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JOINT FAO/WHO FOOD STANDARDS PROGRAMME CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION Thirty fourth Session Geneva, Switzerland, 4-9 July 2011

REPORT OF THE SEVENTEENTH SESSION OF THE FAO/WHO COORDINATING COMMITTEE FOR ASIA Bali, Indonesia 22 - 26 November 2010

NOTE: This report contains Codex Circular Letter CL 2010/56-ASIA.

CL 2010/56-ASIA December 2010 TO: Codex Contact Points Interested International Organizations Secretariat, Codex Alimentarius Commission Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme Distribution of the Report of the Seventeenth Session of the FAO/WHO Coordinating Committee for Asia (REP11/ASIA)

FROM:

SUBJECT:

The report of the Seventeenth Session of the FAO/WHO Coordinating Committee for Asia will be considered by the 34th Session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Geneva, Switzerland, 4-9 July 2011). MATTERS FOR ADOPTION BY THE 34th SESSION OF THE COMMISSION: Draft and Proposed Draft Regional Standards at Step 8 and Steps 5/8 of the Procedure 1. 2. Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour (para. 47 and Appendix II) Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chilli Sauce (para. 76 and Appendix III)

Governments and interested international organizations wishing to comments on the above documents should do so in writing, preferably by e-mail, to the Secretariat, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy (e-mail: codex@fao.org; Fax +39 06 570 54593), before 15 March 2011.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Summary and Conclusions ..................................................................................................................... page iii List of Abbreviations .............................................................................................................................. page iv Report of the Seventeenth Session of the FAO/WHO Coordinating Committee for Asia ...................... page 1 Summary Status of Work ..................................................................................................................... page 19 Paragraphs Introduction ....................................................................................................................................................... 1 Opening of the Session ................................................................................................................................ 2 - 3 Adoption of the Agenda (Agenda Item 1) ................................................................................................... 4 - 8 Matters Arising from the Codex Alimentarius Commission and other Codex Committee and Task Force (Agenda Item 2) ............................................................................................................... 9 - 39 Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour (N06-2007) (Agenda Item 3a) ...................................... 40 - 47 Proposed Draft Standard for Non-Fermented Soybean Products (N06-2005) (Agenda Item 4a) ..................................................................................................................................... 48 - 69 Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chili Sauce (N05-2007) (Agenda Item 4b) ................................ 70 - 76 Status of Implementation of the Strategic Plan for the CCASIA 2009 2014 (Agenda Item 5) ............. 77 - 89 Issues Relevant to the Region (Agenda Item 6) ....................................................................................... 90 - 96 National Food Control Systems and Consumer Participation in Food Standard Setting (Agenda Item 7) ...................................................................................................................... See Agenda Item 5 Discussion Paper on Tempe and Tempe Products (Agenda Item 8) ...................................................... 97 - 102 Activities of FAO and WHO Complementary to the Work of the Codex Alimentarius Commission (Agenda Item 9a) .................................................................................................................................. 103 - 115 Outcomes of Codex Trust Fund Mid-term Review (Agenda Item 9b) ................................................. 116 - 123 Use of Codex Standards at National and Regional Level (Agenda Item 10) ......................... See Agenda Item 5 Nutritional Issues within the Region (Agenda Item 11) ....................................................................... 124 - 128 Nomination of the Coordinator (Agenda Item 12) ............................................................................... 129 - 130 Other Business and Future Work (Agenda Item 13) ............................................................................ 131 - 145 Date and Place of Next Session of the Committee (Agenda Item 14) ........................................................... 146 Appendices Appendix I - List of Participants ........................................................................................................... page 20 Appendix II Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour .............................................................. page 29 Appendix III Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chilli Sauce ...................................................... page 31 Appendix IV Project Document of New Work on a Codex Regional Standard for Tempe ................ page 38 Appendix V Project Document of New Work on a Codex Regional Standard for Durians ................ page 41

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SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The Seventeenth Session of the Codex Coordinating Committee for Asia reached the following conclusions:

Matters for consideration by the 34th Session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission Draft and Proposed Draft Standards and Related Texts for adoption at Step 8 and Steps 5/8 of the Procedure The Coordinating Committee forwarded: Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour for adoption at Step 8 (para. 47 and Appendix II); Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chilli Sauce for adoption at Steps 5/8 (para. 76 and Appendix III)

Other matters for approval The Coordinating Committee agreed: To nominate Japan for appointment as Regional Coordinator (para. 129); To include a provision for a food additive in the Regional Standard for Fermented Soybean Paste (CODEX STAN 298R-2009) (para. 10); To forward proposals for new work on a Regional Standard for tempe (para. 102 and Appendix IV) and a Regional Standard for Durian (para. 142 and Appendix V).

Other matters for information The Coordinating Committee: Agreed to return the Proposed Draft Standard for Non-Fermented Soybean Products to Step 2 for further comments and consideration at its next session (para. 69) and further revise discussion paper on new work for Regional Standards for Yuza (para. 145) and for Edible Crickets and Their Products (para. 145); Considered Activities 4.5 and 5.5 of the Strategic Plan 2008 2013 (paras 23 25) and the preparation of the Strategic Plan 2013 2018 (paras 26 34); Considered the following issues referred by the Commission: private standards (paras 11 17); processed cheese (paras 18 19); development of guidelines for traceability/products tracing (paras 20 22); and options for physical working groups (paras 35 38); Expressed its views on the Codex Trust Fund Mid-Term Review (paras 116 123); Exchanged updated information on the status of implementation of the Strategic Plan for CCASIA, including information on national food control systems and consumer participation in food standard setting, use of Codex standards at national and regional level (paras 77 89); Exchanged information on issues relevant to the region (paras 90 96) and nutritional issues within the region (paras 124 128).

REP11/ASIA LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS (Used in this Report) ADI ASEAN CAC CCASIA CCEXEC CCFA CCFFP CCFFV CCFICS CCFL CCGP CCMAS CCMMP CCNFSDU CTF EU FAO FBDG GIFSA GSFA IDD INFOODS INS NGO SAARC WHO WTO Acceptable Daily Intake Association of SouthEast Asian Nations Codex Alimentarius Commission FAO/WHO Coordinating Committee for Asia Executive Committee of the Codex Alimentarius Commission Codex Committee on Food Additives Codex Committee on Fish and Fishery Products Codex Committee on Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Codex Committee on Food Import and Export Inspection Codex Committee on Food Labelling Codex Committee on General Principles Codex Committee on Methods of Analysis and Sampling Codex Committee on Milk and Milk Products Codex Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses Codex Trust Fund European Union Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations Food-Based Dietary Guidelines Global Initiative for Food-related Scientific Advice General Standard for Food Additives Iodine Deficiency Disorder International Network of Food Data Systems International Numbering System Non-Governmental Organizations South Asia Association for Regional Cooperation World Health Organization World Trade Organization

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EMPRES Food Safety Emergency Prevention System for Food Safety

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INTRODUCTION 1. The FAO/WHO Coordinating Committee for Asia (CCASIA) held its 17th Session in Bali from 22 to 26 November 2010 at the kind invitation of the Government of Indonesia. The Session was chaired by Mr Kukuh S. Achmad, Director for Laboratory and Inspection Body Accreditation Program, National Standardization Agency of Indonesia, assisted by the Vice-Chairperson Dr Sunarya, Director, the Spring Institute, Bogor, Indonesia. The Session was attended by 108 delegates representing 20 Member countries, one member country outside the region and 5 international organizations and the Representative of FAO. A complete list of participants, including the Secretariats, is given in Appendix I to this report. OPENING OF THE SESSION 2. The Session was opened by Dr Bambang Setiadi, Director General of the National Standardization Agency of Indonesia as the Chairman of National Codex Committee. He welcomed the Coordinating Committee and pointed out that the increased production of food in Asia region had made the need to produce safe and quality food more important. He also highlighted that Indonesia, as Coordinator for Asia, had tried to contribute to strengthen communication and coordination amongst CCASIA members and the regions contribution to the work of Codex. Dr Bambang Setiadi stated that the increased production of food and trade in Asia region highlighted the importance of effective participation of Asian countries in Codex work. 3. Dr Bayu Krisnamurthi, M.S, Vice Minister of Agriculture, the Government of Indonesia, also welcomed the Coordinating Committee. In his keynote address, the Vice Minister stressed the importance of the work of CCASIA and highlighted the major challenges that Indonesia was facing as a user of food quality and safety standards developed by Codex. These included: the need to expedite work on standards development to keep pace with the increasing number of new products entering in the market; the need to develop standards that could be implementable by all stakeholders in view of the available infrastructure; the need to ensure that standards promote growth of production and economy and due to lack of infrastructure are not used as unfair barriers to trade; the need to address the new dynamics and challenges with regard to unpredictable environmental changes, including climate change; and the need to ensure close communication among countries of the region, especially due to emerging and re-emerging diseases as well as the complexity of Asian region. ADOPTION OF THE AGENDA (Agenda Item 1)1 4. The Coordinating Committee adopted the Provisional Agenda as its Agenda for the Session with the following amendments. 5. It was agreed to consider together Agenda Item 5 Status of implementation of the strategic plan for the CCASIA 2009-2014, Agenda Item 7 National food control systems and consumer participation in food standard setting and Agenda Item 10 Use of Codex standards at national and regional level. 6. The Coordinating Committee agreed to consider under Other Business and Future Work (Agenda Item 13) the following additional documents: - Proposals for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Laver Products (CX/ASIA 10/17/15) and a Regional Standard for Preserved Yuza (CX/ASIA 10/17/16), prepared by the Republic of Korea; - Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Durian (CX/ASIA 10/17/17), prepared by Thailand; and - Proposal for New Work of Development of a Regional Standard for Edible Crickets and Their Products (CRD 8), prepared by Lao PDR. 7. The Coordinating Committee also agreed to consider Agenda Item 8 Discussion paper on tempe and tempe products before Agenda Item 13.

CX/ASIA 10/17/1

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8. The Coordinating Committee agreed to establish an in-session Working Group, working in English only and open to all Members and observers, on the Proposed draft regional standard for chili sauce (Agenda Item 4b). MATTERS ARISING FROM THE CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION AND OTHER CODEX COMMITTEES AND TASK FORCES (Agenda Item 2)2 9. The Coordinating Committee noted that several matters in document CX/ASIA 10/17/2 from the Codex Alimentarius Commission and other Codex committees were for information only. The Coordinating Committee considered the other matters included in the document and made the following comments, recommendations and conclusions. Regional Standard for Fermented Soybean Paste 10. The Coordinating Committee noted that the Regional Standard for Fermented Soybean Paste (CODEX STAN 298R-2009) had been adopted without the provision for monopotassium tartrate (INS 336(i)) and that the Committee on Food Additives (CCFA) had requested CCASIA to provide a numerical maximum level for this substance, as the same has a numerical ADI. The Coordinating Committee agreed to recommend to the Commission in response to this request to include a provision of 1000 mg/kg for monopotassium tartrate in the regional standard, pending the endorsement by the CCFA. Consideration on the Impact of Private Standards 11. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the 33rd Session of the Commission had considered a paper (CX/CAC 10/33/13) prepared by FAO/WHO on the impact of private food safety standards and noted the Commissions conclusion that trade implication of private standards were best dealt in WTO and that Codex, FAO and WHO should engage with global private standards-setting bodies and encourage their participation in Codex as observers. 12. The Coordinating Committee considered the comments submitted in response to the four questions contained in CL 2010/32-ASIA as follows: Question 1: Have food producers/processors in your country experienced any problems in meeting private standards? Question 2: What are the financial implications of meeting private standards, especially implications for SMEs? 13. The Coordinating Committee noted that in countries of the region, food industries, and in particular small and medium size industries, were experiencing difficulties in meeting private standards mainly due to the high costs for upgrading equipment/infrastructure and training personnel as well as due to the increased costs for inspection and certification. 14. Delegations commented also that in large countries, such as India, a large number of small and medium size industries was still having problems in implementing Codex standards and expecting these industries to implement private standards was difficult. Therefore, member countries could develop simple standard for small farms and enterprises in the absence of relevant surveys and studies. 15. The countries could however not cite any specific issues or big problems. In this regard, the Representative of FAO clarified that document CX/CAC 10/33/13 had highlighted that collective private standards were generally consistent with Codex, except in the area of traceability and being prescriptive in certain areas, while individual firm private standards, in some cases, were more stringent, for example in relation to pesticide residue limits as well as the number of pesticides permitted. It was also clarified that FAO was seeking for specific comments and specific examples of the problems encountered as well as financial implications with clear examples in order to take a stand on the issue. The FAO Representative, therefore, encouraged countries to provide additional information to facilitate further analysis by FAO and effectively contribute to ongoing discussion on this important topic3.

CX/ASIA 10/17/2; CX/ASIA 10/17/2 Add.1 (Comments of Nepal and IDF); CX/ASIA 10/17/2 Add.2 (Comments of Philippines); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan); CRD 6 (Comments of IFT). Information should be sent to Ms Shashi Sareen, FAO Senior Food Safety and Nutrition Officer, FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (e-mail: shashi.sareen@fao.org)

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Question 3: What measures have been taken to overcome/ease the problems in implementing private standards? 16. The Coordinating Committee noted that in Malaysia certain funding schemes as well as mentoring programmes had been put in place to assist medium and small size industries in complying with private standards. Question 4: What should the CAC/ FAO/WHO do in the context of private standards? 17. The Coordinating Committee noted the comments of some Members that: Codex should encourage private standard setting bodies to participate in Codex meetings in order to facilitate the harmonization of private standards with Codex standards as well as exchange of information; that Codex should continue its effort to develop food quality and safety standards to respond to its members requests for standards which protect the health of consumers and ensure fair practice in international trade. Members also supported involvement of FAO/WHO in work on private standards organizations with the view to ensure transparency and reflect Codex work in the area. Proposed draft Standard on Processed Cheese 18. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the 33rd Session of the Commission had deferred its discussion of work on processed cheese and had requested the views of Coordinating Committees. 19. The Coordinating Committee noted the view of the Delegation of India that a standard for processed cheese was needed to regulate the number of new processed cheese products that were entering in the market and to respond to the concern of the consumers who wanted to be informed on the nature of these products. Other delegations recalled the difficulties of the Committee on Milk and Milk Products (CCMMP) in progressing this work and the lack of evidence of any significant problems in the international trade of these products. The Coordinating Committee also noted that development of regional standards for processed cheese by different regions would create confusion in the international trade of these products and thus undermine the mandate of Codex of ensuring fair trade practice. It was also suggested that national regulations could probably be developed to respond to the need of some countries to regulate these products. Therefore, the Coordinating Committee agreed that work on processed cheese should be discontinued, while noting the view expressed by the Delegation of India on this matter. Development of Guidelines for Traceability/Product Tracing 20. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the 32nd Session of the Commission (2009) had endorsed the recommendation of the Committee on Food Import and Export Inspection and Certification Systems (CCFICS) to request FAO/WHO coordinating committees to discuss whether there was a need for further guidance on traceability/product tracing and to report back to the 34th Session of the Commission. 21. One delegation was of the view that countries applied the Principles for Traceability / Product Tracing as a Tool Within a Food Inspection and Certification System (CAC/GL 60-2006) according to their national situations and that, therefore, there was no need for Codex to develop further guidance on this matter. The Delegation of India highlighted the difficulties faced by a large number of small producers in India, which required guidance to establish product tracing/ traceability systems. In this regard, the Representative of FAO informed the Coordinating Committee that during the FAO/WHO Regional Workshop on the Use of Science throughout the food chain for safe foods, held in conjunction with the 17th CCASIA, it had been proposed by participants that FAO/WHO provide support in developing models/guidelines for implementing traceability in the region. 22. In view of the above discussion, the Coordinating Committee agreed that there was no need for Codex to develop further guidance on traceability/product tracing but as countries in the region required assistance to improve their capacity to implement traceability/product tracing systems at country level, FAO and WHO might provide support as appropriate. Implementation of the Codex Strategic Plan 2008-2013 - General Implementation Status 23. The Coordinating Committee considered replies to CL 2010/32-ASIA (point i), requesting comments and information on the following two activities.

REP11/ASIA Activity 4.5 Promote interdisciplinary coordination at the national and regional level

24. The Coordinating Committee noted that, according to the replies provided in writing and during discussion, this activity was very important, particularly in the context of the ongoing debate on private standards, and that interdisciplinary coordination should be enhanced at national and regional level to avoid duplication and prevent development of contradictory standards. Activity 5.5 Enhance participation of non-governmental organizations at international, regional and national level 25. The Coordinating Committee noted that, according to the replies provided in writing and during discussion, this activity aimed at ensuring unbiased opinions from stakeholders in developing Codex standards and that governments should strengthen participation of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) at national level. In this regard, it was noted that in India a limited number of NGOs participated in Codex meetings, despite mechanisms being in place to allow their participation. It was suggested to highlight the importance of collaboration and participation of NGOs in Codex work in the next Strategic Plan and to identify mechanisms to involve a greater number of NGOs, in particular consumers, in activities related to Codex. Preparation of the new Codex Strategic Plan for 2013-2018 26. The Coordinating Committee recalled that, following a decision of the 33rd Session of the Commission, the Chairperson and vice-Chairpersons had prepared a questionnaire to seek suggestions from coordinating committees for the preparation of the next Codex Strategic Plan 2013-2018. Mr Knud Ostergaard, Vice-Chairperson of the Commission, explained that the Strategic Plan was an important tool for the Commission and the Executive Committee to accept proposal for new work, to measure progress of each committee and, if necessary, suggest corrective actions; and that for the new Strategic Plan 2013-2018, it was decided to widen the inputs sought right from the beginning to cover all stakeholders and partner organizations. The Vice-Chairperson appealed to CCASIA to give solid input to the future work of the bureau, including the important question of reflecting in the new Strategic Plan reference to future challenges due to climate change and new production technologies, such as nanotechnology. 27. 28. The Coordinating Committee considered the six questions of the questionnaire as follows. Delegations commented that the current five goals were still relevant. a) Are the current five goals still relevant? What changes would you propose (if any)? b) The 2003-2007 Framework did not include measurable indicators, as does the current Strategic Plan. Should the next Strategic Plan include measurable indicators? Is the current table format useful or would you suggest changes? For example, is it useful to track ongoing activities? 29. Delegations commented that measurable indicators should be kept in the Strategic Plan to allow monitoring the implementation of the activities and evaluate how effectively Codex Strategic Goals were achieved. In this regard one delegation commented that qualitative indicators might be preferable as it would be difficult to achieve an objective evaluation on the basis of numerical indicators. Another delegation was of the view that measurable indicators of performance should be developed for Codex to evaluate whether the objectives had been achieved or not. Further, a delegation suggested that in developing a strategic plan it would always be advantageous to have an external perspective especially from the users of Codex services and products. In this connection, the Vice-Chairperson commented that a difficulty was the selection of the measurable indicators and the type of activity and achievements that should be measured. c) What are the most significant challenges facing Codex? What goals/activities should be included in the next plan to insure that these challenges get the necessary attention? 30. The Delegation of India stated that the most significant challenges facing Codex were the large number of food products and ingredients entering the global market each year, in particular from less developed countries. To face these challenges there was a need to revisit the issue of expediting standards development procedure and consider alternative models which would allow faster agreement on the standards, leaving each country to suitably adapt the same to meet its specific needs. The Delegation also suggested reviewing and strengthening the interface of Codex with other agencies active in the area of standards development in order to leverage the strengths of these organizations for common objectives, thereby increasing the coverage of safe food practices. The Delegation further recommended greater

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involvement of consumers and NGOs in the work of Codex by involving them in training activities organised for regulatory staff. 31. Other delegations suggested that the new Strategic Plan should take into account new challenges, such as climate change and new technologies, and pay attention to ongoing development of new and innovative methodologies that could be incorporated into food safety assessments and which would require more close and effective interactions between risk assessors and risk managers. d) Given the fact that developing country participation in the work of Codex is presently a major issue, what goals/activities should be included in the next plan to ensure that this issue gets necessary attention in 20132018? 32. The Delegation of India stated that the involvement of less developed countries in the Codex system should be encouraged and that IT enabled systems, such as video conferencing, could be used to facilitate discussion between members when actual travel becomes difficult. The Delegation also suggested considering other ways in which regional standards could contribute to greater trade and market access for less developing countries. e) Do current Codex structures and procedures adequately meet present needs of members (i.e., various step procedure options, critical review by CCEXEC, etc.)? What changes might be considered? f) The Commission operates in an environment of change and technological advancement. Should issues such as the food safety consequences of climate change, and new production technologies such as nanotechnology, etc., be reflected in the new Strategic Plan? If so, how? 33. The Coordinating Committee noted that these two questions had been already addressed with the previous questions. 34. The Coordinating Committee concluded its discussion recognising that: - The current five goals of the Codex Strategic Plan were still relevant; - The new Strategic Plan should include measurable indicators; - The most significant challenge for Codex was to develop procedures that would, as appropriate, allow to develop standards and other texts keeping pace with the rapid developments in the food industry; and - The new Strategic Plan should take into account food safety consequences of climate changes and new production technologies. New Options for Physical Working Groups 35. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the 64th Session of the Executive Committee had discussed new options for physical working groups with the goal of working more effectively and efficiently in a smaller group while increasing the possibility of ensuring input from all regions and that the Executive Committee had decided to submit the proposals to the FAO/WHO coordinating committees especially as they referred to the involvement of regional representatives. It was also noted that a document on this subject would be prepared for consideration by the next session of the Committee on General Principles (CCGP) in 2012. 36. Several delegations expressed concern on the proposal as in their view participation in physical working groups should remain as open as possible to all interested members and observers to ensure transparency and in line with Goal 5 Promoting maximum and effective participation of members of the Codex Strategic Plan 2008-2013. In this regard delegations, that intervened, noted that: wider participation in physical working groups was beneficial to discussions; that larger working groups have so far worked efficiently; that all Members and observers should have the opportunity to participate in Codex work; limiting participation would be contrary to the Guidelines on Physical Working Groups, in the Codex Procedural Manual, which state that working groups should be open to all members, take into account the problems of developing country participation .... Furthermore, limiting participation was not a solution to make the physical working groups more efficient; and it might be problematic for regions to identify proper representatives in working groups and develop effective mechanism to share views.

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37. In order to improve the work of physical working groups and to allow wider participation, in particular of developing countries, it was suggested that lead countries identify technical experts on the issues to be discussed to participate and provide inputs in the meetings and to convene working groups meetings immediately prior to Committee sessions as intersessional working groups might result in less participation of developing countries. 38. In view of the above discussion, the Coordinating Committee agreed that physical working groups should remain open to members and observers in accordance with the Guidelines on Physical Working Groups. Modified Standardized Common Names 39. The Coordinating Committee had no specific advice on this matter.

DRAFT REGIONAL STANDARD FOR EDIBLE SAGO FLOUR (N06-2007) (Agenda Item 3a)4 40. The Coordinating Committee noted that the Regional Standard had been adopted at Step 5 and advanced to Step 6 by the 32nd Session of the Commission, as proposed by CCASIA. 41. The Coordinating Committee considered the draft Regional Standard section by section with a view to advance it to Step 8 and, in addition to some minor editorial amendments, agreed to the following changes. Section 3. Essential Composition and Quality Factors 42. The Coordinating Committee, noting that filth encompassed both living and dead insects, agreed to delete living and dead in Sections 3.1.1 and 3.1.2, respectively, and amended Section 3.1.1 to read Edible sago flour shall be free from off-flavours and odours for clarity purpose. 43. The Coordinating Committee agreed to delete Sections 3.1.3 and 3.2.7, which included criteria related to other starches, since the method used for their determination was based on microscopic observation only. The Coordinating Committee also noted that other Codex standards for flours did not include criteria for starch. A new quality criterion Colour: from white to light-brown was added in Section 3.2.7. Section 4. Food Additives 44. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the 41st Session of the Committee on Food Additives (CCFA) had not endorsed the provision of 2500 mg/kg (treatment level) for chlorine dioxide (INS 926) and that, at its 42nd session, it had agreed to revise the provision for chlorine dioxide (INS 926) in the General Standard for Food Additives (GSFA) to 30 mg/kg (level of treatment) and had recommended CCASIA to revise the provision in the Draft Standard accordingly. The Coordinating Committee further recalled that the 42nd CCFA had also agreed to clarify the scope of food category 06.2.1 Flours of the GSFA to include sago flour and, consequently to this decision, had considered that it was appropriate that the Standard for sago flour use a general reference to the relevant provisions of Tables 1 and 2 of the GSFA in the section of food additives. 45. In view of this recommendation, the Coordinating Committee agreed that it was not necessary to explicitly list food additives in this section. Others 46. The Coordinating Committee recalled that the Committees on Food Labelling (CCFL) and on Methods of Analysis and Sampling (CCMAS) had endorsed the labelling provisions and the methods of analysis as proposed, respectively, with some editorial corrections. Status of the proposed draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour (N06-2007) 47. The Coordinating Committee agreed to forward the Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour to the 34th Session of the Codex Alimentarius Commission for adoption at Step 8 (see Appendix II).

ALINORM 09/32/15 Appendix V; CX/ASIA 10/17/3 (Comments of Philippines); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan); CRD 2 (Comments of Malaysia)

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PROPOSED DRAFT STANDARD FOR NON-FERMENTED SOYBEAN PRODUCTS (N06-2005) (Agenda Item 4a)5 48. The Coordinating Committee recalled that at its 16th Session, it had agreed to return the proposed draft Regional Standard for non-fermented soybean products to Step 2 for redrafting by an electronic working group, led by China, circulation for comments at Step 3 and consideration at the current session. The Coordinating Committee further recalled that the 62nd session of the Executive Committee, with regard to the difficulties to establish a classification and definition for non-fermented soybean products, had recommended that CCASIA should consider as a first stage the products that would be more easily standardised6. 49. The Delegation of China briefly introduced the report of the electronic working group, as given in CX/ASIA 10/17/4, and explained that the proposed draft standard had been revised on the basis of the written comments submitted during the 16th CCASIA and additional comments provided by the Working Group members and that the classification of non-fermented soybean products had been made more inclusive and simpler by deleting some sub-classifications of products. 50. The Coordinating Committee agreed to have a general discussion on the further progress of the regional standard and the prioritization of products to be covered by the standard. 51. The Coordinating Committee generally supported the further development of the standard and agreed to the recommendation of the Executive Committee to focus work on a few categories of products that could be more easily standardised. 52. The Delegation of Japan, while referring to their written comments, reiterated its concern on the standardisation of non-fermented soybean products on the ground that they were not aware of either major health concerns or fraudulent practices in trade and because of the difficulty to standardise the wide variety of non-fermented soybean products present in markets of the Asian region. The Delegation was of the view that the standard should only focus on relevant products that meet the Codex Criteria for the Establishment of Work Priority, which required specific data and information on the products to be standardised. 53. The Codex Secretariat recalled that the proposal for new work had been approved by the 28 th Session of the Commission in 2005 on the basis of a project document submitted by CCASIA and that the Executive Committee had not requested CCASIA to submit a new project document to justify work on a regional standard focusing on a prioritised list of products. 54. In order to facilitate progress on this discussion, the Coordinating Committee agreed to establish an insession working group, chaired by China, to prepare a proposal for the prioritization of products to be included in the standard and their justification. 55. The Delegation of China, speaking as the Chair, reported that the working group meeting had been attended by several countries: Cambodia, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Republic of Korea, Singapore and Thailand and had recommended that non-fermented soybean products be prioritized as follows: (i) soybean milk; (ii) soybean curd; (iii) compressed soybean curd; and (iv) soybean milk film, as these four categories of products could be categorized according to their manufacturing process and were already available on the market in the Asian region. 56. The Delegation of Japan reiterated its view that CCASIA should provide sufficient data to justify the prioritization of these products before starting the development of the standard. 57. The Coordinating Committee agreed with the proposal of the in-session working group that work on the regional standard for non-fermented soybean products would focus on the following categories of products: (i) soybean milk; (ii) soybean curd; (iii) compressed soybean curd; and (iv) soybean milk film. 58. The Coordinating Committee agreed to consider the proposed draft Regional Standard section by section, as presented in CX/ASIA 10/17/4, with a view to provide general comments for the further revision of the standard. 59. The Delegation of Japan expressed its reservation to this decision.

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CX/ASIA 10/17/4; CX/ASIA 10/17/4 Add.1 (Comments of CCC); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan) ALINORM 09/32/3 para. 34

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60. The Coordinating Committee considered the proposed draft standard section by section and made comments as follows. Section 2 Description 61. One delegation suggested that the Section 2.2.1 Soybean milk be revised taking into account the descriptor of food category 06.8.1 Soybean-based beverages of the General Standard for Food Additives (GSFA). Section 3 Essential Composition and Quality Factors 62. The Coordinating Committee noted that point (e) other food materials in Section 3.2 Optional ingredients needed to be clarified with the inclusion of some examples. 63. The Coordinating Committee agreed to rearrange Table 1 Physico-chemical requirements to refer to the four selected categories of products and noted the suggestions to specify the protein conversion factor used and to amend the figures accordingly. It was further suggested to revise the protein content of soybean milk to 2 g/100g. Section 4 Food Additives 64. The Coordinating Committee agreed that the list of food additives should be revised according to the relevant sections on food additives of the Relations between Commodity Committees and General Subject Committees and the Format for Codex Commodity Standards sections of the Codex Procedural Manual. Section 5 Contaminants 65. The Coordinating Committee agreed that the Section on Contaminants should be revised according to section on contaminants of the Format for Codex Commodity Standards section of the Codex Procedural Manual. Conclusions 66. The Coordinating Committee agreed to revise the proposed draft regional standard for non-fermented soybean products and to establish an electronic working group, led by China and open to all Members of the region and Observers and working in English only, to revise the proposed draft regional standard on the basis of the above discussion, for circulation for comments at Step 3 and further consideration at the 18 th Session of CCASIA. The Coordinating Committee requested the electronic working group to plan their work so that the proposed draft regional standard could be circulated for comments at Step 3 at least six month before the next Session of CCASIA in order to allow countries adequate time to consider the proposal and submit their comments. 67. The Coordinating Committee also agreed to establish a physical working group, chaired by China, which would meet immediately before its next session and working in English only, to consider the report of the electronic working group and comments submitted in order to facilitate the discussion in the Plenary and the finalisation of the standard. It was noted that provision for interpretation into Chinese would be considered. 68. The Coordinating Committee also noted that the Delegation of China would provide on a bilateral basis information and relevant data on these products to Japan to address its concern. Status of the Proposed Draft Regional Standard for non-Fermented Soybean Products (N06-2005) 69. The Coordinating Committee agreed to return the proposed draft Standard to Step 2 for redrafting by the above mentioned electronic Working Group, circulation at Step 3 and further consideration by the physical Working Group and at the 18th Session of CCASIA. PROPOSED DRAFT (Agenda Item 4b)7 REGIONAL STANDARD FOR CHILI SAUCE (N05-2007)

70. The Delegation of Thailand, speaking as the Chair of the in-session Working Group on Agenda Item 4b, briefly introduced the report of the working group, as presented in CRD 9. The working group had
7

CX/ASIA 10/17/5; CX/ASIA 10/17/5 Add.1 (Comments of Indonesia, Philippines); CRD 7 (Comments of Vietnam); CRD 9 (Prepared by In-session Working Group)

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considered written comments submitted at Step 3 and additional comments provided in the meeting and had agreed on amendments to several sections of the proposed draft regional standard. 71. The Coordinating Committee considered the proposed draft regional standard section by section and, in addition to the amendments proposed by the in-session working group, agreed to the following changes. Section 3. Essential Composition and Quality Factors 72. The Coordinating Committee agreed to delete fruits such as and vegetables such as from (a) and (b) in Section 3.1.2 Other permitted ingredients. It was clarified that the specific fruits and vegetables listed in Section 3.1.2 Other permitted ingredients were specifically referred to as these were the more commonly used ones in chili sauce and that the section allowed for other fruits and vegetable as well as for other edible ingredients, such as edible oil, which were not specifically listed. 73. In Section 3.3 Defects and Allowances the term roasted was changed to roasting.

Section 4. Food Additives 74. The Coordinating Committee considered a number of food additives proposed by the in-session working group and by the delegation of China and agreed to the following: Acidity regulators: disodium monohydrogen citrate (INS 331(ii)) was not added, as it had not been evaluated by JECFA; acetic acid (INS 260) and sodium acetate (INS 262(i)) were not added because already listed in Table 3 of the General Standard for Food Additives (GSFA). Antioxidants: tocopherol, d-alpha (INS 307a), tocopherol concentrate, mixed (INS 307b) and tocopherol, dlalpha (INS 307c), were listed with a maximum level of 600 mg/kg singly or in combination. Colours: curcumin (INS 100(i)); tartrazine (INS 102); carmines (INS 120); ponceau (4R) (cochineal redA) (INS 124); erythrosin ((INS 127); allura red AC (INS 129); brilliant blue, FCF (INS 133); and lycopene (INS 160d(i)) were added. Riboflavins (INS 101) was replaced with the individual riboflavins, i.e.: riboflavin, synthetic (INS 101(i)) and riboflavin 5phosphate sodium (INS 101(ii)). Emulsifiers: polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (INS 432); polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (INS 433); polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monopalmitate (INS 434); polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monoesterate (INS 435); sucrose esters of fatty acid (INS 473); polyglycerol esters of fatty acids (INS 475); and propylene glycol esters of fatty acids (INS 477) were added. Sweeteners: sodium saccharin (INS 954 (iv)) was added. Thickeners: propylene glycol alginate (INS 405) and pullulan (INS 1204) were added. 75. Proposals for inclusion of nisin (INS 234), calcium and sodium cyclamates (INS 952(ii) (iv) were not supported as their use was considered not technologically justified in these types of products. Status of the Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chili Sauce (N05-2007) 76. The Coordinating Committee agreed to forward the sections on food additives, labelling and methods of analysis and sampling respectively to CCFA, CCFL and CCMAS for endorsement and to forward the Proposed Draft Regional Standard to the Commission for adoption at Steps 5/8, with the recommendation to omit Steps 6 and 7 (see Appendix III). STATUS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN FOR THE CCASIA 20092014 (Agenda Item 5)8 77. The Coordinating Committee recalled its decision to consider this Agenda Item together with Agenda Item 7 National food control systems and consumer participation in food standard setting and Agenda Item 10 Use of Codex standards at national and regional level.

CX/ASIA 10/17/6; CX/ASIA 10/17/8 (Comments of Indonesia, Nepal and Philippines); CX/ASIA 10/17/8 Add.1 (Comments of Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea and Thailand); CX/ASIA 10/17/12 (Comments of Indonesia, Philippines and Singapore); CX/ASIA 10/17/12 Add.1 (Comments of Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea, Malaysia and Thailand); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan); CRD 2 (Comments of Malaysia); CRD 11 (Comments of Nepal)

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78. The Delegation of Indonesia briefly introduced the status of implementation of the Strategic Plan for the CCASIA 2009-2014, as presented in Annex 1 to CX/ASIA 10/17/6, and drew the attention of the Coordinating Committee on the progress of various activities, which were reported in the columns Status 2009/2010 and Notes. 79. The Coordinating Committee thanked Indonesia for the report and generally supported the implementation of all the activities. The Coordinating Committee considered each of the actions, taking into account replies to CL 2010/14-ASIA and CL 2010/17-ASIA, as appropriate and commented as follows. Objective 1: To develop and strengthen national food regulatory system and Codex Contact Point and/or National Codex Committee 80. The Coordinating Committee noted that countries in the Region had in place national food regulatory systems and that in a number of countries these systems had been strengthened by developing and/or revising legislation and establishing a new organisation responsible for food safety. Several delegations, however, were of the view that support was still needed to strengthen infrastructure and equipments. 81. The Coordinating Committee noted that while countries had benefited from capacity building activities provided by FAO, WHO and other bilateral and multilateral organizations, training and capacity building were still needed in some countries, in particular to strengthen their scientific and technical capacities. 82. The Representative of FAO, informed the Coordinating Committee of the result of FAO/WHO Regional Workshop on the Use of Science throughout the Food Chain for Safe Foods (CRD 10), which was held prior to the Session, and emphasized that countries had identified need for building scientific capacity in the areas of training, capacity development, databases, regional programmes and support for participating in Codex meetings. Some specific areas highlighted included: - Advocacy to policy makers and planners in enhancing understanding the implication and importance of review of legislation to take account of risk-based approach; - Enhancing collaboration between risk managers and assessors/ experts; - Strengthening capacity to deal with Food Safety in natural emergencies/ disasters; development of guidelines checklist rapid survey - Build web-based scientific research database for Asia and establish database of key scientists/experts in each topic; - Regional initiative on dietary exposure assessments; - Development of communication material for food safety which can be used in the region; and - Enhancing regional participation in scientific meeting. 83. The Delegation of Japan informed the Coordinating Committee that Japan, in coordination with the FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, had financially supported training courses and workshops for improving food control system in the region. The Coordinating Committee also noted that Japan had established in 2009 the Consumer Affairs Agency, which covered a broad range of jurisdictions including labelling and nutritional issues in the context of Codex. Objective 2: To strengthen communication & coordination amongst the CCASIA members, with other regions and Codex Secretariat as well as other relevant organizations 84. The Coordinating Committee noted that countries were using electronic communication systems, e.g. e-mail and websites, for Codex work. The Delegation of India suggested the use of success stories as a communication tool to develop capacity building in the region and encouraged CCASIA to coordinate with regional groupings in Asia, such as ASEAN, SAARC etc. The Representative of FAO informed that under the Japanese funded project Enhancing food safety by strengthening food inspection systems in ASEAN countries, four case studies were been documented and these would be available in the next few months.

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Objective 3: To achieve maximum and effective participation of member countries in the activities of CCASIA, Codex Alimentarius Commission and its subsidiary bodies 85. The Coordinating Committee noted that activities related to this Objective would be considered under Agenda Item 6 Issues relevant to the Region. Objective 4: To strengthen scientific and technical capacities of member countries in the region 86. With regard to Action 4.2, the Coordinating Committee, noting that only China and Indonesia had sent lists of experts, requested the Coordinator to send a letter to all countries to call for information on experts and institutions available in the region, which could provide the required scientific and technical expetise. Objective 5: To promote use of Codex standards and related texts as a basis for national legislation 87. The Coordinating Committee noted that countries generally used Codex standards and related texts as references in the development of national legislation, standards and guidance related to food safety and that Codex texts provided a sound basis for harmonisation of legislation in the region. It was also noted that some countries still had difficulties in using Codex standards and that the rapid development and complexity of analytical methods were causing difficulties in many countries. Others 88. Some delegations emphasized the importance of a clear and workable implementation framework and action plan to ensure that all countries contribute to the implementation of and benefit from the activities of the Strategic Plan for the CCASIA. In view of the large amount of information gathered through this exercise, it was suggested to design a format for collecting, analysing and updating such information. The Coordinating Committee took note of this suggestion and agreed to continue this discussion at its next session. 89. The Coordinating Committee further agreed to request the next Coordinator to provide an update of the implementation of the Strategic Plan and to prepare a preliminary new draft Strategic Plan for discussion at its next session. ISSUES RELEVANT TO THE REGION (Agenda Item 6)9 90. The Delegation of Indonesia, as the Coordinator, briefly introduced document CX/ASIA 10/17/7 and recalled that the Coordinating Committee at its 16th Session had agreed to add to its agenda, as a standing item, the discussion of Issues relevant to the region and to request the Coordinator to prepare a paper on this subject for consideration at the present session. The Coordinator drew the attention of the Coordinating Committee to the Annex of the document, which presented the list of issues relevant to the region, identified for each committees session during 2009-2010. 91. A number of delegations, including Japan, Lao PDR and China, thanked the Coordinator for preparing the document and expressed the view that such information would greatly assist in identifying and facilitating dialogue and communication among countries on common issues on food safety and quality in the region and thus achieving the objectives of CCASIA. 92. In addition, the Coordinating Committee noted the information provided at the session by several delegations, as follows. 93. The Delegation of Maldives drew the attention of the Coordinating Committee to the challenges that Maldives were facing as a small country with poor agriculture land, weak legislative framework, insufficient experts and facilities for testing and calibration, lack of food product registration and vulnerability to climate change due to unique geographical situation. In addition, the need to strengthen sub-regional activities in SAARC in relation to standard setting, dissemination of scientific information, monitoring of alert was needed to protect the public health and fair trade in small nations. The Delegation highlighted that the Codex Trust Fund (CTF) had contributed to the participation of the country in the Codex meetings and capacity building workshops, such as the recent workshop on Use of Science throughout the Food Chain for Safe Foods, organised in conjunction with this session of CCASIA.

CX/ASIA 10/17/7

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94. The Delegations of Bhutan and Pakistan also pointed out that the CTF support to capacity building programme in Codex standard setting activities was a useful way to widen and strengthen participation in Codex. 95. The Delegations of Malaysia and Thailand noted that the identification of issues relevant to the region could allow countries to review and assist countries to develop common positions on issues of interest to the region to be put forward to the Commission for consideration. They recommended strengthening communication and exchange of information among countries of the region. 96. The Chairperson in concluding the discussion noted the useful exchange of information and relevance of the same to the work of CCASIA and expected that the next CCASIA Coordinator would continue preparing and updating the document so to facilitate the identification of issues of mutual interest. He also stressed the need to further enhance continuous communication and exchange of information among countries. NATIONAL FOOD CONTROL SYSTEMS AND CONSUMER PARTICIPATION IN FOOD STANDARD SETTING (Agenda Item 7)10 See Agenda Item 5 DISCUSSION PAPER ON TEMPE AND TEMPE PRODUCTS (Agenda Item 8)11 97. The Coordinating Committee recalled that at its 16th Session it had agreed to request Indonesia to prepare a comprehensive discussion paper to justify the need for new work on the development of a standard for tempe and tempe products including a detailed project document for consideration. 98. The Delegation of Indonesia briefly introduced the document for new work as presented in CX/ASIA 10/17/9 and recommended that the new work focus on tempe only (fresh and fresh frozen tempe). 99. The Coordinating Committee generally supported the development of the standard as proposed by Indonesia and noted that tempe was consumed in many countries of the region but that there was limited data on the volume of trade and production. It was also noted that the Indonesian standard for tempe could be used as a starting point for the development of the regional standard. 100. The Coordinating Committee noted that the Standard for Fermented Soybean Paste (CODEX STAN 298R-2009) did not cover tempe, which was made from soybean fermented by Rhizophus sp. without salt, while fermented soybean paste was fermented by Aspergillus sp. and salt was added in the soybean mash. 101. The Coordinating Committee considered the project document (Annex to CX/ASIA 10/17/9) section by section and revised points (a), (b) and (c) of Section 4 to add information on: import of tempe by Japan and Republic of Korea; potential impediments to trade due to the fast growth of tempe production with the potential as a health food/functional food and the variation of raw materials; and potential new market for this products to countries where large percentage of population is vegetarian. Conclusion 102. The Coordinating Committee agreed to propose to the Commission new work on the development of a regional standard for tempe (see Appendix IV). Subject to the approval of the Commission, an electronic working group, led by Indonesia, open to all Members of the region and Observers and working in English only, would prepare a proposed draft for circulation for comments at Step 3 and consideration at the next session.

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CX/ASIA 10/17/8 (Comments of Indonesia, Nepal, Philippines); CX/ASIA 10/17/8 Add.1 (Comments of DPRK); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan); CRD 2 (Comments of Malaysia); CRD 11 (Comments of Nepal) CX/ASIA 10/17/9

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ACTIVITIES OF FAO AND WHO COMPLEMENTARY TO THE WORK OF THE CODEX ALIMENTARIUS COMMISSION (Agenda Item 9a)12 Capacity Building 103. The Representative of FAO introduced the capacity building programmes and activities of both FAO and WHO since the 16th Session of CCASIA. 104. Under their respective mandates, goals and work plans, FAO and WHO are engaged in a range of food safety and quality activities at national and regional levels, which support the Codex Strategic Plan 20082013, in particular, activities 1.7, 2.6 and 5.4 and are generally aimed at: - Upgrading the capacity of countries with transition economies in food safety, quality control and quality assurance and supporting their effective participation in the work of Codex; - Enhancing the respective roles of the agriculture and health sectors, trade and industry in ensuring food safety and quality; - Strengthening institutional, policy and legislative frameworks of food safety control systems along the food chain; and - Strengthening cooperation and collaboration between FAO and WHO and partner organizations, in the field of food safety and quality. 105. The Representative of FAO highlighted some of the regional and country activities including the Japanese funded regional project on Enhancing food safety by strengthening food inspection systems in the ASEAN countries, the Core Agricultural Support Programme for the Greater Mekong Sub-region countries and some of the country programmes. It was highlighted that the major activities under the projects included areas such as development of food safety and quality policy, updating food legislation, institutional development including strengthening of food control/ inspection systems and laboratories, strengthening disease surveillance systems, linkage to primary production, regional and national workshop and training courses, production of case studies to reflect best practices in the region as well as guidance documents. 106. The Representative of FAO also informed that it was proposed to have a regional workshop in the area of equivalence for the SAARC region in the early part of next year to help the countries in the sub-region in understanding the basic needs and requirements for developing agreements and arrangement on recognitions and equivalence within the region. 107. On the subject of Food Safety Emergency Response Planning, the Representative of FAO highlighted that, based on the FAO/WHO Framework for Developing National Food Safety Emergency Response Plans, capacity building activities were proposed in this area in the next year in Bangladesh and Vietnam under existing projects to help them establish such systems and based on official requests workshops and programmes in other countries could be considered. 108. The Delegation of Japan expressed appreciation of the work of FAO and WHO and informed the Coordinating Committee that they had been supporting the work of Codex Secretariat for developing Codex standards since 1999. They also highlighted that under their funding support workshops and trainings had been held (around 10 total) for strengthening food inspection and certification systems in ASEAN countries. The Delegation further emphasised on their continued efforts towards capacity building support for the Region for future. 109. The Delegation of Bangladesh highlighted the details of the EU funded 7.1 million Euro project on Improving food safety, quality and food control in Bangladesh being implemented by FAO with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh. The details were circulated as CRD 12. 110. The delegations of Thailand, Lao PDR, China, Mongolia, Cambodia, Maldives and Nepal thanked the FAO and WHO and CTF for support and requested that such support towards trainings and capacity building should be continued for country as well as regional activities. 111. The Representative of FAO also highlighted some of the priority areas for Capacity Development support for the coming. It was also decided to focus on the areas identified in the FAO/WHO Regional
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CX/ASIA 10/17/10; CRD 10 (Comments of FAO); CRD 12 (Comments of Bangladesh)

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Workshop on the Use of Science throughout the Food Chain for Safe Foods, held from 18-20 November 2010 and given in CRD 10. Scientific Advice 112. The Representative of FAO, on behalf of FAO and WHO, advised the Committee that detailed information on FAO/WHO scientific advice was presented to the 33rd Session of the Commission (CX/CAC 10/33/15). The Coordinating Committee was informed of some current issues of relevance to its work within Codex and at national level. These included notification of web-based tools on the control of Salmonella and Campylobacter in poultry and microbiological sampling plans under development by JEMRA and the forthcoming call for experts to establish an e-Discussion Group for the Development of a Tiered Approach for Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials. 113. It was also informed that FAOs recently established Emergency Prevention System for Food Safety (EMPRES Food Safety) was now becoming operational and work would be required on emerging risks. To ensure effective pooling of scientific excellence, a new food safety experts roster will be established in 2011. 114. The importance of accessing qualified experts and reliable data from as many parts of the world as possible was stressed as an important element of the FAO/WHO activities on scientific advice to ensure global relevance and use of the scientific advice generated. Countries were encouraged to disseminate FAO/WHO calls for experts and data to a wide audience. 115. The Representative of FAO also provided information on FAO and WHO efforts to target extra budgetary resources for the provision of scientific advice and related activities through the Global Initiative for Food-related Scientific Advice (GIFSA). To further strengthen this initiative FAO has developed a Strategy for the Provision of Scientific Advice for Food Safety (2010 2013), available from the FAO website. OUTCOMES OF THE CODEX TRUST FUND MID TERM REVIEW (Agenda Item 9b)13 116. The Codex Secretariat recalled that the 33rd Session of the Commission and the 64th Session of the Executive Committee had extensively discussed the mid-term review of the Codex Trust Fund (CTF)14. Subsequently FAO/WHO had submitted five interlinked questions15 to the coordinating committees to gather information and feedback on critical issues in each region for use as a basis for determining the strategic and operational direction of the CTF for the next six years. The Secretariat recalled further that the three main objectives of the CTF Objective were as follows: Objective 1 - Widen participation in Codex; Objective 2 Strengthening overall participation in Codex; and Objective 3 - Enhance scientific /technical participation in Codex. 117. The Coordinating Committee considered the questions as follows. Question 1: Should there be a shift in emphasis from Objective 1 to Objectives 2 and 3? 118. The Coordinating Committee was of the view that Objective 1 should be maintained to support wide participation of developing countries and that there should be a gradual shift to Objectives 2 and 3 to increase active and effective participation. Furthermore that there was no need to change eligibility criteria to give support to Codex members on activities related to Objectives 2 and 3. Question 2: If yes, what is the "niche" for the Codex Trust Fund? 119. One delegation was of the view that lack of understanding of food safety system was among the most critical issues in Codex countries and encouraged FAO and WHO to focus their activities in this area as a better understanding would contribute to strengthen participation in and support to Codex. Another delegation noted that participation in Codex was very important for developing countries and that for these countries it was quite difficult to develop clear country position in Codex due to the lack of adequate food safety strategy/capacity at country level. It was also suggested that FAO and WHO should make full use of

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CX/ASIA 10/17/11; CRD 5 (Comments of Philippines) CX/CAC 10/33/14 Add.1 15 CL 2010/42-ASIA

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coordinating committees as a communication channel to deliver their capacity building activities and to gather information to prepare more effective programmes in each region. 120. The Coordinating Committee concluded that the implementation of comprehensive training programmes to look at overall development of food safety and food control system should be the responsibility of FAO and WHO with their regular and external funds and not with the CTF resources. Furthermore, that there was a need to develop mechanisms to enhance technical and scientific participation of scientists from CTF beneficiary countries in FAO/WHO expert meetings. Question 3: Should there be a mechanism to continue support for physical participation for those who need it most (including graduates who cannot sustain participation)? 121. The Coordinating Committee recommended that FAO and WHO explore possible mechanism (external funding) to support participation of graduate countries and develop guidance to ensure transparency, impartiality and confidence for the use of such funds. The Delegation of Maldives recommended that specific mechanisms be developed to address the specific needs of small and less developed countries, such as the Maldives, which even when graduated would not be in a position to sustain their participation in Codex. Question 4: Should there be re-consideration of the criteria for allocation of support? 122. The Coordinating Committee agreed that current criteria for allocation of support were still adequate and that FAO and WHO should give consideration to support participation of graduate countries to workshops, training programmes and other capacity building activities organised in conjunction with Codex committees sessions. Further one delegation suggested that FAO and WHO consider setting a transition period for facilitating smooth graduation, through gradual reduction of funding support. Question 5: Should the lifespan of the Codex Trust Fund be extended? 123. The Coordinating Committee agreed that prior to making any decision on expansion of CTF lifespan, it was necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of CTF and recommended that this evaluation be planned early to avoid any gaps with a possible extension of the CTF. USE OF CODEX STANDARDS AT NATIONAL AND REGIONAL LEVEL (Agenda Item 10)16 See Agenda Item 5 NUTRITIONAL ISSUES WITHIN THE REGION (Agenda Item 11)17 124. The Coordinating Committee recalled that this matter had been placed on the Provisional Agenda at the request of the Coordinator (Indonesia), FAO and WHO. The Coordinating Committee noted that many delegations had submitted substantive information on nutritional issues in the region in response to Part B of CL 2010/14-ASIA. 125. The Coordinating Committee was informed that many countries had problem of undernutrition, which would result in diseases such as Iron Deficiency Anemia, Vitamin A Deficiency and Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD). It was also highlighted that non-communicable diseases such as obesity were also of concern in many countries in the Region. 126. The Coordinating Committee further noted that countries had labelling regulation, either mandatory or voluntary, on nutrition labelling and nutrition and health claims. The Coordinating Committee was informed that countries were making efforts to identify and solve nutritional problems through activities such as nutrition survey, nutrient fortification, public health-oriented actions and education of consumers for selection of nutritionally balanced food items. 127. The Delegation of India informed the Coordinating Committee that the 32nd Session of the Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses (CCNFSDU) had agreed to take up the new work on the
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CX/ASIA 10/17/12 (Comments of Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore); CX/ASIA 10/17/12 Add.1 (Comments of DPRK, Malaysia); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan) CX/ASIA 10/17/13 (Comments of Indonesia, Philippines, Singapore); CX/ASIA 10/17/13 Add.1 (Comments of DPRK, Malaysia); CRD 1 (Comments of Japan); CRD 4 (Comments of Republic of Korea)

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inclusion of new part B for underweight children in the Standard for Processed Cereal-Based Foods for Infants and Young Children (CODEX STAN 74-1981). 128. The Representative of FAO apprised the Member countries on two important Regional initiatives; firstly on the SAARCFOODS, a regional centre of INFOODS, the third meeting of which was organized in Colombo, Sri Lanka on 18-19 October 2010. The goal of SAARCFOODS is to develop national and regional food composition data of high quality, adequate quantity and easy accessibility to end users in SAARC countries and around the world. The second activity highlighted was on the Regional Consultation being held on Food-based Dietary Guidelines in India from 6-9 December which was being organized by Institute of Home Economics, India jointly with WHO and FAO, the aim being to see the status of FBDGs in some selected countries and develop a set of region-wise common messages on FBDGs for wider dissemination. NOMINATION OF THE COORDINATOR (Agenda Item 12)18 129. On the proposal of the Delegation of Indonesia seconded by the Delegation of India, the Coordinating Committee unanimously agreed to recommend to the 34th Session of the Commission that Japan be appointed as Coordinator for Asia. The Delegation of Japan thanked all the Countries for their support and accepted the nomination. 130. The Coordinating Committee expressed its thanks to Indonesia for the excellent work carried out as Coordinator for the Asia region. OTHER BUSINESS AND FUTURE WORK (Agenda Item 13) 19 131. The Chairperson recalled that under this Agenda Item the Coordinating Committee had to consider four proposals for new work and that it would be difficult to take on board all the proposals and the need to prioritise the proposals in order to ensure that CCASIA continues work efficiently. The Coordinating Committee agreed to have a general discussion on each of the four proposals before drawing conclusion and making decisions. General discussion Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Laver Products 132. The Delegation of the Republic of Korea briefly introduced the document, as presented in CX/ASIA 10/17/15, and highlighted that laver products were mainly produced in the Region but traded globally. Laver products are known by various names in different countries and most countries either do not have relevant standards or the standards vary from country to country, causing confusion and impediments to trade. 133. Many delegations supported the development of the standard. The Delegation of China, referring to their written comments in CRD 3, did not support the development of the standard because the market for these products was very stable and well-functioning; and as China with highest production and export volume in the world was not aware of any major problems in their trade. The Delegation further noted that the processing technologies, ingredients and consumers preference varied among countries thus making it difficult to have a single unified standard. 134. The Delegation of India suggested that since laver products were also traded outside the region the development of an international standard could be more appropriate for these products and recalled that, according to the Guideline on the Application of the Criteria for the Establishment of Work Priorities20, in case there was substantial production and trade of a regional commodity in countries outside the region, the Executive Committee would recommend to the concerned commodity committee to consider elaborating a global standard, taking into account its work programme. Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Preserved Yuza 135. The Delegation of the Republic of Korea briefly introduced the document, as presented in CX/ASIA 10/17/16, and highlighted that the increasing trade of preserved yuza in the Region, the lack of relevant
18 19 20

CX/ASIA 10/17/14; CRD 3 (Comments of China) CX/ASIA 10/17/15; CX/ASIA 10/17/16; CX/ASIA 10/17/17; CRD 3 (Comments of China); CRD 8 ALINORM 10/33/3 Appendix II

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legislation and the possible confusion with other products justified the development of a standard to protect consumers from fraud and deception and to promote fair trade between countries. 136. The Delegation of China, referring to their written comments in CRD 3, did not support the development of the standard because preserved yuza was just a Korean designation and other names were used for these products in international trade and raw materials used for these products varied among countries. Furthermore, it was not clear whether such products would be covered within the scope of the Codex Standard for Jams, Jellies and Marmalades (CODEX STAN 296-2009). 137. The Coordinating Committee noted that it might be difficult to standardise these products because many similar products existed in the markets and were traded under different names. Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Durian 138. The Delegation of Thailand briefly introduced the document, as presented in CX/ASIA 10/17/17, and recalled that proposal for new work for a standard for durian was first sent to the Commission by the 14 th Session of the Committee on Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (CCFFV) in 2008 and that subsequently the proposal was referred back to CCFFV and CCASIA and that the 15th CCFFV could not consider the proposal since there was a lack of information related to trade between counries in order to meet the criteria of a worldwide standard. 139. The Coordinating Committee supported the proposal for new work. Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Edible Crickets and Their Products 140. The Delegation of Lao PDR briefly introduced the document, as presented in CRD 8, and highlighted the importance of insects as a food source in the region and provided information on their commercial production. The Delegation noted that the new work would contribute to protect consumers health and ensure fair practice. 141. The Coordinating Committee noted that insects were consumed in some countries and that there was a great potential and growing global interest for utilization of insects as food resource and generally supported the proposal. However, some delegations requested clarification as to the nature of the products to be covered by the Standard, the level of trade and the dimension of production. It was noted that these data were not available since most of the trade was in the informal sector. Conclusions Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Durian 142. The Coordinating Committee considered the project document attached to CX/ASIA 10/17/17, section by section and, in addition to some editorial changes, agreed to include the missing information in points: (b), (d), (e) and (f) of Section 4. Data were also added on durian imports in Japan and Section 5 was amended to make reference to specific actions of the Strategic Plan of the CCASIA (2008-2013) and the Codex Strategic Plan 2008-2013. 143. The Coordinating Committee agreed to propose to the Commission new work on the development of a regional standard for durian (see Appendix V). Subject to the approval of the Commission, an electronic working group, led by Thailand, open to all Members of the region and Observers and working in English only, would prepare a proposed draft for circulation for comments at Step 3 and consideration at the next session. Proposal for New Work on Development of a Regional Standard for Laver Products 144. The Coordinating Committee agreed that a standard for laver products be developed as a global standard in view of the significant amount of products exported outside the region and recommended that the Republic of Korea submit the proposal for new work to the next session of the Committee on Fish and Fishery Products (CCFFP), to be held in Tromso, Norway, on 11-16 April 2011. It was noted, however, that although seaweed products were not specifically covered in the Terms of Reference of the Committee, which only referred to fish and fish products, CCFFP was most likely to have the technical competence for these types of products. The Coordinating Committee further agreed that should the proposal for new work not be supported by CCFFP, the Republic of Korea would forward a proposal for new work on the development of a regional standard for laver products to the next session of the Commission.

REP11/ASIA

18

Proposal for New work on Development of Regional Standards for Preserved Yuza and for Edible Crickets and Their Products 145. The Coordinating Committee agreed that the discussion papers on new work on a regional standard for preserved yuza and for edible crikets needed further revision to address the specific comments made. Therefore, it agreed to establish two electronic working groups, open to all Members of the region and Observers and working in English only, to prepare revised discussion papers on: (i) the development of regional standard for preserved yuza (led by the Republic of Korea); and (ii) the development of regional standard for edible crickets and their products (led by Lao PDR) for consideration at the next session. DATE AND PLACE OF NEXT SESSION OF THE COMMITTEE (Agenda Item 14) 146. The Coordinating Committee was informed that its 18th Session would be held in approximately two years time and that more detailed arrangements would be communicated to Members following the appointment of the Coordinator by the 34th Session of the Commission.

REP11/ASIA

19

SUMMARY STATUS OF WORK DOCUMENT REFERENCE (REP11/ASIA) para. 47, Appendix II para. 76, Appendix III para. 69

SUBJECT MATTER Draft Regional Standard for Edible Sago Flour (N06-2007) Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Chilli Sauce (N05-2007) Proposed Draft Standard for Non-Fermented Soybean Products (N06-2005)

STEP 8 5/8

ACTION BY: Governments, 34th CAC Governments, 34th CAC eWG led by China, Governments, pWG led by China, 18th CCASIA 34th CAC, eWG led by Indonesia, Governments, 18th CCASIA 34th CAC, eWG led by Thailand, Governments, 18th CCASIA eWG led by Republic of Korea, 18th CCASIA eWG led by Lao PDR, 18th CCASIA Coordinator, 18th CCASIA -

2/3

Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Tempe

1/2/3

para. 102, Appendix IV

Proposed Draft Regional Standard for Durian

1/2/3

para. 143, Appendix V

Discussion Paper on New Work on a Regional Standard for Yuza Discussion Paper on New Work on a Regional Standard for Edible Crickets and Their Products Update of (i) the implementation of the Strategic Plan for Asia and (ii) issues relevant to the region and draft strategic plan for CCASIA 2014 2018 Proposal for New Work on a Codex Regional Standard for Laver Products

para. 145

para. 145

paras 89 and 96 para. 144

REP11/ASIA Appendix I

20

Appendix I
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS LISTE DES PARTICIPANTS LISTA DE PARTICIPANTES
Chairperson President Presidente : Mr Kukuh S. Achmad Director, Laboratory and Inspection Body Accreditation National Standardization Agency of Indonesia Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62 21 574 7043 Fax: +62 21 579 02948 E-mail: kukuh@bsn.go.id Dr Sunarya Director, the Spring Institute Jl. Shaleh Iskandar No.279 Bogor, Indonesia Tel: +62 251 4745504 Fax: +62 251 7531861 E-mail: sunarya.thespring@gmail.com

Vice-Chairperson Vice-Prsident Vice-Presidente

MEMBERS / MEMBRES / MIEMBROS BANGLADESH Md Nashir Uddin BSTI (Bangladesh Standards & Testing Institution) 116/A, Tejgaon I/A Dhaka, Bangladesh Tel: 88029897881 (O), 88028816088 (H) E-mail: nashiruddinbsti@yahoo.com Md Abdul Mannan Joint Chief Ministry of Health and Family Welfare Tel: 8802716468 Mobile: 88-02-01552443625 E-mail: m.mdabdul@yahoo.com Mr Deon Mahoney Chief Technical Advisor Food Safety Project Food Safety Project Office 1st Floor, IPH Building Mohakhali, Dhaka-1212 Bangladesh Tel: +880 2 881 8161 Fax: +88 01730 443366 E-mail: deon@bdfoodsafety.org BHUTAN Jambay Dorji Bhutan Agriculture & Food Regulatory Authority Ministry of Agriculture & Forest Thimphu, PO BOX 1071, Bhutan Tel: 00975-2-327031 Fax: 00975-2-327032 E-mail: Jamsdor77@gmail.com

Mr Sonam Wangchuk Head, Public Health Laboratory Ministry of Health Post Box No.: 667, Thimphu Bhutan. Tel: 323317 (O) E-mail: toswangehuk@hotmail.com, sonamphl@health.gov.bt CAMBODIA Aing Hoksrun Ministry of Health Cambodia 151-153. st.kampuchea Krom, Phnom Penh Tel: 85523722150 Mobile : 85585538066 Fax: 85523722150 E-mail: hoksrun02@yahoo.com Pich Chan Ministry of Commerce, Cambodia 50E0, street 144 Phnompenh, Cambodia Tel: 85523426166 Mobil: 85592344068 Fax: 85523426166 E-mail: Chan_Pich@yahoo.com CHINA / CHINE / CHINA Mr Yang Mingsheng Deputy Director Development Centre of Sci & Tech Ministry of Agriculture, P.R.China Room 808,18#, Maizidian Road, Chaoyang District. Beijing. China Tel: 861059195082 Fax: 861059194550 E-mail: yangmingsheng@agri.gov.cn Dr Ning Li Research Fellow National Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, China CDC No.7, Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China, 100021 Tel: 8610-67779118 Fax: 8610-67711813 E-mail: lining_65@163.com

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mr Song Tao Liu Program Officer Bureau of Food Safety Integrated Coordination and Health Supervision, MOH 1, Nanlu Xizhimenwai Beijing, 100044 Tel: 8610-68792404 Fax: 8610-68792408 E-mail: Liust@moh.gov.cn Ms Shelly Shen Senior Science & Commercialization Manager Coca Cola Greater China No.1188, Ziyue Road, Minhang District, Shanghai, Tel: 86-21-61928268 Fax: 86-21-61928013 E-mail: sheshen@apac.ko.com Dr Jing Tian Research Associate National Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety, China CDC No.7, Panjiayuan Nanli, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China, 100021 Tel: 8610-67791259 Fax: 8610-67711813 E-mail: tianjing960928@126.com Mr Li xiangbo Deputy Director Department of Industry Development China General Chamber of Commerce 25# Yuetanbei Street Xicheng District, Beijing Tel: 8610-68391812 Fax: 8610-68391852 E-mail: LXB337@163.com Ms Zhang lijun Deputy Secretary-General China General Chamber of Commerce 25# Yuetanbei Street Xicheng District, Beijing Tel: 8610-68391807 Fax: 8610-68391866 E-mail: ZLJUN1814@163.COM Ms Wang Huali Research Associate Natonal Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety China CDC No.7 Panjia Yuan Nanli, Chao Yang District, Beijing, China 100021 Tel: 8610-87776914 Fax: 8610-67711813 E-mail: whl8208@sina.com.cn DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF KOREA / RPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE DMOCRATIQUE DE CORE / REPBLICA POPULAR DEMOCRTICA DE COREA Prof Dr Hong Hyong Gwan Vice President The Academy of Health & Food Science Ryongbuk-dong, Taesong District Pyongyang Tel: 00850-2-18111-8011 Fax: 00850-2-3814605 E-mail: ahfs421@co.chesin.com Mr Kim Yong Il Senior Researcher The Academy of Health & Food Science Ryongbuk-dong, Taesong District Pyongyang Tel: 00850-2-18111-8011 Fax: 00850-2-3814605 E-mail: ahfs421@co.chesin.com INDIA / INDE / INDIA P.I. Suvrathan Chairperson, Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) Ministry of Health and Family Welfare Government of India FDA Bhavan, Kotla Road New Delhi - 110002 Tel: +91 11-23220991 E-mail: chairperson@fssai.gov.in, suvrathan@nic.in

21

S. Dave Director Agriculture and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) Ministry of Commerce, Government of India NCUI Building, 3 Siri Institutional Area August Kranti Marg, New Delhi - 110016 Tel: +91 11 26513162 Fax: +91 11 26519259 E-mail: director@apeda.com S.K. Tiwari Junior Inspecting Officer (F & VP) Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India FDA Bhavan, Kotla Road New Delhi - 110002 Tel: 011-23237433 E-mail: tiwari_fssa@yahoo.com INDONESIA / INDONSIE / INDONESIA Ms Tetty Helfery Sihombing Director of Food Products Standardization National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: tettyhelfery@yahoo.com Ms Erniningsih Haryadi Head of Centre, National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: ning@bsn.go.id Dr I Nyoman Oka Tridjaja Director of Quality and Standardization Ministry of Agriculture D Building 3rd Floor, Jl. Harsono Rm No 3 Ragunan South Jakarta Tel: 62-21 7815881 Fax: 62-21 7811468 E-mail: ntridjaja@yahoo.com Dr Maman Hermawan Director of Non Consumption Product Development Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Jl. Medan Merdeka Timur 16, Jakarta Tel: 021-3500354 Fax: 021-3500354 E-mail: mhermawan60@yahoo.com

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mr Eddy Siswanto Director of Small and Medium Scale Industry Region III, Ministry of Industry Jl. Gatot Subroto kav 52-53 Jakarta Selatan Tel: 62-21-5255509 E-mail: maseddysis@yahoo.com Prof Dr Mary Astuti, MSc Professor, University of Gadjah Mada Fakultas Teknologi Pertanian Universitas Gadjah Mada Yogyakarta Tel: 62-274-549650 Fax: 62-274-549650 Hardinsyah, MS. PhD Professor Departement of Community Nutrition Bogor Agriculture University (IPB) Tel: 0251-8629277 Fax: 0251-8629277 E-mail: hardinsyah2010@gmail.com Dr Supriyadi Faculty of Agricultural Technology Gadjah Mada University Jl. Flora, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta 55281 Tel: 0274-589787 E-mail: suprif248@ugm.ac.id Ms Deksa Presiana Head of Sub Directorate of Processed Food Standardization, NADFFC Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: subdit_spo@yahoo.com Mrs Dedeh Endawati Head of Division of Intenational Organization Cooperation National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875379 Fax: +62-21-42875379 E-mail: kerjasama_bpom@yahoo.co.id Ms Niza Nemara Head of Food Division, National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-4245075 Fax: +62-21-4201427 E-mail: nnemara@yahoo.com Mr Gasilan Head of Sub Directorate of Food Additives and Raw Material National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: subdit.bb_btp@yahoo.com Ms Sri Yunianti Head of Sub Directorate of District Industrial Core Competence, Ministry of Industry Jl. Gatot Subroto kav 52-53 Jakarta Selatan Tel: +62-21-5255509 E-mail: s_yunianti@yahoo.com

22
Ms Emmy Yuliantien Head of Sub Directorate of Food Crops-based Industry, Ministry of Industry Jl. Gatot Subroto kav 52-53 Jakarta Selatan Tel: +62-21-5252709 Fax: +62-21-5252709 E-mail: emmyyuli@yahoo.com Ms Th. Isti Hastuti Pr Head of Sub Directorate of Standardization Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Tel: 021 3500149 Fax:021 3500149 E-mail: isti_theresia@yahoo.com Mr Y. Kristianto Widiwardono Head of Division, National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: kris@bsn.go.id Ms Ati Widya Perana Head of Section of Codex National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23, Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: athee77@yahoo.com Ms Yuli Hijrah Saputri Head of Sub Division of Food Safety Cooperation NADFC Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875379 Fax: +62-21-42875379 E-mail: kerjasama_bpom@yahoo.co.id Ms Pratiwi Yuniarti Martoyo Head of Section of Raw Material Standardization NADFC Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: pratiwiyuniarti@yahoo.com Ms Lasrida Yuniaty Bakara Head of Section of Food Products Standardization NADFC Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: subditspo2@yahoo.com Mrs Yeni Restiani Head of Section Functional Food National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: restiani75@yahoo.com Mr Yusdianta Head of Food Crops and Horticulture Section Ministry of Agriculture D Building 3rd Floor. Jl. Harsono Rm No 3 Ragunan South Jakarta Tel: 62-21 7815881 ax: 62-21 7811468 E-mail: yusdianta@deptan.go.id

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mr Davi Warsyah Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries Tel: 62-21 3500149 Fax: 62-21 3500149 E-mail: dwarsyah@yahoo.com Ms Nurmalia Staff of Centre of Goods Quality Supervision, Ministry of Trade Jl. Raya Bogor Km.26, Ciracas Jakarta, 13740 Tel: +6221 8710321-23 Fax: +6221 8710477-78 E-mail: nurma_0210@yahoo.com Mr Willyam Saroinsong Directorate of Trade, Industry, Investment & IPR, Ministry of Foreign Affairs Tel: +6221 3812133 Fax: +6221 3519593 E-mail: willem.saroinsong@gmail.com Mr Gunawan Priambodo Staff of Ministry of Industry Jl. Gatot Subroto Kav.52-53 Jakarta Tel: +62-21 5252236 Fax: +62-21 5252236 E-mail: gun_tp00@yahoo.com Mr Fujio Panggabean Staff of Biosafety for Plant Product Division Agency for Agricultural Quarantine Ministry of Agriculture Jl. Harsono Rm No 3 Ragunan Jakarta Selatan Tel: 62-21 7821367 Fax: 62-21 7821367 E-mail: mr.fu30@yahoo.com Ms Desy Rasta Waty Staff of Directorate of Food Product Standardization NADFC Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Telp: +62-21-42875584 Mobile: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: desyrasta@yahoo.com Ms Noviana Kus Yuniawati Staff of Center of Goods Quality Supervision Ministry of Trade Jl. Raya Bogor Km.26, East Jakarta Tel: +6221 8710321/3 Fax: +6221 8710478 E-mail: juniati_ana@yahoo.com Ms Sukma Paramita Dewi Staff of Directorate of Small and Medium Industry Region III, Ministry of Industry Jl.Gatot Subroto Kav.52-53, Jakarta Selatan Tel: +6221 5253526 Fax: +6221 5253526 E-mail: sukma_paramitadewi@yahoo.com Mr Adhi Siswaja Lukman Chairman GAPMMI (The Indonesian Food and Beverages Association) Kantor Pusat Kementerian Pertanian Gd. F, Lt. 2, R. 224a Jl. RM Harsono No. 3, Ragunan Pasarminggu Jakarta 12550 Tel: +62 21 70322626, +62 21 7804347 E-mail: adhi_s_lukman@yahoo.com.sg, Ms Ning Rahayu Vice Chairman-Policy and Regulation GAPMMI Kantor Pusat Kementerian Pertanian Gd. F, Lt. 2, R. 224a, Jl. RM Harsono No. 3, Ragunan Pasarminggu Jakarta 12550 Phone: +62 21 70322626 Phone: +62 21 7804347 Email: ning-rahayu@cbn.net.id Dr Kartika Adiwilaga Regulatory & Scientific Affairs Manager GAPMMI Kantor Pusat Kementerian Pertanian Gd. F, Lt. 2, R. 224a, Jl. RM Harsono No. 3, Ragunan Pasarminggu Jakarta 12550 Tel: +62 21 70322626 Fax: +62 21 7804347 Email: kadiwilaga@yahoo.com; Ms E. Meithy Devijanti R. General Manager Indofood CBP Sukses Makmur Tbk, PT (Food Ingredient) Sudirman Plaza, Indofood Tower 26th Fl. Jl. Jendral Sudirman Kav. 76 - 78 Jakarta 12910, Indonesia Tel: +62 21 5795 8822 Ext. 2423 Fax: +62 21 57937526 E-mail: Meithy.R@icbp.indofood.co.id Mr Cahyo Konstitusianto Corporate Quality Assurance Manager Indofood CBP Sukses Makmur Tbk Jl. Ancol 1 No. 4-5, Jakarta 14430 Tel: +62 21 6909432 Fax: +62 21 6909433 E-mail: cahyo.konstitusianto@icbp.indofood.co.id Ms Marlina Darmadi Indofood CBP Sukses Makmur Tbk, Kp. Jarakosta Rt.03 Rw.02, Desa Sukadanau Cikarang Barat, Bekasi 17520 Tel: +62 21 8904169 Fax: +62 21 8901172 E-mail: marlina.darmadi@icbp.indofood.co.id Ms Hilda Oktora R & D Regulatory PT. Kraft foods indonesia Desa walahar, klari, karawang 41371 Tel: +62 267 431443 Fax: +62 267 431444 E-mail: Hoktora@KraftAsia.com Mr Andi Maulana Product Development Technologist PT. Kraft Foods Indonesia Jl. Cimareme No. 131 Padalarang, Bandung Tel: 022 6657458 E-mail: Amaulana@kraftasia.com JAPAN / JAPON / JAPN Mr Eiji Hinoshita Director Office of International Food Safety Department of Food Safety Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare 1-2-2 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8916, JAPAN Tel: +81-3-3595-2326 Fax: +81-3-3503-7965 E-mail: codex@mhlw.go.jp

23

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mr Yoshikiyo Kondo Associate Director (International Affairs) Food Safety and Consumer Policy Division Food Safety and Consumer Affairs Bureau Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8950, JAPAN Tel: +81-3-3502-8732 Fax: +81-3-3507-4232 E-mail: yoshikiyo_kondo@nm.maff.go.jp Mr Takanori Ohashi Associate Director Fisheries Processing Industries and Marketing Division Fisheries Agency of JAPAN 1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8950, JAPAN Tel:+81-3-3502-8203 Fax:+81-3-3591-6867 E-mail:takanori_ohashi@nm.maff.go.jp Mr Kazuhiro Sakamoto Associate Director (International Affairs) Food Safety and Consumer Policy Division Food Safety and Consumer Affairs Bureau Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8950, JAPAN Tel:+81-3-3502-8732 Fax:+81-3-3507-4232 E-mail:kazuhiro_sakamoto@nm.maff.go.jp Mr Shinichi Ui Associate Director Agricultural Production and Marketing Promotion Division, Agricultural Production Bureau Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8950, JAPAN Tel:+81-3-3502-5958 Fax:+81-3-3502-0889 E-mail:shinichi_ui@nm.maff.go.jp Mr Satoshi Masuzawa Section Chief Food Industry Promotion Division General Food Policy Bureau Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 1-2-1 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8950, JAPAN Tel:+81-3-3502-5747 Fax:+81-3-3502-0614 E-mail:satoshi_masuzawa@nm.maff.go.jp KOREA, REPUBLIC OF / CORE, RPUBLIQUE DE / COREA, REPBLICA DE Dr K. Jai Han Principal Research Scientist Korea Food Research Institute #516, Baekhyeon-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 436-746 Tel: +82-31-780-9120 Fax: +82-31-780-9154 E-mail: hankj@kfri.re.kr

24
Mrs Jeongmi Hong Scientific Researcher Food Safety Policy Division/Korea Food & Drug Administration #194, Tongilro, Eunpyeung-gu, Seoul 122-704, Republic of Korea Tel: +82-2-380-1726 Fax: + 82-2-388-6396 E-mail: hjm0514@korea.kr Miss Bo-Young Noh Research Scientist Korea Food Research Institute #516, Baekhyeon-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 436-746 Tel: +82-31-780-9351 Fax: +82-31-780-9154 E-mail: bynoh@kfri.re.kr Dr Jeong-Hae Rho Principal Research Scientist Korea Food Research Institute #516, Baekhyeon-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 436-746 Tel: +82-31-780-9264 Fax: +82-31-780-9154 E-mail: drno@kfri.re.kr Miss Myo In, Chang Deputy Director Ministry for Food, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries 88 Gwanmun-ro, Gwacheon-Si, Gyeonggi-do Korea, 427-719 Tel: +82.2.500.2099 Fax: +82.2.503.7277 E-mail: indigo75@korea.kr Ms Youyoung Jin Senior Researcher Food Safety Policy Division / Korea Food & Drug Administration #194, Tongilro, Eunpyeung-gu, Seoul 122-704 Republic of Korea Tel: +82-2-380-1726 Fax: +82-2-388-6396 Email: gpfk84@korea.kr LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC / RPUBLIQUE DMOCRATIQUE POPULAIRE LAO / REPBLICA DEMOCRTICA POPULAR LAO Mr Nheune Sisavad Department of Intellectual Property Standardization & Metrology, NAST PO. Box 2279 Vientiane Capital, Lao PDR Tel: 856-21-29002 Fax: (856-21) 213472 E-mail: nheune@nast.gov.la Ms Sivilay Naphayvong Food & Drug Department Ministry of Health Simeuang road, Ministry of Health, Vientiane, Laos Tel: 8562055607781 Fax: 856-21-214015 E-mail: sivilaynpv@gmail.com Mr Jaakko Korpela Laboratory Officer FAO Representative in Lao PDR Phone Xay Rd 128, PO BOX 1640 Vientiane, Lao PDR Tel: +856-21-413-205 Fax: +856-21-414-500 E-mail: jaakko.korpela@fao.org, FAO-LA@fao.org

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Ms Ninon Tollard Marketing Research Officer FAO Representative in Lao PDR Phone Xay Road 128, PO BOX 1640 Vientiane, Lao PDR Tel: +856-21-413-205 Mobile: +856-20-78106940 Fax: +856-21-414-500 E-mail: ninon.tollard@fao.org, FAO-LA@fao.org MALAYSIA / MALAISIE / MALASIA Ms Shamsinar Abdul Talib Deputy Director Codex & International and Standard Development Section Food Safety and Quality Division Ministry of Health Malaysia Level 3, Block E7, Parcel E, Ministry of Health Malaysia Federal Government Administration Centre 62590, Putrajaya, Malaysia Tel: +603 8885 0787 Fax: +603 8885 0790 E-mail: shamsinar@moh.gov.my Ms Shariza Zainol Rashid Assistant Director Food Safety and Quality Division Ministry of Health Malaysia Level 3, Block E7, Parcel E, Ministry of Health Malaysia Federal Government Administration Centre 62590, Putrajaya, Malaysia Tel: +603 8885 0600 EXT. 4066 / +6012 204 5278 Fax: +603 8885 0790 E-mail: shariza_z@moh.gov.my Ms Yeo Moi Eim Head of Section Department of Fisheries Malaysia Ministry of Agriculture and Agro-Based Industry Wisma Tani, Lot 4 G2, Presint 4, 62628, Putrajaya,Malaysia Tel: +603 8870 4675 Fax: +603 8890 3794 E-mail: meyeo@dof.gov.my MALDIVES / MALDIVAS Ms Mariyam Shabeena Ahmed Acting Head of Food Safety Division Maldives Food & Drug Authority Ministry of Health and Family Tel: 009607948666/ 009603343538 Fax: 009603304575 E-mail: Shab_a@hotmail.com, shabeena@health.gov.mv MONGOLIA / MONGOLIE / MONGOLIA Oyunbileg Janchiv Public Health Institute, Ministry of Health Peace Avenue-17 Ulaambaatar, Mongolia Tel: 976-458645, 976-99762000 Fax: 976-458645 E-mail: jobileg@gmail.com MYANMAR Dr Tun Zaw Assistant Director Food and Drug Administration Department of Health Building 47, Nay Pyi Taw Myanmar Tel: +959 6500285 Mobile: +959 2028121 Fax: +9567 431134 E-mail: tunzawdr@gmail.com NEPAL Aruna Nand Mishra Senior Foode Research Officers Dept. of Food Tech & Quality Control DFTQC Babar Mahal, Kathmandu, Nepal Tel: 00977-1-4262739, 977-9841550512 Fax: 00977-1-4262337 E-mail: anmishra123@gmail.com

25

Upendra Ray Dept. of Food Tech & Quality Control Regional Food Tech. & Food Quality Control Office Biratnagar, Nepal Tel: 00977-21-470221, 977-9842051014 Fax: 00977-1-4262337 E-mail: upendraray2006@yahoo.com PAKISTAN Engr Riyaz A. Memon Director Pakistan Standards & Quality Control Authority (PSQCA) Pak.Sect.77, Saddar Karachi 74410 Tel: +92333-7821270 Fax: +92-2199206263 E-mail: engrriyaz@hotmail.com Ms Ghazala Sultana Sr. Marketing Officer Departement of Agriculture Marking & Grading 4th 7th Floor, Jameel Chambers Saddar Karachi, Pakistan 74410 Tel: +92-21-99207436 Fax: +92-21-99207434 E-mail: ghazala_smo@yahoo.com PHILIPPINES / PHILIPPINES / FILIPINAS Ms Maria Lourdes C. Santiago Chief, Laboratory Services Division Food and Drug Administration, Dept of Health Civic Drive, Filinvest Corporate City, Alabang, Muntinlupa City 1770 Tel: +632 8094390 Local 2221 / +632 8424625 Fax: +632 8070751 E-mail: mlcsantiago@yahoo.com Dr Minda S. Manantan Deputy Executive Director National Meat Inspection Service Department of Agriculture BAI Cpd., Visayas Avenue Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines Tel: (632)9214473/ 9247980 Fax: (632)9247973 E-mail: minda.manantan@yahoo.com

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mrs Maria Theresa Correa-Cerbolles Food-Drug Regulation Officer III Food and Drug Administration, Dept of Health Civic Drive, Filinvest Corporate City, Alabang, Muntinlupa City 1770 Tel: +632 8072843/ +632 8094390 Local 1282, 1301 Fax: +632 8070751 E-mail: tessacodex@yahoo.com SINGAPORE / SINGAPOUR / SINGAPUR Dr Paul Chiew Director, Laboratories Department Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore 5 Maxwell Road #18-00 Tower Block, MND Complex Singapore 06911 Tel: (65) 6795-2828/632-57866 Fax: (65) 68619491 E-mail: paul_chiew@ava.gov.sg Mr Sean Wong Programme Lead (Food Safety), Regulatory Administration Department Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore 5 Maxwell Road #18-00 Tower Block, MND Complex Singapore 06911 Tel: (65) 63257829 Fax: (65) 62206068 E-mail: sean_wong @ava.gov.sg THAILAND / THALANDE / TAILANDIA Ms Metanee Sukontarug Advisor, National Bureau of Agricultural Commodity and Food Standards, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives 50 Phaholyothin Rd., Ladyao, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 Tel: (662) 561 2277 Fax: (662) 561 3357 E-mail: metanee@acfs.go.th Ms Ing-Orn Panyakit Senior Standards Officer National Bureau Of Agricultural Commodity And Food Standards, Ministry Of Agriculture And Cooperatives 50 Phaholyothin Rd., Ladyao, Chatuchak Bangkok 10900 Tel: (662) 561 2277 Fax: (662) 561 3357 E-mail: ingorn@acfs.go.th Ms Dawisa Paiboonsere Standards Officer National Bureau of Agricultural Commodity and Food Standards, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives 50 Phaholyothin Rd., Ladyao, Chatuchak Bangkok 10900 Tel: (662) 561 2277 Fax: (662) 561 3357 E-mail: dawisa.p@gmail.com Ms Daranee Mukhajonpun Senior Expert on Food Safety and Consumption Food and Drug Administration Ministry of Public Health Tiwanont Rd., Taladkwan, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 Tel: (662) 591 8447 Fax: (662) 591 8446 E-mail: daranee@fda.moph.go.th Ms Salina Sangthong Food and Drug Technical Officer Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Public Health Tiwanont Rd., Taladkwan, Muang, Nonthaburi 11000 Tel: (662) 590 7173 Fax: (662) 591 8476 E-mail: s_salina@fda.moph,go.th Mr Worapoj Ritdee Food and Drug Technical Officer Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Public Health Tiwanont Rd., Taladkwan, Muang, Nonthaburi 11000 Tel: (662) 590 7185 Fax: (662) 591 8476 E-mail: worapot@fda.moph.go.th VIET NAM/ VIET NAM/ VIET NAM

26

Dr Le Hong Khanh Senior Officer Department of Science, Technology and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development 02 Ngoc Ha Street, Ba Dinh District, Hanoi Tel: 84.437346402 Fax: 84.438433637 E-mail: lehongkhanh1951@gmail.com Mrs Nguyen Thi Minh Ha Deputy Director of Vietnam Codex Office Vietnam National Codex Committee, Vietnam Food Administration (VFA) 135 Nui Truc Street - Ba Dinh District, Hanoi Tel: 84 4 38464489; Extra 3070 Fax: 84 4 38463739 E-mail: codexvn@vfa.gov.vn; nmhacodex@tcvn.gov.vn Dr Huynh Van Tu Md, Mph / Head of Department The Institute of Hygiene and Public Health 159 Hung Phu St., District 8, Ho Chi Minh City Tel: (84-8) 38559503 Fax: (84-8) 38563164 E-mail: huynhtu100@yahoo.com OBSERVER COUNTRIES - PAYS OBSERVATEURS PASES OBSERVADORES DENMARK / DANEMARK / DINAMARCA Vice-chairperson of the Commission Vice-president de la Commission Vicepresidente de la Comissin Mr Knud stergaard Head Division Danish Veterinary and Food Administration Mrkhoj Bygade 19 DK-2860 Sbrg Denmark Tel: +45 72276705 Fax: +45 72276501 E-mail: koe@fvst.dk

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA / TATS -UNIS DAMRIQUEESTADOS / UNIDOS DE AMRICA Mr Paulo Almeida Associate Manager, U.S. Codex Office U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rm. 4861 1400 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20250 Tel: +1/202-205-7760 Fax: +1/202-720-3157 E-mail: paulo.almeida@fsis.usda.gov INTERNATIONAL NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANITATION / ORGANISATIONS NONGOOUVERNEMENTALES INTERNATIONALES / ORGANIZACIONES INTERNACIONALES NO GUBERNAMENTALES ICBA INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF BEVERAGES ASSOCIATIONS Mr Rhadeya Setiawan Advisor, P.T. Coca-Cola Indonesia JI. Jendral Sudirman No. 28 Jakarta, 10210 Indonesia Tel: +62-21-57988-249 E-mail: rsetiawa@apac.ko.com Dr S. Akarat Advisor, Coca-Cola (Thailand) Ltd. 214 Vibhavadi Rangsit Road Tung Song Hong, Laksi Bangkok, 10210 Thailand Tel: +66818300717 E-mail: sakarat@apac.ko.com Wei Sun Adviser Coca Cola, China 1702 Full Link Plaza No. 18 Chaoyangmenwai Avenue Beijing 100020, P.R.C. Tel: (86-10) 5861 0388 Fax: (86-10) 6588 1986 E-mail: wsun@apac.ko.com IDF INTERNATIONAL DAIRY FEDERATION Mr Keith Johnston Representing the International Dairy Federation Fonterra Palmerston North Private Bag 11029, Dairy Farm Rd Palmerston North New Zealand Tel: +64 6 350 4640 Fax: +64 6 350 6330 E-mail: keith.johnston@fonterra.com IGTC INTERNATIONAL GLUTAMATE TECHNICAL COMMITTEE Dr Masanori Kohmura Scientific Adviser 487/1 Si Ayutthaya Road, Khwaeng Thanon Phaya Thai, Khet Ratchathewi, Bangkok 10400, Thailand. Tel: 66-2248-7246 Fax: 66-2248-7242 E-mail: masanori_kohmura@ajinomoto.com EFLA- AEDA (Association Europenne pour le Droit de lAlimentation) Jie Hu Secretariat Asia European Food Law Association 50, Rue de lassociation, Belgium Mobile: +32 473 621052 E-mail: ms.jiehu@gmail.com IFAH INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION FOR ANIMAL HEALTH Mr Dennis Erpelding Director Corporate Affairs Elanco Elanco - A Division of Eli Lilly Asia Inc. Unit 8A2, Hanwei Plaza 7 Guanghua Road, Chaoyang District Beijing 100004, P.R. China Tel: +86 10 5904 2107 Mobile China: +86 13671316931 Mobile U.S.: +1-317-332-3873 E-mail: erpelding_dennis_l@lilly.com

27

Dr Jeetendra Verma General Manager, Regulatory & Corporate Affairs, Eli Lilly Asia Inc.(Elanco) #7, Brunton Road, Bangalore INDIA 560025 Tel: +918025592093-95 Mobile: +919686190997 Fax: +918025598657 E-mail: vermaje@lilly.com SECRETARIAT / SECRTARIAT / SECRETARA INDONESIAN SECRETARIAT / SECRTARIAT DINDONESIE / SECRETARA DE INDONESIA Mr Suprapto Head of Centre for Standard Application System, National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: suprapto@bsn.go.id Mr Singgih Harjanto Codex Contact Point Secretariat National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: singgih@bsn.go.id Ms Anna Melianawati National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: anna@bsn.go.id

REP11/ASIA Appendix I
Mr Syaiful National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: syaiful@bsn.go.id Mr Akbar Aryanto National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: akbar@bsn.go.id Mr Utomo National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail:utomo@bsn.go.id Ms Yurridha Amarin Mahardinis National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: yurridha@bsn.go.id Ms Rindang Ayu Puspa Srikandi National Standardization Agency Manggala Wanabakti Build. Block IV, 4th Floor Jl. Jend. Gatot Subroto, Senayan Jakarta 10270, Indonesia Tel: +62-21-5747043 Fax: +62-21-5747045 E-mail: ayu@bsn.go.id Mr Berlianto Nugroho Staff of Ministry of Industry Jl. Gatot Subroto kav 52-53 Jakarta Selatan Tel: +62-21-5252709 Fax: +62-21-5252709 E-mail: berlianto@kemenperin.go.id Ms Dyah Setyowati Staff of Codex Section National Agency of Drug and Food Control Jalan Percetakan Negara No. 23 Jakarta 10560 Tel: +62-21-42875584 Fax: +62-21-42875780 E-mail: deeyas_fa@yahoo.com Ms Mia Mariani Agustina Staff of Directorate of Quality and Standardization Ministry of Agriculture Tel: +6221 7815881 Fax: +6221 7811468 E-mail: miaw_cumee@yahoo.com

28

CODEX SECRETARIAT / SECRTARIAT DU CODEX/ SECRETARA DE CODEX Ms Annamaria Bruno Food Standards Officer Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome, Italy Tel: + 39 06570 56254 Fax: + 39 06570 54593 E-mail: annamaria.bruno@fao.org Ms Heesun Kim Food Standards Officer Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome, Italy Tel: +39 06 570 54796 Fax: +39 06 570 54593 Email: heesun.kim@fao.org Dr Hidetaka Kobayashi Food Standards Officer Joint FAO/WHO Food Standards Programme Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome, Italy Tel: + 39 06570 53218 Fax: + 39 06570 54593 E-mail: hidetaka.kobayashi@fao.org FAO PERSONNEL/ PERSONNEL DE LA FAO/ PERSONAL DE LA FAO Ms Shashi Sareen FAO, Regional Office for Asia & the Pacific 39, Phra Atit Road, Bangkok 10200 Thailand Tel: +66-2-6974143 Fax: +66-2-6974445 Email: shashi.sareen@fao.org

REP11/ASIA Appendix II

29

Appendix II DRAFT REGIONAL STANDARD FOR EDIBLE SAGO FLOUR (N06-2007) (At Step 8 of the Procedure) 1. SCOPE

This standard applies to Edible Sago Flour obtained from the processing of the pith or soft core of palm tree (Metroxylon sp.) intended for direct human consumption. This standard does not apply to products obtained from cassava tubers (tapioca), which are called sago flour in some region. 2. 2.1. DESCRIPTION Product Definition

Edible Sago flour is the product prepared from the pith or soft core of palm tree be like sago palm (Metroxylon sp.) by a mechanical treatment (pounding, grinding, milling) followed by soaking and settling, then drying. 3. 3.1. ESSENTIAL COMPOSITION AND QUALITY FACTORS QUALITY CRITERIA GENERAL

3.1.1. Edible Sago flour shall be free from off-flavours and odours; 3.1.2. It must be free from filth (impurities of animal origin including dead insects) and other extraneous matters. 3.2. QUALITY CRITERIA SPECIFIC 13% m/m max 0.5% m/m max 220 max 65% m/m min 0.1% m/m max not less than 95% flour shall pass through a 100 mesh sieve from white to light-brown 3.2.1. Moisture content 3.2.2. Ash Inorganic extraneous matter 3.2.3. Acidity (mg KOH/100 g) 3.2.4. Starch content 3.2.5. Crude fibre 3.2.6. Particle size 3.2.7. Colour 4. FOOD ADDITIVES

Flour treatment agents used in accordance with Tables 1 and 2 of the Codex General Standard for Food Additives (CODEX STAN 192-1995) in food category 06.2.1 flours are acceptable for use in foods conforming to this standard. 5. CONTAMINANTS

The products covered by this Standard shall comply with the maximum levels of the Codex General Standard for Contaminants and Toxins in Foods (CODEX/STAN 193-1995). The products covered by this Standard shall comply with maximum residue limits for pesticides established by the Codex Alimentarius Commission.

REP11/ASIA Appendix II 6. HYGIENE

30

6.1. It is recommended that the product covered by the provisions of this standard be prepared and handled in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Recommended International Code of Practice General Principles of Food Hygiene (CAC/RCP 1-1969), and other relevant Codex texts such as codes of hygienic practice and codes of practice. 6.2. The products should comply with any microbiological criteria established in accordance with the Principles for the Establishment and Application of Microbiological Criteria for Foods (CAC/GL 21-1997). 7. LABELLING

The products covered by the provisions of this Standard shall be labelled in accordance with the Codex General Standard for the Labelling of Prepackaged Foods (CODEX STAN 1-1985). In addition, the following specific provisions apply: 7.1. 7.2. NAME OF THE PRODUCT LABELLING OF NON-RETAIL CONTAINERS The name of the product to be shown on the label shall be Edible Sago Flour. Information for non-retail container shall either be given on the container or in accompanying documents, except that the name of the product, lot identification and the name and address of the manufacturer or packer shall appear on the container. However, lot identification and the name and address of the manufacturer or packer may be replaced by identification mark, provided that such a mark is clearly identifiable with the accompanying documents. 8. PACKAGING

8.1. Edible Sago Flour shall be packaged in containers which will safeguard the hygienic, nutritional, technological, and organoleptic qualities of the product. 8.2. The containers, including packaging material, shall be made of substances which are safe and suitable for their intended use. They should not impart any toxic substances or undesirable odour or flavour to the product. 9. METHODS OF ANALYSIS AND SAMPLING 9.1. 9.2. DETERMINATION OF MOISTURE CONTENT DETERMINATION OF ASH (INORGANIC EXTRANEOUS MATTERS) According to ISO 712:1998. According to ISO 2171:2007 Cereals, Pulses and By-Products Determination of Ash yield by incineration (Type I Method). 9.3. 9.4. 9.5. DETERMINATION OF ACIDITY (mg KOH/100g) DETERMINATION OF CRUDE FIBRE DETERMINATION OF STARCH CONTENT According to AOAC 939.05. According to ISO 6541:1981 Determination of Crude Fibre Content Modified Sharrer method According to AOAC 920.44.

REP11/ASIA Appendix III

31 Appendix III

PROPOSED DRAFT REGIONAL STANDARD FOR CHILI SAUCE (N05-2007) (At Steps 5/8 of the Procedure) 1. SCOPE

This standard applies to chili sauce, as defined in Section 2 below, and offered for direct consumption, including for catering purposes or for repacking if required. It does not apply to the product when indicated as being intended for further processing. 2. 2.1 (a) (b) (c) DESCRIPTION PRODUCT DEFINITION intended for use as seasoning and condiment; prepared from the edible portion of sound and clean raw materials referred to in Section 3.1 below which are mixed and prepared to obtain the desired quality and characteristics; processed by heat, in an appropriate manner, before or after being hermetically sealed in a container, so as to prevent spoilage. STYLES Chili sauce with pulp and seeds homogeneously ground together. Chili sauce with pulp and seeds homogeneously ground together with the addition of particles of chili pulp, flakes and pieces and seeds distributed in the sauce. Chili sauce with crushed pulp and seeds as separate layers or distributed in the sauce. Chili sauce with only pulp or crushed pulp or both.

Chili sauce is the product:

2.2 (a) (b) (c) (d)

2.2.1 Chili sauce can be of the following styles:

2.2.2 Other styles Any other presentation of the product should be permitted provided that the product: (a) (b) (c) 3. 3.1 is sufficiently distinctive from other forms of presentation laid down in the Standard; meets all other requirements of the Standard, as applicable; and is adequately described on the label to avoid confusing or misleading the consumer. ESSENTIAL COMPOSITION AND QUALITY FACTORS COMPOSITION

3.1.1 Basic Ingredients Product covered by this standard shall consist of the following ingredients: (a) (b) (c) (d) fresh chili (Capsicum spp.) or processed chili such as chili powder ground from dried chili, roasted chili, ground chili , chili preserved in vinegar or in brine; vinegar or other permitted acid; salt; water.

REP11/ASIA Appendix III 3.1.2 Other Permitted Ingredients The following optional ingredients may also be used in certain product: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) 3.2 mango, papaya, tamarind and/or other fruits; tomato, garlic, onion, carrot, sweet potato, yellow pumpkin and/or other vegetables; spices and herbs; sugars; chili extract;(f) other edible ingredients as appropriate to the product.

32

QUALITY CRITERIA

3.2.1 General Requirements Chili sauce should have normal colour, flavour, and odour, corresponding to the type of raw materials used and should possess texture characteristic of the product. 3.2.2 Definition of Defects Foreign vegetal matter means any vegetable part (such as, but not limited to, chili pedicels, leaves, calyxes and garlic stems) that does not pose any hazard to human health but affects the overall appearance of the final product. 3.2.3 Defects and Allowances The product shall be practically free from dark specks or scale-like particles, discoloured seeds or pieces of abnormally discoloured ingredients and foreign vegetal matter excluding the dark specks or dark particles that are obtained from the natural process of the sauce, for example in the roasting process. 3.3 CLASSIFICATION OF DEFECTIVES

A container that fails to meet one or more of the applicable quality requirements, as set out in Section 3.2 should be considered as a defective. 3.4 LOT ACCEPTANCE

A lot should be considered as meeting the applicable quality requirements referred to in Section 3.2 when the number of defectives as defined in Section 3.3 does not exceed the acceptance number (c) of the appropriate sampling plan with an Acceptable Quality Level (AQL) of 6.5. 4. FOOD ADDITIVES

Only those food additive classes listed below are technologically justified and may be used in products covered by this Standard. Within each additive class only those food additives listed below, or referred to, may be used and only for the functions, and within limits, specified. 4.1 Acidity regulators, antioxidants, colours, flavour enhancers, preservatives, sweeteners and thickeners listed in Table 3 of the Codex General Standard for Food Additives (CODEX STAN 192-1995) are acceptable for use in food conforming to this standard. 4.2 ACIDITY REGULATORS
INS No. 334 452(i) Note 33: As phosphorus. Food Additive Tartaric acid Sodium polyphosphate note33 Maximum level 5000 mg/kg 1000 mg/kg

REP11/ASIA Appendix III 4.3


301 303 307a 307b 307c 320 321 386

33

ANTIOXIDANTS
INS No. Food Additive Sodium ascorbate Potassium ascorbate Tocopherol, d-alphaTocopherol concentrate, mixed Tocopherol, dl-alphaButylated hydroxyanisole Butylated hydroxytoluene Disodium ethylene diamine tetra acetate Maximum level 1000 mg/kg 1000 mg/kg 600 mg/kg (Singly or in combination) 100 mg/kg 100 mg/kg 75 mg/kg

4.4

COLOURS
INS No. Food Additive Curcumin Riboflavin, synthetic Riboflavin, 5-phosphate sodium Tartrazine Sunset yellow FCF Carmines Ponceau (4R) (cochineal red A) Erythrosine Allura Red AC Brilliant blue, FCF Chlorophylls, copper complexes Caramel III ammonia process Caramel IV sulphite ammonia process Brown HT Carotenes, beta (vegetable) Annatto extracts, bixin based Paprika oleoresin Lycopene (synthetic) Maximum level GMP 350 mg/kg (Singly or in combination) 100 mg/kg 300 mg/kg 50 mg/kg 50 mg/kg 50 mg/kg 300 mg/kg 100 mg/kg 30 mg/kg (as Cu) 1500 mg/kg 1500 mg/kg 50 mg/kg 2000 mg/kg 10 mg/kg GMP 390 mg/kg

100(i) 101(i) 101(ii) 102 110 120 124 127 129 133 141(i) 150c 150d 155 160a (ii) 160b(i) 160c 160d(i)

4.5
210 211 212 213 200 201 202 203 220 221 222 223 224 225 227 228 539 218

PRESERVATIVES
INS No. Food Additive Benzoic acid note 13 Sodium benzoate note 13 Potassium benzoate note 13 Calcium benzoate note 13 Sorbic acid note 42 Sodium sorbate note 42 Potassium sorbate note 42 Calcium sorbate note 42 Sulfur dioxide note 44 Sodium sulfite note 44 Sodium hydrogen sulfite note 44 Sodium metabisulfite note 44 Potassium metabisulfite note 44 Potassium sulfite note 44 Calcium hydrogen sulfite note 44 Potassium bisulfite note 44 Sodium thiosulfate note 44 Methyl para-hydroxybenzoate Maximum level 1000 mg/kg (singly or in combination)

1000 mg/kg (singly or in combination)

300 mg/kg (singly or in combination)

1000 mg/kg

Note 13 : as benzoic acid. Note 42 : as sorbic acid. Note 44: As residual SO2

REP11/ASIA Appendix III 4. 6


432 433 434 435 473 475 477

34

EMULSIFIERS
INS No. Food Additive Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monopalmitate Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monoesterate Sucrose esters of fatty acids Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids Propylene glycol esters of fatty acids Maximum level 5 000 mg/kg (singly or in combination) 5 000 mg/kg 10 000 mg/kg 20 000 mg/kg

4. 7

SWEETENERS
INS No. Food Additive Aspartame Acesulfame potassium Sucralose Sodium saccharin Maximum level 350 mg/kg 1000 mg/kg 450 mg/kg 150 mg/kg

951 950 955 954(iv)

4. 8
472e

STABILIZERS
INS No. Food Additive Diacetyctartaric and fatty acid esters of glycerol Maximum level 10 000 mg/kg

4. 9
405 1204

THICKENERS
INS No. Food Additive Propylene glycol alginate Pullulan Maximum level 8 000 mg/kg 50 000 mg/kg

4.10 FLAVOURINGS The flavourings used in products covered by this standard shall comply with the Guidelines for the Use of Flavourings (CAC/GL 66-2008). 5. 5.1 CONTAMINANTS PESTICIDES RESIDUES

The product covered by this Standard shall comply with the maximum residue limits for pesticides established by the CAC. 5.2 OTHER CONTAMINANTS

The product covered by this Standard shall comply with the Maximum Levels of the Codex General Standard for Contaminants and Toxins in Food and Feed (CODEX/STAN 193-1995). 6. HYGIENE 6.1 It is recommended that the products covered by the provisions of this Standard be prepared and handled in accordance with the appropriate sections of the Recommended International Code of Practice General Principles of Food Hygiene (CAC/RCP 1-1969), Recommended International Code of Hygienic Practice for Low-Acid and Acidified Low-Acid Canned Foods (CAC/RCP 23-1979) and other relevant Codex texts such as Codes of Hygienic Practice and Codes of Practice. 6.2 The product should comply with any microbiological criteria established in accordance with the Principles for the Establishment and Application of Microbiological Criteria for Foods (CAC/GL 21-1997)1.
1

For products that are rendered commercially sterile in accordance with the Recommended International Code of Hygienic Practice for Low-Acid and Acidified Low-Acid Canned Foods (CAC/RCP 23-1979), microbiological criteria are not recommended as they do not offer benefit in providing the consumer with a food that is safe and suitable for consumption.

REP11/ASIA Appendix III 7. 7.1 WEIGHTS AND MEASURES FILL OF CONTAINER

35

7.1.1 Minimum Fill (a) The container should be well filled with the product which should occupy not less than 90% (minus any necessary head space according to good manufacturing practices) of the water capacity of the container. The water capacity of the container is the volume of distilled water at 20o C which the sealed container will hold when completely filled. (b) Flexible containers should be filled as full as commercially practicable. 7.1.2 Classification of Defectives A container that fails to meet the requirement for minimum fill of Section 7.1.1 should be considered as a defective. 7.1.3 Lot Acceptance A lot shall be considered as meeting the requirement of Section 7.1.1 when the number of defectives, as defined in Section 7.1.2, does not exceed the acceptance number (c) of the appropriate sampling plan with an AQL of 6.5. 8. LABELLING The product covered by the provisions of this Standard shall be labelled in accordance with the latest edition of the Codex General Standard for the Labelling of Prepackaged Foods (CODEX STAN 1-1985). In addition, the following specific provisions apply: 8.1 NAME OF THE PRODUCT 8.1.1 The name of the product shall be Chili sauce, Sweet chili sauce or other names in accordance with the composition and the law and custom of the country in which the product is sold and in the manner not to mislead the consumer. 8.1.2 The level of chili pungency (heat value) may be declared in conjunction with, or in close proximity to, the name of the product, in accordance with the agreement between trading partners and in the manner not to mislead the consumer, and must be accepted by or be acceptable to competent authorities of the country where the product is sold. 8.1.3 If other permitted ingredients, as defined in Section 3.1.2, alters the flavour characteristic of the product, the name of the product shall be accompanied by the term flavoured with X or X flavoured as appropriate. 8.2 LABELLING OF NON-RETAIL CONTAINERS

Information for non-retail containers shall be given either on the container or in accompanying documents, except that the name of the product, lot identification, and the name and address of the manufacturer, packer, distributor or importer, as well as storage instructions shall appear on the container. However, lot identification, and the name and address of the manufacturer, packer, distributor or importer may be replaced by an identification mark, provided that such a mark is clearly identifiable with the accompanying documents. 9. METHODS OF ANALYSIS AND SAMPLING
Provision pH Method AOAC 981.12 (Codex General Method for processed fruits and vegetables) CAC/RM 46-1972 (Codex General Method for processed fruits and vegetables) Principle Type III

Potentiometry

Fill of containers

Weighing

REP11/ASIA Appendix III Sampling Plans


The appropriate inspection level is selected as follows: Inspection level I Normal sampling Inspection level II Dispute (Codex referee purpose sample size), enforcement or need for better lot estimate

36

SAMPLING PLAN 1 (Inspection Level I, AQL = 6.5)


NET WEIGHT IS EQUAL TO OR LESS THAN 1 KG (2.2 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 4,800 or less 6 1 4,801 24,000 13 2 24,001 48,000 21 3 48,001- 84,000 29 4 84,001 144,000 38 5 144,001 240,000 48 6 more than 240,000 60 7 NET WEIGHT IS GREATER THAN 1 KG (2.2 LB) BUT NOT MORE THAN 4.5 KG (10 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 2,400 or less 6 1 2,401 15,000 13 2 15,001 24,000 21 3 24,001 42,000 29 4 42,001 72,000 38 5 72,001 120,000 48 6 more than 120,000 60 7 NET WEIGHT GREATER THAN 4.5 KG (10 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 600 or less 6 1 601 2,000 13 2 2,001 7,200 21 3 7,201 15,000 29 4 15,001 24,000 38 5 24,001 42,000 48 6 more than 42,000 60 7

REP11/ASIA Appendix III SAMPLING PLAN 2 (Inspection Level II, AQL = 6.5)
NET WEIGHT IS EQUAL TO OR LESS THAN 1 KG (2.2 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 4,800 or less 13 2 4,801 24,000 21 3 24,001 48,000 29 4 48,001- 84,000 38 5 84,001 144,000 48 6 144,001 240,000 60 7 more than 240,000 72 8 NET WEIGHT IS GREATER THAN 1 KG (2.2 LB) BUT NOT MORE THAN 4.5 KG (10 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 2,400 or less 13 2 2,401 15,000 21 3 15,001 24,000 29 4 24,001 42,000 38 5 42,001 72,000 48 6 72,001 120,000 60 7 more than 120,000 72 8 NET WEIGHT GREATER THAN 4.5 KG (10 LB) Lot Size (N) Sample Size (n) Acceptance Number (c) 600 or less 13 2 601 2,000 21 3 2,001 7,200 29 4 7,201 15,000 38 5 15,001 24,000 48 6 24,001 42,000 60 7 more than 42,000 72 8

37

REP11/ASIA Appendix IV

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Appendix IV PROJECT DOCUMENT PROPOSAL FOR NEW WORK ON A CODEX REGIONAL STANDARD FOR TEMPE 1. The purposes and scope of the Standard The purpose is to establish a regional standard for tempe that provides essential guidance related to food safety and quality for protecting the health of consumers and ensuring fair practices in food trade. This standard would cover tempe, a specific product prepared by the fermentation of soybeans by the mold of Rhizopus sp and intended for human consumption. 2. Its relevance and timeliness Tempe is originally from Indonesia and currently is produced and consumed in other countries such as Malaysia, Singapore and Japan. The health benefit of tempe is well known, resulting in increasing tempe consumption globally. Codex regional standard for this product will protect consumers and ensure fair trade practices by harmonizing quality and safety requirements at regional level. 3. The main aspects to be covered This standard will cover essential quality and safety aspects. 4. An assessment against the Criteria for the establishment of work priorities (a) Volume of production and consumption in individual countries and volume and pattern of trade between countries Total soybean used for tempe are described below: No 1 2 3 4 Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 Soybean for tempe (MT) 1,442,000 1,514,000 1,362,000 1,512,000

Source: ASA IM (American Soybean Association International Marketing) and Indonesian Tempe Forum

By assuming that 1 kg soybean can be processed to yield 1.6 kg tempe, the total amount of tempe production are described below: No 1 2 3 4 Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 Production of tempe (MT) 2,307,200 2,424,200 2,179,200 2,419,200

It is around 500-700 ton per year, which is approximately valued US$ 1-1.4 million was traded abroad such as to Malaysia and Singapore. There could be a potential export of tempe to Japan and Republic of Korea. However the exact figure are not available. (b) Diversification of national legislations and apparent resultant or potential impediments to international trade Potential impediments to regioanl trade are due to the fast growth of tempe production as a healty food/functional food and to the differences of raw materials that are used in tempe production in many

REP11/ASIA Appendix IV

39

countries. For harmonizing tempe production in the region, it is important to emphasize that the term tempe is used only for soybean fermented by Rhizopus sp. so as to avoid impediment to trade (c) International or regional market potential Considering the shifting of the consumption pattern towards healthier life, tempe as one of vegetable protein source has high opportunity to be traded regionally. There is significant potential markets where large percentage of the population is vegetarian.(d) Amenability of the commodity to standardization Soybean and Rhizopus sp have always been the most important raw materials for making tempe. As soybean tempe is the most popular, the word tempe usually refers to soybean-tempe. The local name of tempe can be used for international and regional publications, as there are no common English names available. The characteristic of tempe are described below: Physical: white color, surface covered internally by mold mycelia, compact and soft. If it is cut with a knife, it will results in sharp edge cake like (not disintegrated) organoleptic: slightly beany flavor, strong tempe characteristic (aroma of mold mycelia) Microbiology: luxury mold growth no yellow spot. Black spot may appear on uncovered part Increasing soluble protein, sugar and FFA but decreasing phytic acid

(e) Coverage of the main consumer protection and trade issues by existing or proposed general standard A specific codex standard for this product is needed to avoid fraudulent practices and to protect consumers health by meeting the safety and quality requirements for the product. There is no overlap between the products covered by this regional standard and fermented soybean paste, as described below: Soybean tempe: tempe made from soybean fermented by Rhizophus sp. Withou the addition of salt. The physical characteristics of tempe is solid product cover by mycelia of Rhizopus sp which white color of mycelium of Rhizophus sp.; Fermented soybean paste: soybean fermented by Aspergillus sp and salt was added in the soybean mash. The physical characteristic of soybean paste is semi solid.

(f) Number of commodities which would need separate standards indicating whether raw, semi-processed, processed Scope of the tempe and tempe products will cover a wide range of products, for which some provisions such as food additives should be different, and that many of certain products were consumed only in a few countries or weer significantly traded. This standard will exclude tempe products from the scope and focus to develop standard for tempe. (g) Work already undertaken by other international organizations in this field This new work does not duplicate work undertaken by other international organizations. 5. Relevance to Codex Strategic objectives This proposal is relevant to goal 1.2 of the Codex Alimentarius Strategic Plan 2008 2013 relating to the review and development of Codex Standards and related texts for food quality by the commodity committees and the regional coordinating committees. 6. Information on the relation between the proposal and other existing Codex documents The proposal will take into account Recommended International Code of Practice General Principles of Food Hygiene (CAC/RCP 1-1969) rev 3 1997) and relevance Recommended International Code for Hygienic Practice, Codex General Standard for the Labeling of Prepackaged Foods (Codex Stan 1-1985. Rev 3-1999) and Codex General Guidelines on Sampling (CAC/GL 50-2004). 7. Identification of any requirement for and availability of expert scientific advice None identified 8. Identification of any need for technical input to the standard from external bodies

REP11/ASIA Appendix IV None identified

40

9. Proposed time-line for completion of the new work, including the start date, the proposed date for adoption at Step 5, and the proposed date for adoption by the Commission. Procedures Approval for new work by the 34th CAC Consideration by the 18th CCASIA Adoption at Step 5 by the 36 CAC Consideration of the draft standard by the 19 CCASIA Adoption by the 38 CAC as regional standard
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REP11/ASIA Appendix V

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Appendix V PROJECT DOCUMENT PROPOSAL FOR NEW WORK ON A CODEX REGIONAL STANDARD FOR DURIAN 1. The purposes and scope of the Standard An elaboration of regional standard for Durian is to provide essential guidance relating to food safety, essential quality, hygiene, and labeling, for the purpose of protecting the health of the consumers and ensuring fair practices in food trade. 2. Its relevance and timeliness Durian has recently contributed towards worlds economy. Durian can be planted and grown in many areas of the world such as ASEAN countries and other tropical parts of the world. Increasingly, durian fruits are globally traded. The major import countries are China, Indonesia, the United States, Brunei Darussalam, and Japan. 2.1 Background At the 14th session of Codex Committee on Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (CCFFV), the Committee agreed to request the approval of the Commission for new work on Codex Standards for Durian. However, the Executive committee at the 61st session recommended that the Commission referred the proposal for new work on durian to the CCFFV and CCASIA (ALINORM 08/31/3A, para.100). The 31th session of the commission agreed to refer the proposal back to CCFFV for further comments. The 15th session of CCFFV could not consider the proposal since there was a lack of information related to trade between countries in order to meet the criteria of worldwide standard evaluated by the Executive Committee. 2.2 Criteria According to the Criteria for the Establishment of Work Priorities and the Guideline on the Application of the Criteria for the Establishment of Work Priority Applicable to Commodities, when the regional standard is proposed, the well-documented and objective evidence that there is significant intra-regional trade, and that there is no significant trade, between or within other regions should be provided (detail shown in Section 4 (a) and 4 (c)). 3. The main aspects to be covered The standard covers essential quality and safety aspects. 4. An assessment against the Criteria for the establishment of work priorities (a) Volume of production and consumption in individual countries and volume and pattern of trade between countries International trade in durian, especially in Asia, has been strongly increased since 2007. Therefore, the establishment of a regional standard should be envisaged for this product as shown in the export detail provided herewith. The export volume of fresh durian in 2007 was 154,045,000 kg. In 2008, the volume increased 48,720,000 kg compared to 2007. Continuously, the export volume has grown up 53,045,000 kg in 2009. The exported durian can be in various forms, including fresh, frozen, fried crispy and paste. Table 1. Export volume of all durian products in 2007-2010
Item 1. fresh durian 2. frozen durian 3. crispy durian 4. pasted durian Total 2007 Quantity 154,407,000 12,909,000 682,000 9,224,000 177,222,000 Value 85,560 14,050 2,560 13,840 116,000 2008 Quantity 203,127,000 16,311,000 524,000 2,598,000 222,560,000 Value 104,380 13,890 4,100 5,090 127,460

Quantity : kilograms, Value: 1,000 US dollars


2009 Quantity 256,172,000 19,768,000 490,000 3,142,000 279,572,000 Value 137,150 17,020 4,830 6,080 165,080 2010 (Jan-Sep) Quantity 182,190,000 13,532,000 299,000 2,363,000 198,384,000 Value 109,350 15,800 3,740 5,480 134,360

Reference: The Customs Department, Thailand. Available at: www.customs.go.th

REP11/ASIA Appendix V

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(b) Diversification of national legislations and apparent resultant or potential impediments to international trade As producers of durian fruits, ASEAN had harmonized the standards for durian. However, for the benefits of consumers and trade in Asia, it is deemed necessary to establish a regional standard for durian to be used as a common standard for the region to build up understanding in international trade and prevent trade barriers. Moreover many competent authorities are not familiar with durians, which results in the problems in quality and safety inspection. (c) International or regional market potential International or regional market has potentially increased over the last five years. The main importers of Thai fresh durian are China, Hong Kong and Indonesia; and of frozen durian are USA, Australia and China. The export values for Thai durian within ASIA region, which accounts for more than 97% of export value, exceeded 85 million US dollar since 2007 and continued to increase substantially. Table 2 Market of Thais durian fresh fruits in 2007-2010
Region COUNTRY CHINA HONG KONG INDONESIA BRUNEI DARUSSALAM JAPAN Others subtotal UNITED STATES AUSTRALIA Others NEW ZEALAND GERMANY Others subtotal TOTAL 2007 44,741,832.67 17,882,556.03 12,677,743.97 136,768.10 339,430.67 7,898,495.37 83,676,826.80 1,490,086.37 66,577.33 10,160.27 283,449.87 1,850,273.83 85,527,100.63 2008 51,725,019.57 24,482,961.23 15,071,303.93 744,177.27 394,877.37 9,038,175.60 101,456,514.97 2,297,995.37 389,306.33 19,977.97 15,592.63 220,156.50 2,943,028.80 104,399,543.77 2009 67,997,734.37 39,358,893.37 19,516,765.17 762,843.00 387,018.63 7,094,631.87 135,117,886.40 1,562,152.97 117,810.93 110,634.10 81,573.83 156,815.40 2,028,987.23 137,146,873.63 2010 (Jan-Sep) 66,921,051.30 21,632,726.37 14,206,362.97 418,176.17 316,134.70 4,124,389.63 107,618,841.13 1,399,857.17 127,609.90 74,977.77 65,707.47 91,960.90 1,760,113.20 109,378,954.33 2% 98%

Value: US dollars
percentage trade Asia:others

Asia

Reference: The Customs Department, Thailand. Available at: www.customs.go.th Table 3 Japans Quarantine Volume of Durian
COUNTRY Thailand Philippines Vietnam Singapore Malaysia Thailand Indonesia Malaysia 2007 278 <1 <1 <1 <1 5 <1 <1 2008 208 <1 <1 <1 <1 2 <1 <1

Quantity: tons
2009 189 <1 <1 <1 <1 3 <1 <1

Fresh

Frozen

Reference: Plant quarantine Statistics. The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan (d) Amenability of the commodity to standardization As CCFFV has established several standards for tropical fruits, for example mango, longan, and rambutan, therefore it would be appropriate to develop a regional standard for durian, which also has a large trade volume within Asia as well. (e) Coverage of the main consumer protection and trade issues by existing or proposed general standard Durians are the fresh fruits that are consumed by general consumers of this region. This standard will fundamentally protect consumers in the essential qualities such as the appropriate level of maturity required by the consumers as well as the MRL for pesticide residues for importing countries.

REP11/ASIA Appendix V

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Complications that may occur in the authorities in these importing countries are that they may not understand or know the characteristics of this fruit sufficiently to comprehend the suitable level to establish or apply MRL for the imported durians. Therefore to set up a standard for durian, which have been traded widely in Asia, will significantly increase consumer safety. (f) Number of commodities which would need separate standards indicating whether raw, semiprocessed, processed This proposal is applied only for fresh whole durian fruit. The fresh durian fruit is firstly prioritized because its trade volume is the greatest among other products, namely frozen durian, crispy durian, and durian paste. For these other products, there may be proposals to establish standards in future, depending on their trading situations. (g) Work already undertaken by other international organizations in this field Durian standard has already adopted as ASEAN harmonized standard. 5. Relevance to Codex Strategic objectives The proposal for the draft regional standard for durian is corresponding with the strategic plan of CCASIA (2008 -2013) in: - Objective 5, Action 5.2, To increase awareness on the importance of Codex among relevant stakeholders; - Objective 6, Action 6.2, To identify specific food products of interest of the region that requires standard to be develop in order to protect the health of the consumer and ensure fair practices in food trade The proposal also meets with the Part 2 of the CAC strategic plan 2008-2013, Goal 1 promoting sound regulatory frameworks, action 1.2 review and develop Codex standards and related text for food quality. This action is to ensure that the developed standards are generic in nature and whilst maintaining inclusiveness, reflect global variations and focus on essential characteristics so as to avoid being overly prescriptive and not more trade restrictive than necessary. 6. Information on the relation between the proposal and other existing Codex documents At the 30th session of the CAC, the Commission agreed that the conversion of a regional standard into a worldwide standard should be considered after its adoption at Step 8, at the request of Codex members or a coordinating committee or at the recommendation of the commodity committee concerned (ALINORM 07/30/REP). 7. Identification of any requirement for and availability of expert scientific advice None of external input is anticipated. 8. Identification of any need for technical input to the standard from external bodies No need technical input from external bodies 9. The proposed time line for completion of the new work, including the start date, proposed date for adoption at step 5 and the proposed date for adoption by the Commission Procedures Approval for new work by the 34th CAC Consideration by the 18th CCASIA Adoption at Step 5 by the 36 CAC Consideration of the draft standard by the 19 CCASIA Adoption by the 38 CAC as regional standard
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Time 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015