AmbITion Scotland (2009

-
11)
Programme impact evaluation
conducted for Creative
Scotland
December 2011



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© Culture Sparks 2011

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Contents

Executive Summary 4
1. Introduction 11
2. AmbITion Scotland programme overview 12
2.1 Strategic objectives 12
2.2 Desired Outcomes 13
3. AmbITion Scotland-Programme participants 14
3.1 AmbITion Scotland - In Partnership 14
3.2 AmbITion Scotland - In Association 18
3.3 AmbITion Scotland – InVolved 28
4. Evaluation Process 34
4.1 Aims and Objectives 34
4.2 Methodology 35
5. Findings from the evaluation research activity 36
5.1 Findings from Initial Qualitative Research with
participants 36
5.2 Key Findings from the Mid-point Qualitative Group
discussions with Participants. 39
5.3 Key Findings from Quantitative research with Partners
& Associates. 47
5.4 Key Findings from research with Specialist Advisors.62
5.5 Summary of Key Findings from Online feedback from
events. 73
5.6 Scottish Centre for Emerging Technologies 78
5.7 Summary of comments from the AmbITion Scotland Team.
79
6. Conclusions and recommendations 84
6.1 Conclusions 84
6.2 Recommendations 86
Appendix A 89
Overview of AmbITion Scotland Online activity 89
Appendix B 95
Appendix C - Partners & Associates Online survey
Questionnaire 106


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Appendix D - Specialist Advisors Online survey
Questionnaire 111



Executive Summary

The AmbITion Scotland programme 2009-2011(funded by Creative
Scotland) had two strategic objectives - To promote a creative
environment through digital development and to create a
supportive environment for digital development - enabling
wider access to a specialist knowledge base.
Based on the information gathered and contained in section 5 of this
report, we consider that both of these objectives have been
successfully achieved. This was particularly the case for
Partners, and to a lesser degree with Associates (as could be
anticipated). In addition the open events clearly engaged
effectively with a broad range and high number of arts organisations
in Scotland.
The programme ran from autumn 2009 until autumn 2011, and consisted
of 15 Partner organisations (which were funded up to £50,000
each, subject to cohesive business cases, and which received 5 days
business case development consultancy), 40 Associate
organisations (which received 1 day of consultancy to complete a
digital audit) and a series of supporting events, workshops, web
casts and online resources, in which over 750 organisations and
over 1800 individuals participated.
The objectives of the evaluation were to –
- Gather feedback and input from programme participants in the
approach of ‘action research’, to assist with the
refinement, development and execution (especially at the
beginning and mid-point) of the programme to maximise the
opportunity for organisations to obtain the full potential
benefit from the programme.
- Gather feedback from participants who attended the open
sessions, events and activities – identifying the level of
relevance and interest of the session.
- Measure perceptions of the participants related to
achievement the stated programme objectives (at the end of
the programme).


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Additionally, feedback was also gathered from the Specialist
Advisors / Consultants, and the AmbITion Scotland team, to include
any insight and comments they wished to make in relation to the
outcomes of the programme, and any learning for the future.

A combination of qualitative and quantitative methods were used,
including –
- Individual qualitative depth interviews with organisations
prior to the programme commencing.
- Qualitative group discussions with organisations at the mid-
point.
- Post event, online evaluations (for each individual event).
- Web analytics to provide statistical information on the
interaction and use of digitally based communication
activity.
- End of programme quantitative surveys with Partners,
Associates and Specialist Advisors to create the maximum
opportunity for feedback from every organisation who
participated. As the technology capability in each
organisation increased during the programme, there was an
increased use of technology based research techniques.

In addition video case studies were created and featured on-
line (with participant permissions) illustrating the ‘learning
journey’ of development and to serve as inspiration to others
regarding the range and type of change possible.
www.getambition.com
Key points from the mid-point Qualitative research
• Arts organisations were aware of their limited resources (time
and money), when considering digital development in their
organisation. AmbITion Scotland was considered to provide them
the opportunity to build skills and carry out the digital
development that they knew was needed.
• It was recognised that outside help could be extremely useful
to help pinpoint where change is necessary and to prioritise
focus. Some organisation didn’t know, what they ‘didn’t know’
and therefore required very early support.
• The range of existing skills, knowledge and capabilities
amongst participants was noted (from ‘early adopters’ of
technology to those organisations who were more hesitant and
uncertain).
• Some instances of early collaboration had been lost when focus
shifted to delivering individual business plans. This was
regretted.


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• For participants only involved in webinars and road shows,
AmbITion was successful in providing general information,
knowledge and reassurance.
• Without any built-in mechanisms for following up after their
consultancy period ended, some Specialist Advisers were left
uninformed of progress or practical outcomes. More regular and
ongoing contact could have proven useful in the case of the
Partners, to assess whether organisations have progressed
appropriately.
• The research structure (focus groups held in Glasgow) was
considered limiting by those AmbITion Scotland participants
who were unable to attend, for various logistical reasons.
In order to overcome this issue, it was considered appropriate to
increase the use of technology in the research and evaluation
process, removing any logistical / distance issues from the
participation in the evaluation process.
The findings from this mid-point feedback were absorbed by the
AmbITion Scotland team, which led to an increased number of skills
development and training sessions. This included the development of
Video Case histories and more online content.




Key points from the end of programme quantitative research
with Partners and Associates
• A high proportion of Partners and Associates participated in
the evaluation research making the findings very robust.
• Most had become aware through marketing by Creative Scotland
(and previously, Scottish Arts Council), and many found the
initial application process to be ‘challenging’ and ‘thought
provoking’. The application process was considered to be
‘fair’.
• There were mixed experiences related to creating a ‘business
case’ with equal numbers finding it ‘difficult’ and easy’.
• There is clear evidence that the Partners and Associates had
obtained positive benefits from the programme (in line with
the programme objectives). These included –
- Improved levels of public engagement
- Increased organisational efficiency
- Improved and effective online audience participation /
communication


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- Development of content produced with digital tools,
delivered over new digital distribution channels and
consumed through digital services. In some cases this was
described as “ more attractive” content
- Training staff and assisting boards / senior management to
become more digitally aware
- Developing digitally based CRM / ticketing systems and web
sites.
- Changing working practices
- Raising technological capacity with integrated ICT
implementation

• The most common challenges were considered to be –
- Lack of time (for key individuals within the participants)
- Lack of resources (staff / money – especially Associates)
- Steep learning curve
- Staff changes in Partners / Associates, during the life of
the programme.

• The AmbITion Scotland team were highly valued, and the events,
seminars, workshops and web-casts were all considered to have
been very worthwhile.
Key points from the end of programme quantitative research
with Specialist Advisors
• The selection process for Specialist Advisors and the initial
application process were both considered to be ‘fair’, and most
found the preparation of a ‘business case’ with participants to
be ‘easy’.
• Specialist Advisors reported many of the same positive outcomes
from the programme as were identified by the Partners and
Associates.
• The AmbITion Scotland team were also highly valued – considered
to be approachable, professional, responsible, knowledgeable
and accountable, and ‘keeping the project on track’.
• The major challenges from their perspective were –
- Associate company engagement (to either fulfil the one day
consultancy and / or to continue to develop their project
without further support).
- Overcoming (what they perceive as) sector wide hesitation to
engage with technology.
- Staff changes (at participating organisations).
• Specialist Advisors suggested that clear criteria for success
at the outset of the process with the individual organisations
would have been beneficial.
• There was an observation from Special Advisors that frequently
practical and fundamental assistance was required by
participants (as opposed to the assumed ‘high level


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consultancy’ only). This was occasionally reflected in the
lack of detail in core business planning in some
organisations, emphasising the need for greater early support.
Key points from the event evaluation quantitative research
• Attenders came from around 750 different organisations across
Scotland, with over 1800 individuals either attending or
viewing the content live online. The archived material has
been accessed a further 11,000 times.
• Attenders included CEO’s (9%), Senior Managers (27%) and some
Artistic Directors (3%) indication the broad spread of
participant engagement with the subject matter.
• The majority (75%) considered the content of the activity to
be both ‘ interesting’ and ‘relevant’
• Event management criteria such as location, venues, facilities
and catering were all rated highly.
Key points made by the AmbITion Scotland team
• The team consider that the project has fulfilled its
objectives.
• The pace of change related to ‘digital issues’ is thought to
be relentless and it creates a demand for ongoing support as
well as short term intervention of specialists.
• Regular contact and feedback from programme participants and
stakeholders is important to keep evolving the nature and
structure of support required to provide the maximum benefit
to participants.
• They considered there is still substantial work to be done to
educate many senior managers, and Artistic Directors/ CEO’s
(and boards) in relation to fully harnessing the potential
opportunities created as a consequence of digital technology
development.
• A culture of sharing information, especially on less
successful initiatives should be encouraged.
• The combination of skills within the project made a major
contribution to its success – the mix of Specialist Advisors,
Hannah Rudman’s technical expertise, and the light touch
support and direction from Ashley Smith Hammond and Julie Tait
of Culture Sparks.
• Longitudinal, academic evaluation should be applied to the
programme as it seeks to deliver medium-long-term benefits.

Conclusion


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In order to evaluate whether this programme has achieved the
objectives and aims, we have compared the individual objectives,
with the evidence gathered via feedback from Partners, Associates,
Specialist Advisors and individuals who attended the events.
Based on the information gathered and contained in section 5 of this
report, we consider that both of the key objectives have been
successfully achieved. This was particularly the case for Partners,
and as could be anticipated, to a lesser degree with Associates. In
addition the open events clearly engaged effectively with a broad
range and very high number of arts organisations in Scotland.
Recommendations
These recommendations are made, in the event that the AmbITion
programme be repeated, developed or extended at some point in the
future.

• A number of organisations were frustrated and disappointed to
have missed the opportunity to participate fully as Partners.
This applied to many Associates and a number of organisations
who attended the events, and often related to not being aware
of the project in the early stages or not having sufficient
knowledge or time to prepare a more compelling application.
The awareness issue could be addressed by an increase in
marketing activity at the beginning of the programme.

• A ‘rolling’ process of applications across a longer time
period would also increase the reach of the project with
organisations being able to apply at the time appropriate to
their organisational development, without a ‘single’ deadline
for a limited competition.


• While the application process should be rigorous, and linked
to the aims of Creative Scotland’s Cultural Economy programme,
ideally the process should be simpler for applicants. A ‘light
touch’ support process would be beneficial in generating
ideas, refining thoughts prior to application.

• The variation in participation level (Partners up to £50,000 /
5 days consultancy – Associates no funding / 1 day
consultancy), could be bridged with greater flexibility in the
size / scope and funding level of individual projects.

• A number of organisations would have benefitted from
additional / specialist support at the very early stages of
the application process in order to assist them in focussing


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on appropriate aims and objectives, and in the development of
their application.

• Some organisations found the skills of their appointed
Specialist Advisor did not turn out to be an ideal fit. In
some cases this was not identified to the Project team by the
organisation. To overcome this issue a combination of
increased assessment prior to appointment of Advisors,
requesting ‘compatibility’ feedback once an Advisor is
appointed, and allowing greater flexibility and/ or a greater
number of Advisors who have a wide range of skills and
experience in the culture sector, would be beneficial.

• Capacity (internally within organisations) and lack of digital
knowledge and skills appear weak in many organisations.
Therefore the challenge may be to assist organisation
appreciate that they currently do not know, as part of the
early work to assist the development of digital development.
This relates not only to educating managers but perhaps also
with support / underwriting of risk to encourage embracing
change.

• Cross sector working can be highly effective, although bridges
are required between the culture and creative industries by
organisations and programmes such as Culture Hack Scotland,
NESTA and Culture Sparks to signpost and facilitate.

• The ‘ning’ online social network was not as effective as
desired as a networking and communication tool across
participants and Specialist Advisors and it became less
effective as the programme progressed. Other online networking
tools which offer greater integration should be considered.

• The ‘legacy’ resource is considerable and provision should be
made to ensure this continues to be accessible online.

• There was a desire from many participants to increase the
extent of collaborate across different arts organisations. A
forum to facilitate this demand should be considered.

• The anticipated benefits of including the Scottish Centre for
Emerging Technologies in the programme were not obtained
fully. This was due in part to changes in the funding and
structure of SCET during the programme, organisations not
having suitable projects and also the non-contractual
relationship of their involvement. Therefore perhaps more
formal agreements (e.g. service level agreement) between all
associated organisations would help avoid any variations in


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expectations. (Note: It should be noted that SCET involvement was not
funded via AmbITIon Scotland, - SCET is publicly funded by the SFC).

• Due in part to the self determined focus on IT infrastructure,
digital communication issues (including ticketing systems, web
sites and social media activity) and Customer Relationship
Management, there was less emphasis amongst the participants
in relation to creative development / creative outputs with
digital resources. This is perhaps logical in that the digital
infrastructure needs to be in place before it can be utilised
to fulfil creative potential, but it could be encouraged more
strongly in the future with stronger marketing / increased
consultancy emphasis towards Artistic Directors to help unlock
digital potential.

Note: For information. The programme has submitted monthly progress reports
to Creative Scotland throughout the project.
In addition the individual recipients of Partner funding are required to
provide direct reporting and evaluation to Creative Scotland with regard to
the use of the funds received.
1. Introduction

This document has been prepared to summarise the evaluation
activity which was commissioned by Creative Scotland in relation
to the AmbITion Scotland programme. This programme was launched in
Autumn 2009 and concluded in Autumn 2011.
In this report we will set out the aims and objectives of the
project and provide comment on the achievement of the objectives.
Evaluation research was conducted amongst participants, Specialist
Advisors and attendees at the events within the programme to
provide a broad and detailed overview.
The Culture Sparks staff members who conducted the evaluation
research were not involved in the delivery of the AmbITion
Scotland programme, and provide an independent perspective.
However, they did benefit from a close understanding of the
programme from colleagues, and attendance at a number of events.
This document compliments the regular monthly / quarterly reports
submitted to Creative Scotland by the AmbITion Scotland team, and
does not repeat that information.




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James Law
Associate Partner
Culture Sparks
December 2011







2. AmbITion Scotland programme
overview
2.1 Strategic objectives

The AmbITion Scotland programme was underpinned by two strategic
objectives:

A. To promote a creative environment through digital
development - AmbITion Scotland set out to provide expertise
and support for Scottish arts organisations over 18month
period to stimulate change by developing and exploiting the
use of digital technologies across all areas of their
organisation and artistic practice.

It was envisioned that by fully engaging with AmbITion Scotland,
arts organisations would build their own knowledge, access
specialist support networks, and develop methods to engage new
and more loyal audiences and plan for growth.
AmbITion Scotland aimed to encourage the leadership and staff
within the arts sector to develop the use of digital


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technologies enhancing an organisation’s own technical abilities
and capacity, harnessing the benefits of knowledge and best
practice in this rapidly expanding area.

B. Create a supportive environment for digital development
- enabling wider access to a specialist knowledge base

AmbITion Scotland was designed to bring together, arts
practitioners and researchers, leading thinkers, business and
digital experts throughout the programme. It set out to
consider creativity, artistic vision, business model
development, audience development and organisational development
in light of digital technologies and support arts and culture
businesses to use them to innovate and respond to a fast
changing, consumer driven, technological environment.
The programme was designed to draw on the past experience and
significant repository of best practice case studies resulting
from the AmbITion England project and to offer participation in
a widespread programme of professional development events and
seminars. These were aimed at facilitating knowledge transfer
amongst Scottish organisations, - locally and nationally - and
intended to create a professional support networks to last long
after the programme ended.


2.2 Desired Outcomes

A. Increased organisational effectiveness in arts
organisations through:

• significantly raised technology capability and integrated
ICT implementation

• changed working practices, job roles and organisational /
operational structures following the implementation of
digital development

• efficient, integrated, digitally-based customer
relationship management systems; ticketing systems;
websites; fundraising and other databases



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• trained staff, ‘digitally literate’ boards, and skilled
senior management teams in the implementation of new
technologies, business and artistic practices

B. Improved levels of public engagement with the arts
through:

• organisations acquiring better knowledge about existing
audiences

• organisations developing more attractive content that
potential audiences can easily find

• organisations being enabled to provide equitable access to
content for anyone with a connection to the internet,
including those with mobility, hearing and sight
impairments

• audiences being able to participate and communicate with
arts organisations effectively and deeply online

The programme was developed and delivered by the AmbITion
Scotland team consisting of Julie Tait, Culture Sparks
(Glasgow Grows Audiences), Hannah Rudman, Rudman Consulting,
and projectmanager Ashley Smith Hammond.





3. AmbITion Scotland-Programme
participants

There were three levels of engagement within the AmbITion
Scotland programme:
3.1 AmbITion Scotland - In Partnership



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This was the most in-depth change management aspect of the
programme. Organisations from across Scotland made bids
into a competitive fund (for up to £50,000) to support
change in their organisation throughout a 12 – 24 month
process, with five days of support from an external
Specialist Advisor / consultant. Fifteen arts organisations
were selected to participate at partnership level.


- Arika Heavy Industries
- Artlink Edin & Lothians
- Catherine Wheels Theatre Company
- Cove Park
- Craftscotland
- Cumbernauld Theatre Trust Limited
- Edinburgh Printmakers
- Helmsdale Heritage & Arts Society (Timespan)
- Horsecross Arts Ltd
- Promoters Arts Network
- RSAMD
- Scottish Poetry Library
- Stellar Quines Theatre Company
- Taigh Chearsabhagh Trust
- Woodend Arts Association & sound festival














The details of the scope of each of the projects are contained
in the following table. It should be noted that as the
individual projects evolved there were some changes in
emphasis and details to fit with evolving priorities and / or
opportunities.

Applicant
Organisatio
n,
Location,
Specialist
Advisor
Original Project Description Final project description


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Arika Heavy
Industries,
Edinburgh,
Anne Bonnar
To increase our ability to
deliver on our core aims of
engagement with experimental
ideas in art via organisational
development and extended
engagement activities.”
To increase artistic
experimentation, enhance public
engagement and develop more
sustainable operational systems
through web redevelopment, content
creation and management, new
customer relationship management,
event management and operational
systems development
Artlink
Edin
&Lothians,
Edinburgh,
Beth Aplin
“Artlink has a unique
opportunity to significantly
increase the engagement of
disabled audiences with the arts
by establishing networks of
experience using digital
technology through forming
strategic partnerships with key
organisations”
Further research and development of
a public facing customised digital
solution linked to EPPP technology
designed specifically for visually
impaired, deaf and hard of hearing
audiences of the arts in Edinburgh &
the Lothians, informed by their
experiences, and in collaboration
with arts providers and access
practitioners
Catherine
Wheels
Theatre
Company,
East Lothian,
Abigail
Carney
"embed an integrated approach to
digital development across the
organisation, focussing on
enhanced audience experience and
direct sales to venues and
promoters."
To develop a fully integrated
digital public engagement programme
and increase the organisational
operational efficiency through brand
consolidation and web redevelopment
to include range of virtual resource
spaces aimed at key audiences
Cove Park,
Argyll &
Bute,
Blether
Media, later
sulimented by
Hannah Rudman
" ensure that our remoteness
remains inspiring and not
isolating, we will embed digital
development to sustain our
resilience and build artistic
and wider communities"
Embed digital development to
increase resilience and build
artistic and wider communities
through web redevelopment, social
media marketing, improved digital
systems use organisationally and
integrated staff training programme
Craftscotla
nd,
Edinburgh,
Mike
Greenwood
“We aim to allow: audiences to
engage with the craft sector, us
to understand our audiences, a
positive shift in the way we
support the craft sector and the
generation of income.”
Web redevelopment to increase
audience participation, provided
dedicated resources for a community
of makers through new digitally
enabled subscription package,
introduce new customer relationship
management, an online shop and build
sustainable skills and working
practices
Cumbernauld
Theatre
Trust
Limited,
North
Lanarkshire,
Anne Bonnar

"An online audience interaction
programme will be developed, to
engage extant and emerging
audiences in a sustained digital
exchange throughout a series of
live performances."
Deliver a dynamic audience
development programme enabling
artists and audiences to connect and
collaborate using digital tools on
redeveloped website, including a
digital rehearsal space and an
online sales facility; integrate
customer relationship marketing with
new box office system, aligned to a
staff training programme and improve
operational efficiency through
purchase of new IT equipment


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Edinburgh
Printmakers
,
Edinburgh,
Taylor
Nuttall,
later
supported by
Hannah Rudman
& Chris
Elvery


We want to:-
A) enhance our operational
effectiveness by employing
digital systems to automate
administration systems
related to financial,
commercial, evaluation and
communication activities.
B) develop digital content to
engage a broader public in
our activities, services and
products.
Undertake web redevelopment to
incorporate online booking system
and online sales of stock linked to
new stock management system; an
online forum and social networking;
development and delivery of rich
media; and to research the use of an
online game to exploit EP's archive
Helmsdale
Heritage &
Arts
Society
(Timespan),
Highland
(Sutherland),
Adrian Lear

"Timespan will create an online
meeting place; linking culture,
heritage, people and their ideas
by enabling an exchange of
digital information in this
remote area."
Undertake web redevelopment
including an online meeting place; a
social network to develop a creative
community; facilitate digital
content production and exploitation
and undertake a digital development
staff training programme
Horsecross
Arts Ltd.,
Perth and
Kinross
Roger
Tomlinson
“Working smarter by harnessing,
connecting and augmenting
existing digital systems to
improve internal management
processes, enhance audience
understanding and develop
communication of artists with
audiences.”
Undertake web redevelopment to
enable deeper audience engagement,
create new digital content and
develop integrated event planning
and customer relationship management
systems
Promoters
Arts
Network,
Isle of Mull,
Danny Meaney

“To make web 2.0 functionality
the primary mechanism by which
PAN enables communication,
support and advocacy for its
membership of rural voluntary
arts promoters.”
Utilise web 2.0 technology to
deliver core organisational
objectives through population of
content, publicising and moderation,
development of a bespoke social
network platform and delivery of
digital literacy training and
support for membership
RSAMD,
Glasgow,
Sarah Gee
“To embed a digital culture
throughout the Academy from
learning through to practice
through to delivery and audience
engagement and interaction.”
Create www.rsamd.tv (working title),
a repository and social network
website, and undertake further
research and strategy development
Scottish
Poetry
Library,
Edinburgh,
Ewan McIntosh
"To create a model poetry
resource - innovative,
imaginative, integrated and
sustainable - reaching a wide
range of users, while also
expanding the SPL s income-
generating capacity."
Expand and consolidate web 2.0
practice, redevelop website,
introduce open source library
management system and customer
relationship management; generate
new revenue through development of a
digitally enabled Friends scheme


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Stellar
Quines
Theatre
Company,
Edinburgh,
Jane Hogg


“To become an entrepreneurial
hub for female-centric theatre
in Scotland, creating new
projects, training opportunities
and connections with audiences
and collaborators worldwide
through digital technology.”
Create a virtual hub for women in
theatre driven by a revamped content
management system, website with new
rich digital content, a creative lab
for artists and audiences and a
digital learning programme
Taigh
Chearsabhag
h Trust,
Outer
Hebrides,
Hannah Rudman
"Taigh Chearsabhagh aims to
break away from the boundaries
of location and communicate its
creative message to a larger
audience."
Undertake web redevelopment with
integrated content management and
customer relationship management
systems, enhance digital media
output and develop more strategic
social networking practice
Woodend
Arts
Association
& sound
festival,
Aberdeenshire
,
Dave Cummings


"Woodend Barn and sound aim to
create a rural digital hub
including remote networking
possibilities, interactive
audience and partner
communication and external
digitally transmitted events."
Create a digital hub in North East
Scotland, streaming otherwise
inaccessible events at Woodend Barn;
undertake web development to enable
distribution of interactive, rich
content; and undertake IT upgrade
and systems development


Note: These Partner organisations were required to submit individual reports
directly to Creative Scotland regarding the use of the funds awarded.

















3.2 AmbITion Scotland - In Association

Organisations who were unsuccessful in the full bid process had the
opportunity to benefit from a one-day diagnostic session from a
Specialist Advisor / consultant who provided advice to develop
their ideas further. The desire was that they would be able to


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action their initiatives within their own resources or seek
alternative sources of support to implement their plans.

Forty arts organisations were selected to receive Associate level
support which included 1 day of consultancy, and opportunity for
additional support from SCET
1
(Scottish Centre for Enabling
Technology). This was hoped to include the potential for feasibility
consultancy, prototyping and / or support via an intern to assist
progress, should the Associates choose to take up these
opportunities.

Aberdeen International
Youth Festival
Aberdeen Performing
Arts
An Lanntair
Booth Scotland Ltd Citizens Theatre Collective Gallery
Dance Base Ltd Dance Ihayami Deveron Arts
Dundee Contemporary
Arts
Dundee Rep Theatre Giant Productions
Glasgow Photography
Group / Streetlevel
Gallery
Glasgow Women’s
Library
Greenock Arts Guild
Limited
Inverleith House,
Royal Botanic Garden
Edinburgh
Macrobert / Tolbooth National Youth
Orchestra of
Scotland
New Moves
International Limited
North East Arts
Touring
Out of The Blue
Peacock Visual Arts Poor Boy Theatre
Company
Promote YT
(Scotland)
Puppet State Theatre
Company
Regional Screen
Scotland Ltd
Scottish Music
Information Centre
Scottish Youth Theatre Shetland Moving
Image Project
Smallpetitklein
Dance Company
Limited
Stills The Travelling
Gallery
The Work Room
Theatre Cryptic Traverse Theatre
(Scotland) Limited
Tron Theatre
Visible Fictions Wasps Artists’
Studios
Wee Stories
Y dance (Scottish
Youth Dance)



1
SCET was not funded via the AmbITion Scotland project, but is publicly funded by SFC and offered to support
the project and participants.


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Applicant
Organisation,
Location,
Specialist
Advisor
Original project
description
Project undertaken &
described in Mini Audit
Aberdeen
International
Youth Festival,
Aberdeenshire,
Dave Cummings

To develop digital management
and in-house design systems,
e-commerce capabilities.
Social media, SMS and e-
marketing audience engagement.
Produce more live streaming,
podcasting and interactive
opportunities.
AIYF aim to make the following
changes: updating hard and
software systems; an upgraded
website informative and
engaging for audiences; and a
robust IT system that can grow
with the organisation.

Aberdeen
Performing
Arts,
Aberdeen,
Roger Tomlinson

Engage, communicate and
entertain through online
streaming, projection and
multi-media displays
showcasing our performing arts
to new and existing audiences
creating an ambitious arts
experience.
Specification development -
personalisation, segmentation
and tailoring which the
system(s) will need to achieve,
together with the rich content
and dialogue and inter-action
desired by APA. Followed by:
Website re-development;
Ticketing and marketing CRM
systems; Rich Content Creation
Tools and Resources
An Lanntair,
Isle of Lewis,
Hannah Rudman

To increase meaningful
participation in the arts
through greater programmed
integration, more digital
content production, dynamic
access to and distribution of
content and increased
participation in project work
and information through the
education and outreach
programmed.
We would like to keep things as
simple as possible, enhancing
our web presence and making it
more interactive. This would
include a better online sales
offer and the introduction of
things like download-able
worksheets/gallery packs etc
for schools/community groups,
ultimately contributing to a
bigger online resource for
educational activities. Also,
increasing the amount of video
and audio material, interviews
with artists/musicians, virtual
gallery tours etc, that is
produced in-house as an added
extra to our other activities.
Booth Scotland
Ltd.,
Inverness,
Jane Hogg

To provide an innovative and
interactive platform for arts
and cultural organisations to
communicate with their
audiences more effectively;
bringing the arts sector and
arts audiences closer
together.
Note: this project has not yet
been complete due to
exceptional circumstances and
an extension has been granted
to Spring 2012.
Citizens
Theatre,
Glasgow,
Roger Tomlinson

To create a seamless online
experience for audiences that
brings together the
interactivity of our website
with a new online ticketing
experience that is personal,
efficient and builds loyalty.
"Roger Tomlinson spent a day
with The Citz team to define
the Functionality Specification
for a new ticketing and CRM
system. After the one day
consultancy, the Citz agreed to
share the process of procuring
a ticketing and CRM solution,
and with the assistance of
Culture Sparks and a sharing of
the costs, Roger Tomlinson was
engaged to advise and manage


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the process."
Collective
Gallery,
Edinburgh,
Taylor Nuttall

Collective will implement a
programme of web-based
participation to develop
audience engagement and inform
organisational development. A
public panel of web users will
evaluate and comment on the
research, development and
framing of individual
projects.
The idea is to improve our
offer to participants, artists
and audiences by being able to
offer more connection between
the programme and people...
Overall improved web
functionality, web maintenance
(more control of content
management system), podcast
episodes (is there a better way
then podOmatic, direct through
Collective’s website), text
messages to/from Collective
audience.
Dance Base Ltd.
Edinburgh,
Blether Media
To develop new audiences and
further Dance Base's
achievements in CRM & digital
technology by producing online
video content.
Due to internal capacity issues
Dance Base withdrew from
AmbITion Scotland
Dance Ihayami,
Edinburgh,
Cameron Leask

Develop a website that's an
interactive platform to
advertising to audiences and
clients, giving us the
opportunity to promote
ourselves to the widest market
available.
We want a website with a
suitable content management
system and client records
management system that is an
interactive (company and users)
business, operational and
audience development tool,
which will: Generating income;
Increase engagement of public
with DI; support collaborations
and partnerships; Create an
audience asset; Create a
‘virtual administrator’;
Project a professional image of
company.
Deveron Arts,
Aberdeenshire,
Chris Elvery
Deveron Arts aims to
significantly improve
opportunities for bringing our
artistic work, rooted in
Huntly's community, to a
global level trough
international networking and
critical engagement.
The majority of the
conversation and the focus of
the adviser's time was around
helping Deveron to develop a
new online marketing strategy
including the development of a
website with Content Managed
facilities to allow them to
control the output (this has
been difficult and problematic
in the past).


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Dundee
Contemporary
Arts,
Dundee,
Danny Meaney
To grow an increasingly rich
and live interactive dialogue
between our visitors,
customers and artists by more
effectively using rich media
and personal content
generation.
(1) A targeted piece of market
research to assess third level
students’ (FE/HE) entertainment
preferences and how they make
decisions with relation to
cinema entertainment. (2) A
short desk research exercise to
look at what other cinemas are
doing – suggest technological
requirements for development in
conjunction with a primary
research activity using an
online survey with existing
cinema Twitter followers.
Dundee Rep
Theatre,
Dundee,
Mike Coulter

To create an online creative
community through an internal
intranet and an external
social networking platform
that encourages audience
engagement with all Dundee
Rep’s activities.
Due to internal capacity
issues Dundee Rep withdrew from
AmbITion Scotland
Giant
Productions,
Glasgow,
Chris Elvery


Developing our digital needs
from simple everyday tasks
through to a new web based
arts project for children and
artists.
1. Given the haphazard state of
our current IT set up, this
needs to be the priority in
terms of time and money. 2. As
part of this we want to look at
CRM solutions because at the
moment all our contacts and
databases are split across
several different excel
spreadsheets and we have no
organisation way of keeping
track of correspondence etc. 3.
If there is time we would like
to look at pointers towards a
digital strategy.
Glasgow Women’s
Library,
Glasgow,
Ewan McIntosh
"An online community for
learners and learning
practitioners, providing a
safe, supported, online
environment for knowledge-
sharing and creativity for
women across Scotland."
SHORT TERM (1) ensure that all
staff are confident in both the
practical techniques and the
rationale behind our use of
both our revamped website and
the different social networks
(2) guidelines for our online
engagement. MED TERM (3) use
volunteer team to contribute to
our website and social networks
(4) develop our online digital
resources as part of our social
enterprise development LONG
TERM (5) increase the level of
digital content on our website
drawing on both the Library
collections and the lifelong
learning
Greenock Arts
Guild Limited,
Inverclyde,
Danny Meaney

To create a benchmark for best
practice in the use of
accessible technologies that
engage and empower audiences
and enhance operational and
sales efficiency.
The project is the design and
implementation of the
technology roadmap for the new
building


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Inverleith
House, Royal
Botanic Garden
Edinburgh,
Edinburgh,
Chris Elvery
Development and modernisation
of IT infrastructure to ensure
that Inverleith House remains
contemporary and accessible
while promoting meaningful
engagement with our
exhibitions and events
programme.
Inverleith would like to
develop a separate website for
Inverleith House (albeit linked
to the Royal Botanic Gardens
website). The production of
such a website would allow the
showcasing of exhibitions.
Would also like to develop
tours/ exhibition information
that could be made available as
an application on mobile
'phones.
Macrobert /
Tolbooth,
Stirling,
Dave Cummings

To understand, develop and
engage with the audience for
the arts in Stirling, through
the shared use of integrated
online, box office and CRM
technology.
TOLBOOTH: We wanted to use our
consultancy day to evaluate our
current online communications.
Looking at best practice and
gaining an insight as to which
areas to develop. Aim to
achieve a better understanding
of how to maximise the return
of social communication through
the use of limited resources in
response to budget cuts.
MACROBERT: The consultancy will
be used to evaluate the
effectiveness of our current
social media and web activity,
to bench mark it against other
organisation based on the
consultant’s experience and to
draw possible ideas for
improvement.
National Youth
Orchestra of
Scotland,
Glasgow,
Mike Coulter

We wish to develop a new
website to enable us to become
more interactive and
accessible in our
communications strengthening
public engagement and
benefiting a wide audience.
Due to internal capacity issues
NYOS withdrew from AmbITion
Scotland
New Moves
International
Limited,
Glasgow,
Hannah Rudman

The development of a digital
programme and online archive
that will work with the
existing National Review of
Live Art (digitised archive
University of Bristol’s
Theatre Collection). a one-
year post (Digitisation
Technician) at the University
of Bristol to complete the
digitisation of the NRLA up to
and including the 30th
anniversary edition, plus a 3-
year position (Head of Digital
Research & Development) within
the company developing the
NMI website to accommodate an
exciting new digital programme
and online archive.
Due to internal capacity issues
New Moves withdrew from
AmbITion Scotland


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North East Arts
Touring,
Aberdeenshire,
Abigail Carney
Through digital technology,
NEAT will become a more active
and connected network
interacting with promoters on
a higher level, developing
their skills, thereby
developing audiences.
To enable rural and community
venues to sell tickets and
record details of audiences
digitally in an easy to use and
compact way; and to utilise the
data in the same way as larger
venues with full box office
systems. NEAT wants to design a
hand held device (that could be
compared to chip and pin
machines, or train conductors
ticket machines), that would
run a CRM box office software
programme.
Out of The
Blue,
Edinburgh,
Mark Daniels
We aim to create a virtual
shop window for the work and
services of artists and
creative industries housed in
OOTB studios.
To develop and engage new
audiences through the use of
digital media technologies and
to improve OOTB’s branding and
online presence.
Peacock Visual
Arts,
Aberdeen,
Mike Coulter
Improve our use of digital
technology better to deliver
our artistic vision, make us
more effective and to give
audiences more opportunities
for active engagement.
Due to internal capacity issues
Peacock withdrew from AmbITion
Scotland
Poor Boy
Theatre Company
Angus,
Blether Media
Developing use of technology
to improve communications,
increase organisational
effectiveness, establish and
engage new audiences and make
space for creation of new
creative content… During our
work with digital artists
during Playrooms it became
apparent that other creative
practitioners expected a
higher level of digital
outputs, equipment, literacy
and expertise on Poorboy's
part.
Needed to streamline &
implement basic critical
business systems.
Promote YT
(Scotland),
Edinburgh,
Mike Coulter
To create a web portal that
serves the diverse stake
holders in Scottish youth
performing arts providing
information, empowerment and
growth opportunities to the
sector.
In the short-term we wish to
create the basic structure of a
portal site which would have
the following benefits: A
‘youth’ micro-site; A
‘practitioner’ micro-site, with
online foruming; A ‘public’
micro-site. In the medium to
long-term we would look to
appropriately resource and
maintain the portal site in
order to meet the changing
needs of the sector.


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Puppet State
Theatre
Company,
Edinburgh,
Abigail Carney
Puppet State Theatre Company
aims to develop more mobile,
virtual and integrated
operations, sensitive to the
needs of audiences.
We would like to use digital
media to lever our
organisation’s capacity to work
as a small Scottish theatre
company and develop our work
and our profile at home and
internationally: a)
Promotionally: building
merchandise sales and
multimedia content into an
improved, more accessible
website; b) Administratively:
as a small team honing our
virtual office capabilities; c)
Artistically: digital
developments are likely to be
at the heart of future shows
Regional Screen
Scotland Ltd
Scottish Borders,
Mike Coulter
Regional Screen Scotland aims
to develop digital methods and
systems tailored to the
challenges of communicating
and interacting with
cinemagoers in rural and
remote communities."
Commissioned and jointly
developed a new web site for
Regional Screen Scotland & a
separate site for the Screen
Machine (with integrated
ticketing and mapping) using
Wordpress. Started using
MailChimp, Facebook, twitter,
flickr. Transferred staff accts
to google mail.
Scottish Music
Information
Centre,
Glasgow,
Sarah Gee
To revolutionize the ways in
which the Scottish Music
Centre presents and delivers
the material in its
collections to a world-wide
audience
SMC wants to present online
resources more coherently, with
more context with accompanying
interpretive materials tailored
to different kinds of user, and
potentially accessed in a range
of formats via a range of
devices. it will integrate of
newly-digitized sheet music and
recordings into SMC’s website,
and online catalogue, allowing
users to directly view and/or
listen to these resources
online. Then create more
educational materials around
this resource.
Scottish Youth
Theatre,
Glasgow,
Chris Elvery

Development of digital
information and communication
technologies, comprehensive
database and record keeping
systems integrated with
communication applications to
support effective
communications and efficient
operations.
Development and segmentation of
customer communications across
existing digital platforms.
Design, implementation and
evaluation of new digital
platform specific to 15-25s
audience. Development and
streamlining of existing
platforms in line with user-
focused digital communications
and marketing efforts.
Shetland Moving
Image Project,
Shetlands,
Hannah Rudman
To establish and develop a
virtual, interactive, globally
accessible digital archive of
heritage and contemporary
moving images.
This project is in its infancy
and is currently unfunded and
the project leaders are not yet
constituted in any way as an
organization. Therefore they
don't have any IT or confirmed
plans for IT. Next steps
described in SMIP Feasibility
study and project plan.


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Smallpetitklein
Dance Company
Limited.
Dundee,
Jane Hogg
Our ambitious aim ensures
digital technology is embedded
at the heart of our
organisations activities,
discovering new ways to
engage, interact and connect
with audiences.
We would like to stream one our
performances over the internet
to allow new ways of
discovering our work. We want
to create a buzz about our work
by getting our dancers to
provide video blogs during the
rehearsal process and back
stage access at our
performances. We want to
develop an app that will serve
as an interactive teaching
resource. We would want to
develop a generic template for
this teaching resource that can
be updated with information
regarding current touring
programmes over the years.
Through this app participants
would be able to book and pay
for our range of community
classes and receive a small
discount by booking in this
way. We would like to develop
a new, more interactive website
that suits both a younger and
adult audience.
Stills
Edinburgh,
Mike Coulter
Stills will grow audiences
through: a CMS to host
critical and artistic content,
an integrated toolbox to
improve administrative
capacity, and an online social
network.
This digital developmental
process aims to position Stills
at the cutting edge of digital
developments, equipping us to
exploit new technologies as and
when they occur. Not only will
it improve organisational
efficiency and engender an
open-source ethos, it will also
provide the platform for Stills
to be a leader in integrating
creative digital arts practice
within real and virtual
contexts. Stills will be well-
positioned for major national
and international partnerships,
providing creative and critical
exchange at the highest level.
Streetlevel
Gallery
(Glasgow
Photography
Group),
Glasgow,
Mark Daniels
Street Level will develop its
current digital capacity to
enhance organisational
effectiveness, artistic
production and to extend
learning on the work of the
gallery.
Social media changes & strategy
creation / implementation;
Change website to an CMS system
w a customised skin & search
function (w staff support &
training). Long term: host
artists projects online; Design
and integration of 'widgets'
(task specific custom plug-ins)
to bolster social networking,
buying online, mailing list
management, user input etc.
The Travelling
Gallery
Edinburgh,
Mark Daniels
To increase the accessibility
of the Travelling Gallery
programmes and tours, to raise
our profile locally,
nationally and globally and to
streamline our organisational
procedures.
Mobile broadband/online
facilities on TG: for
organisational uses & for
artistic programming. Website
developed to be more
interactive. Marketing through
social networking etc.


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The Work Room
Glasgow,
Mark Daniels
To develop an interactive
digital forum for artists
which: provides space for
debate and sharing of
information, online resources,
international networking, and
remote collaboration.
Note: the consultancy was
completed in March 2011,
however, despite chasing on a
number of occasions,
confirmation of the outcome of
the activity has not been
obtained from The Work Room..
Theatre
Cryptic,
Glasgow,
Blether Media
Cryptic aims to retain and
enhance the audiences
experience of a Cryptic event
by rewarding their loyalty
through providing personalised
digital ‘Cryptic Treats’.
Cryptic treats delivered via QR
codes
Traverse
Theatre
(Scotland)
Limited,
Edinburgh,
Chris Elvery
A 21st Century Customer
Relationship Management
system, with a dynamic website
at its heart, ensuring that
digital communications become
the dominant communications
channel at the Traverse
Traverse Theatre has a website
(www.traverse.co.uk) which was
designed as a temporary measure
and is no longer fit for
purpose. Some of the issues,
were well known to the current
developer who will also be part
of this process. The Traverse
would also like to develop a
strategy for wider digital
communications, including new
content development (video,
audio etc.), maximisation of
social networking and
integration and use of other
innovations for exploitation of
content.
Tron Theatre,
Glasgow,
Dave Cummings

To develop a fully integrated
ticketing and online
operation, running from a
single database, which allows
for greater customer
relationship management and
increased organisational
efficiency.
Integrate our existing social
media activity through creation
of a blog to maximise the
potential for reaching the
widest audience possible;
creating active engagement with
our customers and a more far-
reaching digital audience.
Introduce a system for
tracking, reporting and
monitoring this online activity
and for monitoring the impact
of increased online activity on
box office and catering revenue
Visible
Fictions
Glasgow,
Mike Coulter

By creating an interactive
online community we will give
a voice to all who interact
with us, becoming a leader in
online audience development
strategies.
Utilise social media to reach,
communicate and inspire our
target markets. As a rapidly
increasing network, VF is
excited by the creative ways in
which to use social media
Wasps Artists’
Studios,
Glasgow,
Cameron Leask
To engage and energise Wasps
national community of artists
and build one-to-one
relationships with Open
Studios attendees and the
wider public
To use digital technology to
build a strong online community
of Wasps’ Artists and to
develop an all-year-round
relationship with Wasps Open
Studios Weekend attenders and
our wider mailing list.


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Wee Stories,
Edinburgh,
Chris Elvery

Streamline existing IT systems
with regards to on site and
remote access and review and
expand the use of digital
media in engaging with
audiences.
1. Requirement for a more
customer focussed website which
allows greater engagement 2.
Improved infrastructure
Y dance
(Scottish Youth
Dance),
Glasgow, Cameron
Leask
YDance would greatly increase
it’s effectiveness in all
aspects of its business
through the introduction of a
centralised customer
relationship management
system.
The adoption of a centralised
customer relationship
management system for the whole
organisation




3.3 AmbITion Scotland – InVolved

Other arts organisations across Scotland were invited to sign up,
contribute to and draw from the knowledge base from the
programme’s inception. This was intended to provide access, on
and off line, through a regular programme of events, training and
networking and further skills transfer.
It was planned that Scottish cultural organisations would benefit
not only from the AmbITion Scotland activity but also from the
original information and network created through AmbITion
[England]. This was a self-selecting group, who responded to
open invitational marketing by email, and word of mouth across
the sector, and direct invite by the AmbITion Scotland team.
A programme of 30 separate events took place over an 18 month
period.

The following activity and events were undertaken -
Date Event Speaker(s) Attende
es
Online
Viewers
On
demand
Viewers
28/01/10 Getting
Digital
Introductory
Half Day
Edinburgh
Kyle McRae (Blether
Media), Hannah
Rudman, AmbITion
36 7 126
04/02/10 Getting
Digital
Introductory
Half Day
Glasgow
Kyle McRae (Blether
Media)
51 N/A NA


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10/03/10 Inverness
Getting
Digital
Roadshow
Bill Thompson (BBC)
Jane Hogg (Arts and
Theatres Trust
Fife)
James Wooldridge
(Ludus Dance)
50 18 JH – 11
JW - 9
06/05/10 Dundee
Getting
Digital
Roadshow
Prof. Paul Harris
(University of
Abertay)
David Stark (RSNO)
Clive Gillman (DCA)
30 17 903 total
27/05/10 Stirling
Getting
Digital
Roadshow
Ewan McIntosh (No
Tosh, 4IP)
Andy Catlin (Queens
Hall)
Julia Denby (GLOW)
and Paul Gorman
(Visible Fictions)
49 45 JF & PG –
291
AC – 384
EM - 722
10/06/10

Edinburgh
Getting
Digital
Roadshow
Bill Thompson (BBC)
Katy Beale (Tate)
Martin Reynolds and
Faith Liddell
(Festivals
Edinburgh)
82 25 BT – 672
FL/MR – 439
KB - 738
25/02/10 Webinar 1:
Listening
Online
Mike Coulter
(Digital Agency)
32 17 21
25/03/10 Webinar 2:
Talking
Online
Chris McGuire
(Occupancy
Marketing)
27 24 9
22/04/10 Webinar 3:
Tracking
Impact
David Sim (Open
Brolly & 4TM)
31 50 659
29/07/10 Webinar 4:
Mobile
Gavin Dutch (Loc8
Solutions)
24 50 1643
16/09/10 Webinar 5:
Managing
Multiple
Accounts
Damien Smith (ISO) 29 44 205
21/10/10 Webinar 6: E
Copywriting
Jonathan Melville
(Reel Scotland)
30 64 198
2/11/10 AmbITion
Scotland
Networking
Day
Facilitator: Ben
Young
Speakers Hannah
Rudman and Andrew
Akhtar (SCET)
50 na NA
18/11/10 Webinar 7:
CRM
Roger Tomlinson 21 57 382
10/1/11 Host Your Own
– Stellar
Quines, Hands
On Audio
Visual
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
6 NA NA



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Filming And
Editing
4/2/11 Spring
Training 1 –
Google &
Facebook
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
14 NA NA
22/2/11 Spring
Training 2 –
Rich Media
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
11 NA NA
23/2/11 Webinar 8 –
Open Data
(with
Festivals
Innovation
Lab)
Roland Harwood &
Ben Werdmuller
40 30 708
1/3/11 Host Your Own
– Woodend
Barn,
Practical
Copywriting
for Online
Channels
Sam Thom 8 NA NA

18/3/11 Host Your Own
– Deveron
Arts, Open
Source Design
Tools
Dan Austin 7 NA NA

25/3/11 Host Your Own
– Giant,
Digital
Marketing
Strategy
Chris Elvery 7 NA NA

18/3/11 Spring
Training 3 –
operational
effectiveness
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
6 NA NA

30/3/11 Digital 2011
(in
partnership
with
Interactive
Scotland &
SCET)
Various 300+ 40 Am – 985
Pm – 400
Panel - 606
31/3/11 Digital 2011
CEO Breakfast
(in
partnership
with
Interactive
Scotland &
NA 40 NA NA



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SCET)
1/4/11 Host Your Own
– Scottish
Music Centre,
Practical
introduction
to field
recordings,
soundwalks
and
soundmaps.
Ian Rawes (UK Sound
Map)
Tim Nunn (theatre
maker and artist)
Tim Cooper
(composer and sound
designer)
29 NA NA

6/4/11 Host Your Own
– Cryptic,
Advanced
Twitter
Training
Mike Coulter 10 NA NA

15/4/11 Spring
Training 1 –
Google &
Facebook
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
5 NA NA

20/4/11 Host Your Own
– Stills,
Social Media
workshop
Barry Dewar 12 NA NA

25/5/11 Spring
Training 2 –
Rich Media
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
11 NA NA

1/6/11 Names and
Faces –
networking
NA 7 NA NA

2/6/11 Spring
Training 3 –
operational
effectiveness
Hannah Rudman &
Erin Maguire
12 NA NA

6/7/11 Webinar 9 –
Copyright &
IP
Ken Marr (Targeting
Innovation)
26 65 363
6/7/11 Names and
Faces –
networking
Edinburgh
NA 13 NA NA
3/8/11 Names and
Faces –
networking
Glasgow
NA 4 NA NA
7/9/11 Webinar 10 –
Five Minute
Theatre,
content
Marianne Maxwell
(NTS)
Robert Dawson Scott
(STV.TV)
Hannah Rudman
51 68 558


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partnership
case study
(in
association
with Glasgow
School of
Art)
(Envirodigital)
7/9/11 Names and
Faces –
networking
Glasgow
NA 12 NA NA
5/10/11 Names and
Faces –
networking
Edinburgh
NA 2 NA NA
18/11/11 Webinar 11 &
Workshops –
Digital
Fundraising
(in
partnership
with Arts &
Business
Scotland and
in
association
with Glasgow
School of
Art)
Sarah Gee (Angel
Shares)
Rachel Beer
(Beautiful World)
45 49 -
Total Total
number of
attenders
at events
1220
Total
number of
live
webcast
viewers

602
Total
number of
online
views ( to
Nov 2011)

11,032


A total of 745 different organisations (and over 1800 individuals)
participated in this aspect of the programme, with the archived
online material being accessed over 11,000 times. The names of these
organisations are shown in appendix 1.


In addition to the events, a number of other resources were
developed as part of the programme. This included a series of web
sites, ‘How to...’guides, social marketing tools, and video mini
case studies developed as a result of feedback research to assist
with skills development and communication issues.


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Resource Purpose / focus Author Usage statistics
Getambition.com Central
information forum
and signposting
AmbITion Scotland
team
Visits
26406
Absolute Unique
Visitors
16465
Resources.getambit
ion.com
Searchable,
usable receptacle
for AmbITion
Scotland learning
materials
AmbITion Scotland
team
1845 visits
1133 unique visitors
(period 15/9/10-
31/10/11)
Toolkit.getambitio
n.com
Resource to guide
users through the
“AmbITion
approach” of
organisational
change
AmbITion Scotland
team
1702 visits
1102 unique visitors
(period 1/1/10-
31/10/11)
Connections.getamb
ition.com
Searchable,
useable database
of participants
in the AmbITion
Scotland
programme & their
areas of digital
work
AmbITion Scotland
team
317 visits
190 unique visitors
(period 1/2/11-
31/10/11)
Getambition.ning.c
om
Social network
for arts
organisations
interested in
digital
development
AmbITion Scotland
team
769 members (3/11/11)
Facebook.com/getam
bition
Social network
for arts
organisations
interested in
digital
development –
alternate
platform
AmbITion Scotland
team
380 lifetime likes
128,596 post views
(period 1/1/10-
31/10/11)
Twitter.com/getamb
ition
Social network
for arts
organisations
interested in
digital
development –
alternate
platform
AmbITion Scotland
team
1932 followers
(3/11/11)
1696 following
(3/11/11)
1005 tweets (1/11/09-
31/10/11)
1492 tweets total
(3/11/11)
Flickr.com/getambi
tion
Photos from
AmbITion Scotland
events
AmbITion Scotland
team
8407 views
How To Guide 1 Webcasting Hannah Rudman 70 (unique page
views)
How To Guide 2 Geolocation Ewan McIntosh 149 (unique page
views)
How To Guide 3 Implement CRM Roger Tomlinson 175 (unique page
views)
How To Guide 4 Open Source Marcus Wilson &
Hannah Rudman
286 (unique page
views)
Mini Case study Cryptic AmbITion Scotland
team
30*
Mini Case study Promote Youth
Theatre
AmbITion Scotland
team
32*
Mini Case study WASPS AmbITion Scotland
team
33*
Mini Case study Giant AmbITion Scotland
team
12*
Mini Case study Citizens theatre AmbITion Scotland
team
31*
Mini Case study Stills AmbITion Scotland
team
53*
Mini Case study Regional Screen
Scotland
AmbITion Scotland
team
68*
Mini Case study ATT Fife AmbITion Scotland
team
78*
Mini Case study Woodend Barn AmbITion Scotland
team
83*
Case Study video Stellar Quines AmbITion Scotland
team
131*
Case Study video ATT Fife AmbITion Scotland
team
101*
Case Study video Taigh
Chearsabhagh
AmbITion Scotland
team
128*
Partner webcast –
AMA Conference
20/7/11 Jerry
Yoshitomi
(Meaning
Matters(,
Matthew Cain (
Channel 4), Will
McInnes (Nixon
McInnes)
AMA / Creative
Scotland
Day 1: 276
Day 2: 163


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*Figures are limited to the period 3/11/10 – 3/11/11. Blip.tv figures only
available for most recent calendar year.
4. Evaluation Process

4.1 Aims and Objectives
The aim of the research was to engage with participants –
a – prior to the programme starting
b – at the programme mid point
c - at the end of the programme

The objectives were to –
- Gather feedback and input (especially at the beginning and
mid point) in the approach of ‘action research’, to assist
with the refinement, development and execution of the
programme to maximise the opportunity for organisations to
obtain the full potential benefit from the programme.

- Gather feedback from participants who attended the open
sessions, events and activities – particularly the level of
relevance and interest of the session.

- Gather perceptions on the benefits of participation.

Partner webcast –
AMA Conference
20/7/11 Jerry
Yoshitomi
(Meaning
Matters(,
Matthew Cain (
Channel 4), Will
McInnes (Nixon
McInnes)
21/7/11 Jane
Finnis
(Culture24(
Sebastian Chan
(Powerhouse
Museum)
AMA / Creative
Scotland
Day 1: 276
Day 2: 163
Partner webcast –
British Council
Showcase Digital
Day 2011
Digital
Theatre/NTLive!/W
atershed
Sadler’s Wells /
Hoipolloi /
Envirodigital /
National Theatre
Wales
British Council Session 1: 155
Session 2: 292
Partner Webcast –
FST Emporium
Hannah Rudman FST 114
Innovation Case
Study Videos
Edinburgh
International
Book Festival
AmbITion Scotland
team
86


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- Measure perceptions of the participants related to
achievement the stated programme objectives.

- Where possible, the approach of ‘action research’ was
adopted to feedback knowledge and information to the
AmbITion Scotland team, during the life of the project to
facilitate continuous development and improvement.

Additionally, feedback was also gathered from the Specialist
Advisors / Consultants, and the AmbITion Scotland team, to include
any insight and comments they had in relation to the outcomes of the
programme, and any learning for the future.

4.2 Methodology
We have used a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods with
a sample of programme participants across the range of activities.
This has included –
- Individual qualitative depth interviews with organisations
prior to the programme commencing.

- Qualitative group discussions with organisations at the mid-
point.

- Post event, online evaluations (for each individual event).



- End of programme quantitative surveys with Partners,
Associates and Specialist Advisors to create the maximum
opportunity for feedback from every organisation who
participated. As the technology capability in each
organisation increased during the programme, there was an
increased use of technology based research techniques.
- Web analytics to provide statistical information on the
interaction and use of digitally based communication
activity. A summary report on this is included in Appendix
A.


In addition video case studies were created and featured on-
line (with participant permissions) illustrating the ‘learning
journey’ of development and to serve as inspiration to others
regarding the range and type of change possible.
www.getambition.com




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The above research process compliments the monthly reports
from the programme team to Creative Scotland. These provided
details of progress, activity, and feedback from participants
and highlighted areas where the programme evolved in line with
evolving priorities. These reports also included social media
activity. This document does not seek to replicate the
information already provided to Creative Scotland over the
course of the programme.












5. Findings from the evaluation
research activity

5.1 Findings from Initial Qualitative Research
with participants

Depth interviews were conducted with a sample of Associates and
Partners, at the beginning of the programme, in order to explore a
number of key themes:
• Motivations & Aspirations - organisational needs and
objectives
• Technology - how it is used, systems in place, audience
information and staff skills

A total of 16 in depth interviews took place with ‘Associates’ and
‘Partners’


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Partners - Catherine Wheels, Woodend Barn, RSAMD, PAN, Taigh
Chearsabhagh, Timespan.
Associates - Peacock Visual Arts ,North East Arts Touring (NEAT),
Promote YT, Traverse, Giant, Workroom, NYOS, Cryptic, Greenock Arts
Guild, Stills.


5.1.1 Motivations
All recognised that the programme was a unique opportunity to access
digital development support and resources.

Each organisation was aware of the need to use new tools and
technology, and how they should focus on this in order to develop
audiences, raise awareness and stay competitive. Many organisations
felt they needed an audit to review existing technology/digital
practice to identify how their resources should be deployed in the
future.

The ‘rural’ organisations who participated in the research – Woodend
Barn, NEAT, Taigh Chearsabhagh and Timespan all highlighted the
capacity for technology to break down geographical barriers, which
had motivated them to get involved in AmbITion Scotland.


5.1.2 Aspirations
Building upon existing knowledge, skills and confidence were the
overarching aspirations for all AmbITion Scotland participants.
Organisations had different levels of technical experience and
knowledge, ranging from NEAT who admitted they were “not very clued
up” to Cryptic who “try and be one step ahead of the rest of the
industry” – as a result of this, aspirations varied considerably.

Partner organisations recognised that the five days of consultancy
would be a major catalyst for digital developments, where as the
Associate organisations tended to have aspirations focussed on
improving efficiency and maximising their potential.



5.1.3 Technology
How it is used
For many organisations there was no in-house IT support and this
limited how technology was used – often leading to time being
wasted. However, larger organisations, such as the RSAMD benefit
from having a dedicated IT department to rely on. This demonstrated
that a robust IT infrastructure is a foundation upon which other
developments can be built.


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Organisations use a variety of systems and software, mainly for
managing their contacts and finances, creating marketing materials
and backing up their administration information.

Most participants had a good understanding of what a CRM (Customer
Relationship Management) system was, however, apart from the Royal
Conservatoire of Scotland (formerly) RSAMD) who used fundraising
package Raisers Edge, none of the organisations interviewed had such
a system in place. Even though CRM systems were generally perceived
as being costly and labour intensive, most participants thought that
such a system would improve communication, customer service and
potentially fundraising within their organisation.

Staff Skills
All participants identified staff skills gaps regarding using
technology and recognised that they needed to become more skilled in
order to increase efficiency.

Most staff appeared to have developed their skills ‘on the job’ and
had not participated in any formal systems or software training.
However, those who are part of forum or a member of an Audience
Development agency seemed to have benefitted from more regular
training.

In terms of future training, those with more advanced skills in
using technology and social media were interested in metrics (tools
for monitoring and evaluating performance), and also coding.

Audience Communication
The main methods of audience communication used by participants were
– website and e-flyers. In addition, there was a trend of using
networks - offline (e.g. Young Audiences Scotland) or online (e.g.
forums and discussion groups) to facilitate audience communication.

Most of the organisations had experimented with social media, but it
was not viewed as the main channel of audience communication. It was
considered that social media plays a role in growing awareness of
their work, rather than generating ticket sales.

Some of the more technology focused organisations had experimented
with mobile phone communications, but found this to have limited
success.

Audience Information
Organisations do not appear to be using technology to collect
audience information, and continue to use traditional methods such
as paper questionnaires or comments books.



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Those who do collect audience information are not inclined to share
it, unless they are part of a collective group such as Young
Audiences Scotland or the Highlands and Island Museum Forum, which
facilitates the sharing of informal feedback.

It is evident that organisations are keen to collect more audience
information by improving systems/mechanisms used.

5.2 Key Findings from the Mid-point Qualitative
Group discussions with Participants.

Four focus groups were held in Glasgow in January and February 2011
to consult with the four types of participants engaging with
AmbITion Scotland:
• Associates (with one day of allocated consultancy)
• Partners (with five days of consultancy and grant funding)
• Specialist Advisors
• Involved members -who had participated in events and online
(drawn from the wider AmbITion Scotland mailing list)
Each focus group was recorded and transcribed. The qualitative data
was subject to a content analysis looking for crosscutting themes
within and across the different groups.
5.2.1 Achieving the aims of AmbITion Scotland.
As previously stated, the aims of the AmbITion Scotland programme
are:
• Promoting a creative environment through digital
development
• Creating a supportive environment for digital development
- enabling wider access to a specialist knowledge base.

Within the context of these two overall aims for AmbITion Scotland,
there was a strong message from the focus groups that the process
had been more supportive than creative.
The Specialist Advisors particularly commented on the fact that a
lot of their work had been tied up in teaching organisations the
basic ‘nuts and bolts’ of digital technology. Rather than developing
radically new ideas, the advisor’s role was very much one of
handholding and getting some of the barely digital organisations up
to a minimum level of competency. It could be argued that creative
aspirations will flow more readily once the base technology


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capability and capacities are in place, so developing this aspect of
the sector first could enhance creativity later.
There has clearly been a lot of mutual support and information
sharing – knowledge transfer between peers, although much of this
may have been behind the scenes. Both Partners and Associates agreed
that there hadn’t been any truly creative output thus far, but that
once plans are implemented this might change. Those who had clear
aims for participating were also focused more on organisational
effectiveness than creativity. It was hoped that these practical
steps would then allow for creative output further down the line.
Organisations engaging only with the wider events felt that they
were unable to comment on AmbITion’s strategic aims. However the
overall programme was seen as being worthwhile and an invaluable
source of information, with its online resources and webinars. For
them AmbITion had equally been about building skills and changing
practices.
5.2.2 Application process and Business Plans.
For participants who missed the deadline for applying for Partner or
Associate level engagement, there was frustration of not having
heard about the programme sooner. As funding opportunities are
always going to be competitive, Associates also acknowledged the
difficulties in improving the application stage. However where very
similar programmes had been proposed, Associates would have
appreciated some more transparency and feedback on why the selected
organisation had been awarded Partner funding.
One suggestion that was repeated several times was to arrange some
light consultancy up front before the application process to help
organisations articulate what they actually wanted. This might have
consisted of a day spent with advisors (speed-dating, surgeries
etc.) so that organisations could speak to specialists for ideas on
how to improve their applications. Advisors also supported this
suggestion, arguing that many of the associations seemed unable to
articulate some of their ideas early on during the consultancy.
Had more support and group training taken place pre-application,
there would have also been the possibility of identifying common
aims and themes between organisations, and potentially even going
down a cluster-application route. These Partnerships could have been
something very small, specific and bespoke, or they could have been
linked by organisational size, geography, art form etc. More than
anything else, the focus groups expressed this missed opportunity of
knowledge sharing and collaboration at the early stages of the
programme.


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This sentiment carried through to the business plans developed at
Partner level, where focus group members commented on what a number
of them considered to be a “brutal” turnaround period. (Note: this
is obviously subjective relative to other priorities, and perhaps
highlights the issue of a single deadline for applications). Many
felt that the time allocated to business cases after being selected
was not long enough, and that there was not enough flexibility built
in as plans inevitable evolved during the course of the consultancy.
5.2.3 Relationship with advisors
The consultancy days spent with Specialist Advisors received the
most mixed feedback from the focus groups. While seen as largely
supportive and enthusiastic, advisors were often lacking specific
technical knowledge. This suited some who were looking for larger,
more strategic development, but frustrated others who had hoped for
more immediate, practical outcomes.
Where organisations were matched up with a suitable advisor, the
consultancy days were a highly supportive environment to learn and
experiment within. However several problems were also flagged up. In
one particular case a mismatch occurred where the advisor’s
speciality was a skill-set that the organisation already had
covered. In this instance a better matching process and skill-set
audit would have been appreciated early on. (Note: following this
finding, participants in the programme were reminded that a
mechanism for changing advisor had been set up.)
Another mismatch occurred because of timing, where an organisation
had already been engaging with mobile technology development prior
to AmbITion, and due to their own deadlines had to proceed with this
separately rather than develop it further within their consultancy
days.
The Specialist Advisors that responded were also conscious that the
majority of their days were spent on basic ‘nuts and bolts’. Their
suggestion was for AmbITion to offer more practical group training
early on to bring everyone up to a consistent level of digital
competency.
For Associates who only had one day of consultancy, the time
allocated seems to have helped the majority to tease out some ideas
regarding their digital development. Despite the initial
disappointment of not having been awarded Partner-level funding,
there was also recognition that a lot can be achieved with just a
day’s consultancy. It also gave them a wider access to specialist
knowledge in terms of hints, tips and contacts.
One advisor that had worked with three Associates commented that it
was almost pointless pitching the Associate level consultancy as one


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full day, as this was almost always going to be split over several
hours instead. A suggestion was made to consider alternative ways of
allocating time to organisations, so that the process can be a
little more flexible.
5.2.4 Knowledge and learning events
The focus groups reported that the majority of the various knowledge
and learning events were well run and motivating. Many valued the
social element of the road shows, as they were able to engage with
other sector organisations. The webinars and live-streamed events
were also seen as being informative and often time-efficient, with
remotely connecting participants not having to travel across
Scotland to attend them. Apart from some teething issues with sound
and connectivity early on, live-streaming facilities were accessible
and easy to use. The main criticism of attending live events online
had to do with scheduling them in into normal working hours. Many
found this time-management aspect slightly awkward, trying to devote
their full attention to the events and simultaneously being
unavailable to colleagues in the office. As a result the facility to
go back to recorded events at a later date was highly valued by
some, while others preferred watching live, with the ability to ask
questions and participate in live chat.

Some focus group members also commented that they while they had not
been able to attend all webinars, they had actively promoted them to
other members of staff within their organisations. In the case of
one part-time staff member who could not travel due to health
reasons, it had proven to be a valuable and enjoyable experience.
Others commented that it was a challenge to attend as an individual
and then feed back to the rest of their organisation. The most
positive responses clearly came from instances where the knowledge
and learning events provided attendees with either very practical
skills (such as using web or video tools), or where the wider
organisation made a conscious effort to engage in the training as a
team.

5.2.5 Online Social Network – (the “ning”)
While other online resources were highly valued, the online social
network (“ning”) was less valued and participants seemed to place
much more value on more direct relationships with advisors and each
other (phone bank, face-to-face consultancy and collaboration).
In particular there was an awareness of the lack of traffic on the
site. While no criticisms were levelled at its functionality or


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purpose, this lack of activity often caused users to drift away
after their first few visits. Any spare time was much more readily
spent focusing on proposals than searching for answers on the ning.
Some users seem to have visited it around the time of their business
plans, but this was to access resources and information rather than
to speak to people and contribute to the community.
In instances where focus group members had posted comments on the
ning, either to get answers to a specific question or just to seed a
general conversation, they had received no replies. This reinforcing
silence seems partly due to the reality of platform loyalty and the
old habits that you have to break to make the ning one of your daily
digital communication tools.
(Note: some group respondents may have had inappropriate
expectations from the ning and may have misunderstood its role –
indicating that clearer communication may have been helpful.
However, another key aspect was that the ning did not easily
integrate with other online tools and may this have led to a
reduction in reference and use.)
5.2.6 SCET
All focus group members that engaged with SCET on some level found
them to be incredibly useful in providing practical answers to
queries, and a fresh perspective on the business plan development
carried out with Specialist Advisors. The advice that SCET provided
was also valued because they were not seen as having a vested
interest as a preferred supplier or provider.
However many Partners also felt that they had been left uninformed
of the availability of SCET, either directly by the AmbITion team or
by their individual advisors. (Note: this perception is despite
multiple communications on the subject including emails and
featuring in webinars). Most of the organisations that had managed
to arrange helpful meetings with SCET had done so proactively.

5.2.7 Programme Highlights
The message from both advisors and organisations was that
communication and interaction between organisations was one of the
overriding highlights of AmbITion. In particular November 2010’s
networking event was singled out as having had a fantastic buzz and
positive atmosphere in the room amongst the participants. It
demonstrated that organisations benefitted from feeling like they
were part of a larger community, and knowing what their peers were
up to for comparison or collaboration.


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Organisations would have hoped for more of this throughout the
programme, suggesting that it gave them the confidence and
motivation to take the next step. Because of the strong appeal of
their content, many of the road shows and webinars would have also
worked well as standalone events beyond AmbITion Scotland.
The Specialist Advisors also considered that the Host Your Own
Training is a very positive initiative because with one training
initiative, you’re not only hitting the AmbITion participants but
many other organisations outside of AmbITion, and therefore address
the objectives of collaborating and sharing amongst the wide sector.
5.2.8 AmbITion Scotland team
For those engaging with AmbITion as Partners or Associates, the team
was found to be very accessible and approachable. Focus group
members who were at a very basic stage of their digital development
mentioned that it was comforting to deal with a team that spoke a
common language. Many also found the presentation style at the
various hosted events very enjoyable. However a few gaps in
communication were also flagged up regarding the role and
availability of services such as SCET, the phone bank etc. Several
Partners were unaware of the phone bank even at the time of the
focus groups, or felt that they had not been directly told about
SCET’s remit within the AmbITion programme.
In the case of one organisation who felt that they had been poorly
matched with their Specialist Advisor, the issue was never really
brought to the team’s attention. Although there might have been
willingness on AmbITion Scotland’s side, the organisation felt that
there wasn’t really a mechanism for feeding back and that perhaps
the nature of the programme didn’t allow for this. It was difficult
to know whether it would be a good fit until they met their advisor,
and after being allocated organisations also had no idea who the
other Specialist Advisors might be. (Note: this issue was addressed
with advice and reminders related to the mechanism for changing
advisor).
5.2.9 Organisational Change
One key challenge facing some organisations was issues surrounding
wider organisational buy-in, particularly for Associates. For
individuals in arts marketing roles, the ongoing challenge was to
show their boards that digital development is fundamental to the
whole organisation, and not just about marketing. In this context
AmbITion was seen playing an important role in providing significant
weight to their cases.
The focus groups commented that there was a collective energy to
AmbITion, revealing that this was a genuine trend that needed to be
pushed forward. This added further weight to individual internal


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lobbying by showing that the rest of the sector was going in the
same direction.
However some focus group members felt that the decision-making still
had to come from above, and that if their chief executive or other
senior members had attended some of the events, some further
organisational change might have been possible. The Specialist
Advisors agreed with this, arguing that for a certain size of
organisation requires some digital expertise on the board.
One of the advisors highlighted one of his Associates that had only
got to the point of getting their invitation to tender sorted. At
the end of his consultancy period, all of the work seemed to stop
because the organisations simply didn’t have time in their diaries
to carry the work forward. This stopped any chance for
organisational change.

5.2.10 Future of AmbITion Scotland – what could it do
better?

The legacy of the AmbITion programme run in England was mentioned as
a significant online resource, and many organisations referred to
this during the application stage. All focus groups agreed that it
would be a loss for the AmbITion programme to stop, at least without
some kind of legacy support. Specifically the continuation of road
shows, webinars, case studies and the phone bank were all seen as
valuable learning tools for the arts sector.
The majority of focus group members reported coming away from road
shows and webinars feeling excited and motivated. The primary reason
for this was the feedback and ideas that they were able to get from
interacting with other arts organisations. As a result most of the
improvements already suggested have featured increased
collaboration, case studies and mutual learning throughout the
programme.
One specific Associate organisation realised that the Partner that
had received funding for a very similar programme had simply written
a better and more articulated application. This admittedly might
have been because they wanted to develop their ideas but were
initially unsure of exactly what they wanted. More upfront
consultancy to tease out ideas and help organisations articulate
these during the application process would have been welcome.
The focus groups also highlighted a slight division between the
courses hosted for Associates and Partners. Despite not having been
awarded funding, several Associates agreed that they would have
benefitted from some of the training courses that were run for


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Partners only (e.g. writing briefs for web development), as this
would have helped with their overall knowledge building. (Note: this
was actually available online for all).
The advisors also wondered if there might be scope for increased
collaboration between each other. Where organisations had specific
requirements (such as CRM) that an assigned advisor had limited
knowledge on, some time could have been allocated away to another
advisor. (Note: this was envisaged and possible within the programme
structure). This of course would have assumed equivalent day rates,
but could potentially provide an opportunity to pool Specialist
Advisor resources slightly better.
5.2.11 Conclusions from the mid-point focus groups
Arts organisations across the board are acutely aware of money and
staff time as limited resources, and have to factor that in when
considering a way forward for their own digital development. In that
respect AmbITion provided them a space away from other
organisational pressures, in which they could build skills and carry
out the digital development that they often knew they needed.
A strong message from the focus groups was that AmbITion in their
opinion was ideally about a ‘journey together’, and that while there
had been some instances of collaboration early on, this had been
lost when focus shifted to delivering individual business plans.
For participants only involved in webinars and road shows, AmbITion
was successful in providing general information, knowledge and
reassurance. Several of these organisations mentioned that they do
engage in digital development, but are perhaps not in a place to
expand on that just now. For them it AmbITion has been about
affirmation of moving in the right direction through hearing about
the experiences of other organisations at networking events, case
studies etc.
Without any built-in mechanisms for following up after their
consultancy period ended, specialist advisers were left largely
uninformed of any practical outcomes to date. Regular contact one
month, three months or six months down the line could have proven
useful. Especially in the case of the Partners, there is arguably a
role for advisors to stay involved after that initial period to
assess whether organisations have spent their money correctly and
wisely.
However, particularly for Partners, there was a strong sense that
the business plans and funding applications were just an initial
stage, and that the programme is only just starting now as
organisations go off to work on implementation with web
developers.(Spet / Oct 2011)


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The research structure (focus groups held in Glasgow) was the
subject of comment from those AmbITion Scotland participants who
were unable to attend, for various logistical reasons.
In recognition of this issue it was considered appropriate to
increase the use of technology in the research and evaluation
process, removing any logistical / distance issues from the
participation in the evaluation process.






5.3 Key Findings from Quantitative research
with Partners & Associates.

In order to maximise evaluation feedback from Partners and
Associates, and to reflect the increased digital capabilities within
organisations, an online survey approach was used to provide
quantification of opinions, while allowing a series of open
qualitative comments.
Email invitations (and reminders) were sent to all registered
contacts within the organisations.

5.3.1 Achieved sample.

Partners – 16 individuals, from 13 of the 15 Partner organisations
participated in the research. This represents over 87% of
organisations and is therefore extremely robust and accurate
information.
Associates – 19 individuals, from 16 of the 33 Associate
organisations participated. This represents around 50% of all
Associates and again is very robust and reliable information.
The online approach taken enabled greater participation (and
therefore accuracy of findings) than was originally suggested in our


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evaluation proposal, where we anticipated including feedback from
around a third of Partners and Associates.


5.3.2 Initial awareness and marketing

Most participants (60%) recall being made aware of the AmbITion
Scotland programme by email or newsletters from Creative Scotland
(SAC). The remainder were less clear but recall word of mouth
discussions, and emails from other arts organisations including
emails from Culture Sparks.
There were a few suggestions on how to improve the marketing (from 6
people out of the 35 respondents). These included telephone
marketing, direct mail marketing, provide greater depth of detail to
clarify the specific nature of the digital focus of the activity,
and being more challenging in content
For example - “ I suppose it’s the challenge of getting people to
stop and think for a minute. Ask pertinent questions. Arrestingly.
Perhaps impertinently!” – (Associate).


5.3.4 Initial Application Process
The initial application process was managed by Creative Scotland,
(Scottish Arts Council) not the project team. Respondents were asked
to identify the words of phrases which applied to their experience
of the initial application process.

Words / phrases Overall Partners Associates
Challenging 40% 44% 37%
Thought
Provoking
34% 56% 16%
Straightforward 26% 31% 21%
Complex 23% 13% 32%
Clear criteria
for success
20% 19% 21%


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Frustrating 20% 19% 21%
Inspiring 17% 25% 11%
Confusing 17% 13% 21%
Easy 3% 6% 0%
Base 35 16 19

Partners were more likely to have considered the experience to have
been – ‘Challenging’, ‘Thought Provoking’, ‘Straightforward’ and
‘Inspiring’ (compared to Associates).
While Associates also found the process ‘Challenging’, they were
more likely to have seen it as ‘Complex’ and ‘Confusing’.

Only one individual considered the process to be ‘Easy’.



Base: 35 Partners / Associates



The greatest number participants considered the process to have been
‘Fair’ – either ‘Very Fair’ or ‘Quite Fair’ - (17 individuals),
while only 2 individuals considered the process to have been
‘unfair’ and explained their reasons as follows –


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“We felt disenfranchised from the scheme as we were not
admitted to the main element. Although we were able to
discuss this with the people running the scheme and continued
to work on it...it was increasingly difficult to sustain
engagement as time went on” (Associate)

“It was a bit frustrating that we were not supported to do
the part of our project that was artistic led – the feedback
being that it was not clear enough. When (we thought) the
point of that part of the project was that it was meant to be
experimental” (Partner).

A number (9 individuals) were unable to advise if they considered it
‘Fair’ or not, most commonly because they had not been involved in
the application process.





5.3.5 Creation of a Business Case.

Of those who had to create a Business case in support of their
application (26 individuals), a substantial proportion – around a
third (9 organisations)- found this to be difficult (quite or very).
This was balanced by a similar number (10 individuals) who found the
process ‘Quite Easy’.



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Base 26 Partners / Associates



Those individuals who indicated they considered it to be difficult
were asked to identify “how this could have been made easier?”. The
following comments were made -

“Creating a Business Case is very time consuming, especially for
a small company such as ours with very limited resources (3
staff, 2 of whom work part-time). We could have definitely done
with more time. Also, we were trying to create a business case
for what is essentially an experimental project. As a result a
lot of what we were proposing was always likely to change, or
have limited initial evidence to support possible outcomes, ROI
etc. At times I felt there was a bit of a mismatch between our
aspiration, AmbITion and plans for the project and the formal
Business Case structure we were being asked to respond within. A
simplified business case format with an emphasis on the research
and development side would have been welcomed. Also, we had a
good relationship with our consultant who was extremely helpful
when it came to putting the Business Case together - reading,
suggesting changes, providing advice etc. If this had not been
the case I think we would have struggled to make it as solid as
it was” (Partner).



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“I think the greatest difficulty was the deadline, and the
feeling that we needed more time. I realise that this made us
focus, but some elements might have been thought out more
thoroughly. Working with a consultant was very useful - but this
did make the process necessarily longer due to the need to
meet/correspond/plan with them, and turning the whole business
Case around in the timeframe was tricky.” (Partner).


“ Not sure this why I answered quite difficult. My comment is
more relation to the fact that making a good business case is
something that isn't easy - and in a way never should be”
(Partner).

“I think it was difficult because the organisation wasn't fully
aware of the areas for development until the work began with our
advisor - which began the process of really examining the
organisation as a whole. It was difficult in how time consuming
it was to complete the research and articulate this - but I don't
think this could have been made any easier. It was an essential
examination of the organisation” (Partner).

“It was clearly advertised that AmbITion was about making a step
change to your organisation. However, I focussed on the audience
development aspects of our work - perhaps this was because the
fund was being administered by Culture Sparks* who I associate
with being an audience development agency. However, I realised
during the AmbITion programme that we could have applied for
funding to support us with improving our operational IT systems
which could have fundamentally improved the effectiveness of our
organisation. It would be fantastic if AmbITion had somehow been
a two stage process where you get free consultancy, then can
pitch for funding one you realise what the potential is. However,
this may have not been possible?” (Associate) (*note: this was a
misconception as this aspect was administered by Creative Scotland)


“Our organisation simply did not have the resources or capacity
to take on the additional work - we thought we did, but with the
project running at the same time as cuts to our funding any
additional time we had was expended on lobbying councillors and
MSP's” (Associate)







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5.3.6 Contribution of AmbITion Scotland to Partners and
Associates.

Respondents were asked to identify the extent to which the AmbITion
Scotland had contributed to a range of issues within their
organisation. These issues reflected the overall aims and objectives
of the AmbITion Scotland programme. Therefore these responses are
very important to understand the perceptions of the individual
organisation in relation to the programme fulfilling the overarching
aims and objectives.
At an overview level, 61% of all responses indicated that
participation in AmbITion Scotland had made a positive contribution
towards the programme objectives within their organisation, in
comparison with 31% of responses which indicated ‘little or no’
perceived contribution.
Partners were more likely to indicate a positive contribution (69%),
in comparison with Associates (54% positive contribution). This is
logical given the greater level of engagement and funding received
by Partners.

Base 35 Partners / Associates
Partners were more likely to indicate ‘substantial contribution’
linked to ‘improved levels of engagement’ (31%). ‘enabling audiences


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to participate online (25%)’, ‘developing more attractive content’
(38%) , ‘obtaining efficient, integrated , digitally based CRM
systems’ (38%) and raising technology capacity and integrated ICT
implementation’ ( 38%).
All of these indicated the development of content produced with
digital tools, delivered over new digital distribution channels and
consumed through digital services.

Associates were more likely to indicate ‘some contribution, but more
benefit anticipated’ in relation to improved levels of engagement’
(68%), ‘enabling audiences to participate online (74%)’ ‘training
staff (58%), ‘developing more attractive content’ (42%) , ‘obtaining
efficient, integrated , digitally based CRM systems’ (37)% and
raising technology capacity and integrated ICT implementation’
(37%).


Base 35 Partners / Associates

The areas where the AmbITion Scotland activity has lower levels of
contribution were ‘Acquiring better knowledge about existing


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audiences’ and ‘providing equitable access to anyone with an
internet connection – mobility, hearing, sight impairments’.





5.3.7 Attitudes towards the knowledge and learning
events

The majority of Partners and Associates were very positive in their
attitudes towards the programme of knowledge and learning events
which has taken place as part of the AmbITion Scotland programme.
In overview, they were ‘professionally staged’, were ‘relevant’,
‘interesting’, have left ’a legacy’, and many would have liked to
attend ‘more’ events.
A fuller evaluation of this subject by attenders to the events is
included at section 5.5 of this document.
Base 35 Partners / Associates


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5.3.8 Attitudes to various elements within the
programme

There were mixed views on the ‘helpfulness’ and ‘use’ of a number of
aspects within the programme. In particular the ‘How to guides’,
’web casts’ and ‘Case studies’ were seen as ‘helpful’ and had been
‘used’ by both Partners and Associates. The Facebook page’ was more
likely to have been seen as ‘helpful’ by Associates.
The majority of both Partners and Associates had not ‘ posted a
question on the ning’, ‘appointed an intern to work on the
programme’, ‘made connections via the connections site’ and had not
used ‘the phone bank’.

Respondents were given the opportunity to expand and give more
details in relation to these elements. Comments included –
“There was a rush of social networks springing up all over the
place for a while. In the end, nobody has time to hop from one to
the other. Facebook pages seemed to be the best way forward
rather than ‘nings’, but lately many of us are planning to leave
FB and migrate to google+. It's a fickle old world.” (Partner)



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“The resources and support sessions were excellent -
unfortunately our lack of capacity meant we weren't able to make
full use of them” (Partner)

“Some of the items listed weren't even on my radar - not sure if
that's something to consider in terms of site layout, information
overload and ease of use, or just that we have under-used the
resources available through the Ning site simply due to
organisational demands on time.” (Partner).

“The 'ning' network never felt as if there was enough active
engagement from others to make it worthwhile spending the time to
engage with it ourselves - ironic given the nature of the
programme...” (Associate).

“There are so many social networks/e-marketing facilities which
need updating that I found the ning to increase my time in front
of the computer rather than get out there and do stuff with
people/chat on a personal level.” (Associate).

“Simply not enough time to participate in these things which
seemed of doubtful benefit to us” (Associate)

5.3.9 Attitudes towards the AmbITion Scotland team

Respondents held a very positive view of the AmbITion Scotland team
– ‘professional’, ‘knowledgeable’ and ‘responsive’, with most
considering ‘they communicated’ well, and ‘kept the project on
track’.
This was the case for both Partners and Associates.



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5.3.10 The major challenges

The most common issues indicated as the ‘major challenges for their
organisation in relation to participating in the AmbITion Scotland
programme’ were related to:
- ‘lack of time’,
- ‘lack of resource’ (staff / money),
- ‘steep learning curves’ and
- ‘staff changes’ during the life of the project.
These issues are explained in greater detail by the open comments
made by respondents.

Partner Comments -

“We issued an invitation to tender but despite being widely
advertised, and tenders coming from overseas and elsewhere in the
UK we were very disappointed in the quality and did not award a
tender, delaying the process considerably - it's still not
finished. In the absence of much helpful input from our


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Specialist Adviser we ended up writing our own application and
our own invitation to tender. Perhaps other partner organisations
had more assistance than we did.” (Partner)

“Mainly just getting our heads around a totally new way of doing
something. We are converts to digital technology, having been
luddites, but it can be quite mind blowing at times because of
the speed and extent of the changes and/or possibilities it
offers. Also, finding the extra resources (people, time, money)
to really achieve everything we want to achieve is a challenge.
AmbITion Scotland investment is a kick start, but we will need
more to really get motoring and exploit all the things we think
we could. Also trying to integrate our existing work into the new
work proposed through the AmbITion programme can be a challenge,
both in terms of finding artists who want to go on that journey
with us but also in terms of working out what is appropriate and
what is not. It has made us think a lot about who and what we are
and would like to be. Also, the whole project is taking us a lot
more time to achieve than we thought it would. I think this is
inevitable with something so different to what we did before, but
also we are a tiny company so it can be hard to keep on top of
all things at the same time” (Partner)

“Getting organisational buy-in to delivering the project - it's
one thing to be told departments will participate, it's another
to actually secure staff time and contributions. Second major
challenge is conservative culture - despite recent advances many
staff are more comfortable to do things in 'old fashioned' ways
than to learn new things and step out of their comfort zone.”
(Partner)

“Finding the time to implement the project on top of existing
workloads; delays in implementation due to inability to focus on
more than one aspect at a time and simultaneous need to get
expert advice at appropriate times. The size of our project - one
member of staff has had to project manage it on top of existing
job description, and it has completely dominated the last couple
of years - in a good way, but it has at times felt an immense
project with many aspects to balance and coordinate. Finding the
right expertise, eg for CRM implementation.” (Partner)

“Project managing the implementation of the project was harder
than anticipated and finding the right web developer was
daunting.” (Partner)

“The Specialist Advisor was not a good match. Most of the events
were not relevant as they pertained to activity we already carry
out, however they were interesting and could see them being


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useful for organisations without the knowledge in house.”
(Partner)

“Budget - time to raise funds to make up shortfall Bringing
integration partners together to collaborate on development
Managing a major project alongside core work Bringing a large
organisation together to participate and engage in the project...
and then capturing all their various digital activity!” (Partner)

“Initially finding time to train everyone up on use of digital
cameras etc. Encompassing use of cameras as valuable tools for
recording content on a regular basis - again lack of time, not
always enough bodies around to do the work. Board are still not
all digitally literate or up to speed with value of
digital/social media - work in progress. Our location
geographically has made it hard to be part of many of the
AmbITion events.” Partner)

My organisation is fortunate enough to have an experienced online
innovator within the team, but I felt that this sometimes
hindered us as she did not have many peers to discuss the issues
she was facing. However this has provided me with the opportunity
to readdress this role in our organisation next year. The other
thing is that as a small team it has been extremely difficult for
us to continue resourcing our ongoing day to day online tasks
such as maintaining and improving the current website with
managing the substantial changes we are making through AmbITion.”
(Partner)

“Staff time. Fixed programme, not responsive to particular types
of organisations. Lack of technical infrastructure.” (Partner)

“steep IT learning curves and engaging with a sector that at
times is reluctant to embrace change.” (Partner)

“Location. While aspects of most training sessions were available
as webinars, the workshops never were and there were very few in
the North! The other challenge was understanding some of the
technical language, but the Specialist Advisor was extremely
helpful in that area.” (Partner)

“The major challenges where the changing of key staff within our
organisation and Amb:IT;ion management and communication of
that.” (Partner)

“'Forced' time scales which do not suit our particular audience
groups who need to be directly involved in the development work.”
(Partner)



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“My organisation has yet to complete the project and I feel that
the timescale provided was not long enough. However, I am still
in touch with Ashley, and I am confident that I can still call
upon her expertise if required, as we continue on the project
journey.” (Partner)

Associate Comments -
“Administrating the programme was quite challenging: it required
a lot of staff time to get started and keep momentum and thus it
all took longer than anticipated. Once underway, and having
chosen the right consultant to work with us fulfilling the
programme, it has worked very well. The consultant, Hannah
Rudman, has the great ability to keep it simple, be patient,
avoid long words and understand one's needs based on an
understanding of what a business is doing and thus what it
actually needs from a cornucopia of IT possibilities. We have
been lucky to engage her” (Associate)

“We have found it hard to sustain developments once our
Specialist Advisor had finished. The lack of any bursary / grant
funding to boost our IT capability (even modestly) to better deal
with developments has hindered the momentum of what was achieved
in the initial stages. But we are working on it!” (Associate)

“Lack of resources in house + uncertainty where our project lay
as our Advisor was not what we expected.” (Associate)


“Lack of time and resource and difficulties navigating
institutional bureaucracy” (Partner)
“not enough (staff) time” (Associate)

“As an Associate, the lack of actual funding support meant that
any participation relied on our already strained resources,
particularly w.r.t. staff time.” (Associate)

“Finding out what we need and not being able to access funding or
support to get the work done. SCET was merely a 'gesture'. We
never did get anything out of them.” (Associate)

“I think it's been an excellent programme and we have learned a
lot through the seminars etc. it's been a challenging
implementing some of the actions due to a lack of staff resources
and money but we're getting there slowly but surely. There is a
lot more we could do. Also, as mentioned earlier, I can now fully
see the potential of this support in making organisation change -
would be great if there is an AmbITion Phase 2.” (Associate).


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“time! I felt that there was something to be gained from being
involved, especially with our Specialist Advisor, however the
time limit on the project put constraints on what we could do as
my organisation was going through a very turbulent and could not
arrange times to meet when it suited us and the advisor and then
we ran out of time”. (Associate)

“Funding, staffing” (Associate)

“The major challenges were facing up to the fact that we have to
communicate with our artist tenants more effectively, we had to
build a whole new site (just completed and its great), I had to
re-evaluate my working day to encompass social media and
basically just making the time to step out of the day to day and
prioritise new tasks that will allow us to communicate with our
audiences more effectively. Although I feel we are in a really
good position now - we felt like we had a mountain to climb at
the start” (Associate)

“That there was no funding attached to the package” (Associate)

“To work together with another organisation with which the
initial application was submitted.” (Associate)

“As the key AmbITion person in the company, I've benefited from
it more than others and am kind of seen as the one in charge of
the website. There's some skill sharing to be done!” (Associate)

“Developing a new strand with no additional resources (apart
from a day with Specialist Advisor). If nothing else, AmbITion
has highlighted just how stretched the organisation is and that
we cannot take on any additional work without increasing staff.”
(Associate)
,


5.4 Key Findings from research with Specialist
Advisors.


All individuals who were appointed as ‘Specialist Advisors’ or
consultants to organisations on the AmbITion Scotland programme were
invited to participate in an online consultation and survey .


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A total of 9 individuals (out of 18) participated representing 50%
of the total number of Specialist Advisors. Again this is an
increased proportion in comparison with original expectations and
provides very robust information. The respondents to the survey were
asked if their comments could be attributed to them or if they
wished to remain anonymous. These who agreed to be attributed have
been identified next to their comments in this section of the
report.
When asked to recall how they initially found out about AmbITion
Scotland, 4 individuals were aware due to their previous activity
with the AmbITion (England) programme and were made aware by Hannah
Rudman, with 3 being made aware by Scottish Arts Council (Creative
Scotland). The others could not recall the source of their original
awareness.







5.4.1 Initial Application process


Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors

None of the Specialist Advisors considered the application process
to have been ‘unfair’.


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Only two made suggestions in relation to how the marketing activity
related to the programme could have been improved. These comments
were –

“Few people outside those already working in the Arts industry
knew about it” (Chris Elvery, Specialist Advisor).

“Managing expectations...(could be improved)... in terms of
the different levels of engagement resulting from the
different levels of programme -e.g. Partners / Associates.
(Roger Tomlinson, Specialist Advisor)
Specialist Advisors were asked to indicate the words or phrases
which they considered were applicable to the initial application
process.

Initial application - Words / phrases
Straightforward 8 Challenging 1
Thought Provoking 2 Clear criteria for
success
2
Easy 1 - -


In addition, Specialist Advisors were given the opportunity to
comment on the application process, and made the following
comments –

“it was a while ago now, but my memory is that the criteria for
selection weren't very clear - although I know that it must have
been hard to specify criteria when, at that point, they (the
Partners / Associates) didn't know the skills they might need.
(Specialist Advisor).

“The process seemed to me to be clear, albeit challenging -in a
constructive way. It was about encouraging organisations to raise
their game and increase their capacity and competency through new
resources. The thought processes behind the bid and the sustained
development of a business case, focusing on outcomes and
deliverables were, I believe, useful and positive” (Mike
Greenwood, Specialist Advisor)

“Any competition with insufficient funds mean that applications
which should have been successful were not”. (Roger Tomlinson,
Specialist Advisor)



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Writing in “Arts Professional” magazine, Specialist Advisor Anne
Bonnar made the following comment regarding the tendering process
– “The process for recruiting the specialist advisors for
AmbITion Scotland is a good example: several weeks, widespread
advertising and a clear specification demanding a two page email
response –what a breath of fresh air.”


Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors

None of the Specialist Advisors considered the process of selection,
conducted to select the Specialist Advisors to be ‘unfair’. The
following comments were made in relation to the selection process. –

“ Not sure what the criteria was for pairing Specialists to
companies or which specialists worked with Partners as opposed to
Associates.” (Chris Elvery, Specialist Advisor).

“We submitted a company application re advisors but only one of
us was picked to be used. There was no feedback on why I had
been/the others hadn't, which felt a bit odd. I was the only
member of the team who could make it up to a pre-meet of
consultants in Glasgow, arranged at very short notice, so there
was a feeling that that might have been part of the selection
process without it being overt.” (Specialist Advisor)

“I was selected so it would be difficult to have any other view.”
(Specialist Advisor)


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The only suggestion made about improving the selection process was –
“The criteria needed to be clearer up front. Criteria appeared
to be deployed, quoted in feedback, which clients were not aware
were significant, such as a bias to open source and away from
proprietorial solutions from specialist suppliers.” (Roger
Tomlinson, Specialist Advisor)

5.4.2 Creation of a Business Case

Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors
Only one Specialist Advisor had any difficulty in assisting with the
preparation of a Business Case to support an organisations
application. This is expanded as follows -

“In both cases, it linked back to the organisation's core
business planning (or lack thereof). It's very hard to make the
business case for a project if there isn't a core business plan
to link it into!” (Specialist Advisor)



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5.4.3 Contribution of AmbITion Scotland on
participating organisations

Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors

Specialist Advisors held clearer and stronger perceptions in
relation to the outcomes of the project (in comparison with
Partners and Associates), indicating that they considered the
programme had achieved the overall aims and objectives.


Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors


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These views on contribution were supported by the following
comments. –

“I worked with one partner organisation. Overall AmbITion has
impacted significantly on a broad range of their activities -
although there is still much more to be achieved in the future.”
(Specialist Advisor)

“Distinctly different experiences with two clients - one very
engaged and willing to lead own learning etc, The other not that
engaged and a feeling that they had expected someone else to do
all the work.” (Specialist Advisor)

“Main issue was engagement with businesses. I think the
Associates saw their Specialist time as a "consolation" for not
being a Partner. 2 of my programmes took over a year to engage
whatsoever. Culture within the industry of getting things for
free.” (Chris Elvery, Specialist Advisor)

“In terms of a main organisation they have only just launched the
project for which I am presently undertaking part one evaluation.
Part two will follow in the new year once the outcomes of the
project have been embedded.” (Specialist Advisor)

“I think/hope I had two unusual organisations but neither really
seemed to have made enough time in their diaries for this project
- everything was delayed, not prioritised, etc. Frustrating.”
(Specialist Advisor)

“The challenge was that implementation could not go far enough,
and with Aberdeen Performing Arts required entirely a commitment
from within their own existing budget.” (Roger Tomlinson,
Specialist Advisor)


Specialist Advisors were asked to comment on their interaction with
the Partners and Associates. This highlighted that the largest
proportion found Partners and Associates to have made an ‘excellent
contribution’, however a number of Specialist Advisor found the
Partners / Associates ‘difficult to work with at times’, and didn’t
‘exceed their expectation’.


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Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors


5.4.4 Attitudes towards the knowledge and learning
events

Specialist Advisors held very positive views in relation to the
programme of knowledge and learning events which have taken place
within the AmbITion Scotland programme.



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Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors

The most helpful elements of information sharing activity, as
perceived by Specialist Advisors, were – ‘How to...Guides’, ‘Case
Histories’, ‘participation in webcasts’ and ‘participation in ning’.
The least helpful / not used, were thought to be‘ Making connections
with other organisations via Connections site’ ‘Swap Shop’, ‘the
phone bank’ ‘posting or using photos from Flick r’.




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Base ; 9 Specialist Advisors


These thoughts were expanded by the following comments –

“The aims of all the online networks and resources were
appropriate, but I'm not certain that they connected sufficiently
with those they were intended to serve.” (Specialist Advisor)

“The Phone Bank - simply did not work for me at all. I think for
me the relationships built up were based on a clear set of
outcomes and going over that was outside remit. Plus the type of
work I do is not simple, technical yes or no answers.”
(Specialist Advisor)


Specialist Advisor attitudes towards the AmbITion
Scotland team
Specialist Advisors held very positive views of the AmbITion
Scotland team, with strong agreement that ‘The team were
knowledgeable and helped me answer my questions’ (8 out of 9), ‘The
team were responsive when I raised an issue or voiced a concern (8
out of 9), ‘The team were very professional (8 out of 9) and ‘The
team were supportive and encouraging (8 out of 9). Most – (6 out of
9) thought that ‘the team kept the project on track’.


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None of the Specialist Advisors agreed that they ‘were not sure what
the team did’ and only one thought ‘the team could have communicated
more effectively.
5.4.5 Major challenges for the Specialist Advisors in
fulfilling the AmbITion Scotland programme.

Specialist Advisors were asked to identify what they considered were
the major challenges in relation to fulfilling the AmbITion Scotland
programme. The comments provided included –
“Getting company engagement/ Billing for Associate projects,
which meant in some instances billing for work 12 months + after
first engagement”. (Chris Elvery, Specialist Advisor)

“Working directly with the partner organisation: none.”
(Specialist Advisor)

“challenging engrained attitudes in the cultural sector to
digital content - this will take a long time to change and there
will be resistance.” (Specialist Advisor)

“Personnel changes in some orgs bit disruptive, time consuming.”
(Mike Coulter, Specialist Advisor)

“Not enough time in relation to the needs of the organisation and
their expectations, especially Aberdeen Performing Arts” (Roger
Tomlinson, Specialist Advisor)


5.4.6 Further comments from Specialist Advisors
regarding their experience with the AmbITion Scotland
programme.

The Specialist Advisors were given the opportunity to make any
further comments they wished in relation to their experience with
the AmbITion Scotland programme, and the following comments were
included.

“ Ashley ( AmbITion Scotland Project manager) was great - never
had any dealings with the rest of the team. Need to change the
culture within Arts orgs to consider their own sustainability
rather than focussing on external finance” (Chris Elvery,
Specialist Advisor)



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“I fully support the aims of this programme, and recognise the
many talented and dedicated people in all areas who have
contributed to making it a success. What I became increasingly
concerned with as the programme developed, is that so much more
could have been achieved with so many more organisations
benefiting if a more creative and collaborative approach had been
taken from the outset. I believe that the AmbITion model may well
have worked on its first outing in England, but it is now
potentially dated and flawed and does not serve to best
distribute much needed investment in this area. I strongly hope
that if there is a 'second round' (and I hope there will be) that
an alternative approach will be taken to enable far more
organisations benefit in concrete ways.” (Specialist Advisor)

“Critical to my success in delivering to the organisations, and
indeed to my enjoyment of the whole programme, was without a
shadow of a doubt Ashley's support. She was quite simply superb.
Whatever you are paying her isn't enough. !” (Mike Coulter,
Specialist Advisor)
“I thought the project was worthwhile, and had the potential to
make an enduring difference to the way the organisation worked. I
thought the level of support from the project team was good, as
was the range of learning resources and events organised to
complement the project. Being London-based it was not possible
for me to attend events in person.” (Mike Greenwood, Specialist
Advisor)

“The programmes were good and ambitious. Those who only got a
few days consultancy felt they had a "consolation prize" which
only made worse their awareness of what they wanted/needed to
achieve.” (Roger Tomlinson, Specialist Advisor)



5.5 Summary of key findings from online
feedback from events.

Immediately after each event, seminar workshop and webcast,
participants were invited to take part in an online survey to
provide feedback on the content and quality of the event.
While these surveys were tailored to each individual event, a series
of common questions were asked each time. The following summary


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provides details of the responses to these combined questions to
provide a solid overview of the views of attenders.
Over 75 different organisations (10% of all attending organisations)
participated in the feedback research related to the events. The
largest numbers were from Performing Arts organisations, followed by
Visual Arts organisations, with ‘others’ comprising Education
establishments, Local Authorities, and Creative Scotland staff in
addition to freelancers and students.








5.5.1 Sample Composition

Base 272 Attenders

A wide cross section of roles and responsibilities were
represented amongst the attenders.




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Base 272 Attenders
The majority of participants to the events were from organisations
who were not participating as either Partners or Associates, thereby
expending the reach of the programme, as had been intended.

Base 272 Attenders
5.5.2 Perceptions of the event


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The majority (75%) of participants considered the content of the
event to be ‘Interesting and Relevant’ when asked to rate the
activity.
Base 272 Attenders
The majority of respondents (77%) indicated that following the
event, they had a ‘clear’ (57%) or ‘very clear’ (20%) understanding
of the resources that the AmbITion Scotland programme will leave
behind.
Respondents indicated awareness and use of the following websites
following the event.

Following event

Awareness

Visited

AmbITion Scotland website
(www.getAmbITion.com)

54%

34%
AmbITion Scotland social network 47% 23%
Website(s) suggested by speakers - 23%
Base 271 Attenders
The ratings of various elements of the Events indicate very high
levels of satisfaction with the choice of locations / venues, the
facilities provided, and the catering arrangements.



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Base 272 Attenders



5.5.3 List of organisations who participated in the
event evaluation
1. AbetJeeo loyet 2. Ambl1loo 5peclollst AJvlsot 3. Amot Ctoop
4. Atlko 5. AoJleoces 5ootb west 6. 8ootb 5cotlooJ
7. 8ocboooo 8lstto, wooJeoJ
boto
8. ctoftscotlooJ 9. cteotlve 5cotlooJ
10. coltotol íotetptlse Offlce 11. coltote ooJ 5pott Closqow 12. utoke Moslc 5cotlooJ
13. íost lotbloo cooocll Moseom
5etvlce
14. íJlobotqb Noplet uolvetslty 15. íu1c 1ecbooloqy Cotewoy
16. eMotloolob, Ccu 17. ísctlvo 18. lestlvols íJlobotqb
19. lotestty commlssloo 20. ltelqbt ueslqo 21. CANí (Ctowloq AoJleoces
Nottb íost)
22. Cl1 ooJ Closqow lllm lestlvol 23. Cloot 24. Closqow llfe/Closqow
uNí5cO clty of Moslc
25. Closqow womeo's llbtoty 26. Ctowloq AoJleoces Nottb íost
(CANí)
27. nlAtts


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28. nootly uevelopmeot 1tost 29. lolqo MeJlo ltJ 30. looet íot kll1k ueety Mí
31. lotetmezzo 32. Iobostoo cotmlcboel 33. moctobett
34. M8M commetclol lll 35. Movloq 1otqets, teseotcb oo
oew meJlo
36. Moseoms Colletles 5cotlooJ
37. Nlc 38. omp 39. Nottb looJs cteotlve Closs
40. lAN (ptomotets ott oetwotk) 41. looel
42. looko.lto 43. ltomote o koote 44. kcAnM5
45. keqloool 5cteeo 5cotlooJ 46. kobett CotJoo uolvetslty 47. k5AMu
48. sbwotks (teseotcb & ttololoq
coosoltoocy)
49. 5cots Moslc Ctoop 50. 5cottcom ltJ
51. 5cottlsb Atts cooocll 52. 5cottlsb 8ook 1tost 53. 5cottlsb loetty llbtoty
54. 5cottlsb 5cteeo 55. 5ctoo/kcAnM5 56. 5pot 5peclflc
57. 5tAozo. 5cotlooJ's
lotetootloool loetty lestlvol
58. 5tltlloq cooocll AJolt leotoloq
1eom
59. 5tote5eeo llmlteJ
60. 5totm lu ltJ 61. 1be AoJleoce 8osloess 62. 1be colmoo 1tost
63. 1be nob 64. 1be llst 65. 1be 1ecbooloqy clob ltJ
66. 1tlboloqlc ltJ. 67. uolvetslty of íJlobotqb 68. uolvetslty of 5ttotbclyJe
69. uolvetslty of west 5cotlooJ 70. volcebosloess 71. weblbyslo
72. west lotbloo cooocll 73. ¥uooce 74. ¥ootb 5cotlooJ

lteelooce x 4

5toJeots/CtoJootes x J

letsoool lotetest x 2
coosoltoot x 1


5.6 Scottish Centre for Emerging Technologies
SCET describes itself as a leading Software & Technology Solutions
Company associated with Scottish Enterprise and University of the
West of Scotland. In line with their aims to support development of
emerging technology, SCET joined the AmbITion Scotland programme
without cost or charges, to support any appropriate projects within
the programme. This was not a contractual relationship, but
considered to be of mutual benefit between publicly funded
organisations with complimentary objectives. The support was
intended to be flexible dependent on the specific needs of
individual projects which overlapped into the SCET remit and


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included the potential for feasibility consultancy, prototyping and
/ or support via an intern to assist progress.
Initially this was envisaged to relate to Associates projects only,
however due to requests from Partners, it was extended across both.
As there was some confusion amongst participants in relation to the
nature of support from SCET a short video was prepared and located
on the AmbITion Scotland website.
However, the extent of SCET involvement in the programme was
curtailed due to significant changes in both structure and staff
during the programme time period. These were linked to changes in
the level of Public Funding to SCET.
Although the AmbITion Scotland team had not offered any guarantees
to participants and had simply signposted and highlighted the
opportunity, none-the-less there wasa degree of frustration for a
small number of participants who had to find alternative approaches
to fulfil their individual project aims, without the anticipated
support from SCET. With no formal contract or service level
agreement, the AmbITion Scotland team were unable to exert any
influence on SCET to fulfil their planned involvement in the
programme.




5.7 Summary of comments from the AmbITion
Scotland Team.
“The AmbITion vision is to generate a critical mass of arts
organisations that proactively consider digital development as key
to their business, organisational and artistic growth and
sustainability. Scottish Arts Council in 2008 shared that vision,
and set about commissioning the design and delivery of a national
programme of holistic digital development activity through a
programme approach. Having already successfully piloted a
methodology and approach in two regions of England 2007-09, Rudman
Consulting joined forces with Culture Sparks (then Glasgow Grows
Audiences) to create a bespoke solution for Scotland: the AmbITion
Scotland 2009-2011 programme,
Overall, AmbITion Scotland 2009-2011 has been shown to be an
external success (see the Executive Summary). The AmbITion Approach
is still seen as a challenging but robust methodology for achieving


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organizational change (see the Key Findings from Quantitative
Research with Partners and Associates) and the AmbITion programme is
being studied as a model for digital development and organizational
change in different sectors
2
(and copied in different countries)
3
.
AmbITion Scotland’s Participant organisations have benefitted
through being able to develop their artistic, business and
organisational strategies for sustainability in the 21st century;
and are now fitter for purpose across their artistic and business
objectives, in a digital and knowledge economy. The participating
Scottish arts and cultural organisations are AmbITion Scotland’s
success legacy: their change in mindset to a positive outlook around
the potential of digital opportunities for new artistic practices,
products, and business models; their collective knowledge around the
importance of integrated IT systems and social media; their improved
digital capacity and capability; and their emerging digital
creativity.
The programme was delivered through a collaborative ecology: project
managed by Ashley Smith Hammond; governed by Julie Tait, with the
support of the Culture Sparks team; the expertise and experience of
Rudman Consulting; the support of the strategic partners and
specialist advisors; the guidance of the reference group; and the
investment of time, insight, vision and money from Scottish Arts
Council/Creative Scotland.
The AmbITion Scotland delivery team, in considering whether it met
its objectives, reflects with pride that overall the programme has
unquestionably supported the sectors’ digital development. Some of
the methods used to do this have worked better than others, but
thanks in part to the iterative nature of the evaluation process the
team were able to make ‘running repairs’ as they were needed. For
the AmbITion Scotland team, the formal and informal feedback
mechanisms (including the programme and event evaluations) have made
a huge difference in relevance to participants. For instance, during
the early phase of the evaluation (1-1 interviews) it became clear
that associates were still confused about the full scope of support
that was available to them – they understood the day with a
specialist advisor but weren’t fully aware of the SCET or the intern
offer. The team were able to be responsive to this and increase the
communications around the associate offer and spell out its full
potential by increase communications, including a short video
explaining what SCET could offer participants. Formal post event
feedback showed that participants were in general happy with the
knowledge and learning events but became a valuable feedback

2
TEAM Tourism Consulting & Rudman Consulting (2011) “Technology in Tourism” report for Scottish
Enterprise.
3
See Digital Tourism Wales programme.


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mechanism for other suggested training topics. Informal feedback
could be even more powerful. Some of this feedback helped AmbITion
Scotland pioneer a new method of delivering events – Host Your Own
Trainings – the broad outline of which was suggested by a
participant reflecting on her own professional network and their
training needs. Informal feedback also asked for more networking and
the team responded by starting up Names and Faces, informal monthly
gatherings moving back and forth between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
Over the course of the two years delivering AmbITion Scotland one
technological constant has been the speed of change in the digital
tools, which are relevant to the cultural community. In the realm of
social media alone the massive growth of users on Facebook has
pushed more organisations to feel that they must be present in that
space to remain relevant. AmbITion Scotland trainings have supported
participants in doing this. Similarly the appearance on the scene of
Google+ has triggered many organisations to scramble to make sense
of the new space and its relevance (or lack of) while AmbITion
Scotland’s own choice of social network platform, Ning, has in the
space of the programmes delivery gone from highly relevant to
somewhat obsolete. Similarly those organisations locked into large
institutional IT systems (like city council systems) remain
disadvantaged in terms of flexibility to adopt and experiment with
new technologies. As long as technology remains a target moving at
high speed there will be a need for support to the sector that is
being required to make best use of the technologies but often does
not know where to begin.
The AmbITion Scotland team still see the need for change from the
leadership of organisations. Some boards are coming around to
supporting digital development but many remain sceptical of digital
tools, which by allowing two-way conversation from audiences are
perceived to potentially dilute the control over brand voice and
public image. This is opposed to the team members delivering the
work on the ground, who grasped the potential of such tools more
immediately. This was a challenge identified from the programme’s
inception. It is diminishing, though still present. The team have
seen that the organisations that found the most success from their
participation in AmbITion Scotland have had strong commitment from
senior staff and boards from the beginning.
Reflecting on some of the challenges of delivery of the AmbITion
Scotland programme the team have noticed that capacity is a
consistent project and one which is suggestive of ongoing issues for
the sector in terms of its own resilience. In the March 2011 monthly
update to Creative Scotland the team reported the following:
‘…about half of the participants are experiencing slow
progress. At the moment which was envisioned to be the end


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point for work with AmbITion Scotland associates strategic
issues regarding organisational development are beginning to
shine through. One thing that many of the delayed projects
have in common is an issue around staff turnover, which has
reduced organisations’ capacity to focus on longer and medium
term strategic issues like digital development… Together
these structural issues impact more than two thirds of the
still to submit Associate group. In such circumstances as
these, organisational development will remain a major
challenge because the focus must become crisis management
rather than the improvement of an already healthy business. In
addition, the constant staff turnover has a serious impact on
an organisations’ ability to increase its overall capacity.
Staff members learn new skills but take them away when they
go. New staff members have no institutional knowledge and the
work begun with one staff member is not archived or passed on
to the next. The work is lost, leaving the organisation back
at square one.’
This reflection remains relevant here at the end of the programme.
In the end six organisations had to withdraw due to capacity issues
and an additional five struggled to prioritise AmbITion Scotland
within regular workloads. A full quarter of associate organisations,
then, experienced this suggesting that these are not isolated issues
but ones which are reflective of the wider sector as well as the
challenging financial climate brought on by the financial crisis.
One lesson learned by the team from this experience has been that
the value of this type of work only became self-evident to
participants upon reflection, often initiated by their involvement
with evaluation activities and case study creation activities. The
team needed to be in constant contact with many of them to encourage
continued engagement. We observed that perhaps the incentives (and
the penalties) related to participation and progress needed to be
more tangible to encourage greater self-motivation from the
participant cohort.
Indeed, across all of the participants – partners and associates –
almost everyone fed back to say that their staff time was at a
premium and that they had underestimated the amount of work and
learning that would be required to engage with AmbITion Scotland
successfully. Some associates ultimately fed back that though they
had been disappointed not to be selected as partners that they found
once they started working with their specialist advisor that their
day of consultancy was actually as much as they were able to handle.
It is perhaps particularly valuable for the group of associates and
involved participants that there will be additional AmbITion
Scotland activities programmed in 2012-2014 as these organisations
are now better prepared for more intensive digital development.


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In general the AmbITion Scotland team have observed a culture of
risk-averse management across the broad participant cohort.
Experiments that take place in the public domain (those not art form
related) were strongly avoided. Sharing information about lessons
learned from failed experiments was also in most cases considered to
be out of the question. This may result from a defensive position
for those organisations in receipt of public money not wanting to be
seen to squander precious resources, and / or being concerned for
their reputation amongst colleagues and peers. But, this position
also creates challenges for communal learning. As the AmbITion
Scotland team look forward to the next phase of activity it will
need to support participants in their information sharing so that
others can learn from the groups’ experience rather than repeat the
same mistakes.
Longitudinal academic research would be a welcome addition to
AmbITion Scotland activity and legacy: to both track the medium to
long-term impacts on the participant organisations and wider sector;
and ensure that the methodology and programme is discussed, ratified
and analysed in a formal academic setting. Programme evaluation,
such as this one, should continue to ensure iterative improvements
to the programme content
There is still work to be done to achieve impact on the whole sector
in Scotland, and to further support arts and cultural organisations
to become confident creators of, and collaborators in, digital
innovation. The time window for that work continues to be now -
digital developments progress apace, the constant we can be sure of
is change. The AmbITion Scotland programme team have consistently
listened to feedback as well as integrating the impacts from
market/external influencers to help it iteratively improve the
programme. This remains a constant practice and whilst plans for
AmbITion Scotland 2012-14 further integrate recommendations from
this 2009-11 programme evaluation, the team will remain flexible and
responsive, and anticipate continually amending 2012-14 plans and
processes as feedback is collected.”


The AmbITion Scotland team: Hannah Rudman, Julie Tait and Ashley
Smith Hammond
December 2011.




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6. Conclusions and
recommendations


6.1 Conclusions

In order to evaluate if this programme has achieved the objectives
and aims, we have compared the individual objectives, with the
evidence gathered via feedback from Partners, Associates, Specialist
Advisors and individuals who attended the events.

6.1.1 Strategic objectives
The AmbITion Scotland programme was underpinned by two strategic
objectives:
To promote a creative environment through digital
development - AmbITion Scotland set out to provide expertise and
support for Scottish arts organisations over an 18month period
(later extended to 2 years) to stimulate change by developing and
exploiting the use of digital technologies across all areas of their
organisational, business and artistic practice.


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Create a supportive environment for digital development -
enabling wider access to a specialist knowledge base.
AmbITion Scotland was designed to bring together, arts practitioners
and researchers, leading thinkers, business and digital experts
throughout the programme. It set out to consider creativity,
artistic vision, business model development, audience development
and organisational development in light of digital technologies and
support arts businesses to use them to innovate and respond to a
fast changing, consumer driven, technological environment.

Conclusion : Based on the information gathered and contained in
section 5 of this report, we consider that both of these
objectives have been successfully achieved. This was
particularly the case for Partners, and to a lesser degree with
Associates (as could be anticipated). In addition the open events
clearly engaged effectively with a broad range and high number of
arts and cultural organisations in Scotland.
While there was perhaps more focus by the participants on this
programme on the basics - organisational and infrastructural
aspects- this successful digital development enables the possibility
of increased creativity via digital tools and channels. With the
critical mass and collective knowledge of the sector improved, the
potential for increased digital creative collaborations and
innovations can be realised.




6.1.2 Desired key outcomes.

Increased organisational effectiveness in arts
organisations through:

• significantly raised technology capability and integrated
ICT implementation

• changed working practices, job roles and organisational /
operational structures following the implementation of
digital development



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• efficient, integrated, digitally-based customer
relationship management systems; ticketing systems;
websites; fundraising and other databases

• trained staff, ‘digitally literate’ boards and skilled
senior management teams in the implementation of new
technologies, business and artistic practices




Improved levels of public engagement with the arts
through:

• organisations acquiring better knowledge about existing
audiences

• organisations developing more attractive content that
potential audiences can easily find

• organisations being enabled to provide equitable access to
content for anyone with a connection to the internet,
including those with mobility, hearing and sight
impairments

• audiences being able to participate and communicate with
arts organisations effectively and deeply online


Conclusion: There is clear evidence that the programme has
resulted in the desired outcomes, to varying extents across
Partners, Associates (in line with their individual project
objectives) and the across wider arts and cultural sector
throughout Scotland.





6.2 Recommendations

These recommendations are made, in the event that the AmbITion
programme be repeated, developed or extended at some point in the
future.



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• A number of organisations were frustrated and disappointed to
have missed the opportunity to participate fully as Partners.
This applied to many Associates and a number of organisations
who attended the events, and often related to not being aware
of the project in the early stages or not having sufficient
knowledge or time to prepare a more compelling application.
The awareness issue could be addressed by an increase in
marketing activity at the beginning of the programme.

• A ‘rolling’ process of applications across a longer time
period would also increase the reach of the project with
organisations being able to apply at the time appropriate to
their organisational development, without a ‘single’ deadline
for a limited competition.

• While the application process should be rigorous, and linked
to the aims of Creative Scotland’s Cultural Economy programme,
ideally the process should be simpler for applicants. A ‘light
touch’ support process would be beneficial in generating
ideas, refining thoughts prior to application.

• The variation in participation level (Partners up to £50,000 /
5 days consultancy – Associates no funding / 1 day
consultancy), could be bridged with greater flexibility in the
size / scope and funding level of individual projects.

• A number of organisations would have benefitted from
additional / specialist support at the very early stages of
the application process in order to assist them in focussing
on appropriate aims and objectives, and in the development of
their application.


• Some organisations found the skills of their appointed
Specialist Advisor did not turn out to be an ideal fit. In
some cases this was not identified to the Project Team by the
organisation. To overcome this issue a combination of
increased assessment prior to appointment of Advisors,
requesting ‘compatibility’ feedback once an Advisor is
appointed, and allowing greater flexibility and/ or a greater
number of Advisors who have a wide range of skills and
experience in the culture sector, would be beneficial.

• Capacity (internally within organisations) and lack of digital
knowledge and skills appear weak in many organisations.
Therefore the challenge may be to assist organisation
appreciate that they currently do not know, as part of the
early work to assist the development of digital development.
This relates not only to education managers but perhaps also


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with support / underwriting of risk to encourage embracing
change.

• Cross sector working can be highly effective, although bridges
are required between the culture and creative industries by
organisations such as Culture Hack Scotland, NESTA and Culture
Sparks to signpost and facilitate.

• The ‘ning’ was not as effective as desired as a networking and
communication tool across participants and Specialist Advisors
and it became less effective as the programme progressed.
Other networking tools which offer greater integration should
be considered.

• The ‘legacy’ resource is considerable and provision should be
made to ensure this continues to be accessible online.


• There was a desire from many participants to increase the
extent of collaborate across different arts organisations. A
forum to facilitate this demand should be considered.

• The anticipated benefits of including the Scottish Centre for
Emerging Technologies in the programme were not obtained. This
was due in part to changes in the funding and structure of
SCET during the programme, organisations not having suitable
projects and also the non-contractual relationship of their
involvement. Therefore perhaps more formal agreements (e.g.
service level agreements) between all associated organisations
would help avoid any variations in expectations.


• Due in part to the self determined focus on IT infrastructure,
digital communication issues (including ticketing systems, web
sites and social media activity) and Customer Relationship
Management, there was less emphasis amongst the participants
in relation to creative development / creative outputs with
digital resources. This is perhaps logical that the digital
infrastructure needs to be in place before it can be utilised
to fulfil creative potential, but it could be encouraged more
strongly in the future with stronger marketing / increased
consultancy emphasis towards Artistic Directors to help unlock
digital potential.






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Appendix A
Overview of AmbITion Scotland Online activity

Website Summary
Total traffic over two years:

Summary
Visits 26406
Absolute Unique
Visitors 16465
Pageviews 56148
Average
Pageviews 2.13
Time on Site 00:02:23
Bounce Rate 62.30%
New Visits 60.82%

0
500
1,000
1,500
2,000
N
o
v
-
1
3

D
e
c
-
1
3

J
a
n
-
1
4

F
e
b
-
1
4

M
a
r
-
1
4

A
p
r
-
1
4

M
a
y
-
1
4

J
u
n
-
1
4

J
u
l
-
1
4

A
u
g
-
1
4

S
e
p
-
1
4

O
c
t
-
1
4

N
o
v
-
1
4

D
e
c
-
1
4

J
a
n
-
1
5

F
e
b
-
1
5

M
a
r
-
1
5

A
p
r
-
1
5

M
a
y
-
1
5

J
u
n
-
1
5

J
u
l
-
1
5

A
u
g
-
1
5

S
e
p
-
1
5

O
c
t
-
1
5

Total Website Visitors
Visit
ors


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 90

Website: Visits from Social Media
sites
Around 7% of visits came from social media. Note that actual figure may be much higher (up
to 4x), since Twitter traffic is not interpreted accurately by Google Analytics.

Social Media referrals
Visits 2185 8% of site total
Pageviews 4038 7% of site total
Average Pageviews 1.85 -0.28 less than site average
Time on Site 00:02:12 92% of site average
Bounce Rate 70% 8% higher than site average
New Visits 37.25% -24% less than site average
Website: Visitors by Location
Most visitors came from the UK, with 5% coming from the US and 13% from all other
countries combined:
Location
Visits Pages/visit
Avg Time on
Site
United
Kingdom 21,686 2.26 00:02:38
United States 1,419 1.44 00:01:25
Australia 266 1.84 00:02:00
India 192 1.4 00:01:23
Ireland 186 1.77 00:02:29

0
50
100
150
200
250
N
o
v
-
1
3

D
e
c
-
1
3

J
a
n
-
1
4

F
e
b
-
1
4

M
a
r
-
1
4

A
p
r
-
1
4

M
a
y
-
1
4

J
u
n
-
1
4

J
u
l
-
1
4

A
u
g
-
1
4

S
e
p
-
1
4

O
c
t
-
1
4

N
o
v
-
1
4

D
e
c
-
1
4

J
a
n
-
1
5

F
e
b
-
1
5

M
a
r
-
1
5

A
p
r
-
1
5

M
a
y
-
1
5

J
u
n
-
1
5

J
u
l
-
1
5

A
u
g
-
1
5

S
e
p
-
1
5

O
c
t
-
1
5

SM Visits
SM
Visits


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 91

Website: Mobile Devices
Just over 2% of visits came from mobile devices.

Mobile Devices
Visits 736
Pages/Visit 1.4

Website: Top Content
The following content was most popular, with hits dropping off for the remaining pages:
Top Content Visits
Unique
Visits
home page 17400 13792
resources 3626 2303
about 2548 2053
category/events 2400 1971
category/videos 1222 938

Users are visiting the website for resources, as well as to find out about Ambition and its
events.
66%
14%
12%
4% 3%
1%
Mobile Device Types
iPhone
iPad
Android
iPod
BlackBerry
Other


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 92

Twitter
As of 18/11/11, the @GetAmbition Twitter account:
Made 1,549 Tweets
Is following 1,704 users
Has 1,975 Followers
Has been placed in 96 lists

The account made around 40 Tweets per month, on average:


Klout
Klout is a measure of online influence. The Klout Score
measures influence on a scale of 1 to 100, with 100 being
the most influential. Klout uses data from social networks
in order to measure:
• How many people you influence; (True Reach)
• How much you influence them; and (Amplification)
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
N
o
v
-
1
3

D
e
c
-
1
3

J
a
n
-
1
4

F
e
b
-
1
4

M
a
r
-
1
4

A
p
r
-
1
4

M
a
y
-
1
4

J
u
n
-
1
4

J
u
l
-
1
4

A
u
g
-
1
4

S
e
p
-
1
4

O
c
t
-
1
4

N
o
v
-
1
4

D
e
c
-
1
4

J
a
n
-
1
5

F
e
b
-
1
5

M
a
r
-
1
5

A
p
r
-
1
5

M
a
y
-
1
5

J
u
n
-
1
5

J
u
l
-
1
5

A
u
g
-
1
5

S
e
p
-
1
5

O
c
t
-
1
5

Tweets by @GetAmbition
Tweets


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 93
• How influential they are (Network Score)
Ambition has a Klout score of 36 and is described by Klout as a
“Socialiser - You are the hub of social scenes and people count on
you to find out what's happening. You are quick to connect people
and readily share your social savvy. Your followers appreciate your
network and generosity.”

Facebook

Page Likes
Over the analysis period, the Ambition Facebook paged gained 384 Likes. These Likes
represent a user subscribing to a page, in order to receive that page’s updates/and posts in
their Facebook news stream.

Post Likes and Comments
Users can interact with Ambition’s Facebook posts by clicking Like for the individual post (as
distinct from Liking the Facebook page, above). They can also interact by leaving a
comment in response to a post on the Ambition page.
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
1
1
/
2
/
1
3

1
2
/
2
/
1
3

1
/
2
/
1
4

2
/
2
/
1
4

3
/
2
/
1
4

4
/
2
/
1
4

5
/
2
/
1
4

6
/
2
/
1
4

7
/
2
/
1
4

8
/
2
/
1
4

9
/
2
/
1
4

1
0
/
2
/
1
4

1
1
/
2
/
1
4

1
2
/
2
/
1
4

1
/
2
/
1
5

2
/
2
/
1
5

3
/
2
/
1
5

4
/
2
/
1
5

5
/
2
/
1
5

6
/
2
/
1
5

7
/
2
/
1
5

8
/
2
/
1
5

9
/
2
/
1
5

1
0
/
2
/
1
5

Total Facebook PAGE Likes


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 94

The Facebook page was visited by 1210 unique users.




























0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
1
1
/
2
/
1
3

1
2
/
2
/
1
3

1
/
2
/
1
4

2
/
2
/
1
4

3
/
2
/
1
4

4
/
2
/
1
4

5
/
2
/
1
4

6
/
2
/
1
4

7
/
2
/
1
4

8
/
2
/
1
4

9
/
2
/
1
4

1
0
/
2
/
1
4

1
1
/
2
/
1
4

1
2
/
2
/
1
4

1
/
2
/
1
5

2
/
2
/
1
5

3
/
2
/
1
5

4
/
2
/
1
5

5
/
2
/
1
5

6
/
2
/
1
5

7
/
2
/
1
5

8
/
2
/
1
5

9
/
2
/
1
5

1
0
/
2
/
1
5

Total POST Likes and Comments


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 95
Appendix B
Organisations that attended or viewed the
seminars, workshops and presentations.

100%Open 14c Studio 1745 Trading Company
21nine Advertising 29 5pm.co.uk
9-20recruitment 999 Design Group Aalto school of
economics
Aberdeen Arts
Centre
Aberdeen College Aberdeen Foyer
Aberdeen
International Youth
Festival
Aberdeen Performing Arts Aberdeen University
Aberdeenshire
Council
Aberystwyth university Abigail Carney
Associates
Academy of Music &
Sound
ACCA UK Action Factory
Community Arts Ltd
affective media ltd Aillum Ltd alastaircook.com
Algiz Media All About Audiences All The Rage
Alpha Facilities Ambergreen Amor Group
An Lanntair An Tobar The Tobermory
Arts Centre
Anarkik3D Ltd
AND festival Andy Haldane Productions Anne Curtis
Anon Poetry Applecloud Films Ltd. Argyll & Bute
Council
Arika Heavy
Industries
Art in Healthcare Art Pistol
Artlink Arts and Theatres Trust
Fife
Arts Guild Theatre
Arts In Merkinch Arts Marketing Association Aspire Media
AttFife ATYN Creative Ltd Audiences East
Scotland
Audiences London AV9 Limited Axis
Bad Pony Media/Bad
Pony Television
Bahrain Polytechnic Bang! Productions
BBC Scotland Beam Benchmark
Communications


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 96
Benjamin McCulloch
Audio
Bett Associates
Consultants
Bettridge Centre
Binary Fable Birds of Paradise Theatre
Company
BITWeb.tv
Black Swan Dance
Theatre / Brown
Paper Tickets
Blackwatch Media bleep purple
Blether Media Blobina Animations Bluemungus
Bodysurf Scotland Bonnar Keenlyside Booth Scotland Ltd
Border Crossing
Media
Bothy Messages Bouncesports
break-step
productions ltd
bridgwater college Bright Digital
Marketing
Brink Productions British Council Brown Paper Tickets
Brunton Theatre bsp Buidheann
Leasachaidh Ionad
Hiort
Burnside Research Byre Theatre c4di
Caledonian
University
Callisti Calman Trust
Calman Trust Ltd Canongate Books Carn to Cove
Caroline von
Schmalensee
Technical
Communicator
Carpets Plus Caru Ventures Ltd
Catalyst Catherine Wheels Theatre
Company
Catriona Ross
CCA Celtic Music Radio Center for Nordic
Studies, University
of the Highlands and
Islands
Central Station Centre for Contemporary
Arts (CCA)
Centre for
Educational
Leadership Edinburgh
University
CIRCA Connect Cisco Scotland Citizens Theatre
Citrus Mind Limited City of Edinburgh Council City of Literature
Trust
CIVIC cj-smith.net CMF Consulting
CMN Cognition DDS Collective Gallery


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 97
Collins Gallery Comms FM Ltd Connect
Communications
Conscia Contently Managed Coriolis Media
Cornerhouse Courtney Consulting Ltd Cove Park
craftscotland Creation Editor Ltd Creative Partners
Creative Cultures
Scotland
Creative Scotland Creative Scotland
Creative Services
(Scotland) Ltd
Creative Services, North
Lanarkshire Council
Creative Solutions
Creatively Digital Crostorfin Associates Cryptic
Cultural Enterprise
Office
Culture and Sport Glasgow Culture Sparks
Cumbernauld College Cumbernauld Theatre Dance Base
Dance House Dance Ihayami David Cumings
David Leslie
Associates
DDA Defnet Media
Design Unbound Ltd. Deveron Arts Diamond Edge
Productions
DigiCult Digital Curation Centre Digital Design
Scotland
Digital IP DigitalAgency.com Direct Distribution
Distrify Limited DMU Dogstar Theatre
Company
Doune The Rabbit
Hole Festival
Dovecot Studios dp digital media
Drake Music
Scotland
DUFI Art Ltd Dumfries & Galloway
Arts Festival
Dumfries and
Galloway Arts
Festival
Duncan of Jordanstone Dundee City Council
dundee contemporary
arts
Dundee Rep Theatre East Lindsey
District Council
East Lothian
Council
Eat Balanced Limited ECA - Moving Targets
Ecometrica Eden Court Eden Court Theatre
Edinburgh
International
Festival
Edinburgh Art Festival Edinburgh City
Libraries


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 98
Edinburgh Festival
Fringe
Edinburgh Festival Fringe Edinburgh Festival
Fringe Society
Edinburgh Fringe Edinburgh International
Book Festival
Edinburgh
International
Festival
Edinburgh
International Film
Festival
Edinburgh International
Science Festival
Edinburgh Jazz and
Blues Festival
Edinburgh Mela Edinburgh Museums and
Galleries
Edinburgh Napier Uni
Edinburgh Napier
University
Edinburgh Playhouse edinburgh
printmakers
Edinburgh Research
and Innovation
Edinburgh Science Triangle Edinburgh Sculpture
Workshop
Edinburgh Skillset
Screen & Media
Academy
Edinburgh University EDTC Technology
Gateway
Education Scotland Elevator Video Ltd Ellipsis Digital Ltd
Elspeth Gardner
Ceramics
Escrivo Internet
Consulting
ESEP Global
EUSA EventScotland Everything
Everywhere
Exeter Phoenix Falkirk Council Falkirk Council,
Cultural Services
Festival City
Theatres Trust
Festival Fringe Society Festivals Edinburgh
Festivals Edinburgh FiddleFolk Fife Contemporary
Art & Craft
Fife Council Fife Folk Museum Trust Filmhouse
FilmLive Media Ltd Fin Taw Studio & Gallery Findhorn Foundation
Fitscorer Flatrate Fledgling Press Ltd
Fletcher
Communications
folly Forestry Commission
Found Sounds Ltd Freelance freelance developer
Freetobook Fresh Focus Marketing Frugal Cool
Sustainability+Desig
n
full circle arts GamesAnalytics GANE
GANE - Growing
Audiences North
GAP Productions GEAC


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 99
East
GFT GFT and Glasgow Film
Festival
GFT/Glasgow Film
Festival
Giant Gibson Communications Ltd Giglets ltd.
Gilmore Productions Glasgay Glasgow Caledonian
University
Glasgow East Arts
Company
Glasgow East Arts Company
(Platform)
Glasgow Film Theatre
Glasgow Grows
Audiences (GGA)
Glasgow Homelessness
Network
Glasgow
international
Festival of Visual
Art
Glasgow Life Glasgow Museums Glasgow Print Studio
Glasgow School of
Art
Glasgow Sculpture Studios Glasgow Women's
Library
Glasgow's Concert
Halls
Glimpse GMG Radio
Good4HEALTH Ltd Good4HEALTH Ltd. Greenock Arts Guild
GSA guardian care Haddo User Group
Haiku Interactive Hamill Associates Hands Up for Trad
Harvey Nash Hazelton Health Improvers
Hebrides Ensemble Hebrides Ensemble Heehaw Digital
Heriot-Watt
University
HI~Arts HI-Arts
Highland Council Highland Print Studio Hockyfrilla
HOPE COUNSELLING
AND THERAPEUTIC
SERVICES
Horsecross Horsecross Arts
Horsecross Arts Ltd Howard Arts i2eye design studio
IA Centre ICCE, Goldsmiths ICIPIA Limited
IES Ltd ifoundry Illumina Digital
Illumina Scotland Imaginate Incentive Media
Independant Independent
Consultant/Artist
Indiana University
Inigo Media Inner Ear Ltd. Innovation Business
Innovative Craft insitebright Inspiring Open
Innovation Team


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 100
Interface Interface - The knowledge
connection for business
Interface3
Intermezzo International Network for
Contemporary Performing
Arts (IETM)
Inverleith House
Inverness Old Town
Art
IonRay Studios Jammy Music
Publishers Ltd
Jane Hogg
Consulting
Janice Parker Projects Johnston Carmichael
Joyworks! Juliebee Writing &
Photography
Jumbuck
Entertainment
Jumbuck
Entertainment Ltd.
K2L Ltd kasule design
Kerekes Gmbh Kevin McPhee Key Advice
Kinetica King's Theatre & Theatre
Royal Glasgow
Kingston University
Kinura Web Video kirkcaldy YMCA kk Interactive Ltd
klabkidz Knockando Woolmill Trust Learning and
Teaching Scotland
Leckie & Leckie Lemon Design literaturetraining
LizLeonardMedia Loc8 Solutions Loc8 Soutions
Loop & Layer LTS Lucidity Media
Ludometrics Lyceum Theatre Lynsey Stewart dot
com
M van Fullbroeck
Associates Ltd
Macrobert Arts Centre Malcolm cruickshank,
textile artist
Manaseven Manchester University Mannalution Limited
MashedUpMedia Matchlight Matthews Marketing
MBM Commercial LLP McClure Naismith LLP McIntosh Creative
MDDA mediaco-op MeetingMatrix
International
Meeting and Event
Technology Lab at
Queen Margaret U
MeetingMatrix
International
Meeting and Event
Technology Lab,
Queen Margaret Uni
Merchant City Glasgow and
Glasgay!
Merchant City
Marketing
Merchant City Merchant City Tourism & Merchant City


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 101
Tourism & Marketing
Co-op
Marketing Co-operative Tourism Marketing
Co-op
MET Lab, Queen
Margaret University
Midmar Hall Mimtech
Mind Over Matters MiNetwork Mint Digital
MMPC Mobius Digital Moray Art Centre
Moray College Moray Council Moray School of Art
Morton Consulting Motherwell Concert Hall Motherwell Concert
Hall and theatre
motiontime Moving Targets / ECA MTP LTD
Mull Theatre Museums Galleries Scotland Musicians' Union
Music-Makers My Pinkie Promise n/a
Nairn Book & Arts
Festival
National Galleries of
Scotland
National Galleries
of Scotland
National Museums
Scotland
National Theatre National Theatre of
Scotland
National Trust for
Scotland
National Youth Choir of
Scotland
nb
NEAT Neil Wilson Publishing Ltd NESPaP
NESTA Net Resources Ltd New Makar Marketing
& Copywriting
New Media Partners New Media Scotland New Moves
NewcastleGateshead
Initiative
NEXI Internet Television
Ltd
NLC
nmp nmp Ltd No1 Currency
North Ayrshire
Council Cultural
Services
North East Arts Touring North Lanarkshire
Council
North Lands
Creative Glass
North South Media NoTosh Digital Media
| Education
NoTosh Digital
Media | Education
Ltd
NSDesign Ltd NTS/Robert Burns
Birthplace Museum
Numbercult NVA NVA Europe Ltd.
NXV Ltd NYCoS NYOS
Occupancy Marketing Off the Wall Once Were Farmers
One Thumb Mobile Onyx - Disaster Recovery + Onyx Group


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 102
Ltd Business Continuity
Open Book PW Out of the Darkness
Theatre Company
outerglobe
OXYGEN FILMS PAL Technologies Ltd PAN
Panel Par Equity Paragise ltd
PCM creative PCM creative media PCM projects
PCMprojects Peacock Visual Arts photoworks
PHPR Ltd Ping Pirate Productions
Pirnie Limited Pitlochry Festival Theatre Plan B Collective
Planning Aid for
Scotland
Plexus Media Ltd PointShift
polka dot factory PoLR PoLR Ltd
Polybius Games Pooka.Pro Poorboy
Prescient Software Principal Proiseact nan Ealan
Promote YT Promote YT (Scotland) Promoters Arts
Network
property log bookc
company
Prophet Scotland Publishing Scotland
Puppet Animation
Scotland
Puppet state Puppet State Theatre
Co
Puppet State
Theatre Company
Purple Feather Ltd pza
Queen Margaret
University
Quotabl.es Quotables / Mint
Digital
Radiator Raise the Roof Productions Random Accomplice
RCAHMS Reeling & Writhing Regional Screen
Scotland
Renfrewshire Arts
and Museums
RGU Richard Faint
Right Lines
Productions
River Clyde Homes Robert Gordon
University
Roger Tomlinson
Limited
Royal Commission on the
Ancient & Historical
Monuments of Scotland
Royal Lyceum Theatre
Royal Scottish
Academy of Music
and Drama
Royal Scottish National
Orchestra
RSAMD


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 103
RSNO RTPI Rude Mechanicals
Rundomo RZSS Saltire Foundation
Sara Keith Design Saraband Saville-Ferguson
sbworks SCDI School of Law,
Glasgow University
Science City York Scotland Scots Music Group
ScottCom Ltd Scottish Arts Council Scottish Ballet
Scottish Book Trust Scottish Centre for
Enabling Technologies
Scottish Centre for
Enabling Technology
Scottish Chamber
Orchestra
Scottish Dance Theatre Scottish Ensemble
Scottish Enterprise Scottish Healthcare Scottish Music
Centre
scottish music
industry
association
Scottish National Jazz
Orchestra
Scottish Opera
Scottish Poetry
Library
Scottish Refugee Council Scottish Screen
Scottish
Storytelling Centre
Scottish Traditions of
Dance Trust
Scottish Youth
Theatre
Scottish Youth
Theatre
Scran Scran/RCAHMS
Screen Academy
Scotland
SEPA SERPS Invaders Ltd.
Seven Stories Shelter Scotland Shetland Moving
Image Project
SIAA Skylark Energy Systems Smallpetitklein
Dance Company
Solar Bear Ltd Solvebrand Ltd sound
sound festival &
Woodend Barn
sound, north east
scotland's festival ofnew
music
Source Developments
SourceRail Spagetti Place plc Specialmove
Spider Online Spot Specific Stable Recordings
StAnza StAnza: Scotland's
International Poetry
Festival
Stellar Quines
Stellar Quines Stellar Quines Theatre Co Stellar Quines
Theatre Company


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 104
Stills Stirling Centre for
International Publishing &
Communication
Stirling Council
Stirling Council
Adult Learning Team
StoreSeen Limited Storm ID
Storm ID Stow College Strathclyde
Forensics
Strathpeffer
Pavilion
Street Level Street Level
Photoworks
Sts-Digital Ltd Stuart Brown research &
production
STV
SurefireTV SwellPath Interactive T/A Triple Text
Translations
TAB taigh chearsabhagh Taigh Chearsabhagh
Museum & Arts Centre
taigh chearsabhagh
trust
TAQTW Tarbat Community
Hall Group
Technology Consult Telaco Ltd Tern
The Arches The Audience Business The British Council
The Butterworth
Gallery
The Buzz Agency The Byre Theatre
The CatStrand The Centre for Nordic
Studies at UHI
The Common Guild
The Edinburgh Mela The Edinburgh Mela The Festival Fringe
Society
The Findhorn
Foundation
The Forest The Forest of Black
the future
laboratory
The Glasgow School of Art The Grassic Gibbon
Centre
The Holywood Trust The Hub The Journal
The Leith Gallery The List The List Ltd.
The LOT Edinburgh The Lyceum Theatre The MET Lab, Queen
Margaret University
The Motherwell
Concert Hall and
Theatre
The National Youth
Orchestras of Scotland
The Presentation
Business
The Queen's Hall The Royal Collection The Royal Scottish
Academy of Music &
Drama
The Royal Town The Ruby Trubies The Saltire Society


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
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Page | 105
Planning Institute
The Studio The Technology Club Ltd The Travelling
Gallery
The Tron Theatre The Union The Work Room
The Writer's
Compass (formerly
literaturetraining)
Theatre Cryptic Theatre Workshop
Scotland
Theatrical
Solutions
thekiltedcomposer.com tictoc
Timespan TInCAN (The international
Contemporary Arts Network)
National Youth
Orchestras of
Scotland
Tolbooth Tolbooth / Stirling
Council
Tourism Innovation
Group
Touzie Tyke Town Hall & Symphony Hall Travelling Gallery
Traverse Theatre Traverse Theatre Company Traverse Theawtre
Tribalogic Ltd. Tricast Solutions Ltd Tricast Solutions
ltd.
Trigger Tron Theatre Ltd
TVI - The Value
Innovators Ltd
Twintangibles TWS
University of
Dundee
undp Unique Events
Universal Hall Universal Hall Ltd University of
Abertay Dundee
University of
Dundee
University of Edinburgh University of
Glasgow
University of
Manchester
University of St Andrews University of
Stirling
University of
Strathclyde
University of the West of
Scotland
University of
Westminster
Usher Hall,
Edinburgh
UWS Vanishing Point
Visible Fictions VisitScotland/EventScotlan
d
Visual Arts and
Galleries
Association
Visual Arts and
Galleries
Association (VAGA)
Vital Grooves Voice
Voice of my Own Wasps Artists Studios Wasps Artists'


AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 106
Studios
Vector76 Waverley Books Waves PR
Wasps Studios We Make Sense Ltd WebAge
WebPhysio Wee Stories West Lothian Council
Wilderness Of
Tigers
Wildfire Wilson Digital
Woodend Barn Winterwell Associates WOM@TT (World of
Music @ The
Tabernacle)
Wriggly Rascals Ltd World Club HQ Ltd wowdewow
www.mulliganplus.co
m
Wright & Co WWF UK
xanthe film & tv
ltd
xanthefilm@yahoo.co.uk Youth Scotland
YDance Yomego Young Scot




Appendix C - Partners & Associates Online
survey Questionnaire




AmbITion Scotland Evaluation




AmbITion Scotland evaluation - Final report
culturesparks.co.uk
Page | 107

Culture Sparks are conducting an evaluation of the 2010 / 2011 AmbITion
Scotland programme and your participation is vital
to gathering information to assist in establishing if the project has fulfilled its
key objectives.

Please be as honest and open in your feedback as possible.

If you have any comments or questions about this survey or the evaluation
programme more generally,
please get in touch with me at jim@culturesparks.co.uk or 0141 248 6864.





1.
How did you initially find out about the AmbITion Scotland opportunity?
35 (100.0%)

2.
Could the marketing of the programme have been improved in any way?
6 (17.1%) Yes
10 (28.6%) No
19 (54.3%) Don't know


3.
How do you think the marketing of the programme could have been improved?
6 (100.0%)


4.
Which of the following words or phrases do you think apply to your experience of the initial
application process?
14 (40.0%) Challenging
8 (22.9%) Complex
6 (17.1%) Confusing
7 (20.0%) Clear criteria for successful selection
1 (2.9%) Easy
7 (20.0%) Frustrating
12 (34.3%) Thought provoking
6 (17.1%) Inspiring
9 (25.7%) Straightforward
0 (0.0%) Unnecessary
0 (0.0%) Overwhelming

5.
Please use the following box to expand on your thoughts in relation to the application:
29 (82.9%)


6.
How fair do you feel the application selection process was from your perspective?
8 (22.9%) Very Fair
9 (25.7%) Quite Fair


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7 (20.0%) Neither/Nor
2 (5.7%) Quite Unfair
0 (0.0%) Very Unfair
9 (25.7%) Don't Know

7.
Why do you say that?
35 (100.0%)


8.
If you were required to create a business case to support your application,
how easy or difficult did you find the process of developing a business case?
1 (2.9%) Very Easy
10 (28.6%) Quite Easy
3 (8.6%) Neither/Nor
6 (17.1%) Quite Difficult
3 (8.6%) Very Difficult
4 (11.4%) Don't Know
8 (22.9%) Did not have to create a business case


9.
In what way could it have been made easier for your organisation?
9 (100.0%)


10.
To what extent has AmbITion Scotland contributed to the following within your organisation?

Substantial
Contribution
Some
contribution but
more benefit
anticipated
Little or no
contribution to
date
Don't know if it
has contributed
Not relevant to
my
organisation


Raising technology capacity and
integrated ICT implementation
8 (22.9%) 14 (40.0%) 12 (34.3%) 1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%)

Changing working practices, job roles
and or organisational / operational
structures
3 (8.6%) 20 (57.1%) 9 (25.7%) 3 (8.6%) 0 (0.0%)

Obtaining efficient, integrated,
digitally-based customer relationship
management systems: i.e. ticketing
systems, websites, fundraising and
other databases
7 (20.0%) 12 (34.3%) 12 (34.3%) 1 (2.9%) 3 (8.6%)

Training staff, improving ‘digital
literacy’ of boards and skilling the
senior management teams in the
implementation of new technologies,
business and artistic practices
3 (8.6%) 22 (62.9%) 8 (22.9%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (5.7%)

Acquiring better knowledge about
existing audiences
1 (2.9%) 13 (37.1%) 16 (45.7%) 4 (11.4%) 1 (2.9%)

Developing more attractive content
that potential audiences could easily
find
9 (25.7%) 14 (40.0%) 11 (31.4%) 1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%)

Providing equitable access to content
for anyone with a connection to the
internet (mobility / hearing / sight
impairments)
2 (5.7%) 9 (25.7%) 17 (48.6%) 6 (17.1%) 1 (2.9%)

Enabling audiences to participate and
communicate with your organisation
effectively and deeply online
4 (11.4%) 23 (65.7%) 7 (20.0%) 1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%)

Overall, increasing organisational
effectiveness
3 (8.6%) 20 (57.1%) 11 (31.4%) 1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%)


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Overall, improving levels of public
engagement with your organisation
7 (20.0%) 20 (57.1%) 7 (20.0%) 1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%)


11.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding
the Specialist Advisor you worked with:

Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


The Specialist Advisor made an
excellent contribution to our project
10
(28.6%)
8
(22.9%)
10
(28.6%)
2 (5.7%) 4
(11.4%)
1 (2.9%)

We found the Specialist Advisor
difficult to work with at times
1 (2.9%) 5
(14.3%)
11
(31.4%)
10
(28.6%)
8
(22.9%)
0 (0.0%)

Communication with the Specialist
Advisor was very easy
7
(20.0%)
17
(48.6%)
5
(14.3%)
4
(11.4%)
2 (5.7%) 0 (0.0%)

The Specialist Advisor ’s skills were
not a perfect match for our project
3 (8.6%) 11
(31.4%)
7
(20.0%)
9
(25.7%)
4
(11.4%)
1 (2.9%)

There was not enough time with the
Specialist Advisor
5
(14.3%)
7
(20.0%)
16
(45.7%)
6
(17.1%)
0 (0.0%) 1 (2.9%)

The Specialist Advisor fully
understood our needs
5
(14.3%)
13
(37.1%)
9
(25.7%)
4
(11.4%)
3 (8.6%) 1 (2.9%)


12.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding
the programme of knowledge and learning events which have taken place within the AmbITion
Scotland project:

Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


The programme of events was
interesting
9
(25.7%)
18
(51.4%)
7
(20.0%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1 (2.9%)

The programme of events was not
relevant to my organisation
0 (0.0%) 3 (8.6%) 7
(20.0%)
21
(60.0%)
3 (8.6%) 1 (2.9%)

The events I attended were
professionally staged
7
(20.0%)
22
(62.9%)
4
(11.4%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (5.7%)

There was not enough marketing
activity for the events
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 8
(22.9%)
23
(65.7%)
3 (8.6%) 1 (2.9%)

I would have liked to have attended
more of the events than I did
5
(14.3%)
15
(42.9%)
11
(31.4%)
1 (2.9%) 1 (2.9%) 2 (5.7%)

The events have a valuable legacy
because they can be accessed on
demand online at a future date
9
(25.7%)
19
(54.3%)
3 (8.6%) 2 (5.7%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (5.7%)


13.
Please indicate the helpfulness of the following, if used:

Helpful Not helpful Not used Don't Know


Member of the ‘ning’ 7 (20.0%) 16 (45.7%) 9 (25.7%) 3 (8.6%)

Posted a blog on the 'ning' 1 (2.9%) 3 (8.6%) 30 (85.7%) 1 (2.9%)

How to Guide(s) 22 (62.9%) 0 (0.0%) 10 (28.6%) 3 (8.6%)

Case Studies 19 (54.3%) 0 (0.0%) 14 (40.0%) 2 (5.7%)

Participated in a web cast 19 (54.3%) 1 (2.9%) 13 (37.1%) 2 (5.7%)

Posted a question on the 'ning' 3 (8.6%) 4 (11.4%) 25 (71.4%) 3 (8.6%)

Swop Shop 0 (0.0%) 1 (2.9%) 31 (88.6%) 3 (8.6%)

Appoint an Intern to work on the
project
1 (2.9%) 2 (5.7%) 30 (85.7%) 2 (5.7%)

Made connections with other
organisations via Connections site
7 (20.0%) 1 (2.9%) 26 (74.3%) 1 (2.9%)

The phone bank 4 (11.4%) 2 (5.7%) 28 (80.0%) 1 (2.9%)

The Facebook Page 11 (31.4%) 1 (2.9%) 22 (62.9%) 1 (2.9%)


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Tweet using the #getambition hashtag 15 (42.9%) 1 (2.9%) 16 (45.7%) 3 (8.6%)

Post or use photos from the Flickr
stream
1 (2.9%) 2 (5.7%) 29 (82.9%) 3 (8.6%)

14.
Please expand on any of these issues if you have additional comments:
12 (34.3%)


15.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding
the AmbITion Scotland programme team?


Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


The team could have communicated
more effectively
1 (2.9%) 4
(11.4%)
13
(37.1%)
12
(34.3%)
5
(14.3%)
0 (0.0%)

The team were very professional 9
(25.7%)
23
(65.7%)
3 (8.6%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The team kept the project on track 9
(25.7%)
13
(37.1%)
10
(28.6%)
1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (5.7%)

I'm not sure what the team did 1 (2.9%) 3 (8.6%) 10
(28.6%)
17
(48.6%)
2 (5.7%) 2 (5.7%)

The team were responsive when I
raised an issue or voiced a concern
13
(37.1%)
13
(37.1%)
7
(20.0%)
1 (2.9%) 0 (0.0%) 1 (2.9%)

The team were knowledgeable and
helped me answer my questions
10
(28.6%)
18
(51.4%)
6
(17.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1 (2.9%)


16.
What do you feel have been the major challenges for your organisation in relation to participating in
the AmbITion Scotland programme?

33 (94.3%)

17.
Is there anything more the AmbITion Scotland team could have done to assist you achieve greater
success with this programme?
7 (20.0%) Yes
12 (34.3%) No
16 (45.7%) Don't know


18.
What more could they have done?
7 (100.0%)


19.
Do you have any other comments to make about your experience with the AmbITion Scotland
programme?
19 (54.3%)


4
.
Finally, please complete the following details:

20.
Your Name (this will be kept confidential):
35 (100.0%)


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21.
Your Organisation (this will be kept confidential):
35 (100.0%)

22.
You are an...
16 (45.7%) AmbITion Scotland Partner
19 (54.3%) AmbITion Scotland Associate

23.
Are you willing to take part in further research, if this is required? This may take the form of a
Telephone discussion or perhaps an Online focus group.
25 (71.4%) Yes
10 (28.6%) No

24.
Do we have your permission to attribute any comments to your organisation?
17 (48.6%) Yes
18 (51.4%) No

25.
Do we have your permission to advise the AmbITion Scotland team of your comments?
28
(80.0%)
Yes
7 (20.0%) No










Appendix D - Specialist Advisors Online survey
Questionnaire





AmbITi on Scotl and Eval uati on




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Culture Sparks are conducting an evaluation of the 2010 / 2011 AmbITion
Scotland programme and your participation is vital
to gathering information to assist in establishing if the project has fulfilled its
key objectives.

Please be as honest and open in your feedback as possible.

If you have any comments or questions about this survey or the evaluation
programme more generally,
please get in touch with me at jim@culturesparks.co.uk or 0141 248 6864.





1.
How did you initially find out about AmbITion Scotland?
9 (100.0%)

2.
Could the marketing of the programme to potential consultants/advisors
have been improved in any way?
2 (22.2%) Yes
1 (11.1%) No
6 (66.7%) Don't know


3.
How do you think the marketing of the programme could have been improved?
2 (100.0%)


4.
Which of the following words or phrases do you think apply to your experience
of the initial application process?
1 (11.1%) Challenging
0 (0.0%) Complex
0 (0.0%) Confusing
3 (33.3%) Clear criteria for successful selection
1 (11.1%) Easy
0 (0.0%) Frustrating
2 (22.2%) Thought provoking
0 (0.0%) Inspiring
8 (88.9%) Straightforward
0 (0.0%) Unnecessary
0 (0.0%) Overwhelming

5.
Please use the following box to expand on your thoughts in relation to
the application process?
5 (55.6%)


6.
How fair do you feel the application selection process was from your perspective?
2 (22.2%) Very Fair


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2 (22.2%) Quite Fair
3 (33.3%) Neither/Nor
0 (0.0%) Quite Unfair
0 (0.0%) Very Unfair
2 (22.2%) Don't Know

7.
Why do you say that?
9 (100.0%)


8.
Could the selection process have been improved in any way?
1 (11.1%) Yes
1 (11.1%) No
6 (66.7%) Don't Know


9.
In what way could the selection process have been improved?
2 (100.0%)


10.
If you were required to help create a business case to support the application
by one of the organisations, how easy or difficult did you find the process
of developing a business case?
2 (22.2%) Very Easy
3 (33.3%) Quite Easy
2 (22.2%) Neither/Nor
1 (11.1%) Quite Difficult
0 (0.0%) Very Difficult
0 (0.0%) Don't Know
1 (11.1%) Did not have to create a business case


11.
In what way could it have been made easier for you to assist the organisation(s)?
1 (100.0%)


12.
To what extent do you consider that your involvement in the AmbITion Scotland project has
contributed to the following, within the organisation(s) you worked with?

(We realise that you may have worked with several organisations, and that experiences may have
differed between organisations - but we would like your overall impressions.)

Substantial
Contribution
Some
contribution but
more benefit
anticipated
Little or no
contribution to
date
Don't know if it
has contributed
Not relevant to
organisation(s)
I worked with


Raised their technology capacity and
integrated ICT implementation
5 (55.6%) 4 (44.4%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

Changed their working practices, job
roles and or organisational /
operational structures
5 (55.6%) 3 (33.3%) 0 (0.0%) 1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%)

They obtained efficient, integrated,
digitally-based customer relationship
management systems: i.e. ticketing
systems, websites, fundraising and
other databases
4 (44.4%) 2 (22.2%) 1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (22.2%)


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Trained staff, improved ‘digital literacy’
of boards and skilling the senior
management teams in the
implementation of new technologies,
business and artistic practices
6 (66.7%) 2 (22.2%) 1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

They acquired better knowledge about
existing audiences
3 (33.3%) 3 (33.3%) 1 (11.1%) 1 (11.1%) 1 (11.1%)

They developed more attractive
content that potential audiences could
easily find
3 (33.3%) 5 (55.6%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1 (11.1%)

They provided equitable access to
content for anyone with a connection
to the internet (mobility / hearing /
sight impairments)
2 (22.2%) 3 (33.3%) 2 (22.2%) 1 (11.1%) 1 (11.1%)

Enabled audiences to participate and
communicate with their Organisation
effectively and deeply online
4 (44.4%) 3 (33.3%) 2 (22.2%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

Overall, Increased their organisational
effectiveness
4 (44.4%) 3 (33.3%) 2 (22.2%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

Overall, Improved their levels of public
engagement with their organisation
3 (33.3%) 4 (44.4%) 1 (11.1%) 1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%)

13.
Please use the space here to provide any specific or additional comments you
may have related to the impact of the project with the organisations you worked
with (including any differences between the different organisations you worked with):
7 (77.8%)


14.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements
regarding the organisation(s) you worked with:

(Again, we realise that you may have worked with several organisations and experiences
may have differed between organisations - but we would be grateful for your overall
impressions.)

Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


They made an excellent contribution
to the project
5
(55.6%)
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

We found the organisation(s) difficult
to work with at times
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
1
(11.1%)
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%)

Communication with the
organisation(s) was very easy
1
(11.1%)
4
(44.4%)
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

Their desires were not a perfect match
for our skills
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 4
(44.4%)
4
(44.4%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%)

The organisation(s) we worked with
exceeded our expectations regarding
their willingness to engage
1
(11.1%)
2
(22.2%)
3
(33.3%)
2
(22.2%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%)

There was not enough time with the
organisation(s)
1
(11.1%)
3
(33.3%)
3
(33.3%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The organisation(s) fully understood
our contribution
1
(11.1%)
4
(44.4%)
1
(11.1%)
3
(33.3%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)


15.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following
statements regarding the programme of knowledge and learning events which
have taken place within the AmbITion Scotland project:

Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


The programme of events was
interesting
2
(22.2%)
5
(55.6%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)



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The programme of events was not
relevant to the organisation(s) I
worked with
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)
6
(66.7%)
0 (0.0%) 2
(22.2%)


The events I attended were
professionally staged
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 3
(33.3%)


There was not enough marketing
activity for the events
0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)
2
(22.2%)
4
(44.4%)
1
(11.1%)
1
(11.1%)


I would have liked to have attended
more of the events than I did
1
(11.1%)
5
(55.6%)
3
(33.3%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The events have a valuable legacy
because they can be accessed on
demand online at a future date
3
(33.3%)
3
(33.3%)
2
(22.2%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)


16.
Please indicate the helpfulness of the following, if used:

Helpful Not helpful Not used Don't Know


Member of the ‘ning’ 6 (66.7%) 1 (11.1%) 2 (22.2%) 0 (0.0%)

Posted a blog on the 'ning' 4 (44.4%) 1 (11.1%) 4 (44.4%) 0 (0.0%)

How to Guide(s) 7 (77.8%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (22.2%) 0 (0.0%)

Case Studies 7 (77.8%) 0 (0.0%) 2 (22.2%) 0 (0.0%)

Participated in a web cast 5 (55.6%) 0 (0.0%) 4 (44.4%) 0 (0.0%)

Posted a question on the 'ning' 3 (33.3%) 1 (11.1%) 5 (55.6%) 0 (0.0%)

Swop Shop 0 (0.0%) 1 (11.1%) 7 (77.8%) 1 (11.1%)

Made connections with other
organisations via Connections site
0 (0.0%) 1 (11.1%) 8 (88.9%) 0 (0.0%)

The phone bank 1 (11.1%) 1 (11.1%) 7 (77.8%) 0 (0.0%)

The Facebook Page 1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%) 8 (88.9%) 0 (0.0%)

Tweet using the #getambition hashtag 3 (33.3%) 0 (0.0%) 6 (66.7%) 0 (0.0%)

Post or use photos from the Flickr
stream
1 (11.1%) 0 (0.0%) 8 (88.9%) 0 (0.0%)

17.
Please expand on any of these issues if you have additional comments:
3 (33.3%)


18.
Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding
the AmbITion Scotland programme team:


Agree
Strongly
Agree Neither
agree nor
disagree
Disagree Disagree
Strongly
Don't Know


The team could have communicated
more effectively
0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 6
(66.7%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%)

The team were very professional 4
(44.4%)
4
(44.4%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The team were supportive and
encouraging
4
(44.4%)
4
(44.4%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The team kept the project on track 3
(33.3%)
3
(33.3%)
1
(11.1%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)


I'm not sure what the team did 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 1
(11.1%)
6
(66.7%)
2
(22.2%)
0 (0.0%)

The team were responsive when I
raised an issue or voiced a concern
5
(55.6%)
3
(33.3%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)

The team were knowledgeable and
helped me answer my questions
1
(11.1%)
7
(77.8%)
1
(11.1%)
0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%) 0 (0.0%)




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19.
What do you feel have been the major challenges for your organisation(s)
in relation to fulfilling the AmbITion Scotland programme?

6 (66.7%)

20.
Is there anything more the AmbITion Scotland team could have done
to assist you in achieving greater success with this programme?
1 (11.1%) Yes
5 (55.6%) No
3 (33.3%) Don't know


21.
What more could they have done?
1 (100.0%)


22.
Do you have any other comments to make about your experience
e with the AmbITion Scotland programme?
6 (66.7%)


4
.
Finally, please complete the following details:

23.
Your Name (this will be kept confidential):
9 (100.0%)

24.
Your Organisation (this will be kept confidential):
9 (100.0%)

25.
Are you willing to take part in further research, if this is required?
This may take the form of a Telephone discussion or perhaps an Online focus group.
7 (77.8%) Yes
2 (22.2%) No

26.
Do we have your permission to attribute any comments to your organisation?
4 (44.4%) Yes
5 (55.6%) No



27.
Do we have your permission to advise the AmbITion Scotland team
of your comments?
7 (77.8%) Yes
2 (22.2%) No




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Thank you very much for your participation.

If you have any comments or questions please contact me -
jim@culturesparks.co.uk or 0141 248 6864

James Law
Culture Sparks
Suite 1/1, 6 Dixon Street, Glasgow G1 4AX
www.culturesparks.co.uk