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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1

Module 1 page 7 Overview collocation /,Il'Icin/ Commit a crime is a typical collocation in English.
Module 1 page 7 Overview register /'rcdis/ Business letters should be written in a formal register.
Module 1 page 7 Overview reference /'rcfrns/ We will need a reference from your former employers.
Module 1 page 7 Overview aspect /'spcI/ Dealing with people is the most important aspect of my work.
Module 1 page 7 Overview priority /prai'ri/ The clubs priority is to win the League.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading broaden /'br:dn/ The course helps school-leavers broaden their knowledge of the world
of work.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading setback /'scbI/ The teams hopes of playing in Europe suffered a setback last night.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading on record /n 'rcI:d/ This month has been the wettest on record.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading compensate /'Impnsci/ Her intelligence compensates for her lack of experience.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading miss out on /,mis 'a n/ Make sure you dont miss out on the fun!
Module 1 pages 89 Reading award /'v:d/ 45,000 was awarded to a typist who injured her hand by working long hours.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading finance /'fainns, fi'nns/ The concerts are financed by the Arts Council.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading passion /'pn/ Gardening was her great passion.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading hardship /'h:dip/ Many students are suffering severe financial hardship.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading resilient /ri'zilin/ Amy will soon be out of hospital children of her age are very resilient.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading chance encounter /,:ns in'Ian/ A chance encounter with a journalist changed her life.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading potentially /p'cnli/ Sculpture workshops are potentially dangerous work sites.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading outlook /'alI/ Hes got a good outlook on life.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading confirm /In'fs:m/ New evidence has confirmed the first witnesss story.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading sacrifice /'sIrifais/ She brought three children up single-handedly, often at great
personal sacrifice.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading pursue /p's|u:/ She plans to pursue a career in politics.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading exploration /,cIspl'rcin/ They used the hut as a base for explorations into the mountains.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading backpacking /'bI,pIi/ Backpacking is popular among students and young people.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading ideal /ai'dil/ In an ideal world there would be no need for a police force.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading gap year /'qp |i/ Some students choose to work in high-tech industries during their gap year.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading on a budget /n 'bnd/ Travellers on a budget might prefer to camp.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 pages 89 Reading sheltered /'cld/ I had led a sheltered life and had never experienced such cruelty before.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading upbringing /'np,brii/ Mike had had a strict upbringing.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading make up for /mciI 'np f/ I dont eat breakfast but I make up for it at lunch.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading grant /qr:n/ The university gets a government grant.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading put forward /p 'f:vd/ They put forward a number of suggestions.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading retrace /ri'rcis, ri:-/ We shall be retracing the route taken by Marco Polo.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading turn out /,s:n 'a/ It was a difficult time, but eventually things turned out all right.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading dare /dc/ He wanted to ask her, but he didnt dare.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading adaptable /'dpbl/ Children are often more adaptable than adults.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading supervisor /'su:pvaiz, 's|u:-/ She has worked her way up the company and is now supervisor of fifty
staff members.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading undertake /,nnd'ciI/ Dr Johnson undertook the task of writing a comprehensive English dictionary.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading privileged /'privlidd/ Kylie feels fortunate to be in such a privileged position because of her
successful TV career.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading tribal /'raibl/ They performed a tribal dance.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading gather /'q/ The researchers job is to gather information about people.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading complex /'ImplcIs/ Photosynthesis is a highly complex process.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading generation /,dcn'rcin/ The need to preserve the planet for future generations.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading cut short /,In ':/ His career was tragically cut short when, at the age of forty-two,
he died of a heart attack.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading contract /In'rI/ Two-thirds of the adult population there has contracted AIDS.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading malaria /m'lcri/ Researchers hope to find a biological factor that protects some children
against malaria.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading whet sbs appetite /,vc snmbdiz 'pai/ The view from the bridge whetted my appetite for a trip on the lake.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading put sth to the test /,p snmi 'cs/ We put fifteen rain jackets to the test and found that the Rainex was
the most effective.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading on the edge of sth /n i 'cd v ,snmi/ Their economy is on the edge of collapse.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading tease /i:z/ Dont get upset. I was only teasing.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading in the midst of /in 'mids v/ The government is in the midst of a major crisis.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading deprivation /,dcpri'vcin/ Sleep deprivation can result in mental disorders.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading bounce back /,bans 'bI/ The companys had a lot of problems in the past, but its always managed
to bounce back.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading stem from /'scm frm/ His headaches stemmed from problems with his eyesight.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading onlooker /'n,lI/ A crowd of onlookers had gathered at the scene of the accident.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 pages 89 Reading motive /'miv/ What do you suppose the killers motive was?
Module 1 pages 89 Reading catch up with /,I 'np vi/ At the moment our technology is more advanced, but other countries
are catching up with us.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading as a matter of course /z ,mr v 'I:s/ We will contact your former employer as a matter of course.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading take lightly /,ciI 'laili/ Divorce is not a matter you can afford to take lightly.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading live off /'liv f/ Mum used to live off the interest from her savings.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading pluck up the courage /,plnI np 'Inrid/ He finally plucked up the courage to ask her out.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading take the plunge /,ciI 'plnnd/ We took the plunge and set up our own business.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading embark on /im'b:I n/ He embarked on a new career as a teacher.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading mischief /'misif/ If you cant see Nick, you can be sure hes up to some mischief.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading turn (sb/sth) down /,s:n 'dan/ They offered her the job but she turned it down.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading flat /fl/ He turned my request down flat.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading set your heart on sth /,sc |: 'h: n ,snmi/ His father bought him the bike he had set his heart on.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading on a whim /n 'vim/ I decided on a whim to go to Hawaii.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading rigours /'riqz/ The stresses and rigours of modern life.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading analogous /'nlqs/ The reports findings are analogous with our own.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading intellectual /,in'lcIul/ Her job requires considerable intellectual effort.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading invaluable /in'vl|ubl, -|bl/ Your advice has been invaluable to us.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading means to an end /,mi:nz n 'cnd/ For Geoff, the job was simply a means to an end.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading discipline /'displin/ History and economics only became separate academic disciplines in
the 20th century.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading converge /In'vs:d/ The two rivers converge into one near Pittsburgh.
Module 1 pages 89 Reading subsidise /'snbsidaiz/ Farming is heavily subsidised by the government.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary reject /ri'dcI/ Its obvious why his application was rejected.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary force /f:s/ I had to force myself to get up this morning.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary remote /ri'm/ The helicopter crashed in a remote desert area.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary prejudge /,pri:'dnd/ Dont prejudge the woman before youve heard her story.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary dead-end (job) /,dcd cnd 'db/ Mother warned me Id get stuck in a dead end job if I didnt go to college.
Module 1 page 10 Vocabulary potter /'p/ His wife and twenty-eight year-old daughter are both potters.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 distinguish /di'siqvi/ His lawyer argued that Cope could not distinguish between right and wrong.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 objective /b'dcIiv/ The degree course has two main objectives.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 deadline /'dcdlain/ The deadline for applications is May 27th.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 assignment /'sainmn/ She stayed up late to complete a history assignment.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 standard /'sndd/ Students have to reach a certain standard or they wont pass.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 get hold of /qc 'hld v/ She managed to get hold of a copy of the script.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 safety margin /'scifi ,m:din/ Wed better leave ourselves a safety margin of at least ten minutes if we
want to be there on time.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 identify /ai'dcnifai/ Scientists have identified the gene that causes abnormal growth.
Module 1 page 11 Listening 1 come up with /Inm 'np vi/ Is that the best excuse you can come up with?
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 pick sth up /,piI snmi 'np/ I picked up a few words of Greek when I was there on holiday last year.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 trade /rcid/ Brian insisted that his sons learn a trade.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 charity /'ri/ Several charities sent aid to the flood victims.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 cheeky /'i:Ii/ I dont like teaching that class the kids are all so cheeky.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 chop /p/ Faith has asked for two high quality lamb chops and steak.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 authoritarian /:,ri'crin/ Critics claim his management has become too authoritarian.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 recruit /ri'Iru:/ New recruits are sent to the Atlanta office for training.
Module 1 page 12 English in use 1 drop out /,drp 'a/ The group gets smaller as members move away or drop out.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 function /'fnIn/ In your new job you will perform a variety of functions.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 be due to /bi 'd|u: / The foreign visitors are due to arrive tomorrow morning.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 be bound to /bi 'band / Lets not bother waiting for John. Hes bound to be late.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 be on the point/verge of /bi n 'pin v, 'vs:d/ Jane was on the point of leaving the house when the phone rang.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 tuition /|u'in/ I had to have extra tuition in Maths.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 fee /fi:/ The fee is 50 for a six-week art class.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 come into effect /,Inm in i'fcI/ The new law comes into effect next week.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 oppose /'pz/ Local residents will oppose the construction of a power plant in
their neighbourhood.
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 kick off /,IiI 'f/ What time does the match kick off?
Module 1 page 13 Language Developm. 1 dull /dnl/ Life is never dull when Elizabeth is here.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 mess about /,mcs 'ba/ He spent his vacation messing about on the farm.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 demanding /di'm:ndi/ Being a nurse in a busy hospital is a demanding job you dont get
much free time.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 rigorous /'riqrs/ The rigorous standards required by the college.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 placement /'plcismn/ Students are sent out on placement for training.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 reputable /'rcp|bl/ If you have a burglar alarm fitted, make sure it is done by a
reputable company.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 round off /,rand 'f/ You can round off the evening with a visit to the nightclub.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 shattered /'d/ By the time we got home we were both shattered.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 rewarding /ri'v:di/ Teaching can be a very rewarding career.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 attend /'cnd/ Only twelve people attended the meeting.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 completion /Im'pli:n/ The job is subject to your satisfactory completion of the training course.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 irritated /'irciid/ June gets extremely irritated by William smoking in the house.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 outstanding /a'sndi/ His performance was outstanding.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 publicise /'pnblisaiz/ They are going to publicise the unemployment issue.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 ratty /'ri/ I feel guilty about getting ratty with the children.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 a pat on the back / ,p n 'bI/ Alex deserves a pat on the back for all his hard work.
Module 1 page 14 Writing 1 evaluation /i,vl|u'cin/ They took some samples of products for evaluation.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 retrain /,ri:'rcin/ Shes hoping to retrain as a teacher.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 redundant /ri'dnndn/ Seventy factory workers were made redundant in the recent financial crisis.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 witness /'vins/ Several residents claim to have witnessed the attack.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 income /'iInm, 'in-/ People on a high income should pay more tax.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 strain /srcin/ I couldnt carry on working and caring for three children; the strain
was too much for me.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 superior /su:'piri, s|u:-/ My situation at work is extremely difficult as my superior has taken a
dislike to me.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 superficial /,su:p'fil, ,s|u:-/ Naturally, a short visit can allow only the most superficial understanding
of prison life.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 contribution /,Inri'b|u:n/ Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize for his contribution to Quantum Theory.
Module 1 page 15 Listening 2 stretch /src/ The works too easy. The students arent being stretched enough.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking get over /qc 'v/ She never got over the death of her son.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking assertive /'ss:iv/ Jack has a very assertive personality.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking decisive /di'saisiv/ We are still waiting for Jim to make up his mind. I wish he would be
more decisive.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking fair-minded /,fc 'maindid/ Hes a fair-minded man Im sure hell listen to what you have to say.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking flexible /'flcIsibl/ We can be flexible about your starting date.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking gregarious /qri'qcris/ Kim is gregarious and fun-loving.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking patient /'pcin/ Youll just have to be patient and wait till Im off the phone.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking persistent /p'sisn/ If she hadnt been so persistent she might not have got the job.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking sensible /'scnsbl/ Its sensible to keep a note of your passport number.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking sensitive /'scnsiv/ My brother pretends hes tough, but hes actually pretty sensitive.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking tactful /'Ifl/ It wasnt very tactful of you to ask whether hed put on weight.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking tolerant /'lrn/ Shes not very tolerant of other peoples failings.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking benefits /'bcnfis/ We offer an excellent salary and benefits package.
Module 1 pages 1617 Speaking whereas /vcr'z/ The old system was fairly complicated, whereas the new system is
really very simple.
Module 1 page 18 assume /'s|u:m/ I didnt see your car, so I assumed youd gone out.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 in advance /in d'v:ns/ I should warn you in advance that Im not a very good dancer.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 punctual /'pnIul/ Shes always very punctual for appointments.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 consideration /In,sid'rcin/ The murdered womans name has not been released, out of consideration
for her parents.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 impression /im'prcn/ When it comes to job interviews, first impressions are important.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 crucial /'Iru:l/ The work of monks was crucial in spreading Christianity.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 respond /ri'spnd/ Dave didnt respond to any of her e-mails.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 recommend /,rcI'mcnd/ I recommend that you get some professional advice.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 present yourself /pri'zcn |,sclf/ He presents himself well.
Module 1 page 18 English in use 2 critical /'IriiIl/ These talks are critical to the future of the peace process.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 deliberately /di'librli/ He was deliberately trying to upset her.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 overcharge /,v':d/ They were being overcharged for cheap beer.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 badge /bd/ We were each handed a badge with our name on it.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 ensure /in'/ All the necessary steps had been taken to ensure their safety.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 emotional /i'mnl/ She provided emotional support at a very distressing time for me.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 let (sb) down /,lc 'dan/ The worst feeling is having let our fans down.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 guarantee /,qrn'i:/ I guarantee youll love this film.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 anticipate /n'ispci/ Sales are better than we anticipated.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 reserve /ri'zs:v/ Id like to reserve a
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 sufficient /s'fin/ We can only prosecute if there is sufficient evidence.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 enclose /in'Ilz/ Please enclose a cheque with your order.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 trust /rns/ I trust your family are all in good health?
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 reduction /ri'dnIn/ Cleaner fuel has contributed to a reduction in air pollution.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 in the event of /in i i'vcn v/ He left a letter for me to read in the event of his death.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 cancellation /,Ins'lcin/ Rail passengers are fed up with cancellations and delays.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 fare /fc/ Air fares have increased by as much as twenty percent.
Module 1 page 19 Language Developm. 2 reimburse /,ri:im'bs:s/ The company will reimburse you for travel expenses.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 relevant /'rclvn/ Relevant documents were presented in court.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 neutral /'n|u:rl/ I always tried to remain neutral when they started arguing.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 domestic /d'mcsiI/ Unfortunately his domestic life wasnt very happy.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 kindergarten /'Iindq:n/ Katie was one of the few children who could read when she started
kindergarten.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 handle /'hndl/ The headmaster handled the situation very well.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 act/be in sbs best interest /,I in snmbdiz ,bcs 'inrs, ,bi/ Angela decided to act in her daughters best interests by withdrawing
her from the competition.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 appreciate /'pri:ici/ Her abilities are not fully appreciated by her employer.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 regret /ri'qrc/ I regret to tell you that you will be made redundant.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 drawback /'dr:bI/ The main drawback to your plan is that it requires a large amount of money.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 hesitation /,hcz'cin/ After some hesitation one of them began to speak.
Module 1 pages 2021 Writing 2 reservation /,rcz'vcin/ I had serious reservations about his appointment as captain.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review pliant /'plain/ Youre going to have to be more pliant your colleagues wont
appreciate your stubbornness.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review optimistic /,p'misiI/ We are still relatively optimistic that the factory can be saved.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review stance /s:ns/ What is your stance on environmental issues?
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review miss the boat /,mis 'b/ Youll miss the boat if you dont buy shares now.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review bend the rules /,bcnd 'ru:lz/ I think we can afford to bend the rules just this once!
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review hit the roof /,hi 'ru:f/ Put that back before Dad sees you and hits the roof!
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review timid /'imid/ I was a timid child.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review election /i'lcIn/ Elections will be held on 14
th
February.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review far and wide /,f:r n 'vaid/ The police searched far and wide but no trace of the stolen racehorse
could be found.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review off and on /,f nd 'n/ Ive been living here for five years, off and on.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review presumably /pri'z|u:mbli/ Its raining, which presumably means that your football match
will be cancelled.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review faint /fcin/ Several fans fainted in the blazing heat.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review scandalise /'sIndl-aiz/ His outspoken views scandalised the nation.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review tie the knot /,ai 'n/ They finally decided to tie the knot after being together for twenty-five years.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review get-together /'qc ,qc/ Were having a family get-together on Sunday.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review transfer /rns'fs:/ Id like to transfer 500 to my bank account.
Module 1 page 22 Module 1: Review proposal /pr'pzl/ The French government has approved proposals for a new waste law.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview interaction /,inr'In/ They aim to improve interaction between teacher and student.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview phenomena /f'nmn/ Homelessness, unemployment and poverty are not new phenomena
in modern society.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview genuine /'dcn|uin/ For years people thought the picture was a genuine Van Gogh, but in
fact its a fake.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview existence /iq'zisns/ It is impossible to prove the existence of ghosts.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview rationally /'rnli/ Im sure we can explain this rationally.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview quotation /Iv'cin/ The following quotation is taken from a nineteenth century travel diary.
Module 1 page 23 Module 2: Overview suffice /s'fais/ A light lunch will suffice.
Module 2

Module 2 pages 2425 Reading inexplicable /,iniI'spliIbl/ For some inexplicable reason, he felt depressed.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading spell-binding /'spcl ,baindi/ One of the Presidents most spell-binding TV performances was
shown on 27
th
July.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading conjuror /'Inndr/ The conjuror managed to convince the audience that the woman
was really inside the box.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading astonishing /'snii/ Their album has sold an astonishing eleven million copies.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading intimate /'inm/ Dinner was served in an intimate room with just two other tables.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading billionaire /,bil|'nc/ Anthony Hopkins plays a bookish billionaire who uses his money
to publish poetry.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading mayor /mc/ She was the first woman to be elected mayor in the town.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading rub /rnb/ She yawned and rubbed her eyes.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading signature /'siqn/ Her signature is totally illegible.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading treasury /'rcri/ It has cost the national treasury at least 210 million in the middle
of an economic crisis.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading visualise /'viulaiz/ I tried to visualise the house while he was describing it.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading digit /'didi/ This calculator can display only nine digits at a time.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading literally /'lirli/ The Olympic Games were watched by literally billions of people.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading shaken /'ciIn/ He was badly shaken by the attack.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading attribute sth to (sb/sth) /'rib|u: / The fall in the number of deaths from heart disease is generally
attributed to improvements in diet.
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Module 2 pages 2425 Reading connect /I'ncI/ They valued her ability to empathise and connect with others.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading engage /in'qcid/ The toy didnt engage her interest for long.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading inspire /in'spai/ The story was inspired by a chance meeting with an old Russian duke.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading parlour /'p:l/ I showed her into the parlour.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading trick /riI/ My uncle was always showing me card tricks when I was a kid.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading participate /p:'ispci/ Everyone in the class is expected to participate actively in these discussions.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading persuasion /p'svcin/ It had taken a great deal of persuasion to get him to accept.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading go hand in hand /q ,hnd in 'hnd/ Wealth and power go hand in hand in most societies.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading up to a point /,np 'pin/ I agree with you up to a point.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading smuggle /'smnql/ He smuggled his notes into the exam.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading tap /p/ He turned when somebody tapped him on the shoulder.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading feather /'fc/ An eagle feather.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading react /ri'I/ Peter reacted angrily to the suggestion that he had lied.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading swear /svc/ I never touched your purse, I swear!
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading volunteer /,vln'i/ Most of the relief work was done by volunteers.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading tumbler /'nmbl/ He poured the whiskey into a glass tumbler and handed it to the woman.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading interlink /,in'liI/ It is hoped that this policy will interlink the economies of both parts of Ireland.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading fist /fis/ She held the money tightly in her fist.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading inch /in/ The curtains were an inch too short.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading go off /q 'f/ The thieves ran away when the alarm went off.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading spiritual /'spiriul/ Painting helps fill a spiritual need for beauty.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading essentially /i'scnli/ Unemployment rates have remained essentially unchanged.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading supernatural /,su:p'nrl, ,s|u:-/ She claimed to have supernatural powers.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading seek out /,si:I 'a/ Our mission is to seek out the enemy and destroy them.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading exclusive /iI'sIlu:siv/ The committees exclusive focus will be to improve public transportation.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading eager /'i:q/ Hes a bright kid and eager to learn.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading distraction /di'srIn/ I study in the library as there are too many distractions at home.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading win sb round /,vin snmbdi 'rand/ Well be working hard over the next ten days to win round the
undecided voters.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading be obsessed with /bi b'scs vi/ A lot of young girls are obsessed with their weight.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading sell-out /'scl a/ The concert was expected to be a sell-out.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading by word of mouth /bai ,vs:d v 'ma/ Much of this information is picked up by word of mouth from
previous students.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading strike a chord /,sraiI 'I:d/ Many of the things she says will strike a chord with other young women.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading lucrative /'lu:Iriv/ He inherited a lucrative business from his father.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading go in for sth /q 'in f ,snmi/ I never really went in for sports.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading elaborate /i'lbr/ They organised a very elaborate presentation for the clients.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading function /'fnIn/ This room may be hired for weddings and other functions.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading sustain /s'scin/ This argument is difficult to sustain.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading scepticism /'sIcpisizm/ Arguments for the existence of the monster have met with a good
deal of scepticism.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading tender age /,cndr 'cid/ Nicholas was sent to boarding school at the tender age of seven.
Module 2 pages 2425 Reading weird /vid/ A really weird thing happened last night.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary PIN /pin/ A gang of five youths held her prisoner forcing her to reveal her PIN number.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary cheat /i:/ He had cheated in the Maths test by using a calculator.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary deceive /di'si:v/ He deceived the old lady into letting him into the house by pretending to be a
telephone engineer.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary sly /slai/ I wouldnt trust Dave. Hes very sly.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary demonstrate /'dcmnsrci/ The study demonstrates the link between poverty and malnutrition.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary scratch /sIr/ Dont scratch the rash will get infected.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary pat /p/ He patted the dog affectionately.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary stroke /srI/ He reached out and stroked her cheek tenderly.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary baffle /'bfl/ The question baffled me completely.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary search warrant /'ss: ,vrn/ Even a policeman wouldnt dare enter the house without a search warrant.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary ajar /'d:/ She had left her bedroom door ajar and could hear her parents
talking downstairs.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary vibration /vai'brcin/ I could feel the vibrations from the party coming through the walls.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary squeeze /sIvi:z/ He smiled as he squeezed her hand.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary punch /pnn/ He punched me and knocked my teeth out.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary grasp /qr:sp/ Alan grasped the handle and pulled it.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary itch /i/ The label on this shirt itches.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary slap /slp/ Sarah slapped John across the face.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary grab /qrb/ Two men grabbed her and pushed her to the ground.
Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary clutch /Iln/ She was clutching a bottle of champagne.
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Module 2 page 26 Vocabulary grip /qrip/ I gripped the rail and tried not to look down.
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 ritual /'riul/ He went through the ritual of making his tea.
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 lottery /'lri/ Do you really think winning the lottery would make you happy?
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 superstition /,su:p'sin, ,s|u:-/ Its an old superstition that walking under a ladder is unlucky.
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 discourse /'disI:s/ Shes presenting a discourse on Venetian art at the museum.
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 lucky charm /,lnIi ':m/ The girl had a lucky charm with a small gold horseshoe on it.
Module 2 page 27 Listening 1 sneeze /sni:z/ The dust was making him sneeze.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 monument /'mn|mn/ He erected a monument on the spot where his daughter was killed.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 carve /I:v/ Michelangelo carved this figure from a single block of marble.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 limestone /'laimsn/ It was made of local limestone, instead of marble, and roughened by weather.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 solely /'sl-li/ I shall hold you solely responsible for anything that goes wrong.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 crouch /Ira/ The little boy crouched under the table and hoped that nobody
would notice him.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 sustain /s'scin/ Two of the fire-fighters sustained serious injuries.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 erosion /i'rn/ Poor farming methods have contributed to increased soil erosion.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 invade /in'vcid/ The Romans invaded Britain 2000 years ago.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 target practice /':q ,prIis/ The area is used by the army for target practice.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 serpent /'ss:pn/ The serpent slithered across the ground towards us.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 fragment /'frqmn/ Some glass fragments hit me when the window was smashed.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 commentator /'Imnci/ A number of commentators have pointed out the importance of horses
in the writers work.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 speculate /'spcI|lci/ Edward began to speculate on what life would be like if he were to win
the lottery.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 legendary /'lcdndri/ The cave is the home of a legendary giant.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 flood /flnd/ The village was cut off by floods.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 weathering /'vcri/ The brick has received too much weathering and lost its colour.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 essence /'csns/ The essence of Arsenals style of football was speed.
Module 2 page 28 English in use 1 restore /ri's:/ The church was carefully restored after the war.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 date back /,dci 'bI/ The church dates back to the 13th century.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 worship /'vs:ip/ Please do not raise your voice in this holy place of worship.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 line up /,lain 'np/ The windows should be lined up with the door frame.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 transport /rn'sp:/ The company transports meat across the country in refrigerated containers.
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Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 incident /'insdn/ A spokesman said it was an isolated incident.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 yeti /'|ci/ There have been too many sightings of something resembling a yeti for
us to ignore them completely.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 extensively /iI'scnsivli/ Fire has damaged the islands forests quite extensively.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 antique /n'i:I/ Jacob collects antique fountain pens.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 diagnose /,daiq'nz/ A technician diagnosed a faulty pump in the engine.
Module 2 page 29 Language Developm. 1 tenant /'cnn/ The last tenants left the house in a terrible state so were having to repaint it.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 brainstorming /'brcin,s:mi/ The college is holding a brainstorming session to look at possible
funding sources.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 review /ri'v|u:/ The paper published a review of her book.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 leaflet /'li:fl/ Students were handing out election leaflets at the station.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 outline /'alain/ In a short statement, Alex gave an outline of his plans for the company.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 plot /pl/ As the plot unfolds, we discover that Jack isnt as innocent as he seems.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 spooky /'spu:Ii/ He lived in a spooky house in the middle of a thick dark wood.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 structured /'srnId/ The interviews were highly structured.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 eerie /'iri/ An eerie cry rang through the night.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 suspense /s'spcns/ Come on then, tell me what happened; the suspense is killing me.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 overall /,vr':l/ The overall cost of the exhibition was 400,000.
Module 2 page 30 Writing 1 angle /'ql/ Were approaching the issue from many different angles.
Module 2 page 31 Listening 2 regard sb/sth /ri'q:d ,snmbdi, ,snmi/ Edith was widely regarded as eccentric.
Module 2 page 31 Listening 2 prone /prn/ Hes always been prone to illness.
Module 2 page 31 Listening 2 open to /'pn / The 1960s was a period when greater opportunities were open to women.
Module 2 page 31 Listening 2 stress /srcs/ I cant stress strongly enough that you should not go out into the
mountains without the right equipment.
Module 2 pages 3233 Speaking living /'livi/ What does he do for a living?
Module 2 pages 3233 Speaking leisure time /'lc aim/ Most people now enjoy shorter working hours and more leisure time.
Module 2 pages 3233 Speaking struggle /'srnql/ Im finding it a terrible struggle trying to bring up my daughter and
work at the same time.
Module 2 pages 3233 Speaking permanently /'ps:mnnli/ The accident left him permanently disabled.
Module 2 page 34 English in use 2 coincidence /I'insdns/ By a strange coincidence the king was assassinated on the very spot
where his grandfather had been killed.
Module 2 page 34 English in use 2 acquaintance /'Ivcinns/ She was a casual acquaintance of my family in Vienna.
Module 2 page 34 English in use 2 willing /'vili/ Im willing to apologise if you will.
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Module 2 page 34 English in use 2 settle for /'scl f/ They want 2500 for it, but they might settle for 2000.
Module 2 page 34 English in use 2 absence /'bsns/ In the absence of any evidence, the police had to let Myers go.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 short notice /,: 'nis/ Why didnt you tell me yesterday that you needed the car. Its difficult
for me to change my plans at such short notice.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 bump into /,bnmp 'in/ I bumped into Jean in town this morning.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 catch up on /,I 'np n/ The first thing I did when I got home was to phone up Jo and catch up on
all the gossip.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 squash /sIv/ She always likes a game of squash with her mates from work on Friday
afternoons.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 suspect /'snspcI/ The suspect is being held by the police.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 evidence /'cvidns/ Youve got absolutely no evidence to prove that Emily cheated in the exam!
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 fluid /'flu:id/ He is not allowed solid food yet, only fluids.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 go on strike /,q n 'sraiI/ Teachers went on strike last week to demand better job security.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 syndicate /'sindiI/ The project will be funded through a syndicate of international
financial institutions.
Module 2 page 35 Language Developm. 2 creature /'Iri:/ The first living creature sent into space was a dog named Laika.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 enthusiast /in'|u:zis/ Golf enthusiasts will be able to see the tournament live on TV.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 screening /'sIri:ni/ Theres a screening of Spielbergs new movie in the Student Hall at seven.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 cult movie /,Inl 'mu:vi/ Did you ever see the 1980s cult movie The Gods Must Be Crazy?
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 classic /'IlsiI/ Movies like Paris, Texas have become modern classics.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 blockbuster /'blI,bns/ Roots became a blockbuster TV series.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 preview /'pri:v|u:/ Judy got tickets to the preview because her uncle knows the director.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 annual /'n|ul/ The school trip has become an annual event.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 found /fand/ Our association was founded in 1898 by the local school teacher.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 hiker /'haiI/ Dinner was lively and funny, as the hikers recalled some of the moments
on the trail.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 line-up /'lain np/ Theres a wonderful line-up of programmes for Christmas and the New Year.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 challenging /'lndi/ Teaching young children is a challenging and rewarding job.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 pub crawl /'pnb Ir:l/ She couldnt even remember the last bar they went to on her
birthday pub crawl.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 backgammon /'bIqmn/ If it rained they would stay in the library, playing cards and backgammon.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 readership /'ri:dip/ Were going to have to increase our readership if we want to make
any money out of this paper.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 well-established /,vcl i'sbli/ We prefer to use well-established teaching methods.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 facilities /f'siliz/ The hotel has its own pool and leisure facilities.
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Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 range /rcind/ There were one hundred students whose ages ranged from ten to fifteen.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 budding /'bndi/ As a budding politician, you will have to make a special effort for people to
take you seriously.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 grandmaster /,qrnd'm:s/ She dreamed of becoming a grandmaster at chess one day.
Module 2 pages 3637 Writing 2 thriving /'raivi/ He expanded the shipping trade and left a thriving business to his son.
Module 2 page 38 Review regardless of /ri'q:dls v/ The law requires equal treatment for all, regardless of race, religion, or sex.
Module 2 page 38 Review charming /':mi/ Harry can be very charming.
Module 2 page 38 Review out of body experience /,a v ,bdi iI'spirins/ At first I thought I was having an out of body experience.
Module 2 page 38 Review unconscious /nn'Ins/ She was found alive but unconscious.
Module 2 page 38 Review claim /Ilcim/ He claims to be my long-lost cousin from Australia but Im not so sure.
Module 2 page 38 Review paranormal /,pr'n:ml/ Researchers are investigating paranormal activity in the house.
Module 2 page 38 Review complimentary /,Impl'mcnri/ Jennie was very complimentary about Katherines riding.
Module 2 page 38 Review reincarnation /,ri:inI:'ncin/ Belief in reincarnation is very common in many countries.
Module 2 page 38 Review soul /sl/ Many people believe that a persons soul continues to exist after
they have died.
Module 2 page 38 Review ancestor /'nss, -scs-/ My ancestors were French.
Module 2 page 38 Review Hinduism /'hindu-izm/ Gandhi could have converted many Christians to Hinduism.
Module 2 page 38 Review Buddhism /'bdizm/ Buddhism is a religion that teaches respect for all living things.
Module 2 page 38 Review incorporate /in'I:prci/ Weve incorporated many environmentally-friendly features into the
design of the building.
Module 2 page 38 Review regress /ri'qrcs/ The patient had regressed to a state of childish dependency.
Module 2 page 38 Review hypnosis /hip'nsis/ While under hypnosis, the victim was able to describe her attacker.
Module 3

Module 3 page 39 Overview values /'vl|u:z/ Emily has strong moral values when it comes to marriage.
Module 3 page 39 Overview coherence /I'hirns/ An overall theme will help to give your essay coherence.
Module 3 page 39 Overview issue /'iu:, 'is|u:/ The key issue is whether workers should be classified as employees.
Module 3 page 39 Overview illustrate /'ilsrci/ Let me give an example to illustrate the point.
Module 3 page 39 Overview celebrity /s'lcbri/ He became a national celebrity.
Module 3 page 39 Overview tier /i/ He works in the most senior tier of management.
Module 3 page 39 Overview grand /qrnd/ The party was a grand affair.
Module 3 page 39 Overview dictate /diI'ci/ The amount of available funds dictates what we can do.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading burden /'bs:dn/ Knowing about Kates secret has been such a burden.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading bizarre /bi'z:/ It was such a bizarre coincidence!
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading contradiction /,Inr'diIn/ There was a clear contradiction between the governments ideas
and its actual policy.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading fierce /fis/ These people take fierce pride in their independence.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading glare /qlc/ He was almost blinded by the harsh glare of the desert sun.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading limelight /'laimlai/ Shes afraid this new actor will steal the limelight from her.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading desirable /di'zairbl/ The ability to speak a foreign language is highly desirable.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading wealth /vcl/ The countrys wealth comes from its oil.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading glitzy /'qlisi/ It was a glitzy split-level shopping centre with brightly lit window
displays of expensive fashions.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading aspire /'spai/ At that time, all serious artists aspired to go to Rome and Paris.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading perspective /p'spcIiv/ His fathers death gave him a whole new perspective on life.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading roam /rm/ You shouldnt let your children roam the streets.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading plain /plcin/ The grassy plain gave way to an extensive swamp.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading herder /'hs:d/ The herders were sitting under the trees.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading travel light /,rvl 'lai/ I only ever take one suitcase with me on holiday as I prefer to travel light.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading play a joke on sb /,plci 'dI n ,snmbdi/ She wondered if the others were playing a joke on her.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading conform /In'f:m/ Joseph does not conform to the stereotype of a policeman.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading haughty /'h:i/ Jessica turned away with a haughty look on her face.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading glamorous /'qlmrs/ As a top model, she led an exciting and glamorous life.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading hang on to /,h 'n / I think Ill hang on to the documents for a bit longer.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading identity /ai'dcni/ Children need security, and a sense of identity.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading inhabit /in'hbi/ The woods are inhabited by many wild animals.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading scrutiny /'sIru:ni/ Their activities have come under police scrutiny.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading gain /qcin/ Eating too many fatty goods could cause weight gain.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading mere /mi/ The mere thought of food made her feel sick.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading flash /fl/ The writer had a sudden flash of inspiration and started to write.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading temper /'cmp/ Theo needs to learn to control his temper.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading retinue /'rcin|u:/ He travelled with a huge retinue of servants.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading livelihood /'laivlihd/ The opening of the new shopping centre threatens the livelihoods
of local shopkeepers.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading commodity /I'mdi/ Time is a precious commodity.
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Module 3 pages 4041 Reading profit /'prfi/ All the profits from the auction will go to cancer research.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading get on the wrong side of sb /qc n ,r 'said v ,snmbdi/ I wouldnt like to get on the wrong side of her.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading engender /in'dcnd/ Their financial success has engendered jealousy among their neighbours.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading distrust /dis'rns/ Local people regard the police with suspicion and distrust.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading isolation /,ais'lcin/ Retirement can often cause feelings of isolation.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading take sth at face value /,ciI snmi ,fcis 'vl|u:/ You shouldnt always take his remarks at face value.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading play havoc with /,plci 'hvI vi/ Rain has continued to play havoc with sporting events.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading pomposity /pm'psi/ If it werent for his pomposity and arrogance hed be quite a nice guy.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading arrogance /'rqns/ I couldnt believe the arrogance of the man!
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading far /f:/ You wont get far if you carry on behaving like that.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading well-adjusted /,vcl 'dnsid/ Jacob was a happy, well-adjusted child.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading ill-at-ease /,il 'i:z/ He always felt shy and ill-at-ease at parties.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading petrify /'pcrifai/ She stood their shaking, petrified by the sounds of screaming.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading guarded /'q:did/ Baker spoke about the project with guarded enthusiasm.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading defensive /di'fcnsiv/ She despised herself for sounding so defensive after all, she hadnt
done anything wrong.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading breed /bri:d/ Real cowboys are a dying breed.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading perceive /p'si:v/ That morning, he perceived a change in Bens mood.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading slight /slai/ She was aware of the unspoken slight when he didnt phone her
on her birthday.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading unsettled /nn'scld/ Emily felt a little unsettled and it took her a long time to fall asleep.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading inconvenience /,inIn'vi:nins/ Having to go into the centre of town to pay the parking ticket was
a major inconvenience.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading feel sorry for /,fi:l 'sri f/ Ive got no sympathy for him, but I feel sorry for his wife.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading intriguing /in'ri:qi/ The film uses an intriguing mixture of comedy and horror.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading paradox /'prdIs/ Its a paradox that in such a rich country there can be so much poverty.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading unconditionally /,nnIn'dinli/ He promised to love her unconditionally, whatever she might do or say.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading irrational /i'rnl/ His behaviour can be somewhat irrational at times.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading devotion /di'vn/ Mary expected complete devotion from her employees.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading conviction /In'viIn/ Mary is a woman of strong political convictions.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading idolise /'aidlaiz/ They had one child, a girl whom they idolised.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading have power over /hv 'par ,v/ People should have more power over the decisions that affect their lives.
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Module 3 pages 4041 Reading arguably /':q|ubli/ Senna was arguably the greatest racing driver of all time.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading embody /im'bdi/ She embodies everything I admire in a teacher.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading array /'rci/ There was a wide array of colours to choose from.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading archetypal /,:Ii'aipl/ Byron was the archetypal Romantic hero.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading trait /rci/ Certain personality traits make people more likely to become victims
of violent crime.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading current /'Inrn/ In its current state, the house would be worth 200,000.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading appeal /'pi:l/ The programme has a very wide appeal.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading possess /p'zcs/ Different workers possess different skills.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading incarnation /,inI:'ncin/ She believes she was an Egyptian queen in a previous incarnation.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading illusion /i'lu:n/ Credit creates the illusion that you can own things without paying for them.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading fade /fcid/ Over the years her beauty had faded a little.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading turn on /'s:n n/ Peter turned on Ray and screamed, Get out of my sight!'
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading egg on /,cq 'n/ Bob didnt want to jump, but his friends kept egging him on.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading press /prcs/ The story was widely covered in the national press.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading insatiable /in'scibl/ She had an insatiable thirst for attention.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading topple /'pl/ This scandal could topple the government.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading fall from grace /,f:l frm 'qrcis/ He was the head of the intelligence service until his fall from grace.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading household name /,hashld 'ncim/ Coca Cola is a household name around the world.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading temper /'cmp/ Harrys enthusiasm for the new project was tempered by money worries.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading mercilessness /'ms:silsns/ The mercilessness of the crime shocked the nation.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading odd /d/ It was an odd thing to say.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading moral /'mrl/ It is easy to have an opinion on a moral issue like the death penalty for murder.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading neutrality /n|u:'rli/ After Pearl Harbour, U.S. neutrality ended.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading succumb /s'Inm/ Gina succumbed to temptation and had a second piece of cake.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading virus /'vairs/ Many of the children were infected with the virus.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading ruthlessly /'ru:lsli/ He ruthlessly oppressed the rights of the people.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading underbelly /'nnd,bcli/ They needed to find the soft underbelly of their opponents.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading flipside /'flipsaid/ The flipside of the treatment is that it can make patients feel very tired.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading disguise /dis'qaiz/ Theres no way you can disguise that southern accent.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading observe /b'zs:v/ Scientists have observed a drop in ozone levels over the Antarctic.
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Module 3 pages 4041 Reading tendency /'cndnsi/ The drug is effective but has a tendency to cause headaches.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading self-centred /,sclf 'scnd/ Jills attractive and pleasant to talk to, but shes extremely self-centred.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading imitate /'imci/ The Japanese have no wish to imitate Western social customs and attitudes.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading extent /iI'scn/ I do agree with him to an extent.
Module 3 pages 4041 Reading cult /Inl/ Diet, exercise ... Its all part of this cult of self-improvement.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary land /lnd/ He landed a job with a law firm.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary relatively /'rclivli/ The system is relatively easy to use.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary subject sb to sth /sb'dcI ,snmbdi ,snmi/ Police subjected him to hours of questioning.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary associate /'sici, 'ssi-/ There are problems associated with cancer treatment.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary naive /nai'i:v/ It would be naive to think that the new government can solve the
countrys problems straight away.
Module 3 page 42 Vocabulary promote /pr'm/ Helen was promoted to senior manager.
Module 3 page 43 Listening 1 autograph /':qr:f/ Can I have your autograph?
Module 3 page 43 Listening 1 reflect /ri'flcI/ The drop in consumer spending reflects concern about the economy.
Module 3 page 43 Listening 1 accurate /'I|r/ The brochure tries to give a fair and accurate description of each hotel.
Module 3 page 43 Listening 1 disillusioned /,dis'lu:nd/ As she grew older, Laura became increasingly disillusioned with politics.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 walks of life /,v:Is v 'laif/ Our volunteers include people from different walks of life.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 legend /'lcdnd/ A marvellous player who was a legend in his own lifetime.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 display /di'splci/ A superb display of African masks.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 chamber /'cimb/ Prisoners were taken to the torture chamber.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 update /np'dci/ The files need updating.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 rare /rc/ This species of plant is becoming increasingly rare.
Module 3 page 44 Language Developm. 1 determination /di,s:mi'ncin/ Yuri shows great determination to learn English.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 unpredictable /,nnpri'diIbl/ The weather has been so unpredictable lately.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 intense /in'cns/ Young people today are under intense pressure to succeed.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 confess /In'fcs/ Marsha confessed that she didnt really know how to work the computer.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 hustler /'hnsl/ Be careful that guy is a known hustler!
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 gracious /'qrcis/ Cheryl was the most gracious and helpful person to work with.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 statesman /'scismn/ He is a respected elder statesman.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 dreadful /'drcdfl/ Weve had some dreadful weather lately.
Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 shove /nv/ He shoved her towards the car.
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Module 3 page 45 English in use 1 endure /in'd|/ There friendship has endured for so many years.
Module 3 page 46 Writing 1 assess /'scs/ A report to assess the impact of advertising on children.
Module 3 page 46 Writing 1 device /di'vais/ Metaphor is a common literary device.
Module 3 page 46 Writing 1 revolutionary /,rcv'lu:nri/ A revolutionary leader.
Module 3 page 46 Writing 1 adoring /'d:ri/ His adoring fans.
Module 3 page 46 Writing 1 positively /'pzivli/ Change should be accepted and be viewed positively.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 protest /'prcs/ A small group of demonstrators staged a peaceful protest outside
the UN Headquarters.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 excessive /iI'scsiv/ Ten Euros for two cups of coffee seems excessive.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 inadequate /in'diIv/ Inadequate lighting made it difficult to continue the work after dinner.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 march /m:/ In the end the police decided not to ban the march.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 committed /I'miid/ John is a very committed student.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 draw attention to sth /,dr: 'cnn ,snmi/ I have been asked to draw your attention to the following points.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 frustrate /fr'srci/ The fact that hes working with amateurs really frustrates him.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 object /b'dcI/ If nobody objects, I would like Mrs Harrison to be present.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 recreational /,rcIri'cinl/ He considers drinking beer and watching football as recreational activities.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 indifferent /in'difrn/ Sarah was absolutely indifferent to him, and it hurt.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 supportive /s'p:iv/ My family were very supportive throughout the divorce.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 put pressure on sb /p 'prcr n ,snmbdi/ They are putting pressure on people to vote yes.
Module 3 page 47 Listening 2 amused /'m|u:zd/ Ellen seemed amused by the whole situation.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking back down /,bI 'dan/ Both sides have refused to back down.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking compromise /'Imprmaiz/ After several hours of discussions, they managed to reach a compromise.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking impact /'impI/ Higher mortgage rates have already had a major impact on spending.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking resident /'rczidn/ Local residents are protesting about the new road.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking bypass /'baip:s/ The railway station has been re-sited down the line to make room
for the towns bypass.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking campaigner /Im'pcin/ Florence was a key campaigner for the mayors re-election.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking reconsider /,ri:In'sid/ He should reconsider his decision to resign.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking move on /,mu:v 'n/ I enjoyed my job, but it was time to move on.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking mind you /,maind '|u:/ He looks very young in this photo. Mind you, it was taken years ago.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking ridiculous /ri'diI|ls/ Thats a ridiculous idea!
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking striker /'sraiI/ Manchester City are looking for two good strikers.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking league /li:q/ He makes his football league debut tomorrow.
Module 3 pages 4849 Speaking collaborative /I'lbriv/ A managers main task is to coordinate the collaborative efforts of
a number of people.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 union /'|u:n|n/ Are you planning to join the union?
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 ignore /iq'n:/ The phone rang, but she ignored it.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 minister /'minis/ The Russian foreign minister was also present at the meeting.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 insist /in'sis/ His friends insisted he had no connection with drugs.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 outrageous /a'rcids/ He says the most outrageous things.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 annoy /'ni/ What annoyed him most was that he had received no apology.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 obligation /,bli'qcin/ Parents are under a legal obligation to educate their children.
Module 3 page 50 Language Developm. 2 reception /ri'scpn/ Please leave your key at the reception desk.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 royalty /'rili/ He receives a royalty of two percent on each card sold.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 back /bI/ The scheme has been backed by several major companies in the region.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 auction /':In/ One of the Beatles guitars is being auctioned for charity.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 pledge /plcd/ Moore pledged 100,000 to the orchestra at the fund-raising dinner.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 generous /'dcnrs/ Shes always very generous to the kids.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 reckon /'rcIn/ I reckon I must have spent over a hundred Euros at the weekend.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 money-spinning /'mnni ,spini/ It was a money-spinning idea.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 donate /d'nci/ Last year he donated $1,000 to cancer research.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 estimate /'csimci/ The tree is estimated to be at least two hundred years old.
Module 3 page 51 English in use 2 construction /In'srnIn/ The passive voice is one of the more difficult grammatical constructions.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 sponsored walk /,spnsd 'v:I/ She raised over 200 for the leukaemia fund on a sponsored walk.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 pie chart /'pai ,:/ A pie chart can help the business-person see at a glance exactly
where the money goes.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 disadvantaged /,disd'v:nidd/ Improved nutrition will help disadvantaged children perform better in school.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 board of governors /,b:d v 'qnvnz/ The board of governors met yesterday.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 overview /'vv|u:/ Before we can consider the details we need to have an overview of
the whole situation.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 assistance /'sisns/ We offer financial assistance to students.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 exceed /iI'si:d/ The working week must not exceed forty-two hours.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 appeal /'pi:l/ The appeal has nearly reached its target of 100,000.
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Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 launch /l:n/ The hospital has launched an appeal to raise money for new equipment.
Module 3 pages 5253 Writing 2 in the light of /in 'lai v/ In the light of this tragic event, we have cancelled the celebrations.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review substantial /sb'snl/ We have the support of a substantial number of parents.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review ego /'i:q, 'cq/ Richard has the biggest ego of anyone Ive ever met.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review outcome /'aInm/ The outcome of the negotiations was that the workers would go back
to work after receiving a two percent increase in pay.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review principle /'prinspl/ Parents try to teach their children a set of principles.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review get away with /qc 'vci vi/ Watch out for Frank hell cheat if he thinks he can get away with it.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review make off with /mciI 'f vi/ Thieves broke into the school and made off with computer
equipment worth 40,000.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review stand up for /,snd 'np f/ Its time we stood up for our rights.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review crack a joke /,IrI 'dI/ He kept cracking jokes about my appearance.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review execute /'cIsiI|u:/ The skaters routine was perfectly executed.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review occupy /'I|pai/ Before becoming prime minister, he had already occupied
several cabinet posts.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review adopt /'dp/ Kim adopts a southern accent when speaking to her family back home.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review breathtaking /'brc,ciIi/ The view from my bedroom window was absolutely breathtaking.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review preserve /pri'zs:v/ Norma tried to preserve a normal family life in difficult circumstances.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review convict /In'viI/ She was convicted of shoplifting.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review alternative /:l's:niv/ He says he doesnt want to see a doctor, but Im afraid he has no alternative.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review contestant /In'csn/ Each contestant has to answer questions on a variety of subjects.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review suspicion /s'spin/ I cant say for definite who did it, but I certainly have my suspicions.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review lengthy /'lci/ An accident is causing some lengthy delays.
Module 3 page 54 Module 3: Review plaudits /'pl:dis/ Her performance won plaudits from the critics.
Module 4

Module 4 page 55 Overview tapestry /'psri/ A colourful tapestry depicting a hunting scene.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading breadth /brcd/ His breadth of knowledge was amazing.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading destined /'dcsind/ She seemed destined for a successful career.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading specialise /'spclaiz/ Simon specialised in contract law.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading overlap /,v'lp/ Maxwells responsibilities overlap yours, so you will be sharing
some of the work.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading trivial /'rivil/ We were punished for the most trivial offences.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading ingredient /in'qri:din/ John has all the ingredients of a great football player.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading underpin /,nnd'pin/ Americas wealth is underpinned by a global system which
exploits the worlds poor.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading envious /'cnvis/ Colleagues were envious of her success.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading squabble /'sIvbl/ Theyre always squabbling over money.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading rivalry /'raivlri/ There has always been intense rivalry between the two teams.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading crush /Irn/ Sara was crushed by their insults.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading nonsense /'nnsns/ Nobody cares about me. Thats absolute nonsense, Mary!
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading in the background /in 'bIqrand/ The Presidents advisors are content to remain in the background.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading public relations /,pnbliI ri'lcinz/ The project has been disastrous for the bank in terms of public relations
their customers have a very poor opinion of them now.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading tailoring /'cilri/ Gordon works in the tailoring department of a large clothes store.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading have an eye for sth /hv n 'ai f ,snmi/ Ernest is a very good proof-reader because he has an eye for detail.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading heated /'hi:id/ The discussion turned into an interesting but rather heated debate
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading confrontation /,Infrn'cin/ She stayed in her room to avoid another confrontation with her father.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading operation /,p'rcin/ The firm set up its own property development operation.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading polish /'pli/ I spent all afternoon polishing the silver.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading thoroughly /'nrli/ The room had been thoroughly cleaned.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading hopeless /'hpls/ Im a hopeless cook.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading thin-skinned /,in 'sIind/ Lucy is so thin-skinned its a wonder she ever became a politician.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading throw sb /'r ,snmbdi/ His final question threw me completely I just didnt know what to say.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading (not) a bed of roses /(,n) ,bcd v 'rziz/ Life isnt always a bed of roses, you know.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading demarcation /,di:m:'Icin/ What are the traditional lines of demarcation between medicine and surgery?
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading tread on sbs toes /,rcd n snmbdiz 'z/ I didnt mean to tread on anybodys toes by moving into this office!
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading occupation /,I|'pcin/ Please state your name, address and occupation.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading duo /'d|u:/ The two sisters formed a hilarious comedy duo.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading bounce ideas off /,bans ai'diz f/ When you work in a team you can bounce your ideas off each other.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading get above yourself /qc 'bnv |,sclf/ Your brother is really getting above himself just because he has a
good job doesnt make him better than us.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading pro-active /pr 'Iiv/ The headmaster takes a pro-active approach to staffing requirements,
so hes never short of teachers.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading aggressive /'qrcsiv/ A successful businessman has to be aggressive.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading cautious /'I:s/ It was better to take a cautious approach to the crisis.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading hesitant /'hczin/ They seemed hesitant about coming in I think they were shy.
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Module 4 pages 5657 Reading commissioner /I'min/ The commissioner has ordered an official investigation into
the city-wide blackout.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading ailing /'cili/ She turned an ailing business into one of the most successful
firms in the country.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading network /'ncvs:I/ The development of a high-speed European rail network.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading satellite /'slai/ This broadcast comes live via satellite from New York.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading by a mile /bai 'mail/ He was the best player on the pitch by a mile.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading on a regular basis /n ,rcq|l 'bcisis/ He has started visiting the gym on a regular basis and has already
lost ten kilos.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading hit it off /,hi i 'f/ I knew youd hit it off with Mike you both have the same sense of humour.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading from the word go /frm ,vs:d 'q/ The marriage was a disaster from the word go they even argued
about which church to get married in!
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading chemistry /'Icmisri/ If the chemistrys right then a relationship is bound to work well.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading diversity /dai'vs:si, di-/ There was a diversity of opinions.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading take sb/sth seriously /,ciI snmbdi 'sirisli/ As a teacher, its important that the kids take you seriously.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading be full of yourself /bi 'fl v |,sclf/ My first impression was that he was a bit full of himself.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading cross /Irs/ They were married for fifty years and there was never a cross
word between them.
Module 4 pages 5657 Reading vision /'vin/ He had a clear vision of how he hoped the company would develop.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary offend /'fcnd/ His remarks deeply offended many Scottish people.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary interfere /,in'fi/ My daughter-in-law said that I was interfering, but I was only trying to help.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary trustworthy /'rns,vs:i/ Annas very trustworthy so you dont need to worry about her
looking after your dog.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary import /im'p:/ In 2001, Britain imported a huge number of cars.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary supplier /s'plai/ They are the UKs largest supplier of office equipment.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary interpreter /in's:pr/ Speaking through an interpreter, Ahmed told the judge what he had seen.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary perfectionist /p'fcInis/ Many top athletes are perfectionists who drive themselves to excel.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary place an order /,plcis n ':d/ You can place your order by telephone.
Module 4 page 58 Vocabulary confidence /'Infidns/ She had complete confidence in the young nurse.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 approachable /'prbl/ The head teacher is very approachable, so dont worry about asking
for his advice.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 department /di'p:mn/ The English department of the university.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 initiative /i'niiv/ I wish my son would show more initiative he never does anything
unless his brother suggests it first.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 decline /di'Ilain/ Spending on information technology has declined.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 scenario /s'n:ri/ Imagine a scenario where only twenty percent of people have a job.
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Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 the chop / 'p/ He was worried that he might be for the chop.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 dread /drcd/ Ive got an interview tomorrow and Im dreading it.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 have sth at your fingertips /,hv snmi | 'fiqips/ We have all the facts and figures at our fingertips.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 take a knocking /,ciI 'nIi/ Clives taken quite a knocking lately first he lost his job and
now hes had his car stolen.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 retain /ri'cin/ Its increasingly difficult to recruit and retain good staff.
Module 4 page 59 Listening 1 justify /'dnsifai/ How can we justify spending so much money on weapons?
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 stem /scm/ driv- in driving.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 enlarge /in'l:d/ Police will have the pictures enlarged in an attempt to identify the thief.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 collapse /I'lps/ The roof had collapsed long ago and the rain had done terrible damage
to the interior of the house.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 influence /'influns/ What influenced you to take up nursing?
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 affection /'fcIn/ Their father never showed them much affection.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 defend /di'fcnd/ We are prepared to fight to defend our homeland.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 cruel /'Iru:l/ Telling her that she looked ugly was a cruel, tactless thing to say.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 conformist /In'f:mis/ Our childrens creativity is being blocked by the conformist
educational system.
Module 4 page 60 Language Developm. 1 reversible /ri'vs:sbl/ The courts decision is reversible but only if two judges can
be found to agree.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 restrict /ri'sriI/ The new law restricts the sale of hand guns.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 on the spot /n 'sp/ The manager only gave him five minutes so he had to make his
decision on the spot.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 individual /,indi'vidul/ Each individual receives two genes, one inherited from each parent.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 brand /brnd/ What brand of detergent do you use?
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 hunt through /,hnn 'ru:/ In the school library he hunted through books on politics to find the
article he wanted.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 organic /:'qniI/ Organic farming is better for the environment.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 arouse /'raz/ Matts strange behaviour was arousing the interest of the neighbours.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 dessert /di'zs:/ What are we having for dessert?
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 trolley /'rli/ Most supermarket trolleys have a special seat where a young child can sit.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 tempt /cmp/ If you leave valuables in your car it will tempt thieves.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 discern /di'ss:n/ Officials were keen to discern how much public support there was.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 substance /'snbsns/ Plutonium 238 is one of the most toxic substances known to man.
Module 4 page 61 English in use 1 curious /'I|ris/ Why do you want to know about Catherine? Oh no reason
Im just curious.
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Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 multitude /'mnli|u:d/ I had never seen such a multitude of stars before.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 control freak /In'rl fri:I/ Her husbands a control freak he wont let her leave the house without him.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 immensely /i'mcnsli/ Champagne wines became immensely popular in the 18th century.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 immature /,im'/ He forgave his sons immature behaviour.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 lead (sb) astray /,li:d snmbdi 'srci/ The older boys led him astray and thats why he got into trouble.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 rebel /'rcbl/ Alex has always been a bit of a rebel hes never wanted to follow
in his parents footsteps .
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 informed choice /in,f:md 'is/ Good information is essential if people are to make informed choices
about services.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 struggle /'srnql/ Shes struggling to bring up a family alone.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 factual /'fIul/ Try to keep your account of events as factual as possible.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 rhetorical question /ri,riIl 'Ivcsn/ Politicians often ask rhetorical questions in their speeches.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 controversial /,Inr'vs:l/ A recent government paper on education contains some controversial
new ideas.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 intensify /in'cnsifai/ In June the civil war intensified with even more deaths on either side.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 consequence /'InsiIvns/ Many believe that poverty is a direct consequence of overpopulation.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 guidance /'qaidns/ I went to a counsellor for guidance on my career.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 belittle /bi'lil/ He tends to belittle her efforts.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 weigh up /,vci 'np/ Were still weighing up the advantages and disadvantages of the two options.
Module 4 page 62 Writing 1 take on board /,ciI n 'b:d/ The school refused to take any of the parents criticisms on board.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 sibling /'sibli/ Most young smokers are influenced by their friends and
older siblings smoking habits.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 unique /|u:'ni:I/ Each persons fingerprints are unique.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 expose /iI'spz/ The report revealed that workers had been exposed to high levels of radiation.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 child-rearing /'aild ,riri/ He doesnt believe in a soft approach to child-rearing.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 distinctive /di'siIiv/ Male birds of this species have distinctive blue and yellow markings.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 inherit /in'hcri/ I inherited my mothers curly hair.
Module 4 page 63 Listening 2 rule out /,ru:l 'a/ The police have ruled out suicide as a reason for his death.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking engrossed /in'qrs/ Dad was engrossed in the newspaper all morning.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking inseparable /in'scprbl/ Jane and Sarah soon became inseparable companions.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking enthralled /in'r:ld/ The children were enthralled by the story she was telling.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking devoted /di'vid/ Isabella was devoted to her brother.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking resentful /ri'zcnfl/ She felt resentful at not being promoted.
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Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking tightly-knit /,aili 'ni/ A tightly-knit island community.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking bond /bnd/ The emotional bond between mother and child.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking extended family /iI'scndid 'fmli/ The wedding guests included friends and extended family my cousins,
second cousins, great-uncles and aunts.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking aspiration /,sp'rcin/ His aspirations for developing his career are greater than his disabilities.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking conscientious /,Ini'cns/ A conscientious teacher may feel inclined to take work home.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking conscious /'Ins/ The driver was still conscious when the ambulance arrived.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking fall for /'f:l f/ That was the summer I worked at the fairground, and met and fell for Lucy.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking get your own way /,qc |r n 'vci/ Dont let the children get their own way all the time theyll get spoilt.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking take after /'ciI ,:f/ Jenny really takes after her mother even down to the way she walks.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking see eye to eye /,si: ai 'ai/ We didnt exactly see eye to eye.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking run in the family /,rnn in 'fmli/ Diabetes appears to run in families.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking fall out /,f:l 'a/ Carries always falling out with people.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking lose touch /,lu:z 'n/ I lost touch with Julie after we moved.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking look up to /lI 'np / Ive always looked up to Bill for his courage and determination.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking tenderness /'cndns/ He looked after his wife with infinite care and tenderness.
Module 4 pages 6465 Speaking play safe /,plci 'scif/ Play safe and make sure the eggs are thoroughly cooked.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 identical twins /ai,dcniIl 'vinz/ They are identical twins and only their mother can tell them apart.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 response /ri'spns/ The law was passed in response to public pressure.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 combination /,Imbi'ncin/ A combination of factors may be responsible for the increase in cancer.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 perception /p'scpn/ My perception of the situation was that John didnt really know how to react.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 point out /,pin 'a/ I pointed out that without me they would never have thought of the idea.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 gene /di:n/ People get their genes from their parents.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 be open to debate /bi ,pn di'bci/ Whether that would have made any difference is open to debate.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 dietary /'dairi/ The dietary guidelines can be achieved by eating more fruit and vegetables.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 supplement /'snplmn/ Doctors believe that vitamin supplements are largely unnecessary.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 mental /'mcnl/ Stress has an effect on both your physical and mental health.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 premature /'prcm, -, ,prcm'/ Alcoholism is one of the major causes of premature death.
Module 4 page 66 English in use 2 multiple /'mnlipl/ Baxter was rushed to the hospital with multiple stab wounds.
Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 encouraging /in'Inrdi/ The encouraging news is that typhoid is on the decrease.
Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 uniformly /'|u:nif:mli/ The temperature must be uniformly spread throughout the reactor.
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Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 neurologist /n|'rldis/ A consultant neurologist at the hospital.
Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 put up with /p 'np vi/ She put up with his violent temper for years then one day she just left.
Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 conflicting /In'fliIi/ I had been given a great deal of conflicting advice.
Module 4 page 67 Language Developm. 2 genius /'di:nis/ Freud was a genius.
Module 4 pages 6869 Writing 2 submit /sb'mi/ All applications must be submitted by Monday.
Module 4 pages 6869 Writing 2 in-flight /'in flai/ What was the in-flight entertainment?
Module 4 pages 6869 Writing 2 remark /ri'm:I/ I ignored his rude remark about my clothes.
Module 4 pages 6869 Writing 2 colourful /'Inlfl/ Charlie Chaplin had a long and colourful career.
Module 4 pages 6869 Writing 2 in short /in ':/ In short, the project is just too expensive.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review bargain /'b:qn/ That second-hand table was a real bargain.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review bring out the best in sb /,bri a 'bcs in ,snmbdi/ Coach Ingram always seems to bring out the best in his players.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review get away from it all /qc 'vci frm i ,:l/ Get away from it all in beautiful Hawaii.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review declare /di'Ilc/ A state of emergency has been declared.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review temperament /'cmprmn/ Harry has always had an artistic temperament so its no surprise
that he became a sculptor.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review artisan /,:i'zn/ The work of a number of artisans was on display; there were pots,
baskets, jewellery and leather goods.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review guardian /'q:din/ His aunt is his legal guardian.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review uphold /np'hld/ A committee that aims to uphold educational standards.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review solid /'slid/ The prosecution in this case has no solid evidence.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review institution /,insi'|u:n/ The scandal threatened to undermine the institution of the Presidency.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review idealist /ai'dilis/ But at heart he remained an idealist about social issues.
Module 4 page 70 Module 4: Review cooperation /I,p'rcin/ Burglar alarm companies work in close cooperation with the police.
Module 5

Module 5 page 71 Overview globalisation /,qlblai'zcin/ Globalisation can often lead to the destruction of local customs and cultures.
Module 5 page 71 Overview greed /qri:d/ A lot of people are motivated by jealousy and greed.
Module 5 page 71 Overview material /m'iril/ The spiritual life is more important than material possessions.
Module 5 page 71 Overview conservation /,Ins'vcin/ Shes involved in wildlife conservation projects.
Module 5 page 71 Overview finite /'fainai/ We must look after the earths finite resources.
Module 5 page 71 Overview evolve /i'vlv/ The school has evolved its own style of teaching.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading urban /'s:bn/ There is too much unemployment in urban areas.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading local /'lIl/ We asked one of the locals to recommend a restaurant.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading linger /'liq/ They lingered over coffee and missed the last bus.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading drift by /,drif 'bai/ Four years drifted by and I still hadnt been promoted.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading haven /'hcivn/ In the middle of the city, this garden is a haven of tranquillity.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading frenzy /'frcnzi/ There had been a frenzy of activity in my absence.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading frenetic /fr'nciI/ She rushes from job to job at a frenetic pace.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading culinary /'Inlinri/ Mint is perhaps the best-known of culinary herbs.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading roots /ru:s/ Jazz has its roots in the folk songs of the southern states of the US.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading foster /'fs/ The bishop helped foster a sense of a community in the village.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading conviviality /In,vivi'li/ There was a general feeling of conviviality about the place.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading promotion /pr'mn/ We are planning a winter sales promotion.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading marginal /'m:dnl/ There has been only a marginal increase in the unemployment figures.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading concept /'Inscp/ Whats your concept of an ideal society?
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading come into your own /Inm ,in |r 'n/ On icy roads, a four-wheel drive vehicle really comes into its own.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading exalted /iq'z:lid/ I felt shy in such exalted company.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading truffle /'rnfl/ The pheasant was served with a delicious truffle sauce.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading down-to-earth /,dan 's:/ Frans a very friendly, down-to-earth person.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading epitomise /i'pimaiz/ This building epitomises the spirit of the nineteenth century.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading seal of approval /,si:l v 'pru:vl/ A number of employers have already given their seal of approval
to the scheme.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading designation /,dcziq'ncin/ The designation of Stansted as the third London airport.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading manifesto /,mni'fcs/ The Labour party is due to publish its manifesto tomorrow.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading ban /bn/ Smoking is banned in the building.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading lurid /'lrid, 'l|rid/ The carpets were a lurid shade of green.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading fabric /'fbriI/ I want to buy some fabric to make a skirt.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading grant /qr:n/ The authorities have refused to grant him a visa to visit the US.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading commercial /I'ms:l/ George failed to see the commercial value of his discovery.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading real estate /'ril i,sci/ There is likely to be a fall in the value of real estate soon.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading renovation /,rcn'vcin/ Renovation work has been carried out on this beautiful Tudor mansion.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading processed /'prscs/ Processed foods may lack the vitamins and minerals found in fresh
produce and can be bad for your health.
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Module 5 pages 7273 Reading produce /'prd|u:s/ We only buy fresh local produce.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading regressive /ri'qrcsiv/ Many considered the changes to the welfare laws a regressive step.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading embrace /im'brcis/ Most West European countries have embraced the concept of
high-speed rail networks with enthusiasm.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading turn the clock back /,s:n 'IlI bI/ The new employment bill will turn the clock back fifty years.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading strike a balance between /,sraiI 'blns bivi:n/ He was finding it difficult to strike a balance between his family and his work.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading curb /Is:b/ The city is trying new measures to curb pollution.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading noise pollution /'niz p,lu:n/ Research has revealed links between noise pollution and mental health.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading thwart /v:/ Fierce opposition thwarted the governments plans.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading high spirits /,hai 'spiris/ It was a bright sunny day and we set off in high spirits.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading core /I:/ The core of the book focuses on the period between 1660 and 1857.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading trend /rcnd/ Lately there has been a trend towards hiring younger, cheaper employees.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading deference /'dcfrns/ Lewis was annoyed that Adam did not show enough respect and deference to
him.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading gulp down /,qnlp 'dan/ She gulped down her breakfast and ran for the bus.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading sip /sip/ She was sitting at the table sipping her coffee.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading crusade /Iru:'scid/ He seems to be running a one-man crusade against cigarette smoking.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading rearguard action /,riq:d 'In/ They have been fighting a rearguard action to stop a supermarket
being built on the land.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading cotton on /,In 'n/ It took me a while to cotton on.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading displace /dis'plcis/ Coal has been displaced by natural gas as a major source of energy.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading droves /drvz/ Tourists come in droves to see the White House.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading implement /'implmcn/ We have decided to implement the committees recommendations in full.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading pedestrian /p'dcsrin/ Banning traffic from the shopping areas has made life much more
pleasant for pedestrians.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading aesthetic /i:s'ciI, cs-/ From an aesthetic point of view, its a nice design.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading hospitality /,hsp'li/ Thanks for your hospitality over the past few weeks.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading front /frnn/ He joined the army, and was immediately sent to the front.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading battle /'bl/ The Battle of Trafalgar.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading certification /s,ifi'Icin/ We successfully completed the certification for open water diving.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading hectic /'hcIiI/ Ive had a pretty hectic day.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading bureaucratic /,b|r'IriI/ The procedure for getting funding approval is so bureaucratic!
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading recast /,ri:'I:s/ We made an attempt to recast the statement in less formal language.
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Module 5 pages 7273 Reading swim against the tide /,svim qcns 'aid/ Hes been swimming against the tide for most of his years in office.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading deputy /'dcp|i/ He became the deputy head of the FBI at the age of only thirty-six.
Module 5 pages 7273 Reading administer /d'minis/ Our office administers the affairs of the Society.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary equality /i'Ivli/ All people have the right to equality of opportunity.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary proceed /pr'si:d/ Before proceeding further, we must define our terms.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary provoke /pr'vI/ The dog would not have attacked if it hadnt been provoked.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary censor /'scns/ The information given to the press was carefully censored by
the Ministry of Defence.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary bar /b:/ They seized his passport and barred him from leaving the country.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary carry off /,Iri 'f/ I was flattered to be offered the job but wasnt sure if I could carry it off.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary crack down /,IrI 'dan/ The government is determined to crack down on terrorism.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary slice /slais/ Slice up the onions and add them to the meat.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary lifelong /'laifl/ She became a lifelong friend of ours.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary injustice /in'dnsis/ He had developed a deep sense of social injustice.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary outlive /a'liv/ She outlived her husband by twenty years.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary munch /mnn/ Barry sat munching on an apple.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary suck /snI/ Michael put the cigarette to his lips and sucked in the smoke.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary swig /sviq/ He sat swigging beer and smoking.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary wolf down /,vlf 'dan/ I wolfed down my lunch.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary nibble /'nibl/ He nibbled the biscuit cautiously.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary pick at /'piI / Paige could only pick at her meal, forcing down a mouthful or two.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary guzzle /'qnzl/ Theyve been guzzling beer all evening.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary chew /u:/ This meats so tough I can hardly chew it!
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary drain /drcin/ Mary drained her mug in one gulp.
Module 5 page 74 Vocabulary swallow /'svl/ He swallowed the last of his coffee and asked for the bill.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 slogan /'slqn/ We tried to think of a good advertising slogan.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 plain sailing /,plcin 'scili/ If you can answer the first question, the rest of the test should be plain sailing.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 accusation /,I|'zcin/ A number of serious accusations have been made against her.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 manufacturer /,mn|'fIr/ Read the manufacturers instructions before using your new dishwasher.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 developing country /di,vclpi 'Innri/ We must continue to send aid to developing countries.
Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 violation /,vai'lcin/ Any further fighting will be seen as a violation of the ceasefire agreement.
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Module 5 page 75 Listening 1 code of conduct /,Id v 'IndnI/ Karate has a very strict code of conduct.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 project /pr'dcI I hope the team will project a smart, professional image.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 glossy /'qlsi/ There was a stack of glossy magazines on the coffee table.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 indigenous /in'didns/ Blueberries are indigenous to America.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 capital /'Ipil/ The government is eager to attract foreign capital.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 mount /man/ The National Gallery mounted an exhibition of Danish painting.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 disallow /,dis'la/ Manchester United had a goal disallowed for being offside.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 comprehensive /,Impri'hcnsiv/ We offer our customers a comprehensive range of financial products.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 inclusive /in'Ilu:siv/ At a cost of twenty-five Euros per person per night inclusive, bed
and breakfast accommodation is fairly cheap.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 inflate /in'flci/ Hotels often inflate prices at particular times of the year.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 on the contrary /n 'Inrri/ It wasnt a good thing; on the contrary it was a huge mistake.
Module 5 page 76 English in use 1 poll /pl/ The latest public opinion poll showed that twenty percent of
us consider ourselves superstitious.
Module 5 page 77 Language Developm. 1 draw up /,dr: 'np/ Draw up a list of all the things you want to do.
Module 5 page 77 Language Developm. 1 bitterly /'bili/ He complained bitterly about his poor exam grades.
Module 5 page 77 Language Developm. 1 tedious /'i:dis/ The work of addressing hundreds of envelopes was tiring and tedious.
Module 5 page 77 Language Developm. 1 irate /ai'rci/ Theres another irate customer demanding to see the manager.
Module 5 page 77 Language Developm. 1 incomprehensible /in,Impri'hcnsbl/ I find your attitude quite incomprehensible.
Module 5 page 78 Writing 1 itinerary /ai'inrri/ His itinerary would take him from Bordeaux to Budapest.
Module 5 page 78 Writing 1 formation /f:'mcin/ You cant leave without seeing the canyons impressive rock formations.
Module 5 page 78 Writing 1 aboriginal /,b'ridnl/ As far as we could determine, there is only one aboriginal culture in
the area that still survives.
Module 5 page 78 Writing 1 litter /'li/ People who drop litter can be fined in some cities.
Module 5 page 79 Listening 2 contribute /In'rib|u:/ Alcohol contributes to 100,000 deaths a year in the US.
Module 5 page 79 Listening 2 resource /ri'z:s/ Canada is a country with vast natural mineral resources.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking pest /pcs/ Farmers often use chemicals to kill the pests which eat their crops.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking resistant /ri'zisn/ More and more viruses are becoming resistant to antibiotics.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking bio-degradable /,bai di'qrcidbl/ This carton is made of a bio-degradable material so is friendly to the
environment.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking bio-diversity /,bai dai'vs:si, di-/ The bio-diversity of the rainforest.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking greenhouse gas /'qri:nhas ,qs/ Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas which is thought to contribute
to global warming.
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Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking contaminate /In'minci/ Drinking water supplies are believed to have been contaminated.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking deforestation /di:,fr'scin/ Deforestation has been shown to cause floods and drought.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking dispose of /di'spz v/ This incinerator was built to dispose of toxic waste.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking dump /dnmp/ Ellie dumped all the photos of her ex-husband in the dustbin.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking give off /,qiv 'f/ The wood gave off a sweet, perfumed smell as it burned.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking emit /i'mi/ The kettle emitted a shrill whistle.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking carbon dioxide /,I:bn dai'Isaid/ The carbon dioxide in our atmosphere is causing the earth to heat up.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking toxic /'IsiI/ Toxic chemicals were spilled into the river.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking fumes /f|u:mz/ A strong smell of paint fumes filled the studio.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking hazard /'hzd/ Polluted water sources are a hazard to wildlife.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking nutrition /n|u:'rin/ Nutrition and exercise are essential to fitness and health.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking incinerate /in'sinrci/ All the infected clothing was incinerated.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking famine /'fmin/ Millions of people in Africa continue to die because of war and famine.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking drought /dra/ Central Africa is suffering one of the worst droughts of the century.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking pesticide /'pcsisaid/ Many pests have developed resistance to the most commonly used pesticides.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking trigger /'riq/ Certain forms of mental illness can be triggered by food allergies.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking wipe out /,vaip 'a/ Whole villages were wiped out by the floods.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking conventional /In'vcnnl/ Internet connections through conventional phone lines are fairly slow.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking tamper with /'mp vi/ He noticed that the instruments had been tampered with.
Module 5 pages 8081 Speaking make out /,mciI 'a/ The situation was never as bad as the media made out.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 precaution /pri'I:n/ The climbers didnt take the necessary precautions before
climbing the mountain.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 blizzard /'blizd/ The blizzard lasted three days and nobody was able to leave their houses.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 stock /sI/ He keeps a stock of medicines in the cupboard.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 batter /'b/ The little boat was battered by the storm.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 postpone /ps'pn/ The match had to be postponed until next week.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 refuge /'rcf|u:d/ During the frequent air-raids, people took refuge in their cellars.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 stationary /'scinri/ How did you manage to drive into a stationary vehicle?
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 indicate /'indiIci/ Research indicates that over eighty-one percent of teachers are
dissatisfied with their salary.
Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 circulation /,ss:I|'lcin/ Passengers on long-haul flights should do stretching exercises to
help their blood circulation.
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Module 5 page 82 English in use 2 urge /s:d/ I got a note from Moira urging me to get in touch.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 rattle /'rl/ The window rattled in the wind.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 avalanche /'vl:n/ Two skiers were killed in the avalanche.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 hailstone /'hcilsn/ Some people claimed to have seen hailstones the size of tennis balls.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 descendant /di'scndn/ The coastal areas were occupied by the descendants of Greek colonists.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 erect /i'rcI/ Police have erected barriers across the main roads into the town.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 deteriorate /di'irirci/ Ethels health has deteriorated in recent years.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 prosecute /'prsiI|u:/ Shoplifters will be prosecuted.
Module 5 page 83 Language Developm. 2 vacate /v'Ici, vci-/ Guests must vacate their rooms by eleven oclock.
Module 5 pages 8485 Writing 2 lout /la/ Only a lout would treat a woman that way.
Module 5 pages 8485 Writing 2 vivid /'vivid/ Ive got vivid memories of that summer.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review spark off /,sp:I 'f/ The riots were sparked off by police violence.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review cast /I:s/ Theres a trick to casting your line properly.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review bait /bci/ We used worms as bait.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review pushover /'p,v/ Dont worry about the exam tomorrow itll be a pushover.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review personify /p'snifai/ Carter personifies the values of self-reliance and hard work.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review go broke /,q 'brI/ A lot of small businesses went broke in the recession.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review do (sb) out of /,du: snmbdi 'a v/ Are you trying to do me out of a job?
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review outdo /a'du:/ When it comes to speed of response, a small firm can outdo a big company.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review do up /,du: 'np/ They did up an old cottage in the Scottish Highlands.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review ample /'mpl/ Youll have ample time for questions later.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review lavish /'lvi/ The bathroom was decorated in lavish style with gold bath fittings.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review vital /'vail/ The work she does is absolutely vital for the success of this company.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review inhale /in'hcil/ Myra lit another cigarette and inhaled deeply.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review assassinate /'ssnci/ They suspected a plot to assassinate the President.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review eradicate /i'rdiIci/ We can eradicate this disease from the world.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review consume /In's|u:m/ Alcohol may not be consumed on the premises.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review obesity /'bi:si/ Obesity can lead to heart disorders and other health problems.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review concerted effort /In,ss:id 'cf/ Libraries have made a concerted effort to attract young people.
Module 5 page 86 Module 5: Review immigration /,imi'qrcin/ He called for a common European policy on immigration.
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Module 6

Module 6 page 87 Overview cue /I|u:/ Our success was the cue for other companies to press ahead
with new investment.
Module 6 page 87 Overview cohesion /I'hi:n/ The article comments on the lack of cohesion and commitment
within the administration.
Module 6 page 87 Overview millennium /mi'lcnim/ The beginning of a new millennium.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading pessimistic /,pcs'misiI/ Don't be too pessimistic we may still win the game.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading reverse /ri'vs:s/ More changes are required to reverse the trend towards centralised power.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading sector /'scI/ The growth in the number of home computers has boosted the
electronics sector.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading potential /p'cnl/ The management need to think of new ways of attracting potential customers.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading life expectancy /,laif iI'spcInsi/ The life expectancy of animals in captivity varies from fifty percent
to seventy-five percent of their natural life span.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading conceal /In'si:l/ She tried to conceal the fact that she was pregnant.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading short cut /,: 'In, ': In/ There arent really any shortcuts to learning English.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading prospect /'prspcI/ Job prospects for graduates dont look good.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading medication /,mcdi'Icin/ Hes on medication for high blood pressure.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading far-fetched /,f: 'fc/ All this may sound a bit far-fetched, but companies are already
developing intelligent homes.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading laser vision /,lciz 'vin/ With his laser vision Superman could see through any solid
material except lead.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading genre /'nr/ Science fiction as a genre is relatively new.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading flight of fancy /,flai v 'fnsi/ There are some strange flights of fancy in his book, as well as
some extremely down to earth observations.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading lecturer /'lcIr/ He is a lecturer in medieval studies at Edinburgh University.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading the norm / 'n:m/ Short term contracts are now the norm in some big companies.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading be around /bi 'rand/ That jokes been around for years.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading (not) hold out much hope /(,n) hld a mn 'hp/ Negotiators arent holding out much hope of a peaceful settlement.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading startling /'s:li/ Paddys words had a startling effect on the children.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading vastly /'v:sli/ This book is vastly superior to his last one.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading evidence /'cvidns/ At present we have no evidence of life on other planets.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading unattainable /,nn'cinbl/ A military victory is unattainable.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading notion /'nn/ The notion that children should be seen and not heard is outdated
in modern society.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading cure /I|/ There is still no cure for AIDS.
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Module 6 pages 8889 Reading pump into /,pnmp 'in/ Measures to save the airline failed when the shareholders refused
to pump any more money into it.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading reinforce /,ri:in'f:s/ The film reinforces the idea that women should be pretty and dumb.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading replicate /'rcpliIci/ There is a need for further research to replicate these findings.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading vice-chairman /,vais 'cmn/ Potts was appointed vice-chairman of the education committee.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading shiny /'aini/ She wore a fashionable jacket and high shiny boots.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading baldness /'b:ldns/ Dad was embarrassed about his baldness and always wore a hat
when he went out.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading short-sightedness /,: 'saiidns/ Her short-sightedness meant that she had to wear glasses to read the paper.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading apply /'plai/ Apply the cream evenly over the skin.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading treatment /'ri:mn/ There have been great advances in the treatment of cancer.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading strikingly /'sraiIili/ The two experiments produced strikingly different results.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading pinpoint /'pinpin/ Its difficult to pinpoint the cause of the accident.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading merge /ms:d/ The villages have grown and merged together over the years.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading melting pot /'mcli p/ New York has always been the ultimate melting pot of races and nationalities.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading escalate /'csIlci/ Tension is escalating and the two sides are preparing for war.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading facial /'fcil/ Victors facial expression didnt change.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading geneticist /d'ncsis/ Geneticists are investigating hereditary diseases.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading insight /'insai/ The article gives us a real insight into the causes of the present
economic crisis.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading shade /cid/ In the autumn, the woods are full of countless shades of brown,
yellow and orange.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading complexion /Im'plcIn/ Drinking lots of water is good for the complexion.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading wrinkle /'riIl/ Old Mrs Abbot had twinkling eyes which were surrounded by a
network of tiny wrinkles.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading meticulous /m'iI|ls/ The book describes his journey in meticulous detail.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading sunscreen /'snnsIri:n/ Whatever your skin type, do use a high-factor sunscreen and reapply
it frequently.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading corporation /,I:p'rcin/ He works for a large American corporation.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading work on /'vs:I n/ He has spent the last two years working on a book about childcare.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading tissue /'iu:, -s|u:/ A biopsy of the stomach tissue detected the presence of a viral infection.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading face-lift /'fcis lif/ She must have had half a dozen face-lifts by now.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading cosmetic surgery /Iz,mciI 'ss:dri/ I have seen a lot of people who look extremely odd after
having cosmetic surgery.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading laser treatment /'lciz ,ri:mn/ She had laser treatment to remove a large mole on her leg.
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Module 6 pages 8889 Reading spectacles /'spcIIlz/ Grandfather took off his spectacles and closed his book.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading epidemic /,cpi'dcmiI/ Britain is suffering an epidemic of petty crime.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading proportion /pr'p:n/ Try to reduce your tasks to more manageable proportions.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading contact lens /'InI lcnz/ Jamie started wearing contact lenses because the other kids teased
him about his glasses.
Module 6 pages 8889 Reading preventive /pri'vcniv/ While travelling abroad, take preventive measures to avoid illness.
Module 6 page 90 Vocabulary at will / 'vil/ He cant just fire people at will, can he?
Module 6 page 90 Vocabulary transplant /'rnspl:n/ Heart transplant surgery has come a long way in the last ten years.
Module 6 page 90 Vocabulary clone /Iln/ The process allowed Scottish scientists to clone the sheep named Dolly.
Module 6 page 90 Vocabulary install /in's:l/ Security cameras have been installed in the city centre.
Module 6 page 90 Vocabulary debt /dc/ He had enough money to pay off his fathers outstanding debts.
Module 6 page 91 Listening 1 apparatus /,p'rcis/ Astronauts have special breathing apparatus.
Module 6 page 91 Listening 1 innovation /,in'vcin/ Innovations in information technology have completely transformed
the way students work.
Module 6 page 92 English in use 1 narcolepsy /'n:Ilcpsi/ Narcolepsy is attributed to a genetic cause.
Module 6 page 92 English in use 1 disorder /dis':d/ He suffers from a rare disorder of the liver.
Module 6 page 92 English in use 1 side effect /'said i,fcI/ Possible side effects of the treatment include nausea and diarrhoea.
Module 6 page 92 English in use 1 insufficient /,ins'fin/ Insufficient resources have been devoted to the health service.
Module 6 page 92 English in use 1 trial /'rail/ a new drug that is undergoing clinical trials.
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 atom /'m/ Water is formed from two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen.
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 DNA /,di: cn 'ci/ The men will undergo voluntary DNA testing of their saliva.
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 splice /splais/ We saved the broken pieces and spliced them together.
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 test-tube baby /,cs |u:b 'bcibi/ Are we to understand you have made a test-tube baby?
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 coin the term /,Iin 's:m/ It was he who coined the term anorexia.
Module 6 page 93 Language Developm. 1 stressed out /,srcs 'a/ She always gets stressed out at exam time.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 replace /ri'plcis/ Two of the tyres had to be replaced.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 worn /v:n/ We used to cut up worn blankets to make sleeping bags for the children.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 antioxidant /,ni'Isidn/ Olive oil contains many powerful protective antioxidants.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 unscrupulous /nn'sIru:p|ls/ Isnt it time we did something to protect the elderly from unscrupulous
business people?
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 at ease / 'i:z/ They always looked happy and at ease together as a couple.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 dip /dip/ Are you coming in for a dip?
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Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 strenuous /'srcn|s/ The doctor advised Ken to avoid strenuous exercise.
Module 6 page 94 Writing 1 state-of-the-art /,sci v i ':/ His new laptop is state-of-the-art.
Module 6 page 95 Listening 2 unveil /nn'vcil/ The club has unveiled plans to build a new stadium.
Module 6 page 95 Listening 2 origin /'rdin/ There have been several different theories which attempt to explain
the origins of the universe.
Module 6 page 95 Listening 2 domestic /d'mcsiI/ Cats are the only so-called domestic animals which ultimately have
remained wild.
Module 6 page 95 Listening 2 fossil /'fsl/ Several dinosaur fossils were found in Montana.
Module 6 page 95 Listening 2 companion /Im'pn|n/ His dog became his closest companion.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking stimulate /'sim|lci/ Her interest in art was stimulated by her father.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking involve /in'vlv/ We want to involve the workforce at all stages of the decision-making process.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking fed up /,fcd 'np/ She felt tired and a bit fed up.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking put sb off /,p snmbdi 'f/ Dont let the restaurants decor put you off the food is really good.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking admission fee /d'min fi:/ I was annoyed that I had to pay an admission fee as I am a member of the club.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking exhibit /iq'zibi/ The exhibits date back to the 17th century.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking attendant /'cndn/ The car park attendant told me there werent any spaces left.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking curator /I|'rci/ Michael is the mammal curator at the Los Angeles Zoo.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking brochure /'br, -/ Could you please send us one of your holiday brochures?
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking wander /'vnd/ For an hour and a half we wandered around the old city, enjoying
the sights and sounds of a traditional way of life.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking trudge /rnd/ We trudged home through the snow.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking stride /sraid/ Brian strode out of the room without speaking.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking vintage /'vinid/ He collects vintage cars.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking hire /hai/ The best way to explore the island is to hire a car.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking interactive /,inr'Iiv/ The museum features interactive exhibits.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking hands-on /,hndz 'n/ He has a very hands-on approach to management.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking not bothered /,n 'bd/ What film do you want to see? Im not bothered.
Module 6 page 9697 Speaking abolish /'bli/ Slavery was abolished in the United States in the 19th century.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 trace /rcis/ Theyve traced their ancestry back to the 16th century.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 burial /'bcril/ After the burial ceremony relatives and friends were invited back to
the family home.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 breakthrough /'brciIru:/ Scientists have made a major breakthrough in the treatment of cancer.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 hang on sth /'h n ,snmi/ Everything hangs on the outcome of this meeting.
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Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 at first sight / ,fs:s 'sai/ At first sight, the place seemed deserted.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 will /vil/ Have you made a will yet?
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 misleading /mis'li:di/ The article was misleading, and the newspaper has apologised.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 trail /rcil/ The hunters lost the tigers trail in the middle of the jungle.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 substitute /'snbsi|u:/ I always use a sugar substitute in my coffee.
Module 6 page 98 English in use 2 enquiring /in'Ivairi/ She raised an enquiring eyebrow towards Mary.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 contemplate /'Inmplci/ Did you ever contemplate resigning?
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 yearn /|s:n/ Helen yearned for a child.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 investigation /in,vcsi'qcin/ The investigation continued for nearly three years.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 moan /mn/ I feel seasick already, she moaned.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 island-hopping /'ailnd ,hpi/ Many tourists enjoy island-hopping around the Cyclades islands.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 hitch a ride /,hi 'raid/ We hitched a ride with a lorry driver.
Module 6 page 99 Language Developm. 2 cargo /'I:q/ A ship carrying a cargo of oil has sunk.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 bill sth as sth /'bil ,snmi z snmi/ The castle bills itself as the oldest in England.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 dungeon /'dnndn/ A narrow stairwell wound like a corkscrew into the dungeons of the castle.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 simulate /'sim|lci/ This machine can simulate conditions in space.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 recall /ri'I:l/ You dont happen to recall his name, do you?
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 atrocity /'rsi/ The brutal destruction of an entire village was one of the worst
atrocities of the Vietnam war.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 unravel /nn'rvl/ Detectives are still trying to unravel the mystery surrounding his death.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 behead /bi'hcd/ Charles I was beheaded in 1649.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 boil /bil/ Boil the rice for fifteen minutes.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 disposition /,disp'zin/ The film is not suitable for people of a nervous disposition.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 unaccompanied /,nn'Inmpnid/ Unaccompanied children are not allowed on the premises.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 hot spring /,h 'spri/ The geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park are very impressive.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 gallon /'qln/ The car does about fifty miles to the gallon.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 flourish /'flnri/ The economy is booming and small businesses are flourishing.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 remains /ri'mcinz/ On the table were the remains of the evening meal.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 sculpture /'sInlp/ In the village square there was a large sculpture of an elephant.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 idiosyncratic /,idisin'IriI/ The English language is quite idiosyncratic.

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Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 to such an extent / ,sn n iI'scn/ Her condition deteriorated to such an extent that a blood transfusion
was considered necessary.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 marvel /'m:vl/ The man is a genius, marvelled Claire.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 council /'Iansl/ He sent a letter to the council to complain about the noise.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 artefact /':ifI/ Many artefacts decorated in this way have been found in royal tombs
on the mainland.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 stuffed /snf/ Nailed on the walls were rows and rows of stuffed animal heads.
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 aquarium /'Ivcrim/ Have you visited the tropical aquarium at the zoo?
Module 6 pages 100101 Writing 2 unnerving /,nn'ns:vi/ It was an unnerving experience.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review virtual /'vs:ul/ The website allows you to take a virtual tour of the art gallery.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review finicky /'finiIi/ Shes very finicky about what she eats.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review stroll /srl/ They strolled along the riverbank, enjoying the evening sun.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review depreciate /di'pri:ici/ New cars depreciate in value quickly.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review repeal /ri'pi:l/ Congress repealed the ban on women flying naval combat missions.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review overturn /,v's:n/ His conviction was overturned by the Court of Appeal.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review thesis /'i:sis/ Their main thesis was that the rise in earnings was due to improvements in
education.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review relic /'rcliI/ Roman relics found in a field.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review solitary /'slri/ Ed enjoys the solitary life of a rancher.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review space shuttle /'spcis ,nl/ I realised what it was: a space shuttle entering the atmosphere on
its final run-in to earth.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review Mercury /'ms:I|ri/ The temperatures on Mercury are phenomenally high.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review treacherous /'rcrs/ Strong winds and loose rocks made climbing treacherous.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review polar /'pl/ As our climate warms up, the polar ice caps will begin to melt.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review hull /hnl/ The hull of this ship was built to withstand all kinds of damage.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review sounding weights /'sandi vcis/ The researchers used sounding weights to assess the depth of the lake.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review minute /mai'n|u:/ You only need a minute amount.
Module 6 page 102 Module 6: Review sediment /'scdimn/ There was a thick layer of sediment at the bottom of the wine barrel.
Module 7

Module 7 page 103 Overview break the mould /,brciI 'mld/ He tried to break the mould of British politics with his radical approach.
Module 7 page 103 Overview motivation /,mi'vcin/ Jack is an intelligent pupil, but he lacks motivation.
Module 7 page 103 Overview element /'clmn/ There is an element of truth in your argument.

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Module 7 pages 104105 Reading against the odds /,qcns i 'dz/ The hospitals director has been battling against the odds to
improve patient care.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading demon /'di:mn/ He was speeding down the motorway as if pursued by a demon.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading row /r/ She rowed across the lake.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading solo /'sl/ Ridgeways solo voyage across the Atlantic.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading oarsman /':zmn/ I watched as the boat, propelled by a solitary oarsman, turned almost
directly in front of me.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading contrary wind /,Inrri 'vind/ A contrary wind prevented us from setting off.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading tide /aid/ Strong tides make swimming dangerous.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading engulf /in'qnlf/ The building was engulfed in flames.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading hold a course /,hld 'I:s/ Despite the bad weather the ship held its course.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading WAHR /ru:/ The hunters spear flew straight and true and struck the antelope in its side.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading eccentric /iI'scnriI/ Peters eccentric behaviour lost him his job.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading splash about /,spl 'ba/ The children were splashing about in the pool.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading slender /'slcnd/ We had to make the most of our rather slender resources.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading pursuit /p's|u:/ The pursuit of liberty and happiness.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading score a first /,sI:r 'fs:s/ She scored a first with her book on the history of womens involvement
in the field of anthropology.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading tick off /,iI 'f/ Have you ticked Kates name off the list?
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading plug on /,plnq 'n/ Julia plugged on with the endless exam papers.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading a small fortune / ,sm:l 'f:n/ My first painting sold for 25, a small fortune then for an art student.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading inform /in'f:m/ Her experience as a refugee informs the content of her latest novel.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading do or die /,du: : 'dai/ I told Richard he would fail the examination, but he said he would do or die.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading quest /Ivcs/ World leaders are now united in their quest for peace.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading shallow /'l/ If hes only interested in your looks, that shows how shallow he is.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading ultimately /'nlimli/ Ultimately, the decision rests with the childs parents.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading grip /qrip/ Its a story that really grips you.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading spare /spc/ I wanted to spare them the trouble of buying me a present.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading contented /In'cnid/ I felt warm, cosy and contented.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading beside the point /bi,said 'pin/ Yes, hes a very charming young man, but thats beside the point.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading compulsion /Im'pnln/ The desire to laugh became a compulsion.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading academic /,I'dcmiI/ The study of art as an academic discipline.
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Module 7 pages 104105 Reading primitive /'primiv/ The primitive instinct of survival.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading dominance /'dminns/ Televisions dominance over other media.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading bully /'bli/ A group of girls would bully the younger kids, and force them to
give up their pocket money.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading tempt fate /,cmp 'fci/ You are tempting fate by building your house so close to the river.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading prove yourself /'pru:v |,sclf/ When I first started this job, I felt I had to prove myself.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading come down to /Inm 'dan / It all comes down to money in the end.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading keep faith /,Ii:p 'fci/ The military regime has not kept faith with its promises of democratic reform.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading diversion /dai'vs:n, di-/ Everybody needs a diversion, and basketball is mine.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading dismiss /dis'mis/ The government has dismissed criticisms that the countrys
health policy is a mess.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading macho /'m/ Hes sick of being cast as the hard macho man in films.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading posturing /'psri/ Kens muscular posturing in front of the mirror is making me sick.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading preserve /pri'zs:v/ Banking used to be a male preserve.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading threshold /'rchld, -ld/ William has a very high threshold for pain.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading thrive on /'raiv n/ I wouldnt want that much pressure, but she seems to thrive on it.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading allure /'l|/ She could never resist the allure of foreign travel.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading shudder at /'ndr / He shuddered at the thought of the conflict ahead.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading spare a thought for /,spcr ': f/ Spare a thought for those who dont have enough to eat.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading haunt /h:n/ Clare was haunted by the fear that her husband would have an accident.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading miscalculate /,mis'IlI|lci/ We miscalculated how long it would take to get there.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading tolerate /'lrci/ I couldnt tolerate the long hours you work.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading abandon /'bndn/ They abandoned their attempt to recapture the castle.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading worthwhile /,vs:'vail/ He wanted to do a worthwhile job.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading relate /ri'lci/ Laurie finds it difficult to relate to children.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading courageous /I'rcids/ He was wrong, and courageous enough to admit it.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading admiration /,dm'rcin/ Daniel gazed at her in admiration.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading come to terms with /,Inm 's:mz vi/ George and Elizabeth have come to terms with the fact that they
will never have children.
Module 7 pages 104105 Reading reckless /'rcIls/ He was accused of causing death by reckless driving.
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary summit /'snmi/ Many people have now reached the summit of Mount Everest.
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary burning /'bs:ni/ My burning ambition is to be world champion.
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Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary give in to /,qiv 'in / The government refused to give in to the terrorists demands.
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary defeat /di'fi:/ I refuse to let this setback defeat me; Im more determined than
ever to succeed.
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary calculated risk /,IlI|lciid 'risI/ The police took a calculated risk in releasing the offender.
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary risk life and limb /,risI laif n 'lim/ Why risk life and limb jumping out of a plane just to raise money for charity?
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary vaccination /,vIs'ncin/ Have you had all your vaccinations?
Module 7 page 106 Vocabulary measles /'mi:zlz/ He had poor sight following a very bad attack of measles.
Module 7 page 107 Listening 1 disability /,dis'bili/ Public places are becoming more accessible to people with disabilities.
Module 7 page 107 Listening 1 encounter /in'Ian/ They encountered serious problems when two members of the
expedition were injured.
Module 7 page 107 Listening 1 unconventional /,nnIn'vcnnl/ Her unconventional opinions finally cost her her job.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 the foreseeable future / f:,si:bl 'f|u:/ The situation is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 stationery /'scinri/ They sell paper, pens and all kinds of stationery in their shop.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 complementary medicine /,Implmcnri 'mcdsn/ Acupuncture and other complementary medicines are becoming
more and more popular.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 heel /hi:l/ She wore black boots with high heels. My heel is very sore from
wearing these new shoes.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 heal /hi:l/ It took three months for my arm to heal properly.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 idle /'aidl/ The farmer cannot afford to leave his land lying idle. What an idle boy you are!
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 miner /'main/ A strike by coal miners.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 minor /'main/ Minors are not allowed into this bar.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 split up /,spli 'np/ She split up with her boyfriend two days ago.
Module 7 page 108 Language Developm. 1 mnemonic /n'mniI/ He talked about the effective use of mnemonics to improve memory.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 triumph /'raimf/ In the end, good shall triumph over evil.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 prejudice /'prcddis/ Women still face prejudice in the workplace.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 wrap /rp/ The present was beautifully wrapped in gold paper.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 reconciliation /,rcInsili'cin/ A large group of demonstrators stayed up all night praying
for reconciliation between the two countries.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 settler /'scl/ Many of the earliest settlers here died from disease and hunger.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 role model /'rl ,mdl/ I want to be a positive role model for my sister.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 weigh down /,vci 'dan/ He felt weighed down by his responsibilities.
Module 7 page 109 English in use 1 concede /In'si:d/ In May 1949, Stalin conceded defeat and reopened land access to Berlin.
Module 7 page 110 Writing 1 mutually /'m|u:uli/ We eventually arrived at a figure that was mutually agreeable to both parties.
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Module 7 page 110 Writing 1 hospitable /'hspibl, h'spi-/ The local people were very kind and hospitable.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 kick the habit /,IiI 'hbi/ The new treatment has already helped hundreds of smokers to kick the habit.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 obsessive /b'scsiv/ He has an obsessive concern with cleanliness and order.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 do sth to excess /,du: snmi iI'scs/ Drinking alcohol is alright as long as you dont do it to excess.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 needless /'ni:dls/ The report caused needless anxiety to women who have attended the clinic.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 purchase /'ps:s/ She paid for her purchases and left.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 desert /di'zs:/ Helen was deserted by her husband.
Module 7 page 111 Listening 2 deceitful /di'si:fl/ His manner was sly and deceitful.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking apprehensive /,pri'hcnsiv/ Wed been a little apprehensive about their visit.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking stunned /snnd/ He looked completely stunned.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking elated /i'lciid/ He felt elated and mildly drunk.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking dejected /di'dcIid/ Sad and dejected, he turned and left.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking prey on your mind /,prci n | 'maind/ Finally, she broached the subject that had been preying on her mind for days.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking be a weight off your mind /bi ,vci f | 'maind/ When we finally manage to sell the house it will be a weight off my mind.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking be over the moon /bi ,v 'mu:n/ Shes over the moon about her new job.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking adapt /'dp/ The children are finding it hard to adapt to the new school.
Module 7 pages 112113 Speaking milestone /'mailsn/ The agreement was a milestone in the two countries relations.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 conqueror /'IIr/ The Norman conquerors arrived in England in 1066.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 bitter /'bi/ Enjoy the beers bitter taste as you slowly drink it.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 monk /mnI/ He was in his mid-thirties, tall and thin, with searching eyes and
hair cropped like a Buddhist monk.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 acclaimed /'Ilcimd/ The book has been widely acclaimed by teachers and pupils.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 distinct /di'siI/ The outline of the ship became more distinct as we got closer.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 anti-social /,ni 'sl/ Smoking is an anti-social habit.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 trance /r:ns/ She went into a deep hypnotic trance.
Module 7 page 114 English in use 2 distract /di'srI/ Try not to distract the other students by talking all the time, Peter.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 restriction /ri'sriIn/ The law imposed new financial restrictions on private companies.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 diplomatic /,dipl'miI/ The manager was always very diplomatic with awkward clients.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 antagonise /n'qnaiz/ The police department antagonises the black community here on
an almost regular basis.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 passive smoking /,psiv 'smIi/ Medical evidence in the case showed that he had developed lung
cancer as a result of passive smoking.
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Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 prohibit /pr'hibi/ Smoking is strictly prohibited inside the factory.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 venue /'vcn|u:/ The first thing to do is book a venue for the concert.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 flout /fla/ Some companies flout the rules and employ children as young as seven.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 irrelevant /i'rclvn/ Were focusing too much on irrelevant details.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 drop sb a line /,drp snmbdi 'lain/ Drop us a line to let us know how youre getting on.
Module 7 pages 116117 Writing 2 debate /di'bci/ The new drug has become the subject of heated debate within the medical
profession.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review calculation /,IlI|'lcin/ Dee looked at the bill and made some rapid calculations.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review insignificant /,insiq'nifiIn/ You realise that your problems are insignificant in comparison to what Hilary
has been through?
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review worthless /'vs:ls/ The house was full of worthless junk.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review temptation /cmp'cin/ I finally gave in to the temptation and had a cigarette.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review surmount /s'man/ He has had to surmount immense difficulties.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review wobble /'vbl/ The pile of bricks wobbled and fell.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review get hooked on /qc 'hI n/ I got hooked on television when I spent all those weeks in bed with my illness.
Module 7 page 118 Module 7: Review wetsuit /'vcsu:, -s|u:/ At dawn he puts on his wetsuit, picks up his surfboard and catches the waves.
Module 8

Module 8 pages 120121 Reading bow to /'ba / The owner has decided to bow to public pressure and lift the ban on smoking.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading perch /ps:/ The house was perched on a cliff above the town.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading crime wave /'Iraim vciv/ More police officers are being brought in to help tackle the
current crime wave.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading vice /vais/ Smoking is my only vice.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading indulgence /in'dnldns/ An occasional glass of wine was his only indulgence.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading fall victim to /,f:l 'viIim / Many small businesses have fallen victim to the recession.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading stand accused /,snd 'I|u:zd/ The radio station stands accused of racism.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading idyll /'idl, 'idil/ Decades later, the sailor was still enjoying his island idyll.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading ills /ilz/ He wants to cure all the ills of the world.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading recreate /,ri:Iri'ci/ You can never recreate the feeling of winning for the first time.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading maximise /'mIsimaiz/ The career centre will help you maximise your opportunities.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading elusive /i'lu:siv/ For me, the poem has an elusive quality.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading delegation /,dcl'qcin/ A delegation from Nigeria has arrived to have talks with the
British foreign minister.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading salary /'slri/ The average salary is 39,000 a year.
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Module 8 pages 120121 Reading cede /si:d/ Hong Kong was ceded to Britain in 1842.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading assembly /'scmbli/ the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading transition /rn'zin/ Making the transition from youth to adulthood can be very painful.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading play a role in sth /,plci 'rl in ,snmi/ A good diet and fitness play a crucial role in helping people live longer.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading transformation /,rnsf'mcin/ In recent years, the movie industry has undergone a dramatic transformation.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading broadcasting /'br:dI:si/ BBC stands for British Broadcasting Corporation.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading cable /'Icibl/ Ive got cable television now, and there are almost too many
channels to choose from.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading capture the market /,Ip 'm:Ii/ We aim to capture eight percent of the UK wine market.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading deluge /'dcl|u:d/ Viewers sent a deluge of complaints about the show.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading hermit /'hs:mi/ Emperor Constantine was said to visit the wise hermit for advice.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading corruption /I'rnpn/ The investigation uncovered widespread corruption within the police force.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading loiter /'li/ Five or six teenagers were loitering in front of the newsagents.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading transfix /rns'fiIs/ The sight of the fire transfixed the passers-by.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading crop /Irp/ Growers lost eighty percent of the apple crop in the storm.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading ogle /'ql/ I didnt like the way he was ogling her legs.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading wages /'vcidiz/ In general, computer jobs pay good wages.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading accessory /I'scsri/ Accessories such as a carrying case and battery re-charger are free
with the purchase of a cellular phone.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading sponsor /'spns/ Kodak is a major sponsor of the Olympics.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading acute /'I|u:/ I felt acute embarrassment at that moment.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading collectively /I'lcIivli/ Rain, snow and hail are collectively known as precipitation.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading underestimate /,nndr'csimci/ We underestimated how long it would take to get there; instead of two
hours it took us five!
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading benign /bi'nain/ He shook his head in benign amusement.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading portal /'p:l/ As I passed the portals my feeling of depression increased.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading skew /sI|u:/ These assumptions about Communism skewed American foreign
policy for decades.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading novice /'nvis/ The computer course is ideal for novices.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading preoccupy /pri:'I|pai/ Although I tried to respond, I was mostly preoccupied with my pain.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading omnipresent /,mni'prczn/ Police were virtually omnipresent on the city streets.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading medieval /,mcdi'i:vl/ These spices were first brought to Italy from the East in medieval times.

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Module 8 pages 120121 Reading fortress /'f:rs/ The invaders spent weeks trying to take the fortress along the road to
the city but it wasnt going to surrender without a fight.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading flicker /'fliI/ The overhead lights flickered momentarily.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading wriggle /'riql/ Stop wriggling and let me put your T-shirt on.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading screech /sIri:/ Get out! she screeched angrily. I hate you!
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading glee /qli:/ Manufacturers are rubbing their hands with glee as they prepare to cash in.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading currency /'Inrnsi/ The bank can supply you with foreign currency.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading initiate /i'niici/ They have decided to initiate legal proceedings against the newspaper.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading wary /'vcri/ Im a bit wary of driving in this fog.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading inhibit /in'hibi/ An unhappy family life may inhibit childrens learning.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading conspicuous /In'spiI|s/ He had represented Italy with conspicuous success in the Games.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading hoarding /'h:di/ A huge advertising hoarding.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading voice /vis/ The senator voiced concern at how minorities and immigrants
are treated in California.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading confide /In'faid/ Ive never felt able to confide in my sister.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading mug /mnq/ A lot of people wont go out alone at night because theyre afraid
of being mugged.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading couch potato /'Ia p,ci/ A lot of kids today are overweight couch potatoes.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading think nothing of /,iI 'nni v/ He thinks nothing of staying up all night in casinos.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading patch /p/ The strawberry patch was full of fruit!
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading outskirts /'asIs:s/ They live on the outskirts of Paris.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading lift /lif/ The government plans to lift its ban on cigar imports.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading radical /'rdiIl/ They are proposing radical changes to the way the company is run.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading sign up /,sain 'np/ Over half the people who signed up to do engineering were women.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading round-the-clock /,rand 'IlI/ They have always provided round-the-clock medical care.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading onslaught /'nsl:/ Are you ready for the onslaught of winter?
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading inquisitive /in'Iviziv/ Jenny was a very inquisitive child always asking questions.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading pipe up /,paip 'np/ Mum suddenly piped up with the answer to the puzzle!
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading reel off /,ri:l 'f/ Jack reeled off a list of names.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading overwhelming /,v'vclmi/ There is overwhelming evidence that smoking damages your health.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading relent /ri'lcn/ At last her father relented and came to visit her.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading funding /'fnndi/ College directors have called for more government funding.
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Module 8 pages 120121 Reading extreme /iI'sri:m/ Extreme poverty still exists in many rural areas.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading ironic /ai'rniI/ Your car was stolen at the police station! How ironic!
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading co-ordination /I,:di'ncin/ To play tennis you need excellent hand eye co-ordination.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading resist /ri'zis/ He resisted pressure to resign.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading fundamental /,fnnd'mcnl/ We have to tackle the fundamental cause of the problem.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading outlaw /'al:/ The bill would have outlawed several types of guns.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading compulsory /Im'pnlsri/ Car insurance is compulsory.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading silent majority /,sailn m'dri/ I think the silent majority would agree that all politicians are the same.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading turn to /'s:n / Many people here are turning to solar power as a way of reducing
their fuel bills.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading draw /dr:/ Beth felt strangely drawn to this gentle stranger.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading meditation /,mcdi'cin/ Yoga involves breathing exercises, stretching and meditation.
Module 8 pages 120121 Reading posture /'ps/ Poor posture can lead to muscular problems.
Module 8 page 123 Listening 1 expansion /iI'spnn/ The rapid expansion of cities can cause social and economic problems.
Module 8 page 123 Listening 1 commitment /I'mimn/ Will the job fit in with your family commitments?
Module 8 page 123 Listening 1 congestion /In'dcsn/ The congestion on the roads out of Cornwall is getting worse.
Module 8 page 123 Listening 1 inferior /in'firi/ I felt very inferior among all those academics.
Module 8 page 123 Listening 1 resume /ri'z|u:m/ She hopes to resume work after the baby is born.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 snap /snp/ He shut the book with a snap.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 crackle /'IrIl/ The crackle of the logs burning was the only sound in the room.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 memorandum /,mcm'rndm/ I sent him a memorandum reminding him about the meeting.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 entrant /'cnrn/ The event was a great success and there were over eighty entrants from
throughout the Northern region.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 format /'f:m/ They are planning a large-format book for the partially-sighted.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 panel /'pnl/ A panel of experts has looked at the proposal.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 catchy /'Ii/ He tried to come up with a good catchy advertising slogan.
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 jury /'dri/ Have you ever been on a jury?
Module 8 page 124 English in use 1 get the word out /,qc 'vs:d a/ They tried to get the word out about the benefits of immunisation.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 insert /in'ss:/ His manager inserted a new clause into his contract.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 enter into /,cnr 'in/ The government refused to enter into discussions with the opposition.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 correspondence /,Ir'spndns/ The magazine is unable to enter into any correspondence on medical matters.
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Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 witty /'vii/ I enjoyed the play; it had a clever plot and a very witty script.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 besiege /bi'si:d/ Miller was besieged by press photographers.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 drop off /,drp 'f/ I must have dropped off to sleep.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 balance /'blns/ My bank balance isnt very healthy.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 on hold /n 'hld/ The agent put me on hold while she consulted a colleague.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 resign /ri'zain/ She resigned from the government last week.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 trek /rcI/ The trek to the campsite was along bush tracks and down cliffs.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 starter /'s:/ We had soup as a starter, followed by steak.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 extend /iI'scnd/ Management have agreed to extend the deadline
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 surpass /s'p:s/ He had surpassed all our expectations.
Module 8 page 125 Language Developm. 1 flare /flc/ Rioting has flared up in several northern towns.
Module 8 page 126 Writing 1 consult /In'snl/ If symptoms persist, consult a doctor without delay.
Module 8 page 126 Writing 1 snail mail /'sncil mcil/ Gordon doesnt have a computer, so I suppose Ill have to write him
letters and send them by snail mail!
Module 8 page 126 Writing 1 teleconference /'cli,Infrns/ This week some 3000 doctors and nurses will participate in an
international teleconference on the subject.
Module 8 page 127 Listening 2 offence /'fcns/ The possession of stolen property is a criminal offence.
Module 8 page 127 Listening 2 joy riding /'di ,raidi/ Hes been charged with joy-riding.
Module 8 page 127 Listening 2 arson /':sn/ The school was destroyed in an arson attack.
Module 8 page 127 Listening 2 peer pressure /'pi ,prc/ Teenagers often start smoking because of peer pressure.
Module 8 page 127 Listening 2 enrol /in'rl/ Anybody who has not yet been enrolled on the English course should
contact the tutor.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking barrier /'bri/ The police had set up barriers along the route of the Presidents motorcade.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking patrol /p'rl/ Armed guards patrolled the grounds.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking seal off /,si:l 'f/ Following a bomb warning, police have sealed off the whole area.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking disorderly /dis':dli/ Bell denied being drunk and disorderly.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking tackle /'Il/ There is more than one way to tackle the problem.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking liaise /li'ciz/ Council officers are liaising closely with local groups.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking penalty /'pcnli/ No littering. Penalty 500.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking clamp down on /,Ilmp 'dan n/ The police are clamping down on drink-driving offenders.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking detect /di'cI/ Do I detect a note of criticism in your voice?
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking harness /'h:ns/ We can harness the power of the wind to generate electricity.
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Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking alert /'ls:/ The school immediately alerted the police.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking retain /ri'cin/ Please retain your ticket until you leave the station.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking statement /'scimn/ Detective Brady took a statement from both witnesses.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking assertion /'ss:n/ He made a definite assertion that house prices are falling.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking declaration /,dcIl'rcin/ Under Islamic law it was possible to divorce by making a simple declaration.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking vengeance /'vcndns/ His desire for vengeance led him to shoot his daughters murderer.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking revenge /ri'vcnd/ She is seeking revenge for the murder of her husband.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking reprisal /ri'praizl/ Rebels have killed two soldiers in reprisal for the deaths in prison
of two of their comrades.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking enable /i'ncibl/ The loan enabled Jan to buy the house.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking entitle /in'ail/ Membership entitles you to the monthly journal.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking conviction /In'viIn/ They had no previous convictions.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking take on /,ciI 'n/ Were taking on fifty new staff this year.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking take up /,ciI 'np/ Rob took up the invitation to visit his cousins in Florida.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking take over /,ciI 'v/ His only reason for investing in the company was to take it over.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking custody /'Insdi/ The committee is looking at alternatives to custody.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking incarceration /in,I:s'rcin/ His incarceration in that dreadful place for ten years nearly killed him.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking redeem /ri'di:m/ You can redeem the coupon at any store.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking recuperate /ri'I|u:prci, -'Iu:-/ Weve recuperated our losses.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking recover /ri'Inv/ Four paintings stolen from the gallery have been recovered.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking arraign /'rcin/ Thompson was arraigned on a charge of murder.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking forge /f:d/ Somebody stole my credit card and forged my signature.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking hack /hI/ Somebody hacked into the companys central database.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking libel /'laibl/ Harry sued the newspaper for libel.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking slander /'sl:nd/ He is being sued for slander.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking assault /'s:l/ Two men assaulted him after he left the bar.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking community service /I,m|u:ni 'ss:vis/ Each was ordered to do sixty hours community service.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking buy time /,bai 'aim/ Can we talk about it later? he said, trying to buy a little more time.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking prolific /pr'lifiI/ Handel was a prolific composer of opera.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking notorious /n':ris/ English soccer fans are notorious for their drunkenness.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking outlaw /'al:/ Butch Cassidy was a famous outlaw.
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Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking drop /drp/ The proposal was dropped after opposition from civil liberties groups.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking get away with /qc 'vci vi/ Youll never get away with stealing the money somebody is bound to find out.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking flee /fli:/ His attackers turned and fled.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking rancher /'r:n/ He was a cattle rancher all his life.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking resume /ri'z|u:m/ The students resumed their reading after the headmaster had
left the classroom.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking regulation /,rcq|'lcin/ There seem to be so many rules and regulations these days.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking rehabilitate /,ri:h'bilci/ The hospital has a special unit for rehabilitating stroke patients.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking self-defence /,sclf di'fcns/ He shot him in self-defence.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking hall of residence /,h:l v 'rczidns/ The halls of residence were on the university campus.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking intruder /in'ru:d/ The police think the intruder got in through an unlocked window.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking premises /'prcmisiz/ Whats the location of their new business premises?
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking obtain /b'cin/ You will need to obtain permission from the principal.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking draw on /'dr: n/ His work draws heavily on educational theories of the 1980s.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking conduct /In'dnI/ We are conducting a survey of consumer attitudes towards organic food.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking safe /scif/ Guests can leave their valuables in the hotel safe.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking valuables /'vl|ublz, -|blz/ The burglar took cash, jewellery and other valuables.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking reform /ri'f:m/ Reform of the legal system.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking hassle /'hsl/ I dont feel like cooking tonight, its too much hassle.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking hibernate /'haibnci/ Now who can tell me which animals hibernate in winter?
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking cut back on /,In 'bI n/ Try to cut back on foods containing wheat and dairy products.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking disheartened /dis'h:nd/ If young children dont see quick results they grow disheartened.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking desperate /'dcspr/ I had no money left and was desperate.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking flaw /fl:/ A design flaw caused the engine to explode.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking come to light /,Inm 'lai/ This evidence did not come to light until after the trial.
Module 8 pages 128130 Speaking bug /bnq/ Unfortunately there was a bug in the software.
Module 9

Module 9 pages 136137 Reading call /I:l/ He could never resist the call of the sea.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading unprecedented /nn'prcsdcnid/ An unprecedented number of cars entered the race.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading sensory /'scnsri/ The children respond well to sensory stimuli such as music.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading crawl /Ir:l/ Theres a bug crawling up your leg.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading vine /vain/ We sat underneath the vine in the shade.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading wired up /,vaid 'np/ Check that the plug has been wired up properly.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading eavesdrop /'i:vzdrp/ Helena was eavesdropping outside the door.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading exchange /iIs'cind/ The DJ was fired after a heated exchange on air with a call-in listener.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading infinitesimal /,infin'csiml/ The apparatus can detect infinitesimal changes in temperature.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading scratchy /'sIri/ Julian had a scratchy old recording of some folk songs.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading pulse /pnls/ An electrical pulse sends the atom to the tip of the microscope needle.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading punctuate /'pnIuci/ The silence was occasionally punctuated by laughter.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading rival /'raivl/ Their advertising campaign has given the company a competitive
advantage over its rivals.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading tap out /,p 'a/ He whistled the tune and tapped out the rhythm.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading astounding /'sandi/ The concert was an astounding success.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading crack /IrI/ It took them nearly two months to crack the code.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading pervasive /p'vcisiv/ How can we ever escape the pervasive influence of television?
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading persuasive /p'svcisiv/ Trevor can be very persuasive.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading infinite /'infn/ Shes a woman of infinite patience.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading mate /mci/ The male spends a long time searching for a suitable mate.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading offspring /'f,spri/ A lions offspring are known as cubs.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading subtle /'snl/ The pictures are similar, but there are subtle differences between them.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading low-pitched /,l 'pi/ All we could hear was the low-pitched hum of the generator.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading trumpeting /'rnmpi/ In the distance we heard the distinctive trumpeting of elephants.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading herd /hs:d/ A herd of cattle was moving towards us.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading roar /r:/ We heard a lion roar.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading fury /'f|ri/ Go on then! shouted Jamie in fury. See if I care!
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading flap /flp/ The flags were flapping in the breeze.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading predator /'prcd/ This beetle discharges a very hot fluid from a special gland at
potential predators.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading charge /:d/ The bear charged towards her at full speed.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading hurl /hs:l/ Demonstrators were hurling bricks through the windows.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading rumble /'rnmbl/ The rumble of the train going by woke me up.
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Module 9 pages 136137 Reading dense /dcns/ A narrow track wound steeply up through the dense forest.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading disperse /di'sps:s/ Police used tear gas to disperse the crowd.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading encode /in'Id/ A type of scanner which can encode characters on a page and
store them electronically.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading venture /'vcn/ When darkness fell, he would venture out.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading relocate /,ri:l'Ici/ If rents continue to rise, many local businesses may decide to relocate.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading bury /'bcri/ The story was buried at the back of the paper.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading discriminate /di'sIrimnci/ Newborn babies can discriminate between a mans and a womans voice.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading modify /'mdifai/ The regulations can only be modified by a special committee.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading bass /bcis/ He plays a bass guitar.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading frequency /'fri:Ivnsi/ This station broadcasts on three different frequencies.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading treble /'rcbl/ All we could pick up were the treble frequencies.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading trace /rcis/ There was no trace of anyone having entered the room since then.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading mark /m:I/ Take off your shoes so you dont mark the floor.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading claw /Il:/ The cat dug his claws into my leg.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading bark /b:I/ The disease causes the trees to lose their bark.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading spray /sprci/ She sprayed herself with perfume.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading scent /scn/ The dogs followed the foxs scent to the edge of the forest.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading impregnate /'imprcqnci/ The mats have to be impregnated with disinfectant.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading relay station /'ri:lci ,scin/ A relay station which was transmitting messages.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading territory /'criri/ A tiger has a large territory to defend.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading scent-marking /'scn ,m:Ii/ Scent-marking by foxes or otters.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading plaintive /'plciniv/ We heard the plaintive cry of a seagull.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading intimidate /in'imdci/ Attempts to intimidate her failed.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading secrete /si'Iri:/ The toads skin secretes a deadly poison.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading pungent /'pnndn/ Garlic has a pungent aroma.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading gland /qlnd/ The doctor noticed that the glands in my neck were swollen.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading contender /In'cnd/ Phillips is one of the top contenders for the middleweight championship
of the world.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading back off /,bI 'f/ She backed off and then turned and ran.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading starling /'s:li/ The starlings started flocking for the long journey south.

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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading harsh /h:/ His voice was harsh and menacing.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading take to /'ciI / He was so depressed, he took to his bed for a week.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading hawk /h:I/ We watched the hawk circling the field over its prey.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading groom /qru:m/ Grooming has several important functions in the chimps society.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading rodent /'rdn/ Birds and rodents live in the cavities of these rocks.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading burrow /'bnr/ During the day they retreat into shallow burrows a few centimetres
below the ground.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading defence /di'fcns/ In Britain, the defence of the country has historically been left to the navy.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading conclude /In'Ilu:d/ The report concluded that the school should be closed immediately.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading deter /di's:/ The companys financial difficulties have deterred potential investors.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading repel /ri'pcl/ Have you got a lotion that repels mosquitoes?
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading pose a threat /,pz 'rc/ Officials claim the chemical poses no real threat.
Module 9 pages 136137 Reading transmit /rnz'mi/ She transmitted the message using Morse code.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary squeak /sIvi:I/ The only sound was the soft squeak of the marker on the board.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary hiss /his/ She heard a faint hiss as the metal struck the water.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary growl /qral/ He heard a low growl behind him.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary boast /bs/ Amy boasted that her son was a genius.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary boo /bu:/ Some of the audience started booing.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary sole /sl/ The soles of her shoes were worn down.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary yell /|cl/ Help me! she yelled hysterically.
Module 9 page 138 Vocabulary hind /haind/ On a cue from its master, the bear obediently stood up on its hind legs.
Module 9 page 139 Listening 1 procedure /pr'si:d/ Whats the procedure for applying for a visa?
Module 9 page 139 Listening 1 inappropriate /,in'prpri-/ His comments were wholly inappropriate on such a solemn occasion.
Module 9 page 139 Listening 1 adjust /'dns/ Check and adjust the brakes regularly.
Module 9 page 139 Listening 1 make allowances for sb/sth /,mciI 'lansiz f ,snmbdi/ The budget makes allowances for extra staff when needed.
Module 9 page 139 Listening 1 alter /':l/ Her face hadnt altered much over the years.
Module 9 page 140 English in use 1 emerge /i'ms:d/ The sun emerged from behind the clouds.
Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. admit /d'mi/ Okay, so maybe I was a little bit scared, Jenny admitted.
Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. deny /di'nai/ Two men have denied murdering a woman at a remote picnic spot.
Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. hint /hin/ He hinted strongly that he might be prepared to send troops in.

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Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. random /'rndm/ The company has introduced random drug testing of its employees.
Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. capacity /I'psi/ The childs capacity for learning.
Module 9 page 141 Language Developm. set sb apart /,sc snmbdi 'p:/ Her unusual lifestyle set her apart as a child.
Module 9 page 142 Writing 1 impede /im'pi:d/ Storms at sea impeded our progress.
Module 9 page 142 Writing 1 penalise /'pi:nl-aiz/ Two students were penalised very differently for the same offence.
Module 9 page 142 Writing 1 curling /'Is:li/ Alternatives to skiing include a leisure pool, curling and skating on
the nearby lake and sleigh rides.
Module 9 page 142 Writing 1 refund /ri'fnnd/ I took the radio back, and they refunded my money.
Module 9 page 142 Writing 1 adrenaline /'drcnl-in/ Theres nothing like a good horror film to get the adrenaline going!
Module 9 page 143 Listening 2 cotton /'In/ Made from one hundred percent cotton.
Module 9 page 143 Listening 2 garment /'q:mn/ She pulled the garment on and zipped it up.
Module 9 page 144146 Speaking interlocutor /,in'lI|/ The interlocutor asked me several questions that I didnt understand at first.
Module 9 page 147 English in use 2 hype /haip/ Some experts are concerned that the new drug wont live up to all the hype.
Module 9 page 147 English in use 2 flashy /'fli/ Hes just bought himself a flashy new sports car!
Module 9 page 147 English in use 2 dweller /'dvcl/ City dwellers suffer from the higher pollution levels.
Module 9 pages 148149 Writing 2 feedback /'fi:dbI/ How can I provide feedback without making the manager angry?
Module 9 pages 148149 Writing 2 allocate /'lIci/ You should allocate the same amount of time to each question.
Module 9 pages 148149 Writing 2 raise sbs/sths profile /,rciz snmbdiz 'prfail/ An advertising campaign designed to raise the banks profile.
Module 9 pages 148149 Writing 2 run a feature /,rnn 'fi:/ The programme is going to run a feature on gardening.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review unrivalled /nn'raivld/ She has an unrivalled collection of Chinese art.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review menace /'mcns/ Its the only way to deal with the menace of drug dealing.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review emanate /'cmnci/ A feeling of peace and tranquillity emanated from the temple.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review omit /'mi, -/ Please dont omit any details, no matter how trivial they may seem.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review in kind /in 'Iaind/ After recent bombings, counter-terrorist forces may retaliate in kind.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review sheer /i/ The sheer size of the country makes communications difficult.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review flood /flnd/ They had devised a plan to flood the country with forged banknotes.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review sack /sI/ They couldnt sack me Id done nothing wrong.
Module 9 page 150 Module 9: Review bilingual /bai'liqvl/ Their kids are completely bilingual.



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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 10

Module 10 pages 152153 Reading slapstick /'slp,siI/ I dont think slapstick is funny.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading mime /maim/ The children learn through role-play, dance and mime.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading satire /'sai/ The film is a stinging satire on American politics.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading rubber /'rnb/ A rubber ball.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading swap /svp/ Do you want to swap your sweater for mine?
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading sketch /sIc/ Her television programme is made up of a series of comic sketches.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading material /m'iril/ Anita is collecting material for a novel.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading utter /'n/ Charles nodded without uttering a word.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading stumble across /'snmbl ,Irs/ Researchers have stumbled across a drug that may help patients with
Parkinsons disease.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading vocation /v'Icin/ At seventeen she found her true vocation as a writer.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading forge /f:d/ In 1776 the United States forged an alliance with France.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading establishment /i'sblimn/ A top class training establishment.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading break out /,brciI 'a/ She felt the need to break out of her daily routine.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading albeit /:l'bi:i/ He accepted the job, albeit with some hesitation.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading disjunction /dis'dnIn/ A disjunction between the skills taught in schools and the skills
demanded by employers.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading compelling /Im'pcli/ The book makes compelling reading.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading division /di'vin/ Can he heal the deep divisions among his supporters?
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading persona /p'sn/ Joel has a cheerful public persona but in private hes different.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading parallel world /,prlcl 'vs:ld/ If I lived in a parallel world, I would do things quite differently.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading dominate /'dminci/ The industry is dominated by five multi-national companies.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading all-consuming /,:l In's|u:mi/ She has an all-consuming passion for photography.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading unbolt /,nn'bl/ The builders unbolted the scaffolding and took it away.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading crate /Irci/ A crate of beer.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading heir /c/ Johnson was his political heir as leader of the Nationalist Party.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading adolescent /,d'lcsn/ Adolescents are a difficult age group to teach.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading self-consciousness /,sclf 'Insns/ He has too much self-consciousness about his weight.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading trademark /'rcidm:I/ The striped T-shirt became the comedians trademark.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading pliable /'plaibl/ The clay should be moistened regularly to keep it soft and pliable.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading nondescript /'nndisIrip/ The detective drives a nondescript blue Ford, perfect for
observing people unnoticed.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading knack /nI/ Some people seem to have a knack for making money.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading spontaneity /,spn'ni:i, -'ncii/ The group lacks spontaneity.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading contrived /In'raivd/ The characters are as contrived as the plot.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading leverage /'li:vrid/ The ambassador hopes to gain diplomatic leverage by visiting the US.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading debilitating /di'bilcii/ Shes been suffering from a debilitating disease for a number of years.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading vicious /'vis/ She was shocked by the vicious tone in his voice.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading rating /'rcii/ NBCs new comedy had the highest television rating this season.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading arsenal /':snl/ An arsenal of lawyers to conduct his defence.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading contort /In':/ His face was contorted with rage.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading adamant /'dmn/ Michael Jackson is adamant that he will not tour this year.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading phenomenal /f'nmnl/ The phenomenal success of computer games in recent years.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading low-key /,l 'Ii:/ They want the wedding to be as low-key as possible.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading exaggerate /iq'zdrci/ I couldnt sleep for three days and Im not exaggerating.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading disdain /dis'dcin/ Emily watched the younger children with disdain.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading in certain quarters /in ,ss:n 'Iv:z/ In certain quarters, this kind of behaviour is considered unacceptable.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading relish /'rcli/ I dont relish the thought of the long and tiring journey which is awaiting us.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading minority /mai'nri/ Gaelic is still spoken in Ireland by a tiny minority of people.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading focused /'fIs/ Ive got to stay focused if I want to win this competition.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading uneasy /nn'i:zi/ Ninety percent of those questioned felt uneasy about nuclear power.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading improvisation /,imprvai'zcin/ To cheer us up they put together an improvisation of funny songs.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading accident-prone /'Isidn prn/ As a child she was always accident-prone.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading verbal /'vs:bl/ He was used to receiving verbal abuse from other kids on the street.
Module 10 pages 152153 Reading wit /vi/ His sharp wit had them all smiling.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary alliance /'lains/ Britains military alliance with her NATO partners.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary impressionist /im'prcnis/ Tommy was a brilliant impressionist he could do all
the Hollywood superstars.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary caricature /'IriI/ Scientists are often caricatured as absent-minded professors.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary pick up on /,piI 'np n/ Children pick up on our worries and anxieties.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary assured /'d/ He praised her for her confidence and assured manner.
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Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary modest /'mds/ He was always modest about his role in the Everest expedition.
Module 10 page 154 Vocabulary commercial /I'ms:l/ Have you seen the new Levi jeans commercial?
Module 10 page 155 Listening 1 prevention /pri'vcnn/ Educating new drivers is important for the prevention of accidents.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 glance /ql:ns/ Emily glanced over her shoulder.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 generalisation /,dcnrlai'zcin/ You cant make generalisations about what men and women are like.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 know sth off by heart /,n snmi ,f bai 'h:/ After a few days of phoning Stephanie, he knew her number off by heart.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 outing /'ai/ Mrs Pollack took her class on an outing to the local museum.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 go smoothly /,q 'smu:li/ Itll take about three hours if everything goes smoothly.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 spellbound /'spclband/ King Lear still holds audiences spellbound.
Module 10 page 156 Language Developm. 1 howl /hal/ Upstairs, one of the twins began to howl in pain.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 length and breadth /,lc n 'brcd/ The police searched the length and breadth of the country.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 formidable /'f:midbl, f'mid-/ The new range of computers has formidable processing power.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 array /'rci/ There was a vast array of colours to choose from.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 retailer /'ri:cil/ Retailers face their slowest business period in January and February.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 online /'nlain, ,n'lain/ All the citys schools will be online by the end of the year.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 innovative /'in,vciiv/ The idea for the programme Big Brother was highly innovative.
Module 10 page 157 English in use 1 track /rI/ Theres a great Miles Davis track on side two.
Module 10 page 158 Writing 1 concise /In'sais/ Your summary should be as clear and concise as possible.
Module 10 page 158 Writing 1 work ethic /'vs:I ,ciI/ They instilled the work ethic into their children.
Module 10 page 158 Writing 1 labour-saving /'lcib ,scivi/ If you can afford it, buy some labour-saving devices, like a washing machine.
Module 10 page 158 Writing 1 slump /slnmp/ Carol slumped back in her chair, exhausted.
Module 10 page 159 Listening 2 emulate /'cm|lci/ Young had hoped to emulate the success of Douglas Wilder.
Module 10 page 159 Listening 2 fulfil /fl'fil/ We want to make sure that all children are able to fulfil their potential.
Module 10 page 159 Listening 2 finalist /'fainl-is/ She and a panel of judges will choose ten finalists and the winner.
Module 10 page 159 Listening 2 vulnerable /'vnlnrbl/ He took advantage of me when I was at my most vulnerable.
Module 10 page 159 Listening 2 intrusive /in'ru:siv/ They found the television cameras too intrusive.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking strings /sriz/ I want the strings to come in on a count of three! said the conductor.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking woodwind /'vdvind/ An impressive selection of woodwind instruments such as
the flute and saxophone.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking brass /br:s/ The shop sells only brass instruments.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking percussion /p'Inn/ Tonight we have Paul Duke on percussion.
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Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking keyboard /'Ii:b:d/ Chris Kelly on guitar and Benny Hayes on keyboards.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking evoke /i'vI/ The photographs evoked strong memories of our holidays in France.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking get on your nerves /,qc n | 'ns:vz/ Shes always moaning. It really gets on my nerves.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking highbrow /'haibra/ He picked up a book that was lying on the floor. It was
something highbrow; Kafka, probably.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking trashy /'ri/ A lot of people characterise romance literature as trashy.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking short-lived /,: 'livd/ Our happiness was short-lived.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking grandiose /'qrndis/ Its just another of Wheelers grandiose schemes.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking pull (sth) off /,pl snmi 'f/ The goalkeeper pulled off six terrific saves.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking comprise /Im'praiz/ The house comprises two bedrooms, a kitchen, and a living room.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking belt out /,bcl 'a/ She was belting out old Broadway favourites.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking lyrics /'liriIs/ He wrote some great music, but the lyrics werent that good.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking connoisseur /,In'ss:/ He claims to be a wine connoisseur.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking derive /di'raiv/ Medically, we will derive great benefit from this technique.
Module 10 pages 160161 Speaking manipulate /m'nip|lci/ He was one of those men who manipulated people.
Module 10 page 162 English in use 2 explosion /iI'spln/ The recent explosion of interest in Latin music and dance.
Module 10 page 162 English in use 2 pastime /'p:saim/ Reading was her favourite pastime.
Module 10 page 162 English in use 2 objection /b'dcIn/ Her objection was that he was too young.
Module 10 page 163 Language Developm. 2 discourage /dis'Inrid/ The latest attempts to discourage illegal immigration.
Module 10 page 163 Language Developm. 2 bouquet /b'Ici, bu:-/ He came home with a bouquet of flowers that she knew he had paid
too much for.
Module 10 page 163 Language Developm. 2 resort to /ri'z: / Officials fear that extremists may resort to violence.
Module 10 page 163 Language Developm. 2 muddy /'mndi/ Take your boots off outside if theyre muddy.
Module 10 page 163 Language Developm. 2 black market /,blI 'm:Ii/ Many foods were only available on the black market.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 excruciatingly /iI'sIru:iciili/ Helen described the concert as excruciatingly boring.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 over the top /,v 'p/ Its a bit over-the-top to call him a fascist.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 riveting /'rivi/ His story makes riveting listening.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 inaudible /in':dbl/ The noise of the wind made her cries inaudible.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 overrated /,v'rciid/ Critics claim that many soccer players are overpaid, overrated
and out of touch.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 profoundly /pr'fandli/ I was profoundly moved by his words.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 hilarious /hi'lcris/ Our attempts at dancing were hilarious we kept tripping over each other!
Seite 59 von 59
Module page Exercise English Headword Pronunciation Example Sentence
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 infuriating /in'f|ricii/ The infuriating thing is that he is always right.
Module 10 page 164165 Writing 2 go out of your way /q ,a v | 'vci/ She went out of her way to make me feel welcome.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review obdurate /'bd|r/ They argued, but he remained obdurate.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review immovable /i'mu:vbl/ The president is immovable on this issue.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review steadfast /'scdf:s/ She always had her fathers steadfast love.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review charm /:m/ She was a leader of great character and tremendous personal charm.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review self-assured /,sclf 'd/ Having done this many times before, she was self-assured and
spoke without notes.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review brutal /'bru:l/ Carter was jailed for the brutal murder of a young woman.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review malicious /m'lis/ Miss Simms took a malicious pleasure in other peoples misfortunes.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review be out to (do) sth /bi 'a ,du: ,snmi/ Andrew is just out to have a good time.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review impending /im'pcndi/ She had a sense of impending disaster.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review over your head /,v | 'hcd/ The explanation went completely over my head.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review to cap it all / ,Ip i ':l/ To cap it all, the phones didnt work, and there was no hot water.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review to put it bluntly / ,p i 'blnnli/ To put it bluntly, shes not up to the job.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review endearing /in'diri/ Shyness is one of her most endearing qualities.
Module 10 page 166 Module 10: Review devastated /'dcvsciid/ She was left feeling totally devastated.