (n)
3 1 2

F S W A M P
4

L U B I
6 7

T
5

K E M I S
8

R

O C K B R
9

G R A T E L O D D U I T A B L R E V E R S
10

Down 1. not true or real (adj) 2. to persuade someone to do something or go somewhere by offering them something exciting (v) 3. someone whose job is to buy and sell shares in companies for other people (n) 4. the act of saving or rescuing something (such as a business) from money problems (n) 6. to increase faster and faster (v) 7. to change the direction of something to its opposite (v)

P I P R O F A L

O K E R

R E S U M E
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EclipseCrossword.com

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