River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 By Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

NEWS

How Public-Safety Pensions Are Increasing Your Taxes

S

tate public-employee pension systems are grossly underfunded in general and are financial time bombs for most states. According to the 2010 paper “Are State Public Pensions Sustainable?”, 31 state pension systems will run out of money by 2030 at current benefit and funding levels. (Illinois topped the list, going broke in 2018; Iowa is in better shape than most states, with an estimated expiration date of 2035.) What’s happening in cities across Iowa with police and firefighter pensions, though, shows the flip side – the shortterm budget pain that accompanies a well-funded system when investments perform poorly. In Davenport, the cost of police and firefighter pensions will increase from roughly $3.3 million in Fiscal Year 2010 to $5.5 million next fiscal year and an estimated $6.6 million in Fiscal Year 2014, according to city Budget Director Alan Guard. Over the fouryear period ending in 2014, Guard said, the cumulative additional cost is $7.75 million. In Bettendorf, the cost of police and fire pensions increased from roughly $747,000 in Fiscal Year 2010 to $1.22 million next fiscal year and an expected $1.36 million in Fiscal Year 2014, according to City Administrator Decker Ploehn. Over the four-year period ending in 2014, the cumulative additional cost is $1.62 million. Cities across Iowa will pay roughly $69 million combined in Fiscal Year 2013 for police and firefighter pensions compared to just over $48 million in Fiscal Year 2011. These increased costs are being borne by citizens through higher taxes. Both Davenport and Bettendorf have raised taxes to deal with the higher pension costs. And while these higher pension costs are almost certainly temporary – as markets recover, city costs will drop – they present budget problems to cities for at least the next few years. “These are guys that run into burning buildings when we’re running out,” Guard acknowledged. “And these are guys that stand there and get shot at. ... But at the same time, how are cities supposed to be able to afford this level of benefit for these guys and try to be

able to sustain all the services that we’re expected to sustain?”

Understanding the System
Police and firefighter pensions are funded through the Municipal Fire & Police Retirement System of Iowa (MFPRSI). Employees contribute a fixed 9.4 percent of their salary, while their employers contribute at a variable rate, with a statutory minimum of 17 percent. The problem for city budgets is that the employer contribution is on the rise. The city-contribution rate is set by the nine-member MFPRSI board to meet actuarial requirements. The board includes four members representing police and firefighters, four members representing cities, and one private citizen – all serving four-year terms. The employer-contribution rate was 17 percent from fiscal years 1997 through 2003. As a result of market crashes after the September 11, 2001, attacks, it was gradually raised (to a high of 28.21 percent in Fiscal Year 2006) before again dropping to the statutory minimum in Fiscal Year 2010. Since then, it increased to 19.90 percent in Fiscal Year 2011 and 24.76 in the current fiscal year, 2012. Next year’s rate is 26.12 percent, and it’s then expected to increase each year through Fiscal Year 2015. With 22 years of service at age 55, police and firefighters can retire with 66 percent of the income earned at their high three-year salary average. The maximum benefit level is 82 percent of that average salary for 30 years of service. This system is different from the retirement system for most public employees in Iowa – the Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System (IPERS). For most workers under IPERS, employers make 60 percent of retirement contributions, while employees make 40 percent. Thus, when the contribution rates go up – as they have the past few years, from 14.08 percent of income in mid-2009 to the current 16.62 percent – employers and employees bear a proportional share of the increase. On the surface, then, MFPRSI is more favorable to employee than IPERS. At the statutory-minimum city contribution level, police and firefighters pay only

Continued On Page 12

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 

GUEST COMMENTARY

by Sheldon Richman

Stopping the Rush to War Against Iran

A

growing group of individuals and organizations has designated Saturday, February 4, as a “National Day of Action” aimed at preventing a war against Iran. The manifesto is simple: “No War, No Sanctions, No Intervention, No Assassinations.” Nothing is more urgent than stopping the march to war now underway. Economic warfare has begun already. Sanctions and embargoes are belligerent acts under international law; such policies goaded the Japanese into attacking Pearl Harbor in 1941. The U.S. State Department recently reassured Israeli leaders, who along with their American lobby are in a bigger hurry for war than President Obama is, that the sanctions will devastate the Iranian economy – more precisely, the Iranian people. U.S. officials also say that Iran’s economy will be throttled by the crippling of that country’s central bank. Sanctions authorized by Obama in late December aim to stop the rest of the world from doing business with the bank, which would amount to isolating the Iranian people from world commerce. If successful, this would create indescribable misery for average Iranians. (Rulers always find a way to get by.)

The demanded oil boycott is accompanied by a U.S. suggestion that Iranian oil be replaced with Libyan oil, which sheds new light on the Obama administration’s intervention in the Libyan civil war and the regime change it accomplished. Not all nations can be counted on to boycott Iranian oil, but those that do not will still be in a position to demand lower prices from Iran’s government. Meanwhile, Iranian scientists are being assassinated, and various Iranian facilities are mysteriously exploding. This is surely the work of the CIA or the Israeli Mossad or both of them in conjunction with Iranian groups with histories of violent activity. The covert war is on. The national day of action, with events planned in many cities, is intended to bring all of this to the attention of a complacent American people. Americans are said to be war-weary after an eight-year occupation of Iraq (in fact, 20 years of hostilities) and a decade-long and continuing war in Afghanistan, a quagmire if there ever was one. You’d think a war-weary people would be demanding no war against Iran, but Americans seem not to be paying attention.

George W. Bush famously botched the old saying “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.” The American people were fooled once by unsubstantiated claims about Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear weapons, and his readiness to use them on short notice. There were no such weapons, of course – as many informed authorities said before the U.S. invasion – but those who want to bomb Iran appear to believe that this method of spreading war fever among Americans will work one more time. Hence the incessant propaganda about Iran’s nuclear-weapons program – for which there is zero evidence. America’s dozenand-a-half intelligence agencies have twice reported that Iran scrapped its initial program more than eight years ago. The International Atomic Energy Agency regularly inspects the country and certifies that its uranium has not been enriched to weapons-grade. What Iran has done is consistent with developing nuclear medicine and electrical power. Yet Iran is now subjected to low-level but deadly warfare and threats of a massive bombing campaign because it will not – and cannot – prove a negative: that it is not

developing nuclear weapons. Does Iran represent a serious nuclear threat? Israel’s defense minister and several former Mossad directors say no. “Defense” Secretary Leon Panetta, like Israeli intelligence, is not convinced Iran has decided to build a weapon. Even leading American neoconservatives acknowledge that a nuclear Iran (if such came to be) would not attack Israel – which has its own nukes – much less the United States. Then why the march to war? The U.S. and Israeli governments will not tolerate limits on their hegemony in the Middle East. Iran is a big, populous, and long-existing country that inevitably will be a major force in the region. Therefore, U.S. and Israeli dominance requires a subservient Iran – like the brutal U.S.- and Israeli-sponsored Shah’s regime was until it was overthrown in the Islamic revolution of 1979. To repeat: Nothing is more urgent than stopping this march to war against Iran. Let’s make February 4 the day it was reversed. Sheldon Richman is senior fellow at The Future of Freedom Foundation (FFF.org) and editor of The Freeman magazine.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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ILLINOIS POLITICS

by Rich Miller

L

Bill Could Be Coming Due for Teacher Pensions
Madigan also correctly pointed out that the Chicago school system has its own pension fund and pays its own employer share. “You’re never going to read this in a newspaper article. ... They’re never going to put a paragraph in there talking about that,” Madigan said, echoing others who’ve wondered for years why Chicago taxpayers pay for their own school pension fund while they and the rest of the state’s taxpayers pick up the tab for suburban and Downstate school districts. “Even I don’t remember why that happened,” Madigan joked. “I’ve never found anybody that can tell me why the State of Illinois stepped up one day and said, ‘Okay, school districts, we’ll just pick up all your pensions costs.’” The speaker also pointed out that school districts pay the employer share for janitors and maintenance people, but not for teachers, “and the State of Illinois has a huge requirement to make that pension payment.” This is truly an odd arrangement. All state taxpayers fund Downstate and suburban teacher pension funds, but Chicago receives just a relatively small amount of state cash for its own fund. It doesn’t seem fair, but, then again, life ain’t fair. The teachers’ unions haven’t taken a position yet, probably knowing that freeing up state money could mean more cash for education and that local districts couldn’t short the pension funds because state law forbids it. The state is the only government entity in Illinois that can legally shortchange pension funds, which is what got us into all this financial trouble to begin with. About half the state’s school districts actually do pay into the pension fund, but that’s because the teachers’ unions negotiated contracts that traded wage increases for their employers picking up the teachers’ share of pension contributions. It’s doubtful that anything close to the $2billion contribution to the teachers pension system will be passed down right away, but local property-taxpayers may be about to get hit with a big bill nonetheless. Get ready to pay. Again. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

ast week, powerful Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan appeared to all but endorse an idea to force Downstate and suburban school districts to pay a significant share of their state pension contributions for the first time in anyone’s memory. Senate President John Cullerton floated that very proposal last year, and Governor Pat Quinn added his support not long ago. Needless to say, if all three Democratic leaders are talking about it, you can probably expect some action this year. However, there will be strong pushback from suburban and Downstate legislators who’ll undoubtedly fear a voter backlash over potentially massive local tax increases to pay for the idea. Madigan spoke for well over an hour last week at an Elmhurst College event at the invitation of his old nemesis Lee Daniels, who served as House speaker for two years after the 1994 Republican landslide. Madigan almost never talks for that long when he speaks in public, so his speech was heavily covered by the media. As is his custom, Madigan didn’t come right out and officially endorse the idea to ease the state’s ongoing budget strain by passing pension obligations down the governmental food chain to local schools and public colleges and universities, but he did indicate that he was strongly leaning in that direction. The “normal arrangement,” for pensions, Madigan said, was that the employee and the employer both pay into the pension system. But local school districts pay just 0.054 percent of payroll into the Teachers’ Retirement System fund, Madigan noted. (And when he has it down to the decimal like that, you know he’s focused on the issue.). And he added that the universities pay “zero” toward employee pension costs. “And let’s understand,” Madigan said about education employees, “these are people that never got a payroll check from the State of Illinois.” The speaker went on to note that the state paid $4 billion this year into the pension funds, half of which went to the Teachers Retirement System alone. “So over one-half of our obligation to pensions, which is the subject of great public debate today, is for people who never worked for the State of Illinois,” he said.

“Over one-half of our obligation to pensions, which is the subject of great public debate today, is for people who never worked for the State of Illinois.”
– House Speaker Michael Madigan

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 

IOWA POLITICS

City and County Officials: Help Us Fix Our Roads

by Lynn Campbell IowaPolitics.com

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ity and county officials expressed frustration and a sense of helplessness January 24 over the lack of money to repair crumbling roads and bridges. The local-government leaders argued strenuously at a Transportation Day 2012 event at the Wallace State Office Building that it’s time for the state to increase the gas tax to upgrade infrastructure. But Republican Governor Terry Branstad insisted the state must first show taxpayers it’s being efficient with money it already has. Keokuk County Supervisor Mike Hadley said his county will have to close five bridges this year – including bridges that connect rural and agricultural areas to market towns – because they’re in such disrepair. He said rural America can’t grow if it doesn’t maintain its infrastructure. “We can’t cut any more pencils and paper clips,” Hadley told the governor. “This has gone on too long. We have to act. Nobody wants to do this, but we have to ... . We can’t continue to just close down our infrastructure, because it never reopens.” Don Hole, CEO of the Community Bankers of Iowa – which promotes independent banking and represents banks in more than 700 locations across the state – said Iowa small towns must maintain their roads, especially when they have only one road into town. “We cannot let our rural, small towns die,” Hole said. “The worst thing we can do is not maintain access to them.” Branstad said cost savings must come first. On January 24, he outlined $50 million in ways to reduce the cost of managing Iowa’s roadways. These include new policies to ensure projects come in ahead of schedule and under budget, and to increase signs and sponsorship at rest areas along Iowa’s Interstate highways. But when pressed further, Branstad said he hasn’t closed the door on a gas-tax increase in future years, unlike former Democratic Governor Chet Culver. “The last time this issue came up, the governor said he would veto it,” Branstad said. “I have not said that. I have instead said that I want to protect the interests of citizens and taxpayers. But I also recognize in the long term, user fees are the way we need to provide for our transportation system.” Iowa’s tax is 21 cents a gallon for gasoline, and 19 cents for ethanol-blended

fuel. The last gas-tax increase came in 1989. Branstad, who served as governor from 1983 to 1999, said he was sharply criticized during the 2010 gubernatorial campaign for that gas-tax increase. “I took a heck of a lot of abuse for that,” Branstad said. “I understand what I’m doing.” Hadley said he understands the need for cost savings. But he said he wants Branstad to understand what city and county leaders are saying about the need for action now on Iowa’s roads and bridges. “We just can’t keep putting it off,” Hadley said. “It’s not that the roof is leaking. The roof is gone.” The governor’s Transportation 2020 Citizen Advisory Commission, which was assigned to study this issue, in November identified a $1.6-billion annual shortfall for transportation-infrastructure needs. That included $215 million a year that’s considered “critical.” The panel recommended increasing Iowa’s gas tax as much as 10 cents a gallon. Branstad raised his voice as one participant at the Transportation Day event accused him of cutting road funds. The governor insisted that he wasn’t. He said $128 million in road projects will get done earlier than expected this year because of federal-reimbursement funding that came in to fix Iowa’s roads after Missouri River flooding in western Iowa. “You’ll probably yell at me, too,” joked Harlan City Manager and City Engineer Terry Cox, who pointed out that the governor’s commission recommended increasing Iowa’s gas tax starting in 2012, while the current plan calls for putting that off until 2013. Cox said Branstad is trying to straddle the fence. He said he’s happy for the cost savings for the Department of Transportation, but he said that doesn’t help Iowa’s cities and counties with their road needs. The crowd at the Transportation Day event applauded Iowa Senate Transportation Committee Chair Tom Rielly (D-Oskaloosa), who has cosponsored a bill to increase the gas tax and predicted that will happen this year. “I really, truly think we’re going to get this thing done this year,” Rielly said. This article was produced by IowaPolitics. com. For more stories on Iowa politics, visit RCReader.com/y/iapolitics. 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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Stage to Page to Stage

COVER STORY

T

Author Eileen Boggess Brings Her Junior Theatre Experiences to Life – at Davenport Junior Theatre – in Mia the Melodramatic, February 18 through 26

hose familiar with Davenport Junior Theatre might find its forthcoming production of Mia the Melodramatic a bit ... well ... familiar. After all, the show concerns a children’s theatre company that finds kids starring in and producing plays for other kids, and even comes complete with its own mascot in the form of an energetic, floppy-shoed clown. Rest assured: Any similarities between the fictional children’s theatre of Mia the Melodramatic and Davenport Junior Theatre itself are completely intentional. The 2007 novel Mia the Melodramatic was inspired by author Eileen Boggess’ own experiences with Junior Theatre, as the Davenport native was a teenage participant with the company, both on- and off-stage, from 1981 to 1985. So when Artistic Director Daniel D.P. Sheridan was considering titles for his organization’s 60th-anniversary season, he says the idea to have Boggess adapt her work for the theatre was, quite simply, “a nobrainer. In my three years here, I’ve been particularly focused on the opportunity to tie literature to the stage, in order to get kids inspired about reading. ... And with this book written by an alum, and it being a fictional reflection on her [Boggess’] childhood in Junior Theatre ... . Those things together really drew me into wanting to translate the book to the stage.” For Daniel’s wife Jessica Sheridan, a Junior Theatre instructor who also serves as Mia the Melodramatic’s director, the project’s main appeal lay with its title character, a soon-to-be-high-schoolsophomore “who finally finds a place where she’s able to be herself, which is a really special thing, because some people don’t ever find that.”

Sarah Bubbers, Cole Harksen, and director Jessica Sheridan
And for Boggess herself, whose debuting play will enjoy its first public performance on February 18, the experience of adapting her own work for the stage – specifically the Davenport Junior Theatre stage – has been what she describes as “a real circle-of-life thing. I mean, here I was in Junior Theatre, where they have pictures all along the walls of performances going back to the ’50s. And to think that my book is going to be part of that ... . It’s wonderful. It’s like being part of history.” good writer. She signed me up for a writing conference, and signed me up for advanced English in eighth grade ... . I mean, she really gave me that boost. That idea of, ‘Hey, I could be a writer!’” Instead, at least initially, Boggess followed a career path much like Hermie’s, receiving a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in middle-level education, and securing a job as a middle-school instructor. (Asked if her grammar skills eventually improved, Boggess laughs and says, “They did. I became a language-arts teacher, so I had to actually know my grammar.”) Yet as it turned out, a side career in writing was just around the corner. “One day in class,” says Boggess, “I assigned my students the task of writing a short, realistic-fiction book. And they all whined, as seventh-graders do. So I said, ‘Okay, fine. I’ll write one with you.’ “I loved reading Paula Danzinger when I was a kid,” she continues, referencing the

Photos by Corey Wieckhorst

“Hey, I Could Be a Writer!”
A resident of Urbandale, Iowa, Boggess – who has published, thus far, three youth-fiction Mia the ... novels – credits her initial interest in writing to “my seventh-grade teacher at Sudlow [Intermediate School]. Her name was Marie Hermie, and she would give me, like, ‘A’s in creativity and ‘C’s in grammar.” Laughing, Boggess continues, “But she would tell me that I was a really

children’s literature author of such famed works as The Cat Ate My Gymsuit and There’s a Bat in Bunk Five. “They were just really funny books with a little romance in them, and that’s just what I wanted to do. I wanted to write a book that I would’ve enjoyed when I was in junior high.” What eventually resulted was a 155page novel that was published, in 2006, under the title Mia the Meek. “I taught at a Catholic school,” says Boggess, “and in Catholic school they go [grades] K through eight with the same kids, and after a while the kids know each other inside and out. So I began thinking of this character named Mia, who everyone knew as this shy girl. But she was going to go off to high school, and the book was going to be about all the crazy, silly things that happen to her because she’s tired of being shy” – among them experiences taken from the author’s own life. “Some of the things Mia does are things that I did, like setting my science-lab table on fire,” Boggess says. Laughing, she adds,

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 

Were you thinking of any particular

color?

Olivia Tobin and Mia the Melodramatic cast members
“You know, the teenage years can be just absolutely horrible, but they also lead to the funniest stories when you get together with high-school friends. So I just used ideas based on what had happened to me in high school, because I tended to embarrass myself constantly.” Realizing, after the book’s completion, that “I knew what I wanted to do – I wanted to be a writer,” Boggess decided to write a follow-up to Mia the Meek, and found her subject matter in another experience from her teen years. “When I was in eighth grade,” she says, “a friend of mine said she was signing up for Junior Theatre, and I was like, ‘You know, that sounds really fun!’ So I signed up, and with my first play, they cast me as the lead. I was Queen Snooty. And it really gave me confidence at a time when I needed it. Junior-high girls, obviously, need a lot of confidence.” Boggess enjoyed that first Junior Theatre experience, and continued to enjoy participating with the company for the next four years (working primarily backstage), and says she remembers her time there as “in hindsight, really the perfect job. “Back in the ’80s,” she says, “Davenport Junior Theatre had a stage crew just made up of teenagers. It’s crazy, now, to think that they let us do this, but we were in charge of everything. We did the props, the sets, the costumes, I taught little kids. And then every morning, we’d load up the show wagon, and we’d drive to a park, and one of us would be [Junior Theatre mascot] Showtime Pal and introduce the plays, and the rest of us would get the kids on stage. And then we’d load it up and go to another park, and then at the end of the day we’d get ready for the next day’s shows. It was wonderful.” The experience, says Boggess, meant so much to her that after moving to Urbandale, “I went back to Junior Theatre for the retirement party for Bonnie Gunther,” who served as Junior Theatre’s assistant director during Boggess’ years with the organization. (Gunther retired from her subsequent position as artistic director in 2005.) “I hadn’t been back there in 20 years, but as soon as I walked in, the smell was like ... . It brought me right back. And I thought, ‘Oh my gosh. I have my idea for my next book. Mia is going to work at a children’s theatre.’”

“Are You Kidding Me?”

Titled Mia the Melodramatic, Boggess’ second novel found her smart, funny, humiliation-prone heroine taking a summer job at the fictional Playhouse Theatre, where she eventually makes new friends (among them company mascot Pickles the Clown), learns new skills, and finds a place where she can, at last, be the person she always wanted to be ... while still finding new ways to occasionally embarrass herself. Praised by Midwest Book Review for its author’s “witty one-liners” and “wonderful job [of] taking an established character and stretching her in new

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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Vol. 19 · No. 9

Channeling Doom

MUSIC

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

February -1, 01
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Deleted Scenes, February 3 at Rozz-Tox

W

hen the quartet Deleted Scenes recorded its second album, Young People’s Church of the Air, the atmosphere was “intense and pressurized,” resulting in a “doomed energy,” singer/guitarist/co-songwriter Dan Scheuerman has said. In an interview last week promoting his band’s February 3 performance at Rozz-Tox, Scheuerman elaborated on those intriguing phrases. To start, the recording period was more compressed than for the band’s debut, he said: “We wanted the record to have a moment. Instead of being recorded over a year, it was recorded over more like three months. In that sense, it’s more identifiable as one piece of work.” But the time frame was just one factor. “There was a weird vibe going on in the studio,” Scheuerman said. Producer L. Skell “is hard to read. So there was a lot of silence and glowering ... . And so we’d go in a direction and not be sure what was going on. And then when things seemed dark and we weren’t getting anywhere, everything would sort of snap together and ... [Skell] would come up with one or two really amazing suggestions to focus everything. There was a sense of ominousness to the proceedings, and that I think created a sense of doom. And there’s also a bit of doom in the songwriting as well. ... There was a high degree of tension.” At the album’s outset, though, it’s hard to hear anything but warmth and uplift. “A Litany for Mrs. T” and “The Days of Adderall” are both luminous and buoyant, with Shins-like vocals and harp-like sounds. “Litany” starts ethereal, but the massive drums and hyperactive, articulate bass ultimately overwhelm that mood – overbearing in a good way. It becomes clear that although these are structured as pop songs, they refuse to be consumed casually. “We just got really excited about the possibilities of using the studio to

downtrodden but also hopeful. And I think emotionally we got it pretty right,” Scheuerman said. Elsewhere, the album is nimble and light on its feet. “The Days of Adderall” and “Burglarizing the Deaf ” crib from African pop without ever coming off as pastiches or trend-chasers. “Bedbedbedbedbed” and “Ordination Day” are relatively straightforward, showing that the band isn’t afraid to let the songs stand on their own without all that production ornamentation. The darkness is only plainly evident on the rubbery, big-beat alienation of “A Bunch of People Who Love You Like Crazy,” but Deleted Scenes doesn’t get bogged down by it. The guitar and Scheuerman’s buried vocals snake between the drums and blats, and the song achieves a certain majesty about two-thirds the way through with swelling, glitchy Photo by Laura Rotondo Deleted Scenes trumpet-like calls and a bass that experiment and alter the sound and create sounds as if it’s pushing its range to the point more of a piece that would stand up to of pain. Like the most alluringly sinister repeated listens ... ,” Scheuerman explained. music Coil created, it shapes sonic shrapnel While the band arrived with full songs, it into an organic form. spent studio time “deconstructing the parts Deleted Scenes – with members split and taking away the things that sound between Washington, D.C., and New York standard” and “digging in and messing up – is still relatively obscure, but it might sounds and trying to find textures that we be poised to break out. The ever-fickle hadn’t heard before.” Pitchfork.com gave its two albums scores Examples include a marimba run through of 8.0 and 7.8. The site wrote that Young a fuzz pedal, and the vocals on “English as People’s Church of the Air “squats a unique a Second Language” recorded on an audio ground between pop and experimental cassette. This admittedly kitchen-sink impulses. It doesn’t belong wholly to either recording and production approach could world. It’s an album that seeks to transcend have come across as gimmicky if the final ugliness, both personal and aural. More choices didn’t assist the songs, but Deleted often than not, it succeeds on both counts.” Scenes’ judgment is astute. The result is an album of rich surfaces that Deleted Scenes will perform on Friday, avoids familiar paths and easy resolutions. If February 3, at Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue there was a sense of doom in the studio, the in Rock Island, RozzTox.com). The concert band channeled that energy into compelling also features A Lull and Healing Power. and upbeat adventurousness. Even the Admission is $6, and doors open at 8 p.m. mostly-acoustic-guitar-and-vocal “Nassau” finds room for subtle flourishes, with a synth For more information on Deleted Scenes, visit floor and (I think) the slightest bass. DeletedScenesMusic.com. “I wanted it [the album] to be kind of

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ADMINISTRATION

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 By Thom White

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THEATRE

Buy Local
Bad Habits, at the Village Theatre through February 5

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ew Ground Theatre’s Bad Habits is one Flaherty punctuates Callahan’s eerie lines with of those rare local productions where sudden shifts to gravelly forcefulness, and the focus is on the writers rather than the effect is chilling and disturbing. Flaherty the actors, directors, or technical aspects. While effectively fleshes out Callahan’s troubling a cast and crew, of course, are involved, the work story, and while Her Story left me feeling quite gathers short plays written by local playwrights. uncomfortable, I was impressed with both of Running a touch more than an hour, January their efforts, and interested in seeing more of 19’s performance showcased the promise of Callahan’s works staged. these local wordsmiths, while also revealing The third piece is Malnati Monday by areas on which they need to focus as they work Christopher Edward Moss. Directed by Schmall, on their next pieces – the this one-act takes place most notable being writing late on a Monday night, as people would actually with Josh LeFebreve’s Riley speak. attempting to continue his The evening begins with weekly tradition of pizza author Ann Boaden’s Bad and sports with Dana MossHabits, the one-act from Peterson’s Calvin, despite which this entire collection having nearly injured of four plays draws its name. Calvin’s pregnant girlfriend Boaden’s piece dramatizes in a drunken incident. Patti Flaherty a meeting between Ed Moss’ work concerns Riley’s Villarreal’s Jason, a city assessor, and Rae Mary’s struggle to keep his best friend while refusing Elizabeth, a homeowner late on her tax payments. to lose him to a woman. But my problem was Jason visits Elizabeth in an attempt to allow her that Moss’ point is unclear for so long that to keep her (locally) famous family’s home rather once I finally figured out the play was about a than lose it in a tax auction, and director Jan failing friendship, it didn’t seem as poignant as Schmall’s pacing pleasantly matches that of the it could’ve been, and matters aren’t helped by slowly paced existence of Elizabeth, who has little Schmall’s actors conversing with unnaturally to do, it seems, but spend her days in her family’s slow, overly enunciated cadences. (To Mosshome. Unfortunately, the relationship between Peterson’s credit, however, the performer the two characters, who’ve never met before, manages to squeeze out every bit of humor from progresses unnaturally quickly, and Elizabeth’s his lines, even from lines that barely contain “bad habits” seem a bit disconnected from her any.) circumstances. Boaden attempts to create an Bad Habits’ fourth offering is, fortunately, emotional attachment to Elizabeth, but in my also its funniest, and ends the hour on an up view, Jason was the only one moved by Elizabeth’s note. Playwright Devin Hansen’s Dr. Quinn plight, and by the end of the piece, I couldn’t follows John Turner’s Mr. Robbins as he understand why even he was touched. undergoes a vasectomy … though it’s unclear Michael Callahan’s Her Story follows, with why he’s having the procedure, as he admits to director Chris Jansen starting the piece with not being sexually active, despite having sexual Patti Flaherty’s Janice sitting on a stool, back-lit urges evident in Robbins’ physical reaction so that her face is in shadow. The aesthetic of to Kylie Jansen’s title character, and through a bright light on a shadowy figure is gripping a series of fourth-wall-breaking videos that and quite beautiful, and so, too, are Callahan’s director Chris Jansen inserts throughout the choices in word patterns. Despite Janice’s piece. While I’m still uncertain why Turner repeated insistence that “this isn’t a poem,” the was recorded in a different location for every monologue drips with poetry in its eloquence single one of these (perhaps two dozen) clips, and flow. Janice describes being in a tent with the use of video is an interesting novelty and a snake and, later, with her father, in passages more amusing, I think, than Turner would be that seem representative of sexual encounters speaking directly to the audience from his bed. but are never made explicit; there’s this constant And while Hansen’s work is sexually crass, it’s sense of meaning just behind the surface of also quite funny, aided by the humor in Turner’s Callahan’s words that’s about to break through, delivery. Hansen also avoids the inclination to but meaning that never quite reveals itself. create poignancy out of something that’s not Callahan doesn’t cram ideas down his audience’s poignant, instead leaving us with a lighthearted throat, but rather allows his art to be interpreted laugh at the evening’s end. individually by those viewing it, and it helps that the incomparable Flaherty is delivering his Bad Habits plays at the Village Theatre (2113 East words. Speaking predominantly with a child’s 11th Street, Davenport) through February 5. higher-pitched tones and inflections, with her For tickets and information, call (563)326-7529 or breathy delivery evoking a sense of innocence, visit NewGroundTheatre.org.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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Northern Exposure
THE GREY
Whenever I watch a movie such as Alive or The Thing or director Joe Carnahan’s The Grey – especially in January – I ask myself the same question: Is it worth it? I know about cinematic sleight-of-hand, of course, and that the performers and crew aren’t enduring anywhere near the nightmarish conditions suffered by the characters on-screen. I also presume that a fat Hollywood paycheck instantly makes any location shooting, including The Grey’s outdoor shoot in wintry British Columbia, a lot more bearable. But still, all that ice and wind and trudging through thigh-deep snow ... . Is any movie experience worth spending three months in fear of losing your digits to frostbite? In the case of Carnahan’s new action thriller, the answer would appear to be “Hell, yes,” though I’ll admit that nothing about The Grey’s advance publicity hinted at anything beyond another dreary heman adventure with Liam Neeson in his (quickly becoming stale) righteous-asskicker mode. In basic outline, the film concerns a team of Alaska oil workers who emerge from a devastating plane crash and are forced to contend with their murderously bitter environment and a pack of hungry, extremely territorial wolves. Between its Arctic setting and the tired familiarity of its survival-of-thefittest narrative, with its archetypal band of hot-headed tough guys slowly learning to trust one another, I entered The Grey thinking it would prove to be one of the most aptly titled movies I’d ever seen. I left thinking I’d never seen anything quite

Movie Reviews

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

like it. be in the presence During its first 10 of a major director. minutes, The Grey A few elements, paints an unexpected, particularly a few rather extraordinary too-convenientlyportrait of grief timed wolf and loss, with appearances, may Neeson, composing strain credibility, but a love letter in Carnahan’s movie is haunted voicesupremely wellLiam Neeson in The Grey over, addressing paced and aurally fundamental issues of life, love, and evocative and gorgeously composed, and humanity. It’s an eerily, shockingly there are sequences here so powerful and meditative intro that suggests Carnahan’s damned near lyrical that they practically take latest will be less reminiscent of his recent your breath away. (The scenes of Neeson The A-Team reboot than Malick’s The Tree gently comforting a rapidly dying man, and of Life, but what proves utterly astonishing of an exhausted survivor facing imminent is that this searching and melancholic air death at a tranquil lakeside, are more doesn’t abate once the movie gets down to emotionally wrenching than any you’ll find the business of thrilling the bejeezus out of among this year’s Best Picture contenders.) you. From that deeply unsettling mid-air The Grey is a hugely exciting, sensationally disaster to the hostile vocal assaults to the affecting entertainment. Arriving at brutal and terrifying wolf attacks, every the tail end of what’s generally the most scene is filled with both staggering intensity desolate month for quality releases, it’s also and exquisite empathy; you watch the something of a miracle. proceedings with your stomach in knots, but also with a sizable lump in your throat. MAN ON A LEDGE Carnahan’s and Ian Mackenzie Jeffers’ If you can ignore the ridiculousness of script is punchy, vibrant, and offhandedly its storyline, in which a wrongfully accused profound, and it’s acted to near-perfection thief stages a suicide threat while his brother by Frank Grillo, Dallas Roberts, Dermot hunts down the evidence necessary to Mulroney, Nonso Anozie, Joe Anderson, and Neeson, whose thunderous gravitas and exonerate him, you can have a fair amount of guilty-pleasure fun at Man on a Ledge. expansive soulfulness have perhaps never Boasting several ingenious caper-film been used to finer effect. And while nothing on Carnahan’s résumé, conceits, Asger Leth’s lightweight thriller is nimble and breezily unpretentious, and in not even 2002’s enjoyably vicious Narc, gave an added perk, Pablo F. Fenjves’ script is also indication that he was capable of much in unexpectedly funny, with Elizabeth Banks, the way of wonders, I’m thinking we might

Jamie Bell, Ed Harris, Kyra Sedgwick, and Genesis Rodriguez steadfastly, and wisely, refusing to take this thing seriously. If only they shared their modi operandi with Ed Burns, who gives a typically sour, unpleasant performance, and with lead Sam Worthington, who must certainly be the most vacuously inexpressive and uninteresting leading man currently working. Or has James Cameron just pulled a fast one on us, and the Avatar star is secretly just a motion-capture-animated figure himself?

ONE FOR THE MONEY
One for the Money, based on the first in a series of wildly popular Janet Evanovich novels, stars Katherine Heigl as the feisty, Jersey-based bounty hunter Stephanie Plum, and I’m betting that if you threw a rock in an East Coast nail salon, you could hit five people who’d be smarter casting options. But to take some heat off the film’s peevish and unamusing lead, everything about director Julie Ann Robinson’s comic thriller (with both “comic” and “thriller” deserving of quotation marks) is blandly cutesy and insufferable, with Jason O’Mara delivering a flawless (i.e., unbearable) Gerard Butler impression, and the movie’s only saving graces – the blessedly game Debra Monk and Debbie Reynolds – exiting less than halfway through the picture. Fuggedaboutit. Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 10-9 FM with Dave & Darren

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 Continued From Page 2

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com By Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

NEWS

How Public-Safety Pensions Are Increasing Your Taxes
35.6 percent of Fiscal Year 2009-10 their pension costs. At the current MFPRSI Contribution Rate 17.00% city-contribution Davenport Contribution $3.3 million level, police and firefighters only pay Bettendorf Contribution $747, 000 27.5 percent of their pension costs. But there to the system – an amount that would are other differences that make an be more than $9 million now. Then the apples-to-apples comparison difficult. contribution level became a flat $2.7 Unlike typical public employees, most million – and it’s dwindled since then. firefighters and police officers don’t pay “The state used to contribute $1.5 million into the Social Security system and aren’t a year,” Guard said. “Now [in the current eligible for benefits. MFPRSI serves fiscal year] they contribute zero.” as the disability system for firefighters In a larger context, the public-safetyand police officers. Overtime wages for pension issue relates to local control. police and firefighters are not included in Cities can’t bargain with police and pension income and benefit calculations. firefighter unions on pensions, yet they The benefits are different, too. IPERS have to fund them at state-mandated employees get 2 percent of their highest levels. That’s particularly relevant in a three-year salary average for up to 30 legislative session with multiple proposals years, and then 1 percent for the next five to limit local-government revenue years. With 30 years of service, IPERS – including significantly reducing retirees get 60 percent of their highest commercial property-tax rates and salaries, while MFPRSI retirees get 82. cutting maximum annual agriculturalBut, again, IPERS retirees also get Social and residential-property-tax increases to Security that public-safety retirees don’t. 2 percent from the current 4 percent. According to Dave Mohlis, a captain All this amounts to “basically taking in the Waterloo police department control away from local officials and our and president of the Iowa State Police ability to fund the level of services that Association, police and firefighter our citizens are asking for,” Guard said. organizations have compared city benefit “That’s not local control. ... Right now, contributions overall and found that we just point to the state for everything. employees covered by IPERS actually ‘They’re screwing us.’ ... That’s reality. cost cities more as a percentage of We don’t generate the rollback number. salary. With IPERS, Social Security, We didn’t generate the caps. We don’t workers’ compensation, and Medicare generate the pension contributions. ... It’s contributions combined, employers since handed to us.” 1995 have consistently paid between 31 and 33 percent of salary for those benefits. To deal with the higher pension costs, The problem with MFPRSI, then, Bettendorf has simply raised its Trust & is largely about the variability of Agency levy by the amount of the higher the contribution rate. Cities’ IPERS pension costs. In Fiscal Year 2010, the contribution rates since 1994 have never portion of that levy dedicated to police been below 8.38 percent and never and fire pensions was 50.5 cents. In been above the current 9.97 percent – a Fiscal Year 2014, it will be 68.3 cents – an difference of 19 percent. With MFPRSI increase of nearly 18 cents (or 35 percent) during the same period, however, over five years. the difference between the statutory Davenport’s situation is more minimum and the maximum (28.21 complicated, and the impending tax percent in Fiscal Year 2006) is almost increase is larger as a result. When the 66 percent – with the contribution rate city’s contribution rate jumped above the likely to exceed that previous high in the statutory minimum from fiscal years 2004 coming years. through 2009, Guard said, the city raised Another small but contributing its Trust & Agency levy rate 44 cents. It factor is the state’s decision to phase out also shifted some employee benefits from payments to MFPRSI. At one time, the the Trust & Agency fund. The goal was state contributed 3.79 percent of payroll to use up a balance in the Road Use fund

Fiscal Year 2010-11 19.90% $4.1 million $902, 000

Fiscal Year 2011-12 24.76% $5.1 million $1.12 million

Fiscal Year 2012-13 26.12% $5.5 million $1.22 million

What Cities Have Done

and thus have a smaller property-tax increase. In 2006 – when the MFPRSI rate began dropping – the city council cut 44 cents from the property-tax rate, Guard said. The city had intended to make budget cuts, too – including the elimination of a fire truck and 11 positions related to inspections – but that money was ultimately restored. “They cut taxes and cut people,” Guard said. “They hired all 11 people back and never raised taxes.” In the current fiscal year, he said, the city used $1 million from the debt-service levy for Trust & Agency, but “that’s simply not sustainable.” In short, he said, “we’ve done a lot of ... accounting maneuvers – I mean that in a very nice way ... . We tried to use up our fund balances to try to hold off the inevitable” tax increase related to publicsafety pensions. He added: “If they had left that 44 cents in there, we wouldn’t be having this discussion now.” So of the city’s 96-cent property-taxrate increase for the coming fiscal year, he said, 78 cents is related to public-safety pensions, Guard said. Of that, 57 cents is making up for previous budget choices, those ultimately unsustainable accounting maneuvers designed to avoid or minimize tax increases. Ten cents will go toward next year’s MFPRSI rate increase, and another 11 cents will cover the anticipated Fiscal Year 2014 rate hike. The Iowa League of Cities has proposed a 60/40 contribution split for new publicsafety employees – the same as with IPERS. “When it [the contribution rate] has gone up, my contribution has gone up along with the city’s,” Guard said. “I’m not sure that same system should not be in place with the public-safety employees.” The League of Cities estimated that this would, for a typical municipality in the current year, shift a contribution cost between $1,302 and $1,466 from the city to the public-safety employee for each new worker. Ploehn said that he’d favor reducing the maximum MFPRSI benefit to its previous level of 66 percent for new hires. Other proposals have included

restoring a 3.79-percent state contribution and increasing new employees’ contribution rates by 1 percentage point. At a January 27 legislative forum, Davenport Mayor Bill Gluba suggested that the state should cover cities’ increased public-safety-pension costs. But for now, it appears likely that cities and taxpayers will have to live with these additional costs. The Iowa League of Cities noted in a recent update that there’s little legislative will for major changes to the system, noting differences between Democrats and Republicans and no commitment from Governor Terry Branstad. It suggested that the best short-term hope for cities is a state appropriation to offset some of the increased costs. At the January 27 forum, state legislators from Scott County echoed that. Several expressed sympathy for the city’s plight; Senator Shawn Hamerlinck (R-Dixon) noted that cities have no control over these costs through collective bargaining, and the state isn’t picking up any of the cost. He expressed support for Ploehn’s recommendation of reducing the maximum benefit level for new firefighters and police officers. But Representative Jim Lykam (DDavenport) said Senate State Government Committee Chair Jeff Danielson won’t be taking up systemic public-safety-pension reform this year. He said, however, that Danielson would be working for a state appropriation to help offset the burden on cities. Nearly all Scott County legislators expressed support for long-term changes to the system. The police and fire unions, as expected, favor keeping the system as it is now. The Iowa State Police Association’s Mohlis said that while his organization is open to discussion, it sees no need for changes; cities were involved in the creation of MFPRSI in the early 1990s and have bargained with their unions fully aware of their pension obligations. “The system is very sound and very equitable,” he said. “Their percentages do go up, but they also do go down.”

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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What’s Happenin’
Music
A
St. Ambrose University Tuesday, February 7, 7 p.m.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Des Moines Metro Opera’s The Magic Flute
1) Mozart wrote the music, but who wrote The Magic Flute’s libretto? A) Lorenzo da Ponte B) Carl Ludwig Gleseke C) Emanuel Schikaneder 2) While writing The Magic Flute, Mozart was also composing another opera. Which one? A) La Clemenza di Tito B) Idomeneo C) Lucia Silla 3) The Magic Flute has narrative and musical associations with which society? A) The Knights of Columbus B) The Freemasons C) The Utopian Socialists 4) Why, at The Magic Flute’s beginning, is Prince Tamino so frightened? A) A giant serpent is chasing him B) A hungry lion is chasing him C) An angry Turk is chasing him 5) Who directed a 1975 film version of The Magic Flute? A) Joseph Losey B) Ingmar Bergman C) Orson Welles

Theatre
Company
The District Theatre Friday, February 3, through Saturday, February 18

ll right, friends: It’s time to play “Name That Tune!” Here are your opening lyrics: “Pa pa pa / Pa pa pa.” What’s that? You need a few more? Okay. The song continues thusly: “Pa pa pa pa / Pa pa pa pa.” You still don’t know? Come on; it’s only one of the most famous romantic duets of all time! Oh, all right. Continuing on: “Pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa / Pa pa pa pa pa pa pa pa / Pa pa pa pa pa / Pa pa pa pa pa.” Oh, you’re killing me, folks! It’s “Pa– pa– pa– ” from Mozart’s The Magic Flute! How were those lyrics not a dead giveaway?! Well, don’t beat yourselves up about it; after all, the supremely gifted singers of Des Moines Opera Metro will soon ensure that “Pa– pa– pa– ” forever lingers in memory. Appearing in a special, February 7 presentation by the German American Heritage Center, the professional opera company will deliver a two-hour, English-language version of Mozart’s The Magic Flute at St. Ambrose University’s Rogalski Center. Filled with comedy, drama, and romance – to say nothing of queens, dragons, and bird-catchers – the work features some of its composer’s most legendary tunes, and is perfect operatic introduction for audiences of all ages. For those of you more well-versed in The Magic Flute, though, try your hand at this quiz to the right on the 1791 masterwork, courtesy of our pals at FunTrivia.com. For information on, and tickets to, Des Moines Metro Opera’s performance of The Magic Flute, call (563)322-8844 or visit GAHC.org.

R

unning February 3 through 18, the first production in the District Theatre’s 2012 season is Company, a series of musical-comedy vignettes in which terminal bachelor Bobby – through encounters with his married and about-to-be-married friends – explores life, love, and the possibility of wedded bliss on the

eve of his 35th birthday. Company’s score features such classic songs as “The Ladies Who Lunch,” “Marry Me a Little,” and “Being Alive.” The original Broadway production opened in 1970, and ran a total of 705 performances. It was nominated for five Drama Desk Awards – including Outstanding Music, Lyrics, and Book of a Musical – and won them all. It was nominated for a record-

setti and and It accl the for B T pres Dav thea Jesu Five B (pic Dist in th Hor

Music
T

Chucho Valdés & the Afro-Cuban Messengers
Englert Theatre Friday, February 10, 7:30 p.m.

he latest guests in Hancher Auditorium’s Visiting Artists series are the renowned Cuban pianist Chucho Valdés and his Afro-Cuban Messengers ensemble, who bring their exuberant Latin stylings to Iowa City’s Englert Theatre on February 10. I should tell you, though, that if you visit Valdés’ Web site (at ValdesChucho.com) wanting to learn more about the man yet don’t know any languages

beyond English, you may be sligh Valdés’ biography, which begins: pianista, compositor, profesor de y director de grupa inició su form temprana edad ... .” But fear not! I’ve taken the trou every phrase from the site throug Spanish-to-English translator and everything you need to know abo All About Jazz calls “among the m jazz pianists from Cuba or anywh A Havana native who was alre as a professional pianist at 17, Val first album, Jazz Nocturno, in 196 he has recorded (get this) anothe has performed alongside fellow ja another 33. Among the awards in cabinet are five Grammy Awards Grammy Awards, which he’s ama of 25 Grammy nominations to da

Answers: 1 – C, 2 – A, 3 – B, 4 – A, 5 – B. Don’t let that last answer get you nervous: The Magic Flute is really, really fun! Seriously! No Swedish angst at all!

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

ing 14 Tony Award nominations d won six, including Best Musical d Best Director. t has enjoyed two critically laimed returns to Broadway, with 2006 version receiving the Tony Best Revival of a Musical. The District Theatre’s sentation is being directed by vid Turley, who also helmed the atre’s productions of Chicago, us Christ Superstar, and The Last e Years. Bobby is played by Bryan Tank ctured), showcased in such recent trict Theatre musicals as Sunday he Park with George, The Rocky rror Show, and The 25th Annual

Putnam County Spelling Bee. Featured amongst the show’s ensemble are Wendy Czekalski, Angela Elliott, Sara King, Erin McBride Lounsberry, Christina Myatt, Brian Nelson, Tracy PelzerTimm, Linda Ruebling, Mark Ruebling, Christopher Tracy, John VanDeWoestyne, Jenny Winn, and Paul Workman. Oh, yeah. And Company’s music and lyrics are by Stephen Sondheim. I swear, sometimes the District Theatre makes these things so damned easy to promote. For more information and Company tickets, call (309)235-1654 or visit DistrictTheatre.com.

Literature
Bettendorf Public Library Thursday, February 16, 6:30 p.m.

A Valentine for Faye Clow

F

htly disconcerted by “Nacido en 1941, el e música, arreglista mación musical a

ouble of running gh an online d have now learned out this artist whom most accomplished here else.” eady employed ldés recorded his 64. Since then, er 86 albums, and azz musicians on n the pianist’s trophy s and three Latin assed through a total ate.

Yet Valdés’ professional accomplishments hardly stop with the hardware. He’s received the key to the city in Los Angeles, San Fancisco, and New Orleans. He holds honorary doctorates from the Berklee College of Music and Toronto’s Victoria University. He’s shared stages with the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, David Sánchez, and Tito Puente. And with his AfroCuban Messengers – whom The Guardian praises for their “coolly grooving jazz, hustling fast themes, and breezy New Orleans swing section” – Valdés has toured in more than 50 countries. Plus, at age 70, the man’s lookin’ good! You can see a bunch of photos of him near the bottom of his Web site’s home page, along with ... . Wait. What’s this? ... There’s a link you can click to read his Web pages in English? Aw, man, I just wasted an entire afternoon! For more information and tickets to February 10’s Chucho Valdés & the Afro-Cuban Messengers concert, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www. Hancher.UIowa.edu.

or those of us lucky enough to have known Faye Clow – the beloved Bettendorf resident and patron of the arts who led the Bettendorf Public Library for 30 years and passed away on February 18, 2011 – the one-year anniversary of her passing is sure to be a sad day. Yet on February 16, the library will temper that sadness with a celebratory spirit in the memorial tribute “A Valentine for Faye Clow,” an evening of poetry readings and music honoring this influential and much-missed Quad Citian. With Kai Swanson serving as emcee, the Thursday-night event will feature readings by the winners and runners-up in the Bettendorf Library’s recent love-poetry contest, among them the recipients of first-place prizes in the adult and youth divisions: Jodie Toohey (for her poem “Out of the Blue”) and Christina Mbakwe (for her “Love’s Pistol”), respectively. Both works will also be included in a handmade book by local artist Bill Hannan that attendees can peruse at the event, and recent St. Ambrose University graduate Julia Goodmann will perform songs

she composed using the poems themselves as lyrics. And in addition to these figurative valentines for Faye, the library’s celebration will offer a literal one in the form of the event’s special guest: award-winning, New York City-based poet Jean Valentine (pictured). The winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Poetry and the 2009 Wallace Stevens Award from the Academy of American Poets, Valentine will read from her works (including, I would imagine, her lovely poem titled “Earth & the Librarian”), allowing guests to enjoy what famed poet Adrienne Rich lauded as “poetry of the highest order, because it lets us into spaces and meanings we couldn’t approach in any other way.” There’s no word on whether the library’s guest author will be bringing any family members along with her, but I hope she does; Faye Clow is certainly deserving of as many Valentines, capitalized and lowercased, as possible. More information on February 16’s “A Valentine for Faye Clow” event is available by calling the library at (563)344-4175, or visiting BettendorfLibrary.com.

What Else Is Happenin’
MUSIC
Thursday, February 2 – Bobby Valli. Frankie Valli’s brother performs his tribute to the Four Seasons. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $10-15. For information, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos. com. Thursday, February 2 – Stew & the Negro Problem. The Tony Award winner’s genre-defying rock-pop-funk-punk cabaret, in a Hancher Auditorium presentation. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 7:30 p.m. $12.50-30. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa. edu. Friday, February 3 – Deleted Scenes and A Lull. Acclaimed independent musicians in concert, with openers Healing Power. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $6. For information, e-mail info@rozztox.com or visit RozzTox.com. Saturday, February 4 – HairBall: A Celebration of Arena Rock. Concert tribute to 1980s rock legends, with an opening set

Continued On Page 21

Celebrate Valentine's Day with  dinner at Antonella's Ristorante
The Quad Cities “Best Kept Secret”

Special Valentine's Day dishes available Thursday, Feb 9  thru Tuesday, Feb 14.  • 112 W 3rd St, Davenport.
(sorry, reservations not accepted)

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 By Thom White

THEATRE

If Memory Swerves
How I Learned to Drive, at Augustana College through February 5

A

ugustana College’s How I Learned to Quinn, meanwhile, is convincing as Li’l Bit, Drive offers an interesting opportunavigating her way through her character’s nity to compare the acting talents of ages with appropriate shifts in body language performances at different points in their lives, as and vocal inflection. The truest element of her there’s a marked contrast between Reader editor portrayal – what doesn’t seem at all feigned – is Mike Schulz’s work and that of the students who Li’l Bit’s connection to Uncle Peck, and their compose the rest disturbingly beautiful of the cast. Being relationship kept beyond college-age me wishing that (and hired here as a Peck would drop his guest actor), Schulz physical interest in is presumably more his niece and focus aware of the darkon his efforts to ness in the world, the protect her emotions pain of real life, and and promote her the reality of what education. Through some would call sin. Jacquelyn Schmidt, Michael Pazzol, Amy Sand- Quinn’s and ers, Robin Quinn, Mike Schulz, and Jo Vasquez Schulz’s chemistry, I imagine he’s subsequently able to draw from what he knows and I understood why Li’l Bit didn’t flee from her use it to shape his character, whereas it’s apparent uncle, enduring his advances to the point where that the students are feigning their feelings. To be she even initiates a physical encounter. clear, that’s not to say that the students are poor Each of the other cast members offers at least actors, and each one offered a notable perforone first-rate moment while on stage. With Jo mance during Friday’s presentation. Compared to Vasquez, it’s the broken, pained look her Aunt Schulz’s effort, however, there are distinct differMary gives the audience when revealing what ences in the sincerity of their portrayals. she knows of her husband’s ways. Jacquelyn Directed by Jennifer E. Popple, author Schmidt is most entertaining when her Mother Paula Vogel’s play follows – although not in explains the rules of drinking for women while chronological sequence – the life journey of getting increasingly drunk herself; Schmidt Li’l Bit (Robin Quinn) from age 11, when she slurs and (physically) stumbles through her first spends a few hours alone with her Uncle monologues, and elicits some of the evening’s Peck (Schulz), to her 18th birthday, when she biggest laughs. Amy Sanders is equally amusing realizes her sexual relationship with her uncle as Li’l Bit’s grandmother, her hunched-over (by marriage) is not a good thing. The audience posture and vocal mimicry of an elderly person is privy to Li’l Bit’s driving lessons with Uncle fully embodying Grandma’s sharp wit and Peck and his unhealthy attachment to her, and quick-thinking nature. And as the Male Greek whether by Vogel’s design or Schulz’s portrayal, Chorus, Michael Pazzol and Sean Serluco weave or a combination of both, the beauty of the piece their way through various characters, altering is that Uncle Peck is not a one-note monster. their characterizations remarkably well to fit Because the story is told from Li’l Bit’s their multiple roles. perspective, Uncle Peck has some endearing Popple’s treatment of Vogel’s material is qualities, suggesting that even the darkest of impressive and touching, and her careful real-world souls are not simply creatures of evil pacing allows the show’s themes to settle in with only evil in mind. Uncle Peck adores cars gradually. Her work is made even richer by and driving, is protective of those he loves, is Adam Parboosingh’s lighting-design choices, patient, and despite his pedophilic nature, seems which oftentimes cast (appropriate) shadows a good man; like all of us, he isn’t constantly on the actors rather than washing them in full consumed by sinful thoughts and wants. That’s light. The scene-setting images Parboosingh not to excuse his behavior by any means, but projects onto a curtain also beautifully shape the I do applaud Vogel and Schulz for how they play’s ambiance, and with the technical elements shape this figure. Through the gentle nature of blending with the performances, Vogel’s script, Schulz’s Uncle Peck, with his (utterly believable) and Popple’s staging, How I Learned to Drive Southern accent and unhurried pace, it’s easy winds up flat-out-brilliant, despite the unseemly to like him for his positive qualities, while also content at its core. being disgusted by his negative ones. Schulz so transforms his being that, were the actor not a How I Learned to Drive plays in the Bergendoff personal friend of mine, I would’ve believed that Hall of Fine Arts’ Potter Hall (3701 7th Avenue, his personality, speech, and mannerisms are not Rock Island) through February 5. unlike those of his character. The climax and denoument of Vogel’s tale are moving, in great For tickets and information, call (309)794-7306 or part, because Schulz’s Uncle Peck is human. visit Augustana.edu.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Photo by Denise Greer

Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club

(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader each month will feature an image or images from the Quad Cities Photography Club.)

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ne of the top images in the Quad Cities Photography Club’s January competition in the creative category was this interesting image of a drop of water created by Denise Greer. To make this image, she used a cookie sheet with sides, filled with

about a half-inch of water. She then used some red material and an empty chip bag covered with colorful text for a backdrop. From a tripod she hung a Ziploc bag full of water and poked a small hole in the bag for the drops. In a dark room with an off-camera flash, she worked on getting the water to drop at the speed needed for the image she wanted, and on finding the correct settings for the camera. She spent several hours working on the gathering of materials, setting it all up, and trying out the shot to get it just right, and

she came up with a winning image. She used a Canon 50D camera with a 100-millimeter macro lens, set at f/9.5 and at 1/250 of a second, with an ISO of 100 and manual focus. The Quad Cities Photography Club welcomes visitors and new members. The club sponsors numerous activities encompassing many types and aspects of photography. It holds digital and print competitions most months. At its meetings, members discuss the images,

help each other to improve, and socialize. The club also holds special learning workshops and small groups that meet on specific photography topics, and occasionally offers interesting shooting opportunities. The club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday of the month September through June at the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street in Moline. For more information on the club, visit QCPhotoClub.com. 

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 Continued From Page 7 by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

COVER STORY

Stage to Page to Stage
directions,” the book is, in short, Boggess’ comedic remembrance of her years in Junior Theatre. But she admits to never thinking it might one day be staged at Junior Theatre. “I hadn’t written for three years,” says Boggess. “I mean, I had, but I wasn’t really producing anything of worth. And then ... Daniel [Sheridan] called me out of the blue. He told me he was the new artistic director at Junior Theatre, and knew that a lot of people had read the book, and said, ‘I think it would make a great play. Would you like to do it?’ And I said, ‘Oh my gosh, are you kidding me?’” “Over the last three seasons at Junior Theatre,” says Daniel, “we’ve worked on several new adaptations,” including 2010’s presentation of classic Aesop fables and last spring’s Alice in Wonderland, the adaptation for which he himself wrote. “And being able to continue that effort is exciting, because then we help contribute to the scope of children’s theatre that’s out there, and available for others to do. “With this story,” says Daniel of Mia the Melodramatic, “I like that it’s about coming of age, and standing up for yourself, and learning what that feels like. I was lucky enough to find it through theatre, but other kids find it through sports, and other kids find it through a musical instrument – that ability to be themselves.” Despite having no previous experience with playwriting, Boggess says that the process of transforming her Mia the Melodramatic novel into a theatrical work “wasn’t too difficult. My books are very episodic in nature, so the hardest part was cutting. I had to cut a lot, just because in the [168-page] book, I have a long time to develop the characters. In a play, they kind of have to be the characters, and the audience has to know what their personalities are, right away.” Laughing, she says, “Obviously, it’s a play for children, so it can’t be three hours long.” (Like nearly all Junior Theatre shows, the company’s Mia the Melodramatic will run just under an hour.) In addition to the trimming of material, though, a few other aspects needed to be addressed during the adaptation process, among them changes in the cultural landscape. “When Mia the Melodramatic was published,” says Boggess, “teenagers e-mailed each other. Now they text. So I had to update the technology Mia and [her boyfriend] Tim used to communicate with each other.”

ABOVE: Mia the Melodramatic author Eileen Boggess and leading lady Sarah Bubbers RIGHT: Mia the Melodramatic’s Zach Meyer (top), Grace Hipple, and Sarah Bubbers (second row), Cole Harksen, and Matthew Hayes (bottom row)

“Some things did need updating,” says show director Jessica Sheridan, “like some of the references, and certain musical artists that are mentioned, and things like that. But we did want to keep the characters as true to who they originally were as possible, and Eileen was totally cool with whatever changes needed to be made. She was the first one to be like, ‘Hey, I don’t write plays; I write books. So let’s figure out how to get this up on its feet and in front of audiences.’” It was also important to ensure that Mia the Melodramatic – given the book’s humorous look at the mishaps that can befall an organization run almost entirely by kids – not be seen as any kind of direct spoof on the organization staging the play. “Going into the process,” says Daniel, “we considered that this could be seen as a kind of send-up, an inside joke, about what it’s like to be at Junior Theatre. Yes, it’s a fictional account of Eileen’s experiences at Junior Theatre, and there are things in it that I can relate to. But we also wanted to recognize the fact that Junior Theatre has changed so much over the last 30 years since she was here. We didn’t want to confuse anybody by presenting ourselves as something we’re not. “So we really tried to stay focused on the story that we had in front of us,” he continues, “and telling this one unique

story. That way, when the play does, hopefully, leave here and go somewhere else, it’ll be universal – because its themes are universal – and it’ll translate well for other theatres.” “I think what happens [in Mia the Melodramatic] is very similar to the way a children’s theatre works in general,” says Jessica, “but we made sure to take out anything that could be a wink-winknudge-nudge to people who’ve been to Junior Theatre. We wanted it to be a play that could be appealing to Junior Theatre kids and alums, but also to people who’d never stepped foot in the building before. And that’s what I hope we ended up doing.” Boggess, for one, is eager to see what results, and will be available to sign copies of her novel at all of the show’s public performances. (Through a grant from the Riverboat Development Authority, 750 copies of Mia the Melodramatic will be given to youths attending the show, with copies of Lea Wilcox’s Falling for Rapunzel available for readers too young for Boggess’ book.) “I’m so excited,” says Boggess of the upcoming performances, “and so excited to see the talent that’s there now. I couldn’t believe it when I heard how many kids [63 in total] auditioned for my play. When I was there, [Junior Theatre founder] Mary Fluhrer Nighswander – who was this little, four-foot-10

powerhouse of woman – would just come up to us and be like, ‘Okay, you’re this part, you’re this part ... .’ We didn’t have anything like the numbers they have now.” One aspect of Junior Theatre that hasn’t changed over the years, however, is the presence of clown mascot Showtime Pal, whose costume Boggess occasionally donned when she was a teenager ... and she’ll do so again for one performance during Mia the Melodramatic’s February run. According to Daniel, “Eileen says she doesn’t get to do much acting anymore, so I thought it would be fun for her to put on the suit again.” Boggess, meanwhile, says that she’s game for another stab at warming up the Junior Theatre crowd, even though, as she says with a laugh, “my skin isn’t quite as used to the makeup. And I’m not quite as bouncy as I was in high school. So this might be interesting.” Mia the Melodramatic runs February 18 through 26, at 2822 Eastern Avenue in Davenport with Saturday performances at 1 and 4 p.m. and Sunday performances at 2 p.m. Tickets are $5 at the door for ages three and older, and more information on the show is available at DavenportJuniorTheatre.com. For more on author Eileen Boggess, visit EileenBoggess.com.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 Continued From Page 15 

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What Else Is Happenin’
by E11eventh Hour. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $13-22. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit RiverCtr.com. Saturday, February 11 – Smooth Jazz Valentines Concert & Dinner. Featuring jazz, R&B, and classic funk with acclaimed saxophonist Steve Cole. The Lodge Hotel (900 Spruce Hills Drive, Bettendorf ). 6 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. concert. $75/single ticket, $145-165/couples. For tickets and information, call (563)324-4208 or visit SmoothJazzSeries.com. Saturday, February 11 – Travis Tritt. Acoustic concert with the chart-topping country singer. QuadCities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf ). 7:30 p.m. $20-30. For information, call (800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf. IsleOfCapriCasinos.com. Saturday, February 11 – An Evening with Leon Redbone. Concert with the noted jazz, blues, and ragtime performer. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $26-30. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. For a 2010 interview with Redbone, visit RCReader.com/y/redbone. Saturday, February 11, and Sunday, February 12 – Quad City Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra’s Masterworks: Valentine’s Day concerts, with guest conductor Alondra de la Parra, guest guitarist Robert Belinic, and a program featuring RimskyKorsakov’s “Scheherazade,” Rodrigo’s “Concierto de Aranjuez,” and Ravel’s “Bolero.” Saturday – Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport), 7:30 p.m. Sunday – Augustana College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island), 2 p.m. $11-53. For tickets and information, call (563)322-7276 or visit QCSymphony.com. Saturday, February 11, and Sunday, February 13 – Sun & Moon, Sea & Sky. Winter concerts featuring the professional vocal ensemble the Nova Singers. Saturday – First Lutheran Church of Galesburg (364 East Water Street, Galesburg), 7:30 p.m. Sunday – St. Paul Lutheran Church of Davenport (2136 Brady Street, Davenport), 4 p.m. $12-16 for adults, students free. For tickets and information, call (309)341-7038 or visit http://Departments.Knox.edu/ novasingers. Monday, February 13 – Zoë Keating. Concert with the acclaimed cellist and “one-woman orchestra.” Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $15-18. For tickets and information, call (319)6882653 or visit Englert.org. Wednesday, February 15 – Talkdemonic. Independent musicians in an “Intimate at the Englert” presentation, with opener Skye Carrasco. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $8. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Friday, February 10, through Sunday, February 12 – On Golden Pond. Ernest Thompson’s Tony Award-winning dramatic comedy, in a co-production with the Peace Pipe Players. Ohnward Fine Arts Center (1215 East Platt Street, Maquoketa). Friday and Saturday 7:30p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $8-15. For tickets and information, call (563)652-9815 or visit OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com. Friday, February 10, through Sunday, February 19 – In the Next Room (Or, the Vibrator Play). Sarah Ruhl’s comedy of sexual awakening in the Victorian era. University of Iowa’s E.C. Mabie Theatre (200 North Riverside Drive, Iowa City.) ThursdaysSaturdays 8 p.m., Sundays 2 p.m. $10-17. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www. Hancher.UIowa.edu. Saturday, February 11 – The White Rose: A True Story of Freedom in Nazi Germany. Reader’s theatre performances of a drama about the World War II resistance group, directed by Nathan Porteshawver. German American Heritage Center (712 West Second Street, Davenport). 1:30 and 3 p.m. $3-5. For information, call (563)322-8844, or visit GAHC.org

THEATRE

Tuesday, February 7 – The Color Purple. Tony Award-winning musical based on the famed Alice Walker novel, in a Broadway at the Adler presentation. Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $36.50-61.50. For tickets, call (800)7453000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com. Thursday, February 9 – The Queen of Bingo. Comedy and games in the famed touring production starring Shane Partlow and Rowan Joseph. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $22.5027.50. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Thursday, February 9, through Sunday, February 26 – Scenery. Twoperson show-business comedy by Ed Dixon, directed by James Fairchild. The District Theatre (1611 Second Avenue, Rock Island). February 9, 16, 24, and 25 – 8 p.m.; February 11 and 18 – 2 p.m. $15. For tickets and information, call (309)235-1654 or visit DistrictTheatre.com. Thursday, February 9, and Saturday, February 11 – The Vagina Monologues. Annual fundraising performance of Eve Ensler’s famed solo pieces. Augustana College’s Denkmann Memorial Hall (3520 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $6-9. For information and tickets, call (309)794-7306 or visit Augustana.edu. Friday, February 10, and Saturday, February 11 − The Actor’s Nightmare and Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You. Famed one-act comedies by Christopher Durang. Augustana College’s Black Box Theatre (Bergendoff Hall of Fine Arts, 3701 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). Friday 7:30p.m., Saturday 3 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)794-7306 or visit Augustana.edu.

COMEDY

Friday, February 3, and Saturday, February 4 – The Second City: Laugh Out Loud Tour. Sketch comedy and improvisation with the famed touring comedians. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $22-27. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Thursday, February 9 – Rodney Carrington. Comedian and country singer/songwriter in his “Laughter’s Good Tour.” Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $43.75. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.

EVENT

Saturday, February 4 – Bowling to Banish Bullying. Fundraising event for Ballet Quad Cities’ antibullying program, with bowling, heavy appetizers, and two drink tickets included. Blackhawk Bowl & Martini Lounge (200 East Third Street, Davenport). 6 p.m. $40/bowlers, $10/spectators. For tickets and information, call (309)786-3779 or visit BalletQuadCities.com. 

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

the

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

My commitment-phobic boyfriend of several years is also my neighbor. I resolved to make it work with him and then caught him on FriendFinder exchanging numerous messages with some woman in Tijuana. He claimed he was just being friendly. I asked if he’d correspond with a guy. He responded, “No. I’m not gay.” Humiliatingly, I’ve let him use me for things he can’t afford. (He’s been unemployed for two years.) He sometimes showers at his tiny apartment but basically uses it for storage. He refuses to move in with me so we could pay expenses with money his grandma gives him for his rent, but he spends all his time at my place (where I pay for everything). He partakes of my cable TV, Internet, food, and beer, and he even eats food I buy specially for my 9-year-old son. Well, he’s now my ex-boyfriend. As he’s been many times before. What’s with him? Is talking to some random woman on the Internet worth losing everything over?

Shove Thy Neighbor

Advice Goddess

BY AMY ALKON

– Fuming

Feminists have hammered into us girls that we aren’t supposed to sit around dreaming of being rescued by some prince. Somehow, I don’t think the alternative’s supposed to be opting for the mooch neighbor who eats your kid’s food while using your DSL to talk to some chiquita in Tijuana. Reality, like angry little dogs, often bites. Every day, I wake up wishing for home-invasion house-cleaners. But as much as both nature and I abhor a vacuum, at a certain point, I have to pull one out, lest my rugs provide shelter to a lot of little things with a lot of little legs. You, likewise, can pretend you’ve found Prince Charming, but that won’t transform your Parasite Charming (not even if you throw both hands into the air and say “Poof!” six or seven times, very energetically). Why do you keep taking him back? You’re probably engaging in “future discounting,” an econ term explaining how we’re prone to forgo big benefits down the road for a small immediate reward. It helps to recognize that you’ll be tempted to go for the quick fix. You’ll be lonely some night and want a snuggle, rationalize all the reasons he isn’t so bad after all, and before you know it, there’ll be a familiar barnacle attaching itself to the beer tap on your hull. To avoid backsliding, don’t rely on yourself to gin up self-control in the moment; use tricks

like “pre-commitment” to your goal, a strategy originated by Nobel Prize-winning economist Thomas Schelling and recommended by Dr. Roy Baumeister and John Tierney in their book Willpower. Pre-commitment involves setting things up in advance so it’s hard to cheat. Research suggests that two of the most helpful measures are recruiting others to monitor your progress and establishing financial penalties for relapse – the higher, the better. It also helps to give yourself small rewards for daily good behavior. Maybe put aside $5 on each day you don’t call him and give yourself occasional lump-sum rewards (like at the two months loser-free mark). The Web site StickK.com can help. (You can configure it to forfeit your money to a cause you hate if you fail.) Research from Baumeister’s lab also suggests that practicing daily self-discipline unrelated to your goal (say, making yourself a weird green health shake every morning) increases overall self-control. This should increase your self-respect. Which should increase your chances of having a man in your life who sings your praises – stuff like “your lips are like wine,” not “your Wi-Fi’s, like, free.” I’ve been delighted and humbled by my interactions with this girl who goes to my favorite coffee shop. She is in a band and probably has lots of dates and fans, but I keep picturing us together, and not just sexually – making dinner, going on hikes, doing little couple-y things. I’m not sure why she’d want to go out with me, but I can’t stop thinking about her. – Fixated It’s the teenage fan-girl approach to being a man. (Are your bedroom walls plastered with photos of her that you took while pretending to check your phone?) Here you are imagining this woman running slow-motion through a field of daisies into your arms. The reality: She’s walking out of the coffee shop, probably without giving you a second thought. Yes, she might be out of your league. There’s a way to know for sure in seconds, and it’s by asking her out. Pining over a woman transforms her from a person to an unapproachable ideal. The more you grow your fantasy girl the more impossible it’ll be for you to speak to the real deal. If you want an imaginary something in your life, have an imaginary goldfish. Should things go badly, you could make it die an imaginary death and flush it down your imaginary toilet.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sad but true: A lot of people seem to be perpetually in a state of wanting what they don’t have and not wanting what they actually do have. I’m begging you not to be like that in the coming weeks, Aries. Please? I’ll tell you why: More than I’ve seen in a long time, you will have everything going for you if you want precisely what you do have – and are not full of longing for what’s unavailable. Do you think you can you manage that brilliant trick? If so, you will be amazed by the sublimity of the peace that will settle over you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the signs of the zodiac, Tauruses are the least likely to be arrogant. Sadly, in a related development, they’re also among the most likely to have low self-esteem. But your tribe now has an excellent opportunity to address the latter problem. Current cosmic rhythms are inviting you rather loudly and dramatically to boost your confidence, even at the risk of you careening into the forbidden realm of arrogance. That’s why I recommend Taurus musician Trent Reznor as your role model. He has no problem summoning feelings of self-worth. As evidence, here’s what he confessed when asked about whether he frequents music social networks: “I don’t care what my friends are listening to. Because I’m cooler than they are.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “If Mark Twain had had Twitter,” says humorist Andy Borowitz, “he would have been amazing at it. But he probably wouldn’t have gotten around to writing Huckleberry Finn.” I think you’re facing a comparable choice, Gemini. You can either get a lot of little things done that will serve your short-term aims, or else you can at least partially withdraw from the day-to-day give-and-take so as to devote yourself with more focus to a long-range goal. I’m not here to tell you which way to go; I just want to make sure you know the nature of the decision before you. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You now have a special talent for helping your allies tap into their dormant potentials and latent energy. If you choose to use it, you will also have a knack for snapping lost sheep and fallen angels out of their wasteful trances. There’s a third kind of magic you have in abundance right now, Cancerian, and that’s the ability to coax concealed truths out of their hiding places. Personally, I’m hopeful that you will make lavish use of these gifts. I should mention, however, that some people may resist you. The transformations you could conceivably set in motion with your superpowers might seem alarming to them. So I suggest that you hang out as much as possible with change-lovers who like the strong medicine you have to offer. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Publishing a volume of poetry is like dropping a rose petal down the Grand Canyon and waiting for the echo,” said author Don Marquis, speaking from experience. Something you’re considering, Leo, may seem to fit that description, too. It’s a project or action or gift that you’d feel good about offering, but you also wonder whether it will generate the same buzz as that rose petal floating down into the Grand Canyon. Here’s what I think: To the degree that you shed your attachment to making an impact, you will make the exact impact that matters most. Give yourself without any expectations. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Comedian Louis CK told a story about his young daughter. She had a fever, and he gave her some Tylenol that was bubble-gum flavored. “Ew-w-w-w!” she complained. Louis was exasperated. “You can’t say ‘ew-w-w-w,’” he told her. What he meant was that as a white kid in America, she’s among the most privileged characters in the world – certainly far luckier than all the poor children who have no medicine at all, let alone medicine that tastes like candy. I’m going to present a similar argument to you, Virgo. In the large scheme of things, your suffering right now is small. Try to keep your attention on your blessings rather than your discomfort. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I stumbled upon an engineering textbook for undergraduates. There was a section on how to do technical writing, as opposed to the literary kind. It quoted a poem by Edgar Allan Poe: “Helen, thy beauty is to me / Like those Nicean barks of yore / That gently, o’er a perfumed sea, / The weary wayworn wanderer bore / To his own native shore.” Then the book gave advice to the student: “To express these ideas in technical writing, we would simply say, ‘He thinks Helen is beautiful.’” Don’t take shortcuts like that, Libra. For the sake of your emotional health and spiritual integrity, you can’t see or treat the world anything like what a technical writer would. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Are you ready to start playing in earnest with that riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma? Are you looking forward to the rough and tumble fun that will ensue after you leap into the middle of that sucker and start trying to decipher its impossibly interesting meaning? I hope you are primed and eager, Scorpio. I hope you can’t wait to try to answer the question that seems to have no answer. Be brave and adventurous, my friend – and be intent on having a blast. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Lessons could come to you from unforeseen sources and unanticipated directions during the next few weeks, Sagittarius. They will also come in expected forms from all the familiar influences, so the sum total of your learning could be pretty spectacular. To take maximum advantage of the opportunity, just assume that everyone and everything might have useful teachings for you – even people you usually 

by Rob Brezsny
ignore and situations that have bored you in the past. Act like an eager student who’s hungry for knowledge and curious to fill in the gaps in your education. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The consuming desire of most human beings is deliberately to plant their whole life in the hands of some other person,” said British writer Quentin Crisp. If you harbor even a small tendency in that direction, Capricorn, I hope that in the coming days you will make a concentrated effort to talk yourself out of it. In my astrological opinion, this is a critical moment in the long-term evolution of your healthy selfsufficiency. For both your own sake and the sake of the people you love, you must find a way to shrink your urge to make them responsible for your well-being. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you go to California’s Yosemite National Park this month, you might get the chance to witness a reddish gold waterfall. Here’s how: At sunset, gaze up at the sheer east face of the rock formation known as El Capitan. There you will see what seems to be a vertical river of fire, also known as Horsetail Fall. I nominate this marvel to be your inspirational symbol for the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have the power to blend fire and water in novel ways. I encourage you to look at the photo here – bit.ly/fluidicfire – and imprint the image on your mind’s eye. It will help unleash the subconscious forces you’ll need to pull off your own natural wonder. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): After singer Amy Winehouse died, actor Russell Brand asked the public and media to scale back their derisive opinions about her struggle with intoxicants. Addiction isn’t a romantic affectation or glamorous self-indulgence that people are too lazy to overcome, he said. It’s a disease. Would you mock a schizophrenic for his “stupid” propensity for hearing voices? Would you ridicule a victim of multiple sclerosis for not being vigorous? I’m of the opinion that all of us have at least one addiction, although it may not be as disabling as Winehouse’s weakness for liquor and narcotics. What’s yours, Pisces? Porn? Sugar? Internet? Bad relationships? The coming weeks would be a very good time to seek help in healing it. Homework: You can read free excerpts of my recent book at bit.ly/HotExcerpts. Tell me your thoughts: Truthrooster@gmail.com.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's

1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

HEADS UP - February , 01

Jan. 19 Answers: Right

January 19 Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Klensch or Schiaparelli 5. Import-export pact: Abbr. 10. _ lazuli 15. Antagonists 19. Combine 20. Faux pas 21. Stirred up, as memories 22. Edge 23. Start of a quip by Mitch Hedberg: 5 wds. 27. Cataclysm 28. Microscopic animal 29. Poured 30. Forfeit 31. Factory machine 32. Ms. McEntire 33. Female demon 36. Textile goods 37. Peevish 41. Girl in a song 42. Fundamental 43. French composer 44. Obeisance 45. Wash against 46. Old Roman spirit 47. Hybrid animals 48. Kind of learning 49. Corroded 50. Buenos _ 51. Untamed 52. French department 53. Island east of Borneo 55. Farmyard sound 56. Shoulder ornament 57. Part 2 of quip: 4 wds. 61. Kick downstairs 64. Playing cards 65. Material for overlays 69. Levels 70. Aviary denizens 71. Mason- _ Line 73. Cariou or Deighton 74. Mrs. Herman Munster 75. For _ sake! 76. Quilt 77. Clothesline 78. Drawing of a kind, for short 79. Exposed

80. Jacks up 81. Container for oil 82. Rejoined 84. Porcelain ornaments 85. Praised 86. Mine entrance 87. Strop anagram 88. Male swans 89. Cummerbunds 92. Revise 93. Greek sea goddess 97. End of the quip: 6 wds. 100. Lab device 101. Organic compound 102. Tilestone 103. _ vital 104. Want 105. Disreputable 106. Hackneyed 107. Customary practice DOWN 1. Colossal 2. “Whatever _ wants...” 3. Land 4. Kind of battery 5. Fairly up-to-date 6. Ridge 7. Scuffle 8. Rocky outcrop 9. Certain Yankee 10. Brackish pond 11. Expect 12. Swimming hole 13. DDE, familiarly 14. Hides 15. Of sons and daughters 16. Put _ _ act 17. _ homo 18. Lean-to 24. Overdo it on stage 25. Prize name 26. Capital city in Asia 31. Puffs up 32. Take delight in 33. Pale shade 34. In a snit 35. Computer-game stage 36. Silvery fabric

37. Sense of taste 38. Seething 39. _ Dame 40. Online message 42. Fluid-filled sac 43. Bucolic 46. Household member 47. Sports events 48. Synonyms expert 50. Aids and _ 51. Gnats 52. Threshold, in psychology 54. Tropical tree 55. Decompression problem 56. Scarf 58. One 59. Brought into being 60. Concern of voters 61. Code word for “D” 62. Water brand 63. Liquefies 66. Audibly 67. Cut short 68. Wrapped up 70. Cousin to a tam 71. Fists 72. Noted lithographer 75. Church communities 76. Suspicion 77. Man on a mission 79. Moisten 80. Seraglio 81. Kind of knitting stitch 83. Guitar pedal: Hyph. 84. Follower 85. Like Daddy Warbucks 87. Worked at 88. _ saltpeter 89. Distort 90. Kind of hero 91. Offspring 92. Status quo _ 93. Romanov ruler 94. Some musical compositions 95. Smite 96. English queen 98. Compass pt. 99. Greek letter

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 

2012/02/02 (Thu)

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

THURSDAY

2

2012/02/03 (Fri)

FRIDAY

3

Bobby Valli -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke & Retro DJ w/ BMAX Entertainment -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Lojo Russo (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Lizard Skynard - Electric Machete - Blizzard at Sea -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Reverend Raven $ the Chain Smokin’ Altar Boys -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Stew & the Negro Problem -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL University of Iowa Jazz w/ the Cassius Goens Trio (7pm) - Stinky Jones - The Emilees - Peter Odegaard - Matthew Mesaros - Eli Blank Lueders (9pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA We the Gathered of Virtue - I Cry Wolfe - Pressing Forward - Destruction of a Masterpiece (5pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Battle of the Bands Round 2: Orangadang vs. Jaiguru vs. Big as a Mouse -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Bob Marley Birthday Bash w/ Natty Nation -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Deja Vu Rendezvous featuring Paul Waters & the Lonesome Tears -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Deleted Scenes - A Lull - Healing Power -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL F. Stokes - Calliko - Wild Lyle -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Hap Hazzard -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Justin Morrissey & Friends -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kent Burnside & the New Generation -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Rose ‘n’ Thorns (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Lloyd Paulsen Band (5:30) - Hunter Station (9:30) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Matthew Santos - Briar Rabbit -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

Passions -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Patio -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA The Funk Daddies -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/04 (Sat)

Leon Redbone @ The Redstone Room – February 11
Dirt Road Rockers -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL G h o s t S c i e n ce - N u l ove - M at t Kylestewa - Hypntik -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Hairball - E11eventh Hour -Davenport RiverCenter, 136 E. 3rd St Davenport, IA Jason Carl -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA

Meredosia Road -Blu Shamrock, 311 S. 13th Ave. Cordova, IL On Distant Shores - Avian Swarm - Womprat -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Passions -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Rootless Experience -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Serious Business w/Ron LaPuma & the Peñas - Geezer’s Drafthouse, 1654 W. 3rd St., Davenport,IA Smooth Groove -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Tapped Out -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL The Karry Outz Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA The Pines CD Release Party -CSPS/ Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Twin Rivers (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/05 (Sun)

Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/06 (Mon)

Craig Finn - Mount Moriah -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA 2012/02/07 (Tue)

MONDAY

6

TUESDAY

7

Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Blues Cafe (6:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

SATURDAY

4

Bailiff - Subtle & Sudden - The Post Mortems -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Caught in the Act - Hotel Blackhawk 200 E. 3rd St, Davenport, IA Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Dennis McMurrin & the Demolition Band - Uniphonics -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Cowboy Indian Bear - Break Up Art -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Freddie Steenbock Duo (8am) -Davenport American Legion, 702 W. 35th St. Davenport, IA Manny Lopez Trio (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA

SUNDAY

5

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Guy Davis -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA Pressed And - Postfontaine - Alex Body -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL 2012/02/08 (Wed)

King of Clubz -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Lee Blackmon -The Grape Life Wine Emporium - Davenport, 3402 Elmore Ave. Davenport, IA

WEDNESDAY

8

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL

Continued On Page 26 

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke & Retro DJ w/ BMAX Entertainment -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Mike Cochrane (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Rozz-Vox Open Mic Night w/ Donnie Bobb -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL An Evening with Leon Redbone -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Back 4 More - Hillsdale American Legion, 402 Main St., Hillsdale,IL Bad Lil Dawgy -Racer’s Edge, 936 15th Ave East Moline, IL Cosmic -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st Ave Coal Valley, IL Dirt Road Rockers -Blu Shamrock, 311 S. 13th Ave. Cordova, IL Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 25
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Drum Circle (6pm) -Teranga House of Africa, 1706 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Produc tions Karaoke Contest -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night w/ Alan Sweet and Siri Hirth -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA The Stroehles - ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA Violet Lights -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Wednesday Night Jam Session -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/09 (Thu)

Rude Punch -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Fifth World -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Sam Knutson - John Waite -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL University of Iowa Jazz w/ the Hard Pop Quintet (7pm) - The Damn Choir (9pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2012/02/10 (Fri)

FRIDAY

10

THURSDAY

9

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Gone South - The Treats -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara and Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Battle of the Bands Round 3: Reelfoot Rift vs. The Last Glimpse vs. Shadow Storm -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Buddy Olson (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Chucho Valdés and the Afro-Cuban Messengers -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Cop Bar - Los Voltage - Might Accelerator - Fetal Pig - 100 Degree Centipede -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL

Hellwater - Ghost Hollow Road Squid’s Beard -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jay Nash -Thomas Tredway Library, Augustana College Rock Island, IL Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mississippi Heat -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Morning After -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran Church of Rock Island Parish House, 1600 20th St Rock Island, IL

Pressed And @ The Mill – February 7

People Brothers Band -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Red Rock-it -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Russ Reyman Trio (5:30pm) - Twin River (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL

The Damn Choir -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA Tronicity -Jammerz Roadhouse, 3729 248th St N Hillsdale, IL 2012/02/11 (Sat)

SATURDAY

11

A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Wooden Nickel Saloon, 2042 W 3rd St Davenport, IA

Gray Wolf Band -Jumer’s Casino & Hotel, 777 Jumer Dr. Rock Island, IL Jason Carl and the Whole Damn Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Ken Paulsen Orchestra w/ Darlene CASI (Center for Active Seniors), 1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Night People -Tommy’s, 1302 4th Ave Moline, IL Peter Cetera -Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Smooth Groove -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204 Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL Smooth Jazz Valentines Concert & Dinner w/ Steve Cole -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA

Songwriters in the Round (2:30pm) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Split Lip Rayfield - Head for the Hills -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Tapped Out -Legends - Aledo, 201 E. Main St. Aledo, IL The Fry Daddies (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL The Hold On Band -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA The Lovedogs - The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St., Davenport,IA Travis Tritt -Quad-Cities Water front Convention Center, 1777 Isle Parkway Bettendorf, IA Tri-Tones Jazz Ensemble -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL

Vodkaseven -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Wet Hair - Cuticle - Teenage - Idpyramid -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/12 (Sun)

SUNDAY

12

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Bottom Line Duo -Cedar Rapids Prairie High School, 401 76th Ave. Cedar Rapids, IA Emma’s Revolution CD Release Concert -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL 2012/02/15 (Wed) A Party to Go Karaoke Night -Stacks Bar, 525 14th St. Moline, IL Chris Koza -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Fat Dawgs Produc tions Karaoke Contest -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL In Tall Buildings - Cains and Ables - White Zephyr -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Jam Session -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012 

Five Bridges Jazz Band (10:30am) -Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel Davenport, IA Funday Sunday with Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Lorrie Morgan -Riverside Casino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Nashville Girl Thang (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman, Pianist (10am-2pm brunch) -The Lodge Hotel, 900 Spruce Hills Dr. Bettendorf, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch at Bix Bistro (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Hotel Blackhawk, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/13 (Mon)

WEDNESDAY

15

MONDAY

13

Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Live Lunch w/ Steve Couch (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA

One Night Stand Open Mic -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Open Mic w/ J. Night -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Zoe Keating -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA 2012/02/14 (Tue)

TUESDAY

14

River City 6 - ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA

Glenn Hickson (5:30pm) -O’Melia’s Supper Club, 2900 Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL Jam Night w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Nashville Girl Thang (3pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Old-Timey Blue Valentine’s Show: New Broom - Mutiny in the Parlor -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -The Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA

Talkdemonic - Skye Carrasco -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Troy Harris, Pianist (10pm) -Red Crow Grille, 2504 53rd St. Bettendorf, IA Wednesday Night Jam Session -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA 2012/02/16 (Thu)

Jam Sessions with John O’Meara and Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Jason Carl -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Karaoke & Retro DJ w/ BMAX Entertainment -The Pub, 4320 N. Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Rave On - A Night of Rock ‘n’ Roll -Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

On Distant Shores @ RIBCO – February 4
2012/02/17 (Fri)

FRIDAY

(8pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

17

Battle of the Bands Wild Card Round -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Toasters -The Redstone Room, Bucktown Revue -Nighswander The129 Main St Davenport, IA
atre, 2822 Eastern Ave Davenport, IA Charles Hayes Trio (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL David Ramirez & Harris Collection -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Great River Show Choir Invitational (5:30pm) -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Jazz After Five w/ the Ryan Smith Dan Padley Group (5pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA

Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Modern Mythology - EmJay -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Night People (5:30pm) - Jason Carl & the Whole Damn Band (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA North of 40 -Dew Drop Inn, 602 5th St Durant, IA Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Russ Reyman Trio (5pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Serious Business w/Ron LaPuma & the Peñas -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Summercamp Battle of the Bands -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA The Music of Dr. Joe Seng -Joe’s Club, 1402 W. 7th St. Davenport, IA The Whoozdads (noon) -Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bettendorf, IA 2012/02/18 (Sat)

Christopher Bell -Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL DrFameus -RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Funktastic Five -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Grand Larsony -Crabby’s Bar & Grill, 826 W. 1st Ave. Coal Valley, IL Great River Show Choir Invitational (8am &7:30 pm) -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Jason Carl -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Roadrunner’s Roadhouse, 3803 Rockingham Rd. Davenport, IA Kooby’s Karaoke -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Live Lunch w/ Christopher Bell (noon) -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Mutts -RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

THURSDAY

16

Soap -RIBCO,1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

SATURDAY

18

ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Fat Dawgs Productions Karaoke & DJ -Parker’s, 635 15th St Moline, IL Gaelic Storm -Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Stacy Earle - Mark Stuart -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Thumping Thursday w/ DJ Hypnotic and Patrick Rifley -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL University of Iowa Jazz w/ the Padley/Smith Quintet (7pm) - Stacy Earle & Mark Stuart - Tim Krien

Anna Vogelzang - Busted Chandeliers -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Rob Dahms & Detroit Larry Davidson (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Russ Reyman, Pianist (7pm) -Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Schitzengigles -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Tapped Out -The Office, 305 3rd St Sherrard, IL

Anthony Gomes -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

The Lustalots -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Sundogs -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA The Tailfins -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Zither Ensemble (10am) -German American Heritage Center, 712 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Camden Kaufmann Fundraiser w/ Scott Millage & the Devil’s Candy (2pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA 

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 19 No. 797 • February 2-15, 2012

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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Things we want you to know: While supplies last. Requires new account activation and a two-year agreement (subject to early termination fee). Agreement terms apply as long as you are a customer. Credit approval may apply. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies; this is not a tax or government-required charge. Additional fees, taxes and terms apply and vary by service and equipment. Double Reward Points: To receive first-month double reward points, customer must register for My Account or, if already registered for My Account, log in to My Account within 14 days of activation. Double points based on point value of all points earned during first 30 days after activation. Bonus points will be credited to customer’s account by 3/30/12. No cash value. Promotional phone subject to change. Smartphone Data Plans start at $30 per month or are included with certain Belief Plans. Application and data network usage charges may apply when accessing applications. Kansas Customers: In areas in which U.S. Cellular receives support from the Federal Universal Service Fund, all reasonable requests for service must be met. Unresolved questions concerning services availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation Commission Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Protection at 1-800-662-0027. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. See store or uscellular.com for details. ©2012 U.S. Cellular.

USC-ICON-12-001-4C_News

USC-PRD-11-261

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