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>> LAU$HTER: Quick quiz. Do you like to laugh? Unless


your name is Alan Greenspan, well take that as a "yes." Also, do
you like to make money? Again, probably a yes. Especially if
youre Alan Greenspan. To help you reach both these goals,
someone out there has invented Feb. 8th. Or, more precisely,
deemed Feb. 8 as Laugh and Get Rich Day. If you know of a
way to make that day a reality, please send you suggestions, and
a check or money order to, The 5 Things, c/o The Times Leader
...
>> I (HEART) LOVE SONGS: Valentines Day is right
around the calendarical corner, and what better way to tell your
special someone you care, than by introducing his or her ears to
some beautiful love songs. To help you score big with your
sweetie, the Northeastern Pa. Philharmonic and
the F.M. Kirby Center have a night of Broadway
Love Songs for you. Youll hear classics from
Mamma Mia!, West Side Story and Phan-
tomof the Opera. The show starts at 8 p.m.
The thank you snuggling soon after it ends.
>> HMMMM. IN3D ARE YOU: Theres
good and bad news to be found in the current
3D movie craze. Both aspects will be on display
this Friday when Star Wars: Episode I -- The
PhantomMenace is re-released with the 3D
treatment. How cool would a pod race be in 3D?
Or that climactic light saber battle with Obi-Wan,
Qui-Gon and Darth Maul? Ahhhhh. Pure three-
dimensional awesomeness. Then again, the
words Jar Jar Binks in 3D is enough to
scare a hairball out of a Wookie.
>> TASTES LIKE HUMAN: Dinner and a movie take on a
new meaning when the AMC Network restarts its zombie apoc-
alypse series The Walking Dead, this Sunday at 9 p.m. When
last we left our plucky group of survivors, they were shooting
the living dead on a Georgia farm. Of course, that pretty much
summed up the entire second season. But cheer up, Dead
fans, the producers say theyll be adding more action to the
show this spring. Maybe zombie NASCAR races. Or maybe
Chuck Norris will sign on as a butt-kicking zombie killer.
Probably not, though.
>> AND THE GRAMMYGOES TO: If the flesh-
eating undead dont do it for you, then maybe musics
biggest stars will. (Although, with Lady Gaga, you can
probably have both.) Fans want to check out the Grammy
Awards next Sunday at 8 p.m. on CBS. Adele
is the frontrunner in nominations,
but right behind her are other stars
such as Katy Perry and Rihanna.
THINGS
YOU NEED
TO KNOW
THIS WEEK
C M Y K
6 09815 10011
WILKES-BARRE, PA MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 50
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After Nevada, GOP turns to
Colorado, Minnesota, Maine.
NATION & WORLD, 5A
Candidates
headed East
Heart Ball; Storytime Event;
Leadership Wilkes-Barre
CLICK, 1C
Smile, youre on
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HARRISBURG A final
framework is at hand on sweep-
ing legislation to impose an im-
pact fee and update safety regu-
lations on Pennsyl-
vanias booming
natural gas indus-
try, top Republican
state lawmakers
say.
Republicans noti-
fied rank-and-file
lawmakers Saturday night that
they hope to hold votes this week
on a framework reached by nego-
tiators from the House, Senate
and Gov. Tom Corbetts office
during closed-door negotiations
over the past six weeks.
These discussions have pro-
gressedrapidly over the course of
the last two weeks, House
Speaker Sam Smith and House
MajorityLeader Mike Turzai said
in a letter to lawmakers. In fact,
staff have been working through-
out the weekend and will be
working (Sunday) in order to
have a proposal that we can con-
sider as early as this week.
Pennsylvania is the only major
gas-producing state that doesnt
Pa. GOP
to seek
vote on
drill bill
Party has notified lawmakers
that it hopes to hold votes on
impact fee, regs this week.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
See DRILL, Page 10A
Local school districts have played their
annual gameof blindfoldbudgeting, either
promising to keep tax increases within a
state limits or releasing preliminary bud-
gets showing why they must exceed the
limits. Nowthey are waiting to see if their
guesses were right as Gov Tom Corbett is
poised to release his proposed budget
Tuesday.
If Corbett cuts againheloppednearlya
billiondollars out of educationlast year it
could toss all the work local districts did
over a cliff.
We budgeted assuming no increase or
decrease in state money, Wyoming Valley
West FinanceManager JoeRodriguezsaid.
Schools
wait on
state plan
If governor proposes cutbacks, local
districts have more work to do.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See BUDGET, Page 10A
WILKES-BARRE Entering the Lu-
zerne County courtroom on Friday, Lisa
Sands was hoping the judge would keep
the scheduled date of Hugo Selenskis cap-
ital murder trial.
When she walked out, her quest for clo-
sure was delayed for the seventh time
since May 2006, when Selenski, 38, was
charged in the killings of Sands sister,
Tammy Fassett, 37, and Michael Jason
Kerkowski, 37.
ED LEWIS/THE TIMES LEADER
Lisa Sands holds a wallet-size photo of
her sister, Tammy Fassett. Its the last
picture taken of Fassett.
Victims sisters
wait goes on
Lisa Sands has seen Hugo Selenskis
murder trial delayed seven times.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
See SANDS, Page 10A
INSIDE
A NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 6A
Editorials 9A
B SPORTS
Weather 8B
C CLICK
Community News 2C
Birthdays 4C
Television 6C
Movies 6C
Puzzles 7C
Comics 8C
E CLASSIFIED
N.Y. rolls
Rangers smack
the Flyers.
Story, 3B
BEIRUT The United States
proposed an international coali-
tion to support Syrias opposition
Sunday after Russia and China
blocked a U.N. attempt to end
nearly 11 months of bloodshed,
raising fears that violence will es-
calate.
Rebel soldiers said force was
now the only way to oust Presi-
dent Bashar Assad, while the re-
gime vowed to press its military
crackdown.
The threat of both sides turn-
ing to greater force after Russia
and China vetoed a U.N. Security
Council resolution raises the po-
tential for Syrias turmoil tomove
into even a more dangerous new
phase that could degenerate into
outright civil war.
The uprising inspired by other
Arab Spring revolts began in
U.S. urges
support for
Syria rebels
International coalition
proposed as threat of war in
in Mideast nation increases.
See SYRIA, Page 10A
By LEE KEATH and MATTHEWLEE
Associated Press
FEELIN BLUE
AP PHOTO
N
ew York Giants RB Ahmad Bradshaw reacts after scoring the game-winning touch-
down with 57 seconds left in Super Bowl XLVI on Sunday in Indianapolis. New York
drove 88 yards in the final minutes to erase a New England lead and claima 21-17 victory.
For some local fans celebration and game coverage, see Pages 3Aand 1B.
PATRIOTS
17
N.Y. GIANTS
21
K
PAGE 2A MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Chropowicki, June
Coach, Robert
Hosey, Leonard
Koytek, Mary
Letoski, Frank
Lopuhovsky, Alyce
Petrillo, Lucy
Schneider, Carl
Trudnak, Edward
OBITUARIES
Page 6A
BUILDING
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spot. If you have information
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at 829-7242.
No player matched all five
winning numbers drawn in
Sundays Pennsylvania
Cash 5 game so the jackpot
will be worth $325,000.
Lottery officials said 50
players matched four num-
bers and won $328.50 each;
2,175 players matched three
numbers and won $12.50
each; and 28,398 players
matched two numbers and
won $1 each.
The winning numbers in
Saturday evenings drawing
of the Powerball game
were:
15-23-43-45-56
Powerball: 7
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER 6-3-5
BIG 4 5-0-1-4
QUINTO - 1-9-2-2-0
TREASURE HUNT
03-08-10-25-30
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 9-6-6
BIG 4 - 9-4-3-3
QUINTO - 5-3-3-0-3
CASH 5
07-10-14-38-42
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Issue No. 2012-037
SUGARLOAF TWP. State po-
lice are investigating a robbery
Sunday afternoon at Joes Choice
Convenient Mart on state Route
93.
According to state police:
A woman man walked into the
store around12:15 p.m. and took a
carton of Farmers Iced Tea from
the cooler. She approached the
cash register and demanded mon-
ey fromthe clerk.
As theclerkstartedtoemptythe
register, the woman reached over
the counter and took $221and the
iced tea.
The robber is described as a
white woman, approximately 20,
between5feet, 6inches and5feet,
8 inches tall with a skinny build.
She wore a blue hooded top with
two white stripes from the shoul-
derstothecuffsof thearmsandde-
signontheleft front. Shealsowore
darkpants withadesignontheup-
per left leg, light-colored shoes.
She might have some sort of pierc-
ing jewelry in the eyebrowarea.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
A surveillance photo of a suspect in Joes Choice Convenient Mart
in Sugarloaf Twp.
Robbery is under investigation
GRAHAM, Wash. Days af-
ter a judge ruled against himin a
child custody hearing, a father
and his two young sons were
killed Sunday when police said
he intentionally blewup a house
with all three inside a tragic
ending to a bizarre case that be-
gan more than two years ago
when the mans wife went mys-
teriously missing in Utah.
A social worker brought the
two boys to Josh Powells home
for what was to be a supervised
visit, and Powell let his sons in-
side but then blocked the so-
cial worker from entering, Gra-
hamFire and Rescue Chief Gary
Franz toldThe AssociatedPress.
The social worker called her
supervisors to report that she
could smell gas, and moments
later the home exploded.
Sgt. Ed Troyer, Pierce County
sheriffs spokesman, said emails
that Powell sent authorities
seemed to confirm that Powell
planned the deadly blast. Troyer
didnt elaborate on the contents
of the emails, but saidthey make
police believe this is intention-
al, this is planned ... this is a dou-
ble murder-suicide.
Authorities were removing
three bodies fromthe home Sun-
day evening as fire crews and po-
lice continued to search the rub-
ble. Troyer said it appeared
some sort of accelerant was used
to make the house burn faster.
Jeffrey Bassett, who repre-
sented Powell in the custody
case, said he received a brief
email from his client just min-
utes before Powell and the two
boys died. It said, Im sorry,
goodbye.
The email arrived at 12:05
p.m. Sunday, about 10 minutes
before the explosion, but he
didnt see it until twohours later,
when others told him Josh and
the boys hadbeenkilled. He said
he knewJosh was upset after be-
ingorderedtoundergoa psycho-
sexual evaluation recently, but
he didnt see this coming.
Powell was under investiga-
tion in the disappearance of his
28-year-old wife, Susan, from
their West Valley City, Utah,
home in December 2009. He
claimed he had taken the boys
ona midnight excursioninfreez-
ing temperatures when she van-
ished.
The children, Braden, 5, and
Charles, 7, had been living with
Susan Powells parents since
Josh Powells father, Steven, was
arrested on child porn and voy-
eurism charges last fall. There
were no accusations concerning
Steven Powell and his grandchil-
dren. Troyer said Steven Powell
was put on suicide watch in cus-
tody after he was told of the
deadly blast.
Steve Powell didnt seem ve-
ry upset by the news, but was an-
gry towards authorities who no-
tified him, Troyer said.
On Wednesday, a judge had
denied an attempt by Josh Po-
well to regain custody, saying
she wouldnt consider returning
the two boys to their father until
he underwent a psycho-sexual
evaluation. A psychologist rec-
ommendedthe evaluationbased
on undisclosed materials Utah
police discovered on Josh Po-
wells computer in 2009.
Sherry Hill, a spokeswoman
for the state Department of So-
cial and Health Services, said
the social worker who was with
the children was not a Child Pro-
tective Services employee but a
contract worker with a private
agency that supervises visits for
the state.
The visit supervisor for this
particular agency had taken the
children to the home. When she
does that, she sits through the
visit andmight take notes onher
observations, Hill said. She
pulled up in the car, and the kids
ran out ahead of her. He closed
the door and locked it. She
wasnt able to get in, and thats
when she smelled gas.
Lawyer Steve Downing, who
represented Susan Powells par-
ents, ChuckandJudy Cox, inthe
custody fight, said: Its the most
horrifying thing you can imag-
ine happening ...The Coxes are
absolutely devastated. They
were always very fearful of him
doing something like this, and
he did it.
Bassett said he represented
Powell free of charge because
every parent deserves the right
to an attorney. Powell called or
emailed him at least once a day,
and often more than that, and in
their conversations he never
once admitted doing anything
regarding Susan. In fact, he de-
nied it.
Sgt. Mike Powell of the West
ValleyCityPoliceDepartment in
Utah, which is handling the in-
vestigation into Susan Powells
disappearance, said it was too
soon to say how Josh Powells
death may impact their probe.
Kirk Graves, 39, of West Jor-
dan, Utah, whose wife is JoshPo-
wells sister, said they were
stunned by the news.
AP PHOTO
The smoldering remains of a house, left, where an explosion killed Josh Powell and his two sons,
Sunday is shown fromthe air in Graham, Wash.
Father, sons die in blast
Police say husband of missing
Utah woman intentionally
blew up house.
By MIKE BAKER
and GENE JOHNSON
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES Some un-
known kids with superpowers
have nudged out the actor who
plays the worlds most famous
teen wizard at the weekend box
office.
The 20th Century Fox release
Chronicle, featuring a relative-
ly unknown cast as youths who
gain telekinetic abilities, debut-
ed as the No. 1 movie with $22
million.
Sunday studio estimates put
Harry Potter star Daniel Rad-
cliffes ghost story The Woman
in Black, released by CBS
Films, just behindwitha $21mil-
lion opening.
The results were close enough
that the No. 1 and 2 rankings
could switch when final num-
bers are released Monday.
The two movies had healthy
starts considering it was Super
Bowl weekend, whenfewpeople
go to theaters on Sunday be-
cause of the big game.
Each movie landed in the all-
time top-10 list for Super Bowl
weekend debuts, which is head-
ed by the $31.1 million opening
for 2008s Hannah Montana &
Miley Cyrus: Best of Both
Worlds Concert, according to
box-office tracker Hollywood-
.com.
To have two movies over $20
million on a Super Bowl week-
end is really strong, said Holly-
wood.comanalyst Paul Dergara-
bedian. If the Super Bowl is as
close as these two movies, thatll
be a really good Super Bowl.
Both movies packed in solid
teen and early-20s crowds, Hol-
lywoods bread-and-butter audi-
ence that had been giving mo-
vies a pass during a box-office
slide late last year.
Chronicle was designed
and made for a younger demo-
graphic. That demographic has
been the one thats been missing
from theaters, said Chris Aron-
son, headof distributionfor 20th
Century Fox. Theres some-
thing very unique and very inno-
vative about this movie that they
got wind of. There was a lot of
pre-release chatter on social
media that made a connection
with this audience.
From first-time director Josh
Trank, Chronicle relies ondoc-
umentary-style, hand-held film-
ingtechniques totell the story of
three teens (Dane DeHaan, Mi-
chael B. Jordan and Alex Rus-
sell) who put their newfound su-
perpowers to work in mischie-
vous and eventually dark ways.
Chronicle added $13 million
overseas for a worldwide total of
$35 million.
In The Woman in Black, his
first starring role since last sum-
mers Harry Potter finale, Rad-
cliffe plays a widowed lawyer be-
set by ghostly apparitions at the
remote home of a recently de-
ceased client.
While the audience for
Chronicle was 55 percent
male, the crowds for Woman in
Black were 59 percent female,
drawn by heartthrob Radcliffe
and the lure of an old-fashioned
Gothic ghost story.
Chronicle uses superpowers for top spot
Film with unknown actors
nudges out Daniel Radcliffes
The Woman In Black.
By DAVID GERMAIN
AP Movie Writer
WILKES-BARRE State
police said a mentally disabled
man who walked away from his
job at The Green House coun-
seling center on South Franklin
Street on Friday afternoon was
found in Wilkes-Barre.
Stephen Roccograndi, 53, left
his job around 3:30 Friday. City
police located him around 7
a.m. Sunday. He is a resident of
the Residence Rehab Group
Home in Bear Creek Township,
operated by the Wyoming Valley
Healthcare System, state police
said.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following:
A female juvenile said she
was struck in the head by a
transgender person shortly
before midnight Saturday at
The Factory at 105 N. Main St.
The juvenile was taken to a local
hospital for treatment of a non-
life threatening injury and the
transgender person fled the
scene before police arrived.
HAZLE TWP. Two men
involved in a fistfight Sunday
afternoon in the jewelry section
of the Boscovs store in the
Laurel Mall caused nearly
$2,000 in damage, state police
said.
Courtney Miller, 29, and
Alfred Singleton, 43, both of
Hazleton, will be charged with
disorderly conduct and criminal
mischief, state police said.
Miller and Singleton broke six
glass display tables and mer-
chandise in the fight, state po-
lice said. They fled before police
arrived, but Miller was caught
nearby a short time later. Single-
ton was identified as the other
person in the fight, state police
said.
HAZLETON Police said
three men were arrested Sunday
morning during a burglary at
the rear of 226 E. Diamond Ave.
Taken into custody were:
Daniel Agosto Soto, 41, of Ha-
zleton; Mario Canela, 44, of
Connecticut; and Wilton Lora
Romas, 39, of New York.
The men face charges of bur-
glary, criminal trespass, receiv-
ing stolen property, conspiracy
to commit burglary, conspiracy
to commit receiving stolen
property and criminal mischief.
Soto also was charged with
resisting arrest and had an out-
standing warrant from the state
police.
WHITE HAVEN -- State police
said Kerri Romig, 26, of Weath-
erly, was arrested on evidence of
drunken driving Sunday morn-
ing.
Romig was stopped for driv-
ing with only one headlight
around 2:20 a.m. on Towanda
Street in White Haven, state
police said.
She showed signs of intoxica-
tion, state police said, was taken
into custody and transported to
the state police barracks at
Hazleton for a legal breath test.
FRACKVILLE State police
said Kristen Lynn Lasalle, 25, of
West Pittston, tried to smuggle
prescription medication to an
inmate at the state correctional
institution at Mahanoy in
Schuylkill County on Saturday
morning.
Lasalle concealed the medica-
tion and admitted having it
when confronted by prison
personnel, state police said. She
handed it over to prison person-
nel and was arraigned before
District Judge Cristina Hale.
Lasalle was released on her own
recognizance, state police said.
HAZLE TWP. -- State police
asked for assistance locating
Nicholas Caputo, 33, of Hazle-
ton, after they said he stole a
40-inch television from the
Walmart store on Airport Road
on Jan. 9.
An arrest warrant was issued
for him on Friday. Anyone with
information on his whereabouts
is asked to contact state police
at the Hazleton station at 570
459-3890.
HANOVER TWP. Township
police reported driving under
the influence charges will be
filed against two men after
crashes Saturday.
Kenneth Gribble of Goeringer
Avenue was arrested after a
crash on Oxford Street. Police
said Gribble showed signs of
intoxication and refused to
submit to a breath test at the
Luzerne County DUI Processing
Center.
Matthew Mullery of Boland
Avenue was arrested after he
struck vehicles Saturday on Lee
Park Avenue. Mullery showed
signs of intoxication and also
refused to a chemical test, po-
lice said.
PLAINS TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Marcos J. Hernandez Gon-
zalez, of Scott Street, Wilkes-
Barre, was arrested Thursday
morning in the theft of an SUV
belonging to a woman who
hired him to do construction
work.
Rose Raven of 4 W. Berg St.
told police Thursday morning
Gonzalez stole a spare set of
keys to her Chevrolet Tracker
from her residence, police said.
Police said Gonzalez was
stopped in the area of Ravens
residence, showed signs of alco-
hol impairment and was taken
to Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal for a blood alcohol test. He
was arraigned on charges of
driving under the influence,
unauthorized use of an automo-
bile and driving without a li-
cense and committed to the
county prison for lack of $10,000
bail.
Kyle Loftus, 19, of Rose
Avenue, was arrested Saturday
morning on an outstanding
warrant stemming from the
alleged assault of his girlfriend
Dawn Unger of Jonestown.
Police said Loftus held Unger
against her will at the Rose
Avenue residence between
Wednesday and Friday, bit her
on the back, burned her on the
shoulder with a vehicle cigarette
lighter and cut her hands and
arms with knife and razor. Un-
ger received medical treatment
for her injuries. Police said
Loftus was arraigned on charges
of simple assault, false impris-
onment and harassment and
committed to the county prison
for lack of $10,000 bail.
POLICE BLOTTER
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
KINGSTON
Safe Prom Pledge begins
The law firm of Fellerman & Cia-
rimboli has announced that it has
once again embarked on a Safe Prom
Pledge.
Students are asked to commit to a
night free of drinking and driving by
signing the pledge. It also educates
students about the dangers of drink-
ing and driving and state laws.
This year, one lucky signer will
win an all-expense-paid limousine for
six on the night of his or her prom
courtesy of Touch of Class Limou-
sine as well as a prom gown from
Place One, tuxedo rental from Tuxe-
do Junction and a custom corsage
from Matterns. The high school with
the highest percentage of signers will
win $1,000.
Prom-goers at Luzerne and Lacka-
wanna county high schools may sign
the pledge at www.714hurt.com. All
Safe Prom Pledge signers will re-
ceive $25 credit towards a Prom
Dress at Place One in Wilkes-Barre
or an additional $5 discount towards
a tuxedo rental from Tuxedo Junc-
tion in Hanover Township.
Attorneys Greg Fellerman and Ed
Ciarimboli will launch the program
with a presentation at Lake-Lehman
High School on Wednesday at 9:30
a.m.
The winner of the grand prize will
be announced on or about Sunday,
March 31. The winning high school
will be announced at the conclusion
of the prom season.
LA PLUME
Black History noted
Keystone College will celebrate
Black History Month with a lecture
by community leader Sherman
Wooden.
Presented by Keystones Concerts
and Lectures Series, Wooden will
discuss African-Americans in North-
east Pennsylvania and their role in
the Underground Railroad. He will
speak on Feb. 16 at 7 p.m. in Evans
Hall in Hibbard Campus Center. The
presentation is free and open to the
public.
Wooden is the president of the
Center for Anti-Slavery Studies,
Montrose, and the author of The
Place Called Home published in
2009.
HARRISBURG
Camp taking entrants
Young Pennsylvanians interested
in pursuing environmental careers
are invited to apply by April 1 for the
Department of Conservation and
Natural Resources summer resi-
dential camp, DCNR Secretary Ri-
chard Allan said.
Now entering its 10th year, the
Exploring Careers Outdoors Camp
has become one of DCNRs strongest
success stories, said Allan. Weve
successfully worked with scores of
young people to hone their aware-
ness of the natural world and the
variety of related careers available to
them.
The six-day camp will begin July 8,
at Kirby Episcopal House and Chap-
el, Glen Summit. The camp is near
Nescopeck State Park and about 10
miles south of Wilkes-Barre.
The camp will introduce 20 to 25
students in grades 10-12 to conserva-
tion and environmental careers.
For more details and applications,
visitwww.dcnr.state.pa.us/state-
parks/ecocamp; emailE-
CO_Camp@pa.gov; write to ECO
Camp Coordinator, Bureau of State
Parks, Outdoor Programming Ser-
vices Division, P.O. Box 8551, Harris-
burg, PA17105-8551; or call 724-865-
7857.
SCRANTON
TCMC seeks dean input
As the national search begins for a
permanent dean of The Common-
wealth Medical College, the schools
Board of Trustees and the Search
Advisory Committee are inviting the
public to participate in a brief survey
to identify the essential qualities and
characteristics necessary to lead the
medical school.
Individuals interested in taking the
brief survey can visit: www.thecom-
monwealthmedical.com/DeanSearch
until Friday. The survey will close at
5 p.m. for compilation, analysis and
summary. All submissions are confi-
dential and will be reviewed and
considered as part of the complete
response group.
N E W S I N B R I E F
SWOYERSVILLE No one would
mistake Scott Simko for New York Gi-
ants defensive end Justin Tuck. Nor
would they mistake whom he was root-
ing for in Sundays Super Bowl XLVI.
The Giants fan sported a blue jersey
with TUCKs name and number 91 at the
party Murphys Pub threw Sunday.
Simko, 33, of Swoyersville, had a
prime spot at the end of the bar in front
of one of the eight televisions and fig-
ured to be one of the millions of people
at bars, house parties and work who
tuned into the game between the Giants
and New England Patriots.
Like many viewers Simko imbibed and
feasted on some of the fare owner Eric
Murphy and his staff prepared for the
expected 120 patrons.
But unlike some, Simko didnt think
hed be wearing the jersey.
Im just as shocked as anyone else
that Im cheering for the Giants in the
Super Bowl, said Simko.
He predicted a Giants victory by a
score of 31-24.
Dave Bakalec, who sat next to Simko
as the pre-game festivities wound down
to the 6:30 p.m. kickoff, also had the
Giants winning 27-24.
Bakalec, 33, also of Swoyersville, had
on a top with the Giants logo. He said
he was raised in New Jersey, about 20
minutes from the Meadowlands, the
former stadium the Giants shared with
the New York Jets, and a Giants fan
since he was a kid.
At the other end of the pub, Murphy
kept busy in the kitchen where hed been
since about noon.
We do everything homemade, he
said.
The menu included chicken francaise,
sausage-and-peppers, broccoli alfredo,
pizza and chicken wings.
Lots of wings, thats our big thing,
he said. We probably go through 400 to
500 pounds.
The bar on Slocum Street served the
food in house and for take outs.
People paid $30 to have unlimited
food and beer at the party, while others
just paid for their food and drinks.
It was the fifth year Murphy hosted
the party for his regulars who come from
West Side communities and from the
other side of Susquehanna River.
Its more of a customer appreciation
thing, he said. Its not a big money
Fans show off their true colors at Swoyersville pub and eatery
that was just one of many places where Super Bowl was on menu
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Wearing their New York Giants colors, Dave Bakalec, left, and Scott Simko, both of Swoyersville, joined the crowd at Murphys
Pub on Slocum Street, Swoyersville, for a Super Bowl party Sunday afternoon. The two friends had prime seats at the bar.
A super party scene
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See PARTY, Page 10A
DALLAS TWP. Crystal Kuy-
kendall concedes pitching her
message about the importance of
getting along in a diverse world
may be preaching to the choir as
the keynote speaker for The Di-
versity Insti-
tute dinner Feb.
16. But she ad-
vises people to
attend with an
open mind.
I dont want
people to think
that Im going
to beat them
over the head
withthis notion
of appreciating
differences,
Kuykendall
said with a
laugh during a
phone inter-
view. People
should attend
willing not on-
ly to be in-
formed but re-
alizing they are
going to be en-
tertained and
inspired as
well.
I like to
think most of my speeches leave
people feeling really good about
their experience, and they will be
more hopeful about tomorrow,
the Chicago native said.
According to her website, Kuy-
kendall has worked as a teacher,
lawyer, human relations expert,
consultant and motivational
speaker. She was appointed by
President Jimmy Carter to the
National Advisory Council on
Continuing Education, and in
1992 penned the book From
Rage to Hope: Reclaiming Black
and Hispanic Students that be-
came be national bestseller.
While she wouldnt give away
details of her speech, she pointed
out there are many types of diver-
sity beyond the usual topics of
race and ethnicity, including in-
come, age, culture and physical
appearance.
Dealing with people we per-
ceive as different depends on
our willingness to understand,
our willingness to accept and our
willingness to embrace those dif-
ferences, Kuykendall said
Those differences are what
make us stronger.
Asked about the hot-button is-
sue of illegal immigration par-
ticularly of Hispanics, a group
nowmaking up 37 percent of Ha-
zletons population according to
the U.S. Census Kuykendall
said the issue of immigration sta-
tus and race should be separated
with a simple self-test.
People should question them-
selves: If every person who was
racially or ethnically different
was a legal citizen, how would
you feel? We can rail against ille-
gal immigrants, but if everyone
were here legally, would you feel
the same way, Kuykendall said.
If the answer is yes, then you re-
ally do need to examine your mo-
tivations.
Avisitor tofour continents and
hundreds of regions around the
country in the past, including the
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area,
Kuykendall sees the local strug-
gletoadapt toincreaseddiversity
as an ultimate strength.
I think there are wonderful
people there, andbecause it is be-
coming more diverse as we
speak, I think it has great poten-
tial to really show the rest of the
world how people can co-exist in
spite of differences.
Diversity
Institute
promotes
acceptance
Keynote speaker at dinner
says there are many types of
diversity in the world.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Kuykendall
What: Diversity
Institute annual
dinner
Where: Rooms
216-218, In-
salaco Hall,
Misericordia
University,
Lake St., Dallas
Twp.
When: Feb 16,
5:30 p.m.
Speaker: Crys-
tal Kuykendall
To register:
570-674-1483
I F YO U
G O
Adocumentary featuring the revitaliza-
tion of Williamsport through a budding
art scene will debut tonight at 7 on WVIA-
TV, channel 44.
Written, produced and directed by Dal-
las native Lorena Beniquez, William-
sport Art Attack centers on the10th anni-
versary of Williamsports First Friday, a
monthly community event that celebrates
local art and music.
A graduate of Dallas High School and
Mansfield University, Beniquez has been
working in the filmindustry for almost 20
years, including 10 in Los Angeles doing
public relations, and the past seven as an
independent film director in William-
sport.
Having first heard about the festival
while working with station WBRE, she
was part of a community group that
pitched the documentary to producers at
WVIA.
WVIA Executive Vice
President Tom Curr
said the documentary is
a story of people in the
community coming to-
gether to fix up their
town.
And its a story we
love to tell, he said.
Through interviews with several citi-
zens and community officials, the docu-
mentary shows how Williamsports First
Friday helped rejuvenate the downtown
area. The work of local artists and bands
are featured throughout the documentary
as well.
Beniquez said the change is evident
throughout downtown Williamsport.
Walking around downtown, you see a
different spark, she said. Theres a tre-
mendous energy.
That energy translated to the art scene.
We dont just have local artists here
anymore, but artists from all over the
world, she said.
Beniquez said one particular objective
of the documentary was toshowhowFirst
Fridayhelpedencourageartistic culturein
what is known nationally as a famous
sports town.
Williamsport has the Little League
WorldSeries, andthats great, but wewant
to bring people into our town monthly,
she said. Not just once a year.
Three years ago Beniquez founded the
Central Pennsylvania Film Office, which
co-produced Williamsport Art Attack.
The CPFO provides services for film,
television, commercial, internet and vid-
eo game productions to nine counties in
Central Pennsylvania.
Beniquez hopes the documentary will
continue tobringvisitors toWilliamsport.
Getting people to visit our downtown,
not just locally, but from around the state
and around the world, she said, thats
our goal.
Area womans documentary boosts Williamsport
Williamsport Art Attack debuts
tonight on WVIA-TV, channel 44.
By JOE DOLINSKY
Times Leader Intern
Beniquez
What: Documentary Williamsport Art
Attack
Written, produced and directed by Dallas
native Lorena Beniquez
When: Today, 7 p.m.
Station: WVIA-TV Channel 44
I F YO U WAT C H
DALLASMorethanadozen
young children hurried into
their seats as the first of several
large puppets popped out from
behind a curtain during Cara-
way Street Childrens Theater
at the Dallas Baptist Church on
Sundayevening.
The interactive program
teaches kids Christian values
and Biblical truths, said Ron
Boudreaux, oneof theactorsand
a puppeteer for the program.
Boudreaux, 70, said the
church held a similar program
for children over the last five
years in the sanctuary, but Sun-
day was the first time the per-
formance was held in the base-
ment, its permanent location.
A number of volunteers
helped to transform the base-
ment tolooklikeatown. It took
several months to get this
Learning Christian
values from puppets
Dallas Baptist Church holds
interactive theater program
for young children.
See PUPPETS, Page 10A
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kim Grezsek, right, as Vanna Banana, gives Mia Murphy of
Larksville the Top Banana Award Sunday night.
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 4A MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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PROVIDENCE, R.I. The
recording was forgotten, and so,
too, was the odd twist of history
that brought together Malcolm
X and a bespectacled Ivy Leagu-
er fated to become one of Amer-
icas top diplomats.
The audiotape of MalcolmXs
1961 address in Providence
might never have surfaced at all
if 22-year-old Brown University
student Malcolm Burnley
hadnt stumbled across a refer-
ence to it in an old student
newspaper. He found the re-
cording of the little-remem-
bered visit gathering dust in the
university archives.
No one had listened to this in
50 years, Burnley told The As-
sociated Press. There arent
many recordings of him before
1962. And this is a unique
speech its not like others he
had given before.
In the May 11, 1961, speech
delivered to a mostly white au-
dience of students and some
residents, Malcolm X combines
blistering humor and reason to
argue that blacks should not
look to integrate into white so-
ciety but instead must forge
their own identities and culture.
At the time, Malcolm X, 35,
was a loyal supporter of the
black separatist movement Na-
tion of Islam, now based in Chi-
cago. He would be assassinated
four years later after leaving the
group and crafting his own
more global, spiritual ideology.
The legacy of slavery and rac-
ism, he told the crowd of 800,
has made the 20 million black
people in this country a dead
people. Dead economically,
dead mentally, dead spiritually.
Dead morally and otherwise. In-
tegration will not bring a man
back from the grave.
The rediscovery of the speech
could be the whole story. But
Burnley found the young stu-
dents in the crowd that night
proved to be just as fascinating.
Malcolm X was prompted to
come to Brown by an article
about the growing Black Mus-
lim movement published in the
Brown Daily Herald. The article
by Katharine Pierce, a young
student at Pembroke College,
then the womens college at
Brown, was first written for a re-
ligious studies class. It caught
the eye of the student papers
editor, Richard Holbrooke.
Holbrooke would become a
leading American diplomat,
serving as U.S. Ambassador to
Germany soon after that na-
tions reunification, ambassador
to the United Nations and Presi-
dent Barack Obamas special ad-
viser on Pakistan and Afghanis-
tan before his death in 2010 at
age 69.
But in 1961, Holbrooke, 20,
was eager to use the student
newspaper to examine race rela-
tions an unusual interest on
an Ivy League campus with only
a handful of black students.
Pierces article ran in the
newspapers magazine and
made her the first woman
whose name was featured on
the newspapers masthead.
Somehow, the article made
its way to Malcolm X. His staff
and Holbrooke worked out de-
tails of the visit weeks in ad-
vance. Campus officials were
wary: Malcolm X had been
banned from the University of
California-Berkeley and Queens
College in New York.
Tickets going for 50 cents
apiece for the Brown speech
sold quickly. About 800 people
filled the venue, the 19th-centu-
ry, Romanesque Sayles Hall,
meant to hold about 500.
Brown University student recovers tape of Malcolm X speech
Recording of the May 11, 1961,
speech by black activist was
long thought to be lost.
By DAVID KLEPPER
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Brown University senior Malcolm Burnley, 22, discovered a long-
lost tape recording of a 1961 address by Malcolm X at Brown.
PHILADELPHIA Past the
glass case containing sketches
for his novel Oliver Twist, be-
yond the handwritten letter to
his publisher about Little Nell,
andawayfromthefirst published
installments of Hard Times
sits Charles Dickens pet bird.
The carefully preserved and
stuffed raven named Grip lat-
er the inspirationfor Edgar Allan
Poes famous poemis perhaps
the quirkiest part of the Philadel-
phia public librarys valuable
Dickens collection, now on dis-
play to celebrate his bicenten-
nial.
The British author, who creat-
ed unforgettable characters like
Ebenezer Scrooge and David
Copperfield, visited The City of
Brotherly Love only twice. But
two local benefactors be-
queathed major collections of
Dickensiana to the library, in-
cluding1,200letters alone. Anda
rare statue of the author sits in a
neighborhood park.
The library and Friends of
Clark Park are now among nu-
merous groups worldwide cele-
bratingthenovelists 200thbirth-
day. He was born in Portsmouth,
England, on Feb. 7, 1812.
(It was) the ideal opportunity
to share our literary treasures
with the community and cele-
brate the fact that Dickens clev-
er characters and engaging plot-
lines transcend time and are as
relevant todayastheywerewhen
he created them, library direc-
tor Siobhan Reardon said in a
statement.
Among the items on view in
the rare book department are
first editions of his novels and
original artwork for the tales;
dozens of letters to colleagues;
thedeskwhereheleft unfinished
his 15th book, The Mystery of
EdwinDrood; andan1846man-
uscript of the Childrens New
Testament Dickens ownver-
sion of the life of Jesus, which he
readtohis chil-
dren each
Christmas.
Also on dis-
play, safe in a
terrarium,
stands Grip,
the pet raven
that Dickens
preserved through taxidermy.
Gripappearedas a minor charac-
ter in Dickens book Barnaby
Rudge, which Poe reviewed
while living in Philadelphia. He
criticized the birds small role,
and penned The Raven four
years later.
The librarys yearlong celebra-
tion also includes regular book
discussions and readings by a
Dickens impersonator, who won
the role through an American
Idol-style contest. A birthday
party is also planned.
Dickens first visited Philadel-
phia in1842 and received a rock-
star welcome, shaking hands
with fans for hours in a hotel lob-
by. When he returned in 1868,
people camped out for tickets to
his readings and scalpers com-
manded high prices for the sold-
out performances, according to
research by the Philadelphia
chapter of the Dickens Fellow-
ship.
His work remains popular to-
day because Dickens is a great
storyteller who uses energetic
language to create unforgettable
characters, saidJohnO. Jordan, a
literature professor who directs
the Dickens Project at the Uni-
versity of California at Santa
Cruz.
Dickens writes about impor-
tant social issues that are still
nagging at us today poverty,
inequality inwealth, the abuse of
children, issuesof social class, as-
piration to move beyond the sta-
tion into which you were born,
and the problems that arise from
that, Jordan said.
Through another twist of fate,
Clark Park in west Philadelphia
ended up with a statue of the
writer. Washington Post founder
Stilson Hutchins had commis-
sioned the work in the 1880s but
then backed out of the deal, leav-
ing it orphaned until a local art
association purchased it.
Philly celebrates
Dickens 200th
Public library displays
English authors works to
note his birthday.
By KATHY MATHESON
Associated Press
Dickens
When US News & World Re-
port debuted its list of Americas
Best Colleges nearly 30 years
ago, the magazine hoped its col-
lege rankings would be a game-
changer for students andfamilies.
But arguably, theyve had a much
bigger effect on colleges them-
selves.
Yes, students and families still
buy the guide and its less famous
competitors by the hundreds of
thousands, and still care about a
colleges reputation. But it isnt
students who obsess over every
incremental shift on the rankings
scoreboard, and who regularly
embarrass themselves in the
process. Its colleges.
Its colleges that have spent bil-
lions on financial aid for high-
scoring students who dont ac-
tually need the money, motivated
at least partly by the quest for
rankings glory.
It was a college, Baylor Univer-
sity, that paid students it had al-
ready accepted to retake the SAT
exam in a transparent ploy to
boost the average scores it could
report. Its colleges that have
awarded bonuses to presidents
who lift their school a few slots.
And its colleges that occasion-
ally get caught in the kind of
cheating you might expect in
sports or on Wall Street, but
whichseems especially ignomini-
ous coming from professional
educators.
The latest example came last
week at Claremont McKenna, a
highly regarded California liberal
arts college where a senior ad-
ministrator resigned after ac-
knowledging he falsified college
entrance examscores for years to
rankings publications such as US
News.
The scale was small: submit-
ting scores just 10 or 20 points
higher on the 1,600-point SAT
mathandreadingexams. Average
test scores account for just 7.5
percent of the US News rankings
formula. Still, the magazine ac-
knowledged the effect could have
beento move the college up a slot
or twoinits rankings of topliberal
arts colleges. And so it was hard
not to notice Claremont McKen-
na stood at No. 9 in this years
rankings, which to people who
care about such things sounds
much sweeter than No. 11.
For Claremont, there is I
would think a psycho-
logically large differ-
ence between being
ninth and 11th, said
Bob Schaeffer of the
group FairTest and a
rankings critic.
If it was an effort to
gain an edge, it back-
fired badly. Another
popular list, Kiplin-
gers Best College
Values, said Friday it
was removing Clar-
emont McKenna from its 2011-12
rankings entirely because of the
false reporting. The college had
beenNo. 18onits list of best-value
liberal arts colleges.
Competitiveness may be natu-
rally human, but to many who
work with students, such behav-
ior among fellow educators is
mystifying. Contrary to wide-
spread perceptions, they say, stu-
dents typically use the rankings
as a source of data and pay little
attention to a schools number.
When I started in this busi-
ness, I thought, The rankings are
terrible, said Brad MacGowan,
a 21-year-veteran college counsel-
or at Newton North High School
outside Boston. But spending all
this time with students, I just
dont hear that much about them.
Im sure its colleges that are per-
petuating it.
Its hard to knowhowcommon
cheating like that re-
ported at Claremont
McKenna is, given
that while US News
cross-checks someda-
ta with other sources,
it relies largely on col-
leges themselves to
provide it. Modest
forms of fudging
through data selec-
tion are undeniably
common, especially
in law school rank-
ings.
But most rankings critics say
by far the most pernicious failure
of colleges isnt blatant cheating,
but what they do more openly
allowing the rankings formula to
drive their goals and policies.
Colleges, they argue, have
caved to the rankings pressure in
a range of ways. A big one is
recruiting as many students as
they can to apply, even if theyre
not likely to be a good fit, just to
boost their selectivity numbers.
And theyve showered financial
aid on high-achieving, and often
wealthy, kids with high SAT
scores.
In the mid-1990s, roughly one-
third of grant aid, or scholarships
colleges of all types awarded with
their own money, was given on
grounds other than need (typical-
ly called merit aid). A decade
later, they gave away three times
as much money but well over
half was based on merit.
Yes, some colleges recruited
better students, but there was a
price to be paid. Consider a 2008
study by The Institute for College
Access and Success that examin-
ed the $11.2 billion annually four-
year colleges were awarding in
grant aid. Of that, $3.35 billion
was awarded as merit aid. That
would have easily covered the
$2.4 billion in unmet need-based
aid that the colleges said their
low-income students still faced.
Rankings critic Lloyd Thacker,
founder of the group Education
Conservancy, calls that a shift in
financial aidfromcharitable acts
to competitive weapons. Or, as
Schaeffer describes it, they end
upgivingthe money torichwhite
kids.
The vast majority of students
attend college within three hours
of home, so national rankings
have little meaning. Junior
Bridget Gillis said shed yet to
even see a college ranking guide.
Her criteria: If they have my ma-
jor, if its a nice campus, howbigit
is, if they have the sport I want to
play in college (field hockey).
Colleges obsess over rankings
Some have cheated to up
standing, but students dont
give it much weight.
By JUSTIN POPE
AP Education Writer
AP PHOTO
A senior administrator at Claremont McKenna resigned after acknowledging he falsified college
entrance exam scores for years to rankings publications such as US News.
When I start-
ed in this busi-
ness, I
thought, The
rankings are
terrible,
Brad MacGowan
college counselor
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 5A
N A T I O N & W O R L D
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN
Car bomb kills seven
A
car bomb exploded Sunday near
police headquarters in the southern
city of Kandahar, killing seven people
and wounding at least 19, provincial
officials said.
Five Afghan police officers and two
civilians, including a child, were among
the dead, said Javid Faisal, a spokes-
man for the Kandahar governor.
He said the blast occurred on a busy
street where police officers and civil-
ians park their cars.
No one claimed responsibility for the
blast. President Hamid Karzai attribut-
ed it in a statement to the enemies of
the people of Afghanistan.
WASHINGTON
11 Occupiers arrested
Authorities say 11 people have been
arrested in Washingtons McPherson
Square since Park Police began clear-
ing away tents from one of the nations
last remaining Occupy sites.
David Schlosser, who is a spokesman
for the U.S. Park Police, said Sunday
that one of those arrested was charged
with felony assault on a police officer
and assault with a deadly weapon. That
person is accused of hitting an officer
in the face with a brick Saturday eve-
ning. The officer was treated at a hospi-
tal.
Three others were charged with
assault on a police officer.
Schlosser says officials are contin-
uing to clear the park of unsanitary
conditions, though so far Sunday
things had remained mostly peaceful.
HAGERSTOWN, MD.
Shoe furor closes mall
Authorities say a Hagerstown, Md.,
mall was closed temporarily after a
crowd became unruly while waiting for
a shoe store to open and begin selling
Nikes new Foamposite sneaker.
The Washington County Sheriffs
office says officers went to the Valley
Mall after a disturbance was reported
among about 100 people waiting for
the store to open Saturday morning.
The sheriffs office says some shoppers
told officers they had been waiting in
line overnight and others began cutting
in line.
Sheriff Douglas Mullendore told The
Herald-Mail of Hagerstown the release
of the new shoe drew shoppers from as
far away as Washington, over 70 miles
away. Mullendore said after the mall
was locked down, patrons were escort-
ed into the shoe store a few at a time.
HOPE MILLS, N.C.
Stunned at drive-thru
North Carolina authorities say they
used a stun gun on a woman motorist
who blocked a McDonalds drive-thru
for 20 minutes after employees refused
to serve her because she cut in line.
Authorities say 37-year-old Evange-
line Lucca bypassed the order screen
and line and pulled directly up to the
pick-up window Friday afternoon at the
restaurant in Hope Mills.
Cumberland County sheriffs spo-
keswoman Debbie Tanner told The
Fayetteville Observer that the woman
had her 3-year-old daughter in the car
when she became confrontational with
the workers before deputies arrived.
Tanna says Lucca was subsequently
shocked by deputies and charged with
second-degree trespass. A phone listing
for the woman couldnt be found.
Authorities say the womans daugh-
ter was taken into protective custody.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Muslim celebration in India
A seller inflates balloons Sunday near
a procession to celebrate Eid-e-Milad-
un-Nabi or birthday of Prophet Mo-
hammed in New Delhi, India. Indias
Muslims are a minority in the predom-
inantly Hindu state, but they are one
of the largest Muslim populations in
the world.
LAS VEGAS Nowits on to
Colorado, Minnesota and
Maine.
With back-to-back victories
fueling him, Republican presi-
dential front-runner Mitt Rom-
ney is looking toward the next
states that hold GOP nominat-
ing contests as main rival Newt
Gingrich brushes aside any talk
of abandoning his White House
bidall but ensuringthebattle
will stretchintothe springif not
beyond.
Shortly after losing big to
Romneyhere, the former House
speaker emphati-
cally renewed his
vowto campaign
into the party
convention in
Tampa this sum-
mer. His goal, he said, was to
find a series of victories which
by the end of the Texas primary
will leave us at parity with
Romney by early April.
Next up to vote are Colorado
andMinnesota, whichbothhold
caucuses Tuesday. Maine fol-
lows on Saturday during a
month that promises to be as
plodding as January was rapid-
fire in the presidential race.
Romney will look to maintain
his position of strength, if not
build upon it, as his rivals con-
tinueworkingtoderail himeven
as their options for doingsonar-
rowwith each victory he notch-
es.
As Saturday turned to Sun-
day, the former Massachusetts
governor held a double-digit
lead over his nearest pursuer as
the totals mounted in Nevada,
where fellow Mormons ac-
counted for roughly a quarter of
all caucus-goers. Gingrich and
Texas Rep. Ron Paul vied for a
distant second. Former Pennsyl-
vania Sen. Rick Santorum
trailed the field.
Returnsfrom16of17counties
showed Romney with 42 per-
cent support, Gingrich with 26
percent, Paul with 18 percent
and Santorumwith13 percent.
Yet to report its results was
Clark County, which includes
LasVegasandoftenaccountsfor
half or more of the votes in a
statewideelection. Officialssaid
it could be Sunday before those
were released.
Romneys victory capped a
week that began with his dou-
ble-digit win in the Florida pri-
mary. That contest was as in-
tenseas Nevadas caucuses were
sedate so quiet that they pro-
duced little television advertis-
ing, no candidate debates and
only a modest investment of
time by the contenders.
A total of 28 Republican Na-
tional Convention delegates
were at stake in caucuses held
across thesprawlingstate. Rom-
ney won at least 10, Gingrich at
least four, Paul at least threeand
Santorum at least two. Eight
were still to be determined.
Despite Mitt Romneys victories, rival Newt Gingrich wont abandon presidential bid
GOP turns to Colo., Minn., Maine
By SHANNON MCCAFFREY
and KASIE HUNT
Associated Press
20 1 2
ELECTION
Romney Gingrich
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina
Bosnia used helicopters on Sunday to
evacuate the sick and deliver food to
thousands of people left stranded by its
heaviest snowfall ever, while Pope Bene-
dict XVI donned an overcoat to bless the
few pilgrims who braved Romes unusu-
ally cold weather to visit St. Peters
Square.
The snow is beautiful, but lets hope
spring comes soon, the pope told the pil-
grims, looking out over remnants of
Romes biggest snowstorm since 1986.
Across Eastern Europe, thousands of
people continued to dig out from heavy
snow that has fallen during a cold snap
that struck more than a week ago and has
killed hundreds of people.
In Ukraine, the hardest hit area, tem-
peratures have fallen as low as minus 33
Fahrenheit (minus 36 Celsius). The gov-
ernment said Sunday the countrys death
toll now stands at 131, including many
homeless people. About 2,300 other Uk-
rainians have sought treatment for frost-
bite or hypothermia.
At the other end of Europe, Britain had
its first snowfall of thewinter onSaturday
up to 6.3 inches forcing Londons
HeathrowAirport Europes busiest
tocancel flights andstrandingmany driv-
ers overnight on highways. Stansted, Bir-
mingham and Luton airports suspended
operations overnight as snowpiled up on
runways, but resumed operations Sun-
day.
Still, Queen Elizabeth II and her hus-
band Prince Philip managed to brave the
cold and snowto attend a service at West
Newton church on her Sandringham Es-
tate in eastern England on Sunday.
The 85-year-old monarch marks 60
years on the throne today and her Dia-
mond Jubilee anniversary will be marked
by a series of regional, national and inter-
national events throughout 2012.
InBosnia, more than100 remote villag-
es have been cut off by 6 1/2 feet of snow
in the mountains. More than 3 feet fell in
Sarajevo, the capital, where a state of
emergency has been declared.
Three helicopters cruised over eastern
Bosnia on Sunday, delivering food and
picking up people who needed evacua-
tion.
S E V E R E W I N T E R W E AT H E R I N E U R O P E
AP PHOTO
People walk along an icy promenade past ice covered cars and trees Sunday on the shores of Lake Geneva in Versoix, Swit-
zerland.
Thousands trapped in Bosnia
From Britain to Eastern Europe,
heavy snow and cold have wreaked
havoc for millions.
By AIDA CERKEZ
Associated Press
JERUSALEM For the first
timeinnearlytwodecades of esca-
lating tensions over Irans nuclear
program, world leaders are genu-
inelyconcernedthat anIsraeli mil-
itary attack on the Islamic Repub-
lic couldbeimminent anaction
that many fear might trigger a
wider war, ter-
rorismandglob-
al economic ha-
voc.
President Ba-
rack Obama
said on Sunday
that theU.S. will
work in lock-
step with Israel
to prevent Iran from becoming a
nuclear power and says he hopes
that the crisis will be resolved dip-
lomatically.
Obama told NBC in an inter-
view from the White House on
Sunday that Israel is rightly very
concerned about Irans nuclear
program. He said both Israel and
the U.S. believe that Iran has to
stand down.
High-level foreign dignitaries,
including the U.N. chief and the
head of the American military,
have stopped in Israel in recent
weeks, urging leaders to give the
diplomatic process more time to
work. But U.S. Defense Secretary
Leon Panetta has reportedly con-
cluded that an Israeli attack on
Iran is likely in the coming
months.
Despite harsh economic sanc-
tions and international pressure,
Iran is refusing to abandon its nu-
clear program, which it insists is
purely civilian, and threatening Is-
rael and the West.
Its beginning to cause jitters in
world capitals and financial mar-
kets.
Of course I worry that there
will be a military conflict, Bri-
tains deputy prime minister, Nick
Clegg, said in a magazine inter-
viewlast week. HesaidBritainwas
strainingevery single sinewtore-
solve this through a combination
of pressure and engagement,
rather than military action.
Prime Minister Benjamin Neta-
nyahu frequently draws parallels
between modern-day Iran and Na-
zi Germanyontheeveof theHolo-
caust.
On Thursday, Defense Minister
EhudBarakclaimedduringahigh-
profile security conference that
thereis awideglobal understand-
ing that military action may be
needed.
On Friday, Irans supreme lead-
er, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called
Israel a cancerous tumor that
shouldbe cut andwill be cut, and
boasted of supporting any group
that will challenge the Jewish
state.
Israeli
attack on
Iranians
is feared
Nations, world markets
growing nervous over propect
of warfare in the Gulf region.
The Associated Press
Khamenei
CAIROIgnoring a U.S. threat to cut
off aid, Egypt on Sunday referred 19
Americans and 24 other employees of
nonprofit groups totrial before a criminal
court on accusations they illegally used
foreign funds to foment unrest in the
country.
Egypts military rulers had already
deeply strained ties with Washington
with their crackdown on U.S.-funded
groups promoting democracy and hu-
manrights andaccusedof stirring upvio-
lence in the aftermath of the uprising a
year agothat oustedHosni Mubarak. The
decisiontosend43workers fromthevari-
ous groups to trials marks a sharp escala-
tion in the dispute.
Egypt and the United States have been
close allies for more than three decades,
but the campaign against the organiza-
tions has angered Washington, and jeop-
ardized the $1.5 billion in aid Egypt is set
to receive from the U.S. this year.
On Saturday, U.S. Secretary of State
Hillary Rodham Clinton warned Egypt
that failure to resolve the dispute may
lead to the loss of American aid. The
Egyptian minister, Mohammed Amr, re-
sponded Sunday by saying the govern-
ment cannot interfere in the work of the
judiciary.
We are doing our best to contain this
but ... we cannot actually exercise any in-
fluence on the investigating judges right
nowwhen it comes to the investigation,
Amr told reporters in Munich, Germany.
A few hours later, word of the referral to
trials came.
The Egyptian investigation into the
workof nonprofit groups inthecountryis
closely linkedtothe political turmoil that
has engulfed the nation since the ouster
of Mubarak, a close U.S. ally who ruled
Egypt for nearly 30 years.
Egypts military rulers have been un-
der fire by liberal and secular groups for
bungling what was supposed to be a tran-
sitiontodemocracyafter Mubaraks oust-
er. The ruling generals who took power,
led by a man who was Mubaraks defense
minister for 20years, have triedtodeflect
the criticismby claiming foreign hands
are behind protests against their rule.
Egypt refers 19 to court despite U.S. threat
The action could jeopardize the $1.5
billion in aid Egypt is set to receive.
By HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
A protestor wears a mask and goggles
during clashes with security forces
Sunday in Cairo, Egypt.
K
PAGE 6A MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O B I T U A R I E S
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
Happy 18th Birthday
In Heaven
NICKY DOROSKY
Feb. 6, 1994 - Nov. 7, 2003
Time passes quickly,
But, as we grow older,
You remain forever young.
Loving and missing you
forever
Mom, Dad, Jen and Ali
BATES Arthur, memorial service 5
to 7 p.m. today in the Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke.
BERTOCKI Amil, funeral with
military honors beginning with
Panachida 9 a.m. Tuesday in the
Victor M. Ferri Funeral Home, 522
Fallon St., Old Forge. Divine
Liturgy at 10 a.m. in St. Nicholas
of Myra Byzantine Catholic
Church, Old Forge. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. today. Parastas at
7 p.m.
COOLBAUGH Wendell, funeral 1
p.m. Tuesday in the Sheldon-
Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73
W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.
Friends may call 6 to 8 p.m.
today.
CONWAY Joan, celebration life
10:30 a.m. Thursday in McLaugh-
lins The Family Funeral Service,
142 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. in
the Church of St. Aloysius,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 9
to 10:30 a.m.
DAVIS Naomi, funeral 11 a.m.
Tuesday in the Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Memo-
rial Highway, Dallas. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today.
DULNY Sophie, Mass of Christian
Burial 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in Holy
Rosary Church, Duryea. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
Piontek Funeral Home, 204 Main
St., Duryea. Family and friends
are asked to go directly to the
church the morning of the funer-
al.
HOSEY Leonard, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. Wednesday
in St. Ignatius Church, Maple
Street, Kingston. There will be no
calling hours.
HUGHES Theodore, funeral 9 a.m.
Tuesday in the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exe-
ter. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. at Immaculate Concep-
tion Church (Corpus Christi
Parish), West Pittston. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
JOHNSON John, funeral 11 a.m.
today in the Curtis L. Swanson
Funeral Home, Inc., corner of
routes 29 &118, Pikes.
KARALUNAS Anna, Mass of
Christian Burial 10 a.m. today in
Holy Family Parish, Luzerne.
There will be no calling hours;
friends are asked to go directly to
church.
LUCHETTI Ottavio, memorial
Mass 9:30 a.m. today in St. Jo-
seph Marello Parish at Our Lady
of Mount Carmel Church, 237
William St., Pittston. The family
will receive friends and relatives
in the church 8:30 a.m. until the
time of Mass.
PARADA Clara, funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Michael J. Mikelski
Funeral Home, 293 S. River St.,
Plains Township. Office of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St.
Marys Byzantine Catholic
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
PUCHALSKY John Edward,
funeral 9:15 a.m. Tuesday in the
Wroblewski Funeral Home Inc.,
1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.
Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. Francis Xavier Cabrini
Church, Carverton. Friends may
call 5 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
ROSETTI Rose, funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave., Exe-
ter. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua
Church (St. Barbara Parish),
Exeter.
SUTT Irene, funeral 9:30 a.m.
today in the Grontkowski Funeral
Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green Street,
Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina
Parish, formerly St. Marys
Church, Nanticoke.
TURRELL G. Henry Jr., funeral 9
a.m. Saturday in the P. Dean
Homer Funeral Home, 1 Grovedale
Lane, Wyalusing. Friends may call
5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral
home.
WEIHBRECHT Edward Sr., Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. today
in St. Marys Church Our Lady
of Fatima Parish, 134 S. Washing-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre. There will
be no public calling hours. Family
and friends are asked to go
directly to the church for the
funeral.
YALCH Janice, funeral 11:30 a.m.
today in the Stanley S. Stegura
Funeral Home Inc., 614 S. Hanover
St., Nanticoke. Mass of Christian
Burial at noon in the main site of
St. Faustinas Parish, Nanticoke.
FUNERALS
MARY (CEBULA) KOYTEK,
78, of Taylor, passed away Satur-
day, February 4, 2012, at Riverside
Rehab and Nursing Center, Taylor.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Kiesinger Funeral
Services Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea.
CARL J. SCHNEIDER, 90, of
Wesley Village, Jenkins Township,
passed away Sunday, February 5,
2012, at Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
LeonardC. Ho-
sey, age 64, of
Larksville,
passed into
eternal rest on
Thursday, Feb-
ruary 2, 2012.
Born in
Kingston, he
was the sonof the late Charles Leo-
nard and Agnes Pahl Hosey.
Len attended Central Catholic
High School, Kingston, and was a
member and Eucharistic minister
at St. Ignatius Church of Kingston.
He was a United States Navy
veteran serving during the Viet-
namWar and was a member of the
American Legion, Swoyersville
Post. Also, he was a 4th degree
member of the Knights of Colum-
bus, Luzerne Council. Len was the
owner and operator of Len Hosey
Appliance Repair Service for over
30 years.
He was preceded in death by his
brother, Charles Hosey.
Surviving are his wife of 41
years, the former Mary Naparlo;
daughters, Malinda Bilwinandher
husband, John, of Dallas, and Mi-
chele Jenkins and her husband,
Michael, of Radford, Va.; grand-
sons, JonathanandNathanBilwin;
sisters, Peggy Gavlick and her hus-
band, Stan, of Swoyersville, and
Charlotte Demko and her hus-
band, George, of Swoyersville; sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Friends and family are invit-
ed to attend Mass of Chris-
tian Burial on Wednesday at 9:30
a.m. in St. Ignatius Church, Maple
Street, Kingston. There will be no
calling hours. Funeral arrange-
ments are entrusted to the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530
West Main Street, Plymouth.
Please visitwww.sjgrontkowski-
funeralhome.comto submit online
condolences to Lens family.
Leonard C. Hosey
February 2, 2012
R
obert E. Coach, 61, North Good-
win Avenue, Kingston, passed
away peacefully at home on Thurs-
day, February 2, 2012.
Born in Kingston the son of Mar-
garet BitscoCoachandthelateEmil
Coach. He was a graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School.
Class of 1968. He was a United
States Marine Corps veteran, serv-
ing during the VietnamWar. He was
employed by Keystone Automotive
and Tom Tobin Wholesale Floral,
retiring in 2003. He was a member
of St. Ignatius of Loyola Parish,
Kingston.
Fishing and being on vacation
were among his favorite outdoor ac-
tivities. He always made you laugh
with his crazy jokes.
No matter how he felt, he never
complained . He will be sadly mis-
sed.
Surviving, beside his mother, are
his wife of 35 years, the former Nan-
cy Forgash; daughter, Candace Pa-
tronick (Jason), and granddaught-
er, Summer, Swoyersville; brother,
David Coach, Edwardsville; neph-
ews, Michael Coach and Mitchell
Forgash, niece, Cameryn Forgash.
Funeral will be held on Mon-
day at 10 a.m. from the Kielty-
Moran Funeral Home Inc., 87 Wash-
ington Ave., Plymouth. A Mass of
ChristianBurial will be at10:30a.m.
in St Ignatius of Loyola Church, Ma-
ple Street, Kingston.
Interment will be in the parish
cemetery, Pringle, where Military
Honors will be accorded by the
United States Marine Corps.
Friends may call today from 8 to
10 a.m. at the funeral home.
Robert E. Coach
February 2, 2012
F
rank J. Letoski, age 76, of Sha-
vertown, passed away Sunday,
Feb. 5, 2012, peacefully, surrounded
by his loving children.
Born in Luzerne, Frank was a son
of the late Frank J. and Helen Per-
chach Letoski.
Frank was employed as a Mill-
wright retiring from HPG, Moun-
tain Top, after a lengthy career. He
was a hardworking and talented
tradesman who could fix anything.
Frank loved the outdoors, enjoyed
gardening and took great pride in
his home and grounds.
An Army veteran, Frank was also
a member of the Daddow-Isaacs
Dallas American Legion Post 672.
He was a devoted and loving hus-
band, father and grandfather who
will be deeply missed by his family.
Preceding him in death, in addi-
tion to his parents, were his beloved
wife, the former Joyce Micklo;
brothers John, Robert and Leo Le-
toski; sisters Marie Letoski, Do-
rothy Gaydos and Florence Magli.
Surviving are his son, Frank J. Le-
toski, andwife Wendy, SouthAbing-
ton; daughters, Gwenn Ann Letos-
ki, Shavertown; Susan J. Hockenbu-
ry and husband, Jeffrey G., Dallas;
Holly Jill Letoski, West Pittston;
grandchildren, Marlee Makayla Le-
toski, Tyler Jeffrey Hockenbury,
Reese Connor Rhodes; brothers
Emery and Joseph Letoski; sisters
Helen Dwinchick and Anna Mae
Delaney; numerous nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral services will be held
Wednesday, February 8, 2012
at 10 a.m. fromthe Harold C. Snow-
don Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main
Street, Shavertown. Deacon George
Mochin Jr. will officiate. Interment
will be made in St. Anns Cemetery,
Lehman. Friends may call at the fu-
neral home Tuesday, February 7,
from 4 to 7 p.m.
Frank J. Letoski
February 5, 2012
L
ucy Martino Petrillo, 91, former-
ly of Lehigh Street, Wilkes-
Barre, passed away peacefully on
Friday, February 3, 2012 at the Gold-
en Living Center Summit, Pennsyl-
vania Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, sur-
rounded by her loving family.
She was the daughter of the late
Anthony and Concetta Martino.
She resided in Brooklyn, New York,
and later resided in Wilkes-Barre.
She was an active member of the
Sacred Heart & Rosary Society at
Holy Rosary Church, Wilkes-Barre,
having held several offices and
working on many various events.
She was an honored volunteer for
the Deborah Heart and Lung Foun-
dation and a tireless volunteer for
many school programs and events.
She was also a member of the St.
Theresas Senior Citizens Group,
where she was fondly known as
The Sunshine Lady. Lucywas a re-
tired seamstress.
Lucy was a devout Catholic and
also a devoted wife, mother, grand-
mother, great-grandmother and a
great-great-grandmother. She en-
joyed traveling, cooking her famous
Italian meals, baking, music and
spending time with her family and
friends.
She will be sadly missed by all
who knew her.
She was preceded in death by her
husband of 68 years, Pasquale (Pa-
trick), and by sisters Camille, Su-
san, Carmelina andBeatrice, andby
brothers Michael, Peter and Vin-
cent.
She is survived by her sons, Dr.
Patrick Petrillo, DDS, Doylestown;
Martin Petrillo, Ph.D, Eldersburg,
Maryland; and her daughters, Joy
Tagnani, LPN, Plymouth, and Tere-
sa Ferguson, Swoyersville;12 grand-
children; 12 great-grandchildren
and two great-great-grandchildren
and by her sister Josephine, Arizo-
na.
Funeral services will be held
Thursday at 9 a.m. from the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave-
nue, Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of
Christian Burial to follow at 9:30
a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, 226
South Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre.
Interment will be in St. Marys
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call Wednesday from 5
to 8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Lucys family would like to thank
everyone at Golden Living Center
Summit and Hospice of the Sacred
Heart for the kind and loving care
they gave to Lucy during her stay
with them.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to The Deborah Heart and
Lung Foundation, 212 Trenton
Road, Browns Mills, NJ 08015 or to
Hospice of the Sacred Heart at 600
Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Onlinecondolences maybemade
at www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Lucy Martino Petrillo
February 3, 2012
Alyce C.
Brutko Lopu-
hovsky, 86, of
Swoyersville,
passed away
early Sunday
morning, Feb-
ruary 5, 2012,
at home with her family by her
side. She was the wife of the late
Albert J. Lopuhovsky Sr.
Born in Swoyersville, on Sep-
tember 3, 1925, she was the daugh-
ter of the late Steve and Caroline
Dziadosz Brutko.
She was a member of Holy Trin-
ity Church, Swoyersville. She was
a graduate of Swoyersville High
School, Class of 1943. Prior to her
retirement, she was employed by
the Maltby Drug Store in Swoyers-
ville.
She was preceded in death by
her brothers, Joseph Brutko and
Edward Brutko; and infant sister,
Anna Mae Brutko.
Alyce was a loving wife, mother,
grandmother, great-grandmother,
great-great-grandmother, sister
and aunt. She will be missed by all
who knew and loved her.
Surviving are her children, Paul
Lopuhovsky and his wife, Rita, Cali-
fornia; David Lopuhovsky and his
wife, Beth, New Jersey; Albert Lopu-
hovsky , Alabama; Andrew Lopuhov-
sky and his wife, Paulette, Swoyers-
ville; Joseph Lopuhovsky, Wyoming;
CarolannDrevenak andher husband,
Andrew, Swoyersville; 14 grandchil-
dren, 10 great-grandchildren, one
great-great-grandchild; sister, Mary
Ann Whalen, New Jersey; brothers,
Steven Brutko, Carlisle and Freder-
ick Brutko, Wilkes-Barre; several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held on
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. fromBednar-
ski Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave-
nue, Wyoming, with a Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity
Church, Swoyersville. Interment will
be held in Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville.
Friends may call Tuesday 5 to 8
p.m. at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to the American
Heart Association, 613 Baltimore
Drive, Wilkes-Barre, PA18702.
Alyce C. Lopuhovsky
February 5, 2012
M
rs. June Ann Chropowicki,
83, of Old Forge, passed
away Saturday at Riverside Re-
hab and Nursing Center, Taylor.
Born in Duryea, she was the
daughter of the late Edward and
Victoria Szymanski Barlik. She
was a graduate of Duryea High
School, class of 1946, and Mad-
ame Fenwick School of Beauty,
Scranton. Prior to her retire-
ment, she was employed in the
area garment industry. She was a
member of Nativity of Our Lord
Parish, Duryea.
She was a loving wife, mother
and grandmother, who loved
spending time with her grand-
children.
She and her husband, Peter T.
Chropowicki, celebrated their
55th wedding anniversary this
past June 9.
She was preceded in death by
three brothers, John, Monsignor
Robert and Leonard Barlik.
Surviving, in addition to her
husband, are daughter, Jane
Chropowicki of Old Forge; son
Jim Chropowicki and his wife,
Ada, of Duryea; grandson Jim;
granddaughter Julie; sister Eliza-
beth Meredick of Scranton; niec-
es and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial
will be held Wednesday at 9:30
a.m. in Holy Rosary Church, Du-
ryea, with the Rev. Charles Ro-
kosz officiating. Interment will
be in Holy Rosary Cemetery, Du-
ryea. Friends may call Tuesday
from6 to 8 p.m. at the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Family and
friends are asked to go directly to
the church the morning of the fu-
neral.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
contributions may be made to
Holy Rosary School, Duryea.
June Ann
Chropowicki
February 4, 2012
E
dward S. Trudnak, age 82, of
Sunken Heights, Bloomsburg,
died on Saturday morning, Febru-
ary 4, 2012, at his home surrounded
by his family under the care of Co-
lumbia Montour Home Hospice.
Edward was born on Sunday,
June 9, 1929, in Chicago, Illinois, a
son of the late William and Anna
(Tomaszkiewiz) Trudnak.
He was preceded in death by a
brother, Stephen Trudnak.
Surviving are his beloved wife of
over 13 years, Janet (Edwards)
Bachinger, having been married on
May 1, 1999; also surviving are a
daughter, Ann Trudnak; a son, Mi-
chael Trudnak; a step-son, John
Bachinger; two step-daughters,
Jean Green and Janice Woodmen-
cey; several grandchildren; as well
as a sister, Joan Albertson, and two
brothers, William and Raymond
Trudnak.
A time of visitation for family
and friends will be held on Wednes-
day, February 8, from 10 a.m. until
the time of service at the St. Colum-
bia Catholic Church, Third and Iron
streets, Bloomsburg.
AMass of ChristianBurial will be
held on Wednesday, February 8, at
11a.m. at the St. Columbia Catholic
Church, with Monsignor Robert E.
Lawrence, as celebrant. Private gra-
veside services will be heldat a later
date at the convenience of the fam-
ily.
The Trudnak family is being as-
sisted by the Allen Funeral Home,
Inc., 745 Market at Eighth Street,
Bloomsburg.
Memorial contributions in Ed-
wards name are suggested to Co-
lumbia Montour Home Hospice,
410 Glenn Ave., Suite 200, Blooms-
burg, PA17815. For those unable to
personally attend, online condo-
lences are available at Allen-Funer-
alHome.com.
Edward S. Trudnak
February 4, 2012
CHICAGO Texting while
driving, speeding and back-
seat hanky-panky arent all
that parents need to worry
about when their kids are in
cars: Add secondhand smoke
to the list.
In the first national estimate
of its kind, a report from gov-
ernment researchers says
more than 1 in 5 high school
students and middle schoolers
ride in cars while others are
smoking.
This kind of secondhand
smoke exposure has been link-
ed with breathing problems
and allergy symptoms, and
more restrictions are needed
to prevent it, the report says.
With widespread crack-
downs on smoking in public,
private places including
homes and cars are where peo-
ple encounter secondhand
smoke these days.
Anti-smoking advocates
have zeroed in on cars because
of research showing theyre
potentially more dangerous
than smoke-filled bars and
other less confined areas.
The research, from the fed-
eral Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention, was re-
leased online Monday in Pedi-
atrics.
The study is based on na-
tional surveys done at public
and private high schools and
middle schools.
Students were asked how of-
ten they rode in cars while
someone was smoking within
the past week.
The most common answer
was one or two days.
The smoker could mean oth-
er kids or parents; the study
didnt specify.
A CDC fact sheet suggests
even small amounts of second-
hand smoke can be risky.
There is no risk-free level
of exposure to secondhand
smoke, the CDC says.
Overall, 22 percent of teens
and pre-teens were exposed to
secondhand smoke in cars in
2009, the latest data available.
That figure declined gradu-
ally during the decade, from
40 percent in 2000, the study
found.
But still, the numbers of
kids still facing the risks is
certainly problematic, said
CDC researcher Brian King,
the studys lead author.
The car is the only source
of exposure for some of these
children, so if you can reduce
that exposure, its definitely
advantageous for health,
King said.
The CDC advises parents to
not allow smoking in their
homes and cars, and says
opening a car window will not
protect kids from cigarette
smoke inside.
Measures banning smoking
in cars when children are pre-
sent have been enacted in a
handful of states and proposed
in several others.
The study authors say simi-
lar bans should be adopted
elsewhere.
2nd-hand
smoke in
cars worry
for young
CDC warns of yet another
auto-related concern for
children.
By LINDSEY TANNER
AP Medical Writer
LOS ANGELES Mike de-
Gruy, an award-winning cinema-
tographer who spent three dec-
ades making documentary films
about the ocean, was killed in a
helicopter crashineasternAustra-
lia. He was 60.
His employer, National Geo-
graphic, said Sunday that deGruy
and Australian television writer-
producer AndrewWight died Sat-
urday.
Their helicopter crashed soon
after takeoff from an airstrip near
Nowra, 97 miles north of Sydney,
police said. Australias ABCNews
reported that Wight was piloting
the copter when it crashed.
DeGruy won multiple Emmy
and British Academy of Film and
Television Arts, or BAFTA,
awards for cinematography.
Anaccomplisheddiver andsub-
mersible pilot, the Santa Barbara
resident was the director of un-
dersea photography for James
Camerons 2005 documentary
Last Mysteries of the Titanic.
Mike and Andrew were like
family to me, Cameron said in
a joint statement with National
Geographic. They were my
deep-sea brothers and both
were true explorers who did ex-
traordinary things and went
places no human being has
been.
After spending three years at
the University of Hawaii in a
Marine Biology Ph.D. program,
DeGruy moved to the Marshall
Islands, according to his web-
site. He spent three years there,
working as the manager of the
Mid-Pacific Marine Lab, before
transitioning to filmmaking.
Undersea documentarian
dies in helicopter crash
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 7A
N E W S
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GOLD BEACH, Ore. Three
mushroompickers lost six nights
in the rugged forest of southwest
Oregonusedtheir deadcellphone
andasheathknifetoflashasignal
at the helicopter pilot who found
them.
Dan Conne said Sunday from
his hospital bed in Gold Beach
that he andhis wife andsonspent
thenightshuddledinahollowlog
with nothing to eat, and consid-
ered sacrificing their dog Jesse
for food before they were found.
A volunteer helicopter pilot
looking outside the search area
Saturday spotted Dan and Belin-
da Conne, both47, along with25-
year-oldsonMichael, onthe edge
of a deep ravine in tall timber.
They were several miles outside
the community of Gold Beach,
roughly 330 miles south-south-
west of Portland.
The wife had the Blackberry
and I had the knife, Dan Conne
toldTheAssociatedPress. I kept
flashing. The wife said, Youre
blinding them. But I wanted to
make sure they seen us. I wasnt
taking no chance.
He said the three had given up
hope and thought they were go-
ing to die when rescuers came.
None of us thought we were
coming out of there, he said.
Until their rescue, the cold and
hungry family hadbeenunable to
signal search helicopters flying
lowand slowoverhead.
The three were airlifted to a
Gold Beach hospital, where Cur-
ry County Sheriff John Bishop
spoke withthemat anemergency
room. He said the Connes told
him they could see search heli-
copters just a few hundred feet
above them while they were lost
but had nothing to signal them
with through the thick, coastal
forest vegetation.
Bishop said Daniel Conne suf-
fered a back injury, Belinda
Conne had hypothermia, and
their son had a sprained foot and
minor frostbite. All three also
were dehydrated and hungry.
They just got turned around,
Bishop said. They sought some
shelter ina hollowed-out tree and
basically they stayed in the same
place. But it was heavyvegetation
where they were.
Bishop said the three were re-
markably in pretty good shape,
given the amount of time they
spent outside. He said they likely
could have survived for two or
three more days in the area,
where fresh water is plentiful but
food is scarce. The weather was
mostly clear, with temperatures
in the 40s and 50s.
Bishop said the family was
spotted by Jackson County Com-
missioner JohnRaschor, whowas
searchingfor theminhis ownhel-
icopter with Curry County Sher-
iffs Lt. John Ward.
Raschor is the same pilot who
found a San Francisco family lost
in a snowstorm in 2006 just 35
miles from where he found the
Connes. In 2006, Raschor flew
Kati Kim and her two young
daughters to safety after spotting
them near their car. James Kim
died of hypothermia trying to
hike out for help.
When dawn broke Saturday,
Bishopsaidsearchers enteredthe
woods without much hope.
We were sort of getting ready
to go into body-recovery mode,
he said.
The ordeal began last Sunday
when the three went out looking
for hedgehog mushrooms, an or-
ange-topped fungus prized by
mushroom hunters for its sweet
and nutty flavor. The three had
been living in a trailer at a camp-
site after leaving Oklahoma for
Oregon last summer.
Dusk fell during the familys
hunt. They started to return to
their Jeep but couldnt agree on
directions.
Prettyquickly, theyfoundthey
were lost, Bishop said.
The family found a forest road
next to a river bank and huddled
together withtheir dog, a pit bull-
terrier mix.
Searchparties were dispatched
Tuesday, when their campsite
manager realized the Connes
hadnt returned.
Lost mushroom pickers signaled with knife
Dan and Belinda Conne along
with adult son Michael were
spotted by a helicopter.
By JEFF BARNARD
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Daniel and Belinda Conne and their adult son were found injured
but alive Saturday after they got lost picking mushrooms.
ALLENTOWN Looking at
the barrenblockat13thandAllen
streets in Allentown, where at
this time last year a modest
stretch of row homes stood in a
quiet working-class neighbor-
hood, its difficult to imagine that
anything good could have come
from the massive natural gas ex-
plosion there on Feb. 9, 2011.
But interviews with the local
gas company, state and federal
regulators, a key state legislator
and gas pipeline watchdogs and
advocates suggest that the blast,
which took five lives, became the
tipping point in a nationwide dis-
cussionabout improvingpipeline
safety. Since the Allentown ex-
plosion, increased efforts to ad-
dress public safety promise to
speed up, if not improve upon,
the safety of the network of local,
intrastate and interstate gas lines
beneath the ground.
For example:
After the explosion, UGI
Utilities more than doubled its
spending on replacing the aging,
leaky cast-ironpipeline that is im-
plicatedintheexplosion, andwill
continue to do so this year.
A bill allowing gas compa-
nies to assess a surcharge to be
devoted solely to replacing aged
pipes a perennial non-starter
in Harrisburg has passed the
state Senate and now is before
the House of Representatives.
State regulators also tightened
up requirements to test for gas
leaks and required more detailed
plans for replacing old pipelines.
Perhaps most amazing of all,
a bill modestly upgradingthe fed-
eral governments regulatory
power over its part of the nations
pipeline system passed easily
through an otherwise bitterly di-
vided Congress late last year and
was signed into law by President
Barack Obama in January.
The past year or so has seen a
lot more interest in overall pipe-
line safety, said Carl Weimer of
the watchdog group Pipeline
Safety Trust.
Unfortunately, he said, it took
three disasters to jump-start it:
the July 2010 rupture of a 30-inch
line that spilled 819,000 gallons
of oil into a tributary of the Kala-
mazoo River in Michigan; the
September 2010 gas leak and ex-
plosion in San Bruno, Calif., that
killed eight people and destroyed
38 homes; and the Allentown
leakandblast linkedtoacast-iron
pipe dating to 1928.
The string of accidents culmi-
nating in the Allentown tragedy
also shook federal regulators and
the national gas industry and put
a focus on safety.
Gas blast
may be
catalyst
for safety
Allentown explosion that left
5 dead spurs discussion of
pipeline hazards.
By SCOTT KRAUS
and TIMDARRAGH
The (Allentown) Morning Call
C M Y K
PAGE 8A MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
7
3
5
3
9
9
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
THE H & K GROUP
HEAVY TRUCK SHOP
MECHANIC
Evening
or Night Shift.
CDL license -
experienced with
own tools.
Positions
available at the
following
locations:
Lehigh Valley Site
Contractors
Easton, PA
Locust Ridge Site
Contractors
Pocono Lake, PA
Pikes Creek Site
Contractors-
Wyalusing, PA
FULL TIME
ROAD MECHANIC
Mobile Mechanic
to repair equip-
ment at various
locations.
CDL- B, Must
have own tools.
CAT experience
preferred.
Positions
available at the
following
locations:
Lehigh Valley Site
Contractors -
Easton, PA
Hazleton Site
Contractors
Hazleton, PA
Pikes Creek Site
Contractors
Hunlock Creek, PA
Materials Division
based in
Easton, PA
Pre-employment
drug testing.
Fax resume to:
610-222-4955
Email resume to
hr@hkgroup.
com or call
610-222-3578
for details
(EOE)
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
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search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
548 Medical/Health
CHILDRENS
SERVICE CENTER OF
WYOMING VALLEY, INC
Local leader in
providing a full
continuum of
behavioral health
care to children/
adolescents and
their families has
the following
position avail-
able:
Psychologist
Full Time & Part Time
One year of post-
doctoral experience
in the field of psy-
chology; and a doc-
toral degree in the
field of psychology
or educational psy-
chology, including a
one-year internship
or one year of
equivalent super-
vised experience.
Two years of pre-
doctoral experience
at a level compara-
ble to the Psycho-
logical Services may
be substituted for
the required year of
post-doctoral expe-
rience. Member-
ship in appropriate
national, state and
local psychological
associations. Licen-
sure by the State of
Pennsylvania is
desirable.
A full job descrip-
tion can be
accessed on our
website at
www.cscwv.org
CSC is dedicated to
creating a thera-
peutic living and
learning environ-
ment for all clients
and team members.
Through implemen-
tation of the innova-
tive Sanctuary
Model of trauma
informed care, Chil-
drens Service Cen-
ter strives to pro-
vide safe, demo-
cratic environments
that are emotionally
intelligent and
socially responsible
for all members of
our community.
More information on
the Sanctuary
Model can be
accessed at www.
sanctuaryweb.com
Please send rsum
and letter of interest
to:
Childrens
Service Center of
Wyoming Valley,
Inc.; Attn: HR
Generalist
335 S. Franklin
Street Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702
Phone:
(570) 825-6425
Fax:
(570) 301-0929
Email:
hr@e-csc.org
Drug Free Work
Place- EEO -
www.cscwv.org
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
FRONT VIEW
REAR VIEW
BEAUTIFUL BRICK,
SLATE, MARBLE & WOOD
HOUSE. MUST BE SEEN
TO BE APPRECIATED.
2 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. Great kit-
chen with new
stainless steel app-
liances & custom
cabinets with center
island. Dining room
with stone fireplace
& marble floor.
Hardwood floors in
living room, which
also has stone walls
& eight arched win-
dows. Hand carved
wooden staircase
leads to Master
Bedroom Suite with
large closet & large
second bedroom &
bath. Middle level
with custom pool
room. Lower level
has 1/2 bath, bar &
built in stone & glass
hutches. Two new
self-feed rice coal
stoves keep heating
bills to less than
$400 a year! New
roof with lifetime
guarantee, privacy
fence, and 12
above ground pool
with composite
deck. New 2 story,
1 car garage, & a
long driveway for
plenty of parking.
$199,000, firm.
Showings will be
held weekends for
prequalified buyers
only, please.
Call 570-233-7235
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
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street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
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sellers know!
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953Houses for Rent
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
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single family home
including refrigera-
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washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
Well run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
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What
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primary source
for shopping
information.
HARRISBURG -- Anyone who
spreads manure on fields or has a
pasture, barnyard or feedlot must
now have a manure management
plan, evenif hehasnoanimalsand
imports manure only for his
fields, a state Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection official said
Friday.
This would even apply to an in-
dividual who has only one horse,
DEP spokeswoman Amanda
Whitman said.
That horse, no doubt, grazes
on a pasture and collected ma-
nure from the horse may be ap-
plied to nearby fields, Whitman
said. Also, the horse most likely
utilizes a loafing area or an exer-
cise lot that has minimal or no
vegetation. These areas are con-
sidered animal concentration ar-
eas, which need to be properly
managed.
And its not only working farms
about which Whitman is talking.
Sites raising farm animals for
recreation would fall under this
obligationas they needto demon-
strate proper management of
these animals. This would in-
clude that the manure and any
animal concentration areas asso-
ciated with those animals are be-
ing managed consistent with
state approved guidelines so that
local or regional water resources
are protected.
TheDEPwill beresponsiblefor
making sure there is compliance.
As for staffing, DEP continues
to evaluate its current work force
to determine how best to meet
this responsibility.
Manure management plans de-
veloped under this obligation are
not required to be submitted for
reviewor approval, Whitmancon-
tinued. So, she said, there is
not a need to staff the depart-
ment, to the extent needed to re-
view all developed manure man-
agement plans.
Plans are required to be devel-
oped and used by the farmer in
the management of the manure
used or generated on site. These
plans are to be made available to
DEP staff or other delegated enti-
ties that may visit the site to as-
sess compliance or in response to
a complaint. Whitman said.
The latest revision of DEP ma-
nure management requirements
address criteria that have always
been a part of proper manure
management.
Manure management rules expand
Regulations apply even to
those who do not have farm
animals, state says.
By RICK DANDES
The Sunbury Daily Item
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 9A
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
I will barnstorm American living
rooms.
Roseanne Barr
The actress-comedian announced this month that
she will seek the Green Partys presidential
nomination, using her celebrity status to advocate
for the needs of average Americans. Barrs hit TV sitcom Roseanne
aired from1988 to 1997.
WHEN THE Gallery of
Sound recently announced
that it would be closing its
store at the Gateway Shop-
ping Center in Edwardsville,
I was both saddened and
reflective.
Saddened because Ive come to know both
Joe Nardone Sr. and Joe Nardone Jr. pretty
well over the years and know how dedicated
they are to the record business. Id written
quite a few articles about them, and Id
worked with them on a few projects. In this
age of generic superstores and digital down-
loading, I was pulling for them to weather
the iTunes and Walmart storm and survive.
Fortunately, they still have a few more
stores in the Gallery of Sound chain, which I
hope are around for a long, long time.
Other Gallery of Sound stores had closed
in recent years, including locations in Pitt-
ston and Dallas. But the closing of the Ed-
wardsville store hit me the hardest. For as
long as I can remember, it was my spot to
buy records. And even though it had moved
within the shopping center a few times, I still
felt as if I grew up there. And that prompted
my reflection.
I thought of the time, in the fall of 1982, I
went in to buy the new KISS album. It was
$8.95, and I can still recall pushing my last
nickel across the counter to pay for it. I re-
member the clerk and what she looked like.
Its hard to believe it was nearly 30 years ago.
The store also was a place of discovery. It
was a place where you could easily learn
more about your favorite artists simply by
browsing. In the early 80s, as a young teen-
ager, I was just discovering The Who, The
Rolling Stones and Bruce Springsteen, and I
was delighted to learn that each had a great
catalog of material. Id leaf through their
albums, taking each one out of the bin to
read the song titles and examine the artwork.
Id check to see what year they were first
released, and eventually, I started to buy
them all. I built a record collection. Later it
was cassettes, then CDs. The format didnt
matter. The fact was I learned a lot about
music in that store.
And I know Im not alone. Thousands of
kids who grew up on the West Side did the
same. We got to know most of the clerks by
name, and we always were welcomed. Some-
times, theyd be playing something so good
when you went into the store, youd end up
buying it.
When my friends and I were about 16, we
would make an entire afternoon out of vis-
iting the record store. Wed save up our mon-
ey until we had about $25. Then wed walk to
the shopping center, have lunch at Antonios
Pizza and go buy two or three albums. This
was a big deal. Wed take our time choosing
between bands such as The Police and Van
Halen. For me, an old Who album was al-
most always on the agenda. I really didnt
discover the band until its 1982 Farewell
Tour, but thanks to the Gallery of Sound, I
learned all about it pretty fast.
Of course, there was more than music at
the store. Rock posters, pins, T-shirts, videos
it had it all. There was an image to music
a vibe, if you will that doesnt exist today.
These things also added to the simple fun of
a record store, and the Gallery Of Sound
was indeed very well-named. In the 90s, the
midnight sale became popular for major
releases, and it was not uncommon to see a
long line of music fans outside the store,
often talking to each other about their favor-
ite artists. You must admit, theres something
pretty cool about that.
My last visit to the Edwardsville Gallery of
Sound came just before Christmas. I wanted
to add to my collection of classic holiday
music and was looking for a few CDs by
Frank Sinatra and Nat King Cole. Of course,
the store had both albums for which I was
looking. If I had known it would be my last
time there, perhaps I would have perused the
aisles a bit longer.
Dont get me wrong. Ive downloaded
songs from iTunes and I love my iPod. But I
dont understand why anyone would rather
download a CD instead of just buying it. The
cost is about the same, and its easy enough
to take the music from the CD and add it to
your iPod, so why not own the actual prod-
uct, complete with artwork and liner notes?
Why not have the actual recording in case
your hard drive crashes? Should I ever lose
my iPod or crash my hard drive, my music
collection will remain intact. And thats be-
cause its mostly on CD.
Theres a new Springsteen album coming
out next month. And though I plan to upload
it to my iPod, the first thing Ill need to do is
go buy it. Thankfully, right around the corner
from my office on Wilkes-Barres Public
Square, theres still a Gallery of Sound.
Gallery of Sound provides lifetime of musical memories
Alan K. Stout covered rock and pop music for The
Times Leader and The Weekender from1992-2011,
still occasionally writes about music and hosts a
weekly radio show on 102.3-FM, The Mountain.
Reach him at alankstout@verizon.net.
COMMENTARY
A L A N K . S T O U T
E
UROPEAN UNION
leaders failed last
month to move for-
ward on their most ur-
gent task: increasing the bai-
lout fund to protect Europes
ailing economies from default-
ing on their bonds.
Instead, leaders of 25 of 27
European countries agreed to
sign a new fiscal compact that
will legally restrict them from
fighting recessions with robust
fiscal stimulus. Most econo-
mists outside the eurozone
consider this approach a dan-
gerous one. Those countries
account for more than 20 per-
cent of the worlds economy.
Condemning them to longer
anddeeper recessions will drag
down economies elsewhere
that depend on trade, from the
United States to China.
Without a bigger bailout
fund, investors will likely keep
betting against weakened
economies such as Italy and
Spain, pushing up their inter-
est costs and, consequently,
adding to their deficits. Never-
theless, Europes leaders de-
ferred action on more money
until March. Market specula-
tors might not agree to wait.
The world has become ac-
customed to failed European
summit meetings. What is par-
ticularly disheartening about
this one is that some European
leaders seem to believe they
succeeded. Considering the
time frame, this was a real mas-
terpiece, Chancellor Angela
Merkel of Germany said of the
new fiscal pact.
Poor German leadership in
this crisis has exacted an in-
creasing economic and social
price from Greece, Ireland,
Portugal, Spain, Italy, Belgium
andFrance. The longer Germa-
ny insists on putting fiscal aus-
terity ahead of growth, the
more likely it becomes that
Germany, too, will suffer eco-
nomic pain.
International Herald Tribune
Paris
WORLD OPINION
Refusal of bigger bailout
adds to unease in Europe
N
EW FORECASTS
about Japans popula-
tion for the period un-
til 2060, released on
Jan. 30 by the National Institute
of Population and Social Securi-
ty Research, paint a gloomy pic-
ture of the nations demographic
future.
The speed at which the Japa-
nese population will shrink in
the coming decades is simply
stunning. The number of Japa-
nese will decrease by 41.32 mil-
lion in the next half century to
about two-thirds of the current
figure, accordingtotheforecasts.
Can we change the predicted
demographic future of our coun-
try?
If the fertility rate gradually
rises until it stabilizes at 2.07 in
2030 onward, the percentage of
senior citizens will peak in the
2040s in the 30 to 35 percent
range, and then fall before stabi-
lizing around the 25 percent
rangeover thelongterm, accord-
ing to an estimate by Shigesato
Takahashi, deputy director-gen-
eral of the institute.
That is a tough target to
achieve. But growth of the child
populationwouldcertainlystabi-
lize the nations demographic
structure.
There is a huge difference in
vitality between a society where
one in every 2.5 members is an
elderly citizen and a society
where the ratio is one in every
four.
The Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo
A population plummet
T
HE GOAL OF meet-
ing a minimum quota
for women at the an-
nual meeting of the
World Economic Forum in Da-
vos, Switzerland, has not been
crowned with success.
Only 17 percent of those
gathered at the Swiss Alp re-
sort were women. No matter
how good of a face organizers
have tried to put on this years
level of female participation,
the fact remains that the mod-
est 20-percent minimum
wasnt reached.
Davos organizers cannot be
blamed. Klaus Schwab, foun-
der andchairmanof the forum,
said last year: A world where
women make up less than 20
percent of the global decision-
makers is a world that is mis-
sing a huge opportunity for
growth and ignoring an un-
tapped reservoir of potential.
Global statistics buttress
Schwabs case that the reser-
voir is untapped. In 2011, only
3.6 percent of CEOs at Fortune
500 companies were women.
Women make up more than
half of the worlds population,
but own less than 1 percent of
the worlds wealth. The men at
Davos missedanimportant op-
portunity to start correcting a
terrible imbalance.
The Gazette, Montreal
Few females at forum
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
U.S. Postal Service gets
users stamp of approval
I
depend on the postal service. Recently,
Ive had two occasions to use the U.S.
Postal Service (other than for paying
bills, etc.)
I sent an item (per letter) and photos
(per padded package). Both were mailed at
Plains Townships post office on different
days. Each went to Scranton to be can-
celled. The letter went to Shickshinny and
the photo package to Wilkes-Barre. Each
was delivered the next day.
I wont complain about 44 cents for a
letter, or 88 cents for padded package. I
appreciate the USPS.
A. Royer
Wilkes-Barre
Writer: Morals missing
from U.S. capitalism
I
n response to the letters to the editor by
Alan Lispi (Jan. 23) and Robert Orbin
(Jan. 21) regarding the Keystone XL
Pipeline, I have to ask if they previously
had read the article published in The
Times Leader concerning Americas im-
ports/exports of oil.
This article indicated the United States
imports roughly 800 million barrels of oil
but exports roughly 750 million barrels. If
this statistic is true, have they or others
who approve of this pipeline considered
what this really means?
In my mind, it means that if oil compa-
nies would consider reducing their profits,
from say roughly $36 billion a year for the
betterment of the American people, they
would not export Americas oil to other
countries. This, in turn, would decrease
Americas need for importing oil and
would increase its energy independence.
However, under the present rules of
capitalism without morals, it is OK to
put the American people under stressful
conditions so that as much money as pos-
sible can be made.
Stanley Halas
Hanover Township
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the
writers name, address and daytime
phone number for verification. Letters
should be no more than 250 words. We
reserve the right to edit and limit writers
to one published letter every 30 days.
Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
Fax: 570-829-5537
Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
PAGE 10A MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
maker.
Diane Cowman of Courtdale
proudly showed off her Patriots
colors
She said she is a pub regular
andhas beena Patriots fansince
she was 8, whenher father made
her pick a team.
I liked their red-white-and-
blue uniforms, she said.
Her prediction of the Patriots
winning by a score of 42-21drew
jeers from Matt Narvid and oth-
ers at her table.
Narvid and his wife, Barb, of
Kingston, wore black-and-white
striped referees tops mainly be-
cause their team, the Green Bay
Packers, wasnt playing Sunday.
In the playoffs, the Giants beat
the Packers, who were last
years Super Bowl champs.
We decided were going to
root for the referees, said Barb
Narvid.
Begrudgingly the couple was
pulling for a Giants win.
He doesnt like (Tom) Bra-
dy, she said of her husbands
feelings for thePatriots quarter-
back.
PARTY
Continued from Page 3A
tax natural gas production, and
Democrats have not been part of
the negotiations after trying un-
successfully for three years to
win enough Republican votes to
impose a severance tax on the in-
dustry. Because Corbett opposes
a tax on the industry, Republi-
cans, who control the Legisla-
ture, have instead pursued an
impact fee that he views as be-
ing fundamentally different than
a tax. But House and Senate Re-
publicans have clashed over the
size of the fee, while Democrats
and environmental groups view
their proposals as too low and
members of the industry have
been split over paying any levy.
The 15-year impact fee would
rise and fall with the price of nat-
ural gas and inflation. Currently,
the price of natural gas is about
$2.30 per million British thermal
units a measurement used at
major pipeline hubs. If the price
is between $3 and $5, the total
per-well fee would be $310,000
over 15 years, not counting infla-
tion, according to a summary dis-
tributed to senators.
At the current price of gas, the
15-year fee total would be
$240,000 per well, not counting
inflation, according to a sum-
mary distributed to House Dem-
ocrats. The maximum per-well
fee a company would pay is
$355,000, if gas stays above $6,
while the minimum would be
$190,000, if gas stays below
$2.25, again not including infla-
tion.
But the fee at any price would
be well below the average life-
time per-well tax paid in other
natural gas states, including
$993,700 in West Virginia,
$878,500 in Texas and $555,700
in Arkansas, according to the
Harrisburg-based Pennsylvania
Budget and Policy Center, a liber-
al think tank.
Counties that host the drilling
wouldhave the optionof whether
to impose the fee a key ele-
ment sought by Corbett and dis-
liked by senators but a critical
mass of municipalities would
have 60 days to override a coun-
tys refusal. Counties and munici-
palities that refuse the fee would
not get a share of the money.
Money fromthe impact fee and
state forest drilling royalties
would be distributed to a wide
range of purposes, including
bridge repairs, open space, water
and sewer plant improvements,
statewide environmental clea-
nup programs and purchases of
natural-gas fleet vehicles. Local
governments that are home to
drilling would get 60 percent of
the money from an impact fee,
with 40 percent going to state
programs or agencies, according
to the summaries, even though
Corbett had opposed using im-
pact fee money for state pro-
grams.
The bill would increase the re-
quired distance between drilling
and public water sources such as
reservoirs, but not to the extent
sought by Democrats and envi-
ronmental groups, and it would
require the state to develop regu-
lations for transporting drilling
wastewater andenforce qualifica-
tions of treatment plant oper-
ators.
The legislation also would ad-
dress a top priority of the natural
gas industry and set limits to pre-
vent municipal officials from im-
posing zoning ordinances that ef-
fectively prevent drilling there. A
drilling operator could ask state
utility regulators toreviewa local
ordinance to determine whether
it allows for the reasonable de-
velopment of oil and gas. If the
Public Utility Commission or a
state court decides that a local or-
dinance fails, the municipality
would be unable to receive im-
pact-feemoneyuntil it changes it,
according to the summaries.
Pennsylvania lawmakers have
talked about whether to tax the
natural gas industry since it ar-
rived in earnest in 2008 to tap in-
to the Marcellus Shale natural
gas formation, considered the na-
tions largest-known natural gas
reservoir. The drilling has drawn
opponents whofear it is polluting
the water supply.
DRILL
Continued from Page 1A
ready, said Boudreaux.
We took the sets apart and re-
paintedandremodeledthem, he
said, adding that a new tile floor
was also installed. The walls in
the hall leading to the Caraway
Street set were painted to look
like a garden, complete with a
white picket fence.
Melba Boudreaux, Rons wife,
also 70, is the director of the pro-
gram.
Its copyrighted, so we had to
buy the rights, she said. The
church bought four years of
scripts and plans to hold a per-
formance based on a different
moral lesson every Sunday eve-
ning. We just teach the basics,
like howto love one another.
Five-year-old David Kottler of
Harveys Lakesaidthebest part of
the programwas learning howto
singthesongJesus Loves Me in
sign language. I sing it with my
grandma.
Ernie Pender, 10, of Harveys
Lake said he has participated in
the program since he was 5, but
nowthathesabigkid, heworksas
a stage manager andhelpedbuild
pieces of the set.
Its not only about God, but
about life lessons, he said.
One of the lessons Ernie says
stuckwithhimistobenicetopeo-
ple evenif theyre not nice to you.
I woundupmakingsomefriends
that way, he said.
PUPPETS
Continued from Page 3A
Sands saidshe has beenliving
a nightmare for nearly 10 years
after Fassett, who she says was
her best friend, went missing in
early May 2002. She learned
from media reports on June 5,
2003, that her sisters body had
beenfoundburiedwithKerkow-
skis in a shallow hole outside
the Kingston Township home
on Mount Olivet Road, where
Selenski lived.
Selenskis trial has been
moved fromApril 23 to Sept. 10.
Sands laughed when she was
remindedthat at apre-trial hear-
ing held on Feb. 26, 2007, Selen-
ski said he was sick of delays.
I just want to go to trial, he
said after that hearing almost
five years ago.
Selenskis mindset was differ-
ent on Friday, when he told
countyJudge FredPierantoni III
that he agreed with his newly
appointed attorneys, Shelley L.
Centini and Edward J. Rymsza,
in seeking a delay. Attorney Da-
vid V. Lampman has represent-
ed Selenski for nearly two years.
Selenskis lawyers asked for
the postponement to better pre-
pare for trial in having to review
20,000 pages of evidence, wit-
ness statements and expert re-
ports.
Its just impossiblefor us hav-
ing stepped into this in the last
few weeks to adequately pre-
pare a zealous defense, Centini
said Friday.
Centini asked that the trial be
held in 2013, but Pierantoni
scheduled the proceedings for
September.
Its overwhelming with all
these delays and stuff, and the
lawyers are up there talking to
the judge, Sands said after Fri-
days hearing. He plays the sys-
tem. Heplayedit beforetheelec-
tion when he wanted to be his
own attorney, then all of a sud-
den, when Jackie (former Dis-
trict Attorney Jacqueline Musto
Carroll) lost, and Stefanie (new-
ly elected District Attorney Ste-
fanie Salavantis) won, he want-
ed legal representation.
Selenski was successful in
getting rid of his previous attor-
ney, John Pike, when he wanted
to represent himself. A judge
granted Selen-
skis request per-
mitting Pike to
leave and delay-
ing the trial to
November.
As quickly as
Selenski decided
he wanted to rep-
resent himself, he
changed his
mind, demand-
ingdefenselawyers. Centini and
Rymsza were appointed earlier
this year.
Sands said it was painful to
wait until the court decided
what to do about Selenski at the
same time learning Musto Car-
roll lost her bid for a second
term as district attorney in the
November general election.
I was devastated and mad,
Sands saidabout the electionre-
sults. I wanted her to win so
badly because I knew Hugo hat-
ed her. She made a promise to
me because I knew there were
open judge seats and that she
was not going to run for judge
because she would not give (Se-
lenski) the satisfaction. Thats
why she ran for district attorney
again. That is why this is so
heartbreaking for me that she
lost, because I wanted her to
win so badly.
Despite the many legal delays
and the election that resulted in
a new district attorney, Sands
saidshe remains positive for her
sister andconfident that most of
the Selenski prosecution team
has remained intact.
Salavantis has kept assistant
district attorneys Jarrett Feren-
tinoandMichael Melnickonthe
Selenski case, and assigned
First Assistant District Attorney
Sam Sanguedolce to the team.
Sanguedolce prosecuted Se-
lenski in another homicide case
in which he was acquitted by a
Luzerne County jury in the kill-
ings of two men.
Sands said she was impressed
by Pierantoni, who was elected
as a judge in the November elec-
tionandis the fifthjudge tohave
the Selenski case since May
2006.
He seems like he wants to do
this, doit fairly anddoit quickly.
That was my impression of him.
Hes not going to take no bull, so
to speak, Sands said.
SANDS
Continued from Page 1A
To see video
of Lisa
Sands
interview,
visit
www.times
leader.com.
Edward Lewis, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7196.
Evenso, the district exceededthe
statelimit ontaxincreases, is ask-
ing for an exception to cover a
sharphike inpensionfundcontri-
butions (set by a state agency)
and still is looking at nearly $1.7
million that has to be trimmed by
the end of June, when final bud-
gets must be passed.
We flat-lined our budget, Ha-
nover Area Business Manager
Tom Cipriano said of plans that
call for little or no tax increase
and a slight drop in spending,
fromabout $24.9 million to $24.8
million. That includes the as-
sumption that nothing is being
decreased in the state budget. If
Corbett does makeanother round
of cuts, the district could see a
$300,000 shortfall in the current
numbers grow.
Greater Nanticoke Area Super-
intendent Tony Perrone was
more blunt. The school board
passeda resolutionvowing not to
raise taxes above the limit, and
Perrone said that is doable as
long as Corbett makes no more
cuts.
But now were hearing anoth-
er billion is going to be cut, Per-
rone said. We vote oneverything
and we dont know what the hell
were getting. We have toguess. If
hes running the state like that
were all in trouble.
Budgeting blind
School districts have long had
tocraft balancedbudgets without
knowing how much to expect
from the state local and state
budgets must be done by June 30,
but the legislature rarely gets the
job done until the last minute.
During Gov. Ed Rendells eight-
year tenure preceding Corbett,
state budgets were routinely late.
But the law known as Act 1,
which provides money fromgam-
bling to reduce homeowner
school district property taxes,
radically changed the process,
setting an annual tax increase
limit that canvaryyear toyear. To
exceed the limit, districts must
either get voter approval via a ref-
erendumor seek exceptions from
the state for limitedreasons, such
as a steep hike in special educa-
tion or pension costs.
As a result, boards must either
pass a resolution promising to
stay within the state limit or pre-
pare a preliminary budget in the
first few weeks of the year, to al-
low time to set up a referendum
or to seek the state exceptions.
AndwhileCorbett kept a prom-
ise barely -- last year to sign a
state budget by June 30, he did
not release his proposal this year
in time for districts to use it in
making decisions. And once re-
leased, the proposal must go
through the legislative sausage
grinder.
Six of Luzerne Countys 11 dis-
tricts voted to stay within the tax
limit: Crestwood, Dallas, Greater
Nanticoke Area, Hanover Area,
Pittston Area and Wilkes-Barre
Area. This allowed them to put
off preparing and releasing a pre-
liminary budget. The six have tax
limits ranging from2.1percent to
2.5 percent of last years rate.
Cipriano said Hanover Area
made major cost-cutting moves
last year to erase a $3.5 million
shortfall created in large part by
Corbetts cuts. The district closed
a school, offered an early-retire-
ment package that cut teacher
staffing by 19 and replaced only
one, persuaded administrators
andteachers totakeawagefreeze
and cut sports in grades seven
and eight, though students can
participate in grade nine pro-
grams.
Its a tough year for budgeting
even without more state cuts.
Districts are facing a big increase
in the amount they must pay into
teacher pension funds, a move
mandated by the agency that
runs thefund, inorder tomakeup
shortfalls from past low or nega-
tive returns on investments, and
health insurance premiums are
expected to rise by 10 to 11 per-
cent for districts coveredthrough
the Northeast Pennsylvania
School District Health Trust, a
consortiumof districts formed in
1999 to pool resources and lower
costs.
Pensions troublesome
Pension payments have been a
sore spot for a decade. The mon-
ey comes from employee contri-
butions set at a fairly steady av-
erage rate of about 7 percent of
salary and employer contribu-
tions, split betweenthestateand
district and varying based on the
rate of return on investments.
Districts had been paying near
nothing in the 1990s as the stock
markets boomed, but the crashes
at the turn of the Millenniumand
again in 2008 wreaked havoc on
the investment fund, with the
rate paid by districts expected to
hit 20 or even 30 percent in com-
ing years. The legislature eased
that spike by raising rates more
slowly over more years, but did
not increase the share the state
picks up.
In fact, most, if not all, districts
seeking exceptions are doing so
to cover the pensioncontribution
spike. Lake-Lehman wants an ex-
ceptionsoit canraise taxes above
the limit to collect $218,523 for
the pension fund, Wyoming Area
appliedfor apensionexceptionto
raise $208,654, while Wyoming
Valley West sought a pension ex-
ception to raise about $478,000.
Wyoming Valley West will also
close two schools this summer,
and Wyoming Area is contem-
plating closing one.
The five districts that present-
ed preliminary budgets propose
tax hikes from 3 percent to 4.6
percent their limits range from
2.2 to 2.4 percent. The biggest
proposed increase is in Hazleton
Area, the countys largest district,
thoughthe district has a tradition
of proposing a large increase in
the preliminary budget and whit-
tling it down dramatically before
the final budget is passed.
In the past there were more
ways to get anexceptionfromthe
state, and the process was a vir-
tual rubber stamp, with requests
rarely denied. Gov. Corbett
vowed to clamp down, and the
state reduced the number of ex-
ceptions from nine to three. This
is the first year the newapproach
is being implemented.
Corbett has insisted the state
doesnt have the money to an-
nually increase education fund-
ing, andhas signaleda preference
to increase the number of charter
schools public schools free of
many state restrictions and
vouchers that would let parents
use state money to send children
to a private school. Corbett con-
tends the competition would be
healthy for public schools.
Perrone said another round of
cuts Tuesday would be proof that
Corbett does not want toimprove
public education, but to disman-
tle it.
Public education is what
makes any country great, Per-
rone said. And what they are try-
ing to do is privatize it.
BUDGET
Continued from Page 1A
Sources: State Dept. of Education, local districts Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
No preliminary budget passed Preliminary budget passed
Pct. 2011-12
Current max. Max. Budget Tax Mills Budget Budget
Staying mills incr. mills (millions) incr. incr. (millions) Incr.
In tax limit
Crestwood 9.16 2.2% 9.3615 $32.5
Dallas 11.5624 2.1% 11.8052 $32.0
Grtr. Nant. Area 9.9295 2.5% 10.1777 $24.3
Hanover Area 16.48 2.4% 16.8755 $24.8
Pittston Area 13.1228 2.3% 13.4246 $40.8
WB Area 15.3684 2.4% 15.7372 $97.6
Over limit
Hazleton Area 9.0446 2.4% 9.2617 $117.0 4.6% 9.461 $126 8.0%
Lake-Lehman 8.8913 2.2% 9.0869 $26 4.4% 9.280 $27 4.9%
Northwest Area 9.1956 2.4% 9.4163 $17.4 3.0% 9.4746 $18 3.4%
Wyoming Area 13.0799 2.3% 13.3807 $28.9 4.0% 13.6024 $30 3.7%
Wyo. Valley West 13.5 2.4% 13.8240 $59.6 4.1% 14.060 $63 6.2%
PRELIMINARY SCHOOL DISTRICT BUDGETS
Six Luzerne County school boards voted to keep any tax increase at or belowtheir state
limits. The other ve approved preliminary budgets with increases above their limits and are
asking the state for exceptions to exceed the limits. A mill is a $1 tax for every $1,000 in
assessed property value.
Mark Guydish, a Times Leader staff
writer, can be reached at 829-7161.
March with peaceful protests
against Assads regime, sparking
a fierce crackdown by govern-
ment forces. Soldiers who defect-
edtojointhe uprisinglater began
to protect protesters from at-
tacks. In recent months, the rebel
soldiers, known as the Free Syr-
ian Army, have grown bolder, at-
tacking regime troops and trying
to establish control in pro-oppo-
sition areas. That has brought a
heavier government response.
More than 5,400 people have
been killed since March, accord-
ing to the U.N., and now regime
opponents fear that Assad will be
emboldened by the feeling he is
protected by his top ally Moscow
and unleash even greater vio-
lence to crush protesters. If the
opposition turns overtly to
armed resistance, the result
could be a dramatic increase in
bloodshed.
At least 30 civilians were killed
Sunday, including five children
and a woman who was hit by a
bullet while standing on her bal-
cony as troops fired on protesters
in a Damascus suburb, according
to the Britain-based Syrian Ob-
servatory for Human Rights, an
activist group.
Government forces firing mor-
tars andheavy machine guns also
battered the mountain town of
Zabadani, north of Damascus, a
significant opposition strong-
hold that fell under rebel control
late last month. Bombardment
the past two days has wounded
dozens and forced scores of fam-
ilies to flee, an activist in the
town said.
The situation is terrifying.
Makeshift hospitals are full, said
the activist, who only gave his
first name, Fares, for fear of gov-
ernment reprisal. He said the
townhas beenunder siege for the
past five days and there is a short-
age of food and heating fuel dur-
ing the cold winter.
The commander of the Free
Syrian Army told The Associated
Press that, after the vetoes at the
U.N., there is no other road ex-
cept military action to topple As-
sad.
We consider that Syria is oc-
cupied by a criminal gang and we
must liberate the country from
this gang, Col. Riad al-Asaad
said, speaking by telephone from
Turkey. This regime does not
understand the language of poli-
tics. It only understands the lan-
guage of force.
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton warned that
chances for a brutal civil war
would increase as Syrians under
attack from their government
move to defend themselves, un-
less international steps provide
another way.
Speaking to reporters in the
Bulgarian capital of Sofia, she
called the double veto at the U.N.
Security Council on Saturday a
travesty.
Faced with a neutered Securi-
ty Council, we have to redouble
our efforts outside of the United
Nations, she said, calling for
friends of democratic Syria to
unite support the Syrian peo-
ples right to have a better fu-
ture.
The call points to the forma-
tion of a formal group of like-
minded nations to coordinate as-
sistance to the Syrian opposition,
similar but not identical to the
Contact Group on Libya, which
oversaw international help for
opponents of the late deposed Li-
byan leader Moammar Gadhafi.
In the case of Libya, the group al-
so coordinated NATO military
operations to protect Libyan ci-
vilians, something that is not en-
visioned in Syria.
U.S. officials said an alliance
would work to further squeeze
the Assad regime by stepping up
sanctions against it, bringing dis-
parate Syrian opposition groups
inside andoutside the country to-
gether, providing humanitarian
relief for embattled Syrian com-
munities and working to prevent
an escalation of violence by mon-
itoring arms sales.
The main Syrian opposition
umbrella group, the Syrian Na-
tional Council, backed the idea.
Radwan Ziadeh, a prominent
figure in the SNC, wrote on his
Facebook page that friendly
countries should form an inter-
national coalition ... whose aim
will be to lead international
moves to support the revolution
through political and economic
aid.
SYRIA
Continued from Page 1A
PHILADELPHIA At least
two dozen Roman Catholic
schools targeted for closure by
the Archdiocese of Philadelphia
have appealed the decision to
shutter them, a newspaper re-
ported
The Philadelphia Inquirer
saidnearly half of the 49 schools
designated for closure have ap-
pealed the recommendations of
a blue-ribbon commission an-
nounced last month.
Following the announce-
ment, schools have held candle-
light vigils, organized rallies
and marches and presented en-
rollment data and financial pro-
jections to archdiocesan offi-
cials. They are to find out in the
middle of the month whether
their efforts have persuaded
Archbishop Charles Chaput to
keep them open.
The archdiocese in January
said it would close about a quar-
ter of its high schools and close
or combine nearly 30 percent of
its elementary schools.
Philly Catholic schools appeal closure
The Associated Press
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012
timesleader.com
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
INSIDE: FOUR PAGES OF SUPER BOWL COVERAGE, Pages 4B-7B
I
NDIANAPOLIS Take that, Bra-
dy. You too, Peyton.
Eli Manning is the big man in the
NFL after one-upping Tom Brady and
leading the New York Giants to a 21-17
victory over the New England Patriots
in Sundays Super Bowl in older
brother Peytons house, at that.
Just as Manning did four years ago
when the Giants ruined New Englands
perfect season, he guided them 88 yards
to the decisive touchdown, which the
Patriots didnt contest as Ahmad Brad-
shaw ran 6 yards with 57 seconds left.
Patriots coach Bill Belichick reasoned
the Giants would run the clock down
and kick a short field goal, so he gam-
bled by allowing the six points.
The gamble failed.
And now Manning not only has
stamped himself as the elite quarter-
back he claimed to be when the season
began in the same class as Brady
hes beaten the Patriots in two thrilling
Super Bowls. The Giants (13-7), who
stood 7-7 in mid-December, now own
PLAY IT AGAIN, ELI
Manning foils Pats with another comeback
AP PHOTOS
New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning celebrates after throwing a touchdown pass against the New England Patriots during Super Bowl XLVI Sunday in Indianapolis.
See ELI, Page 6B
New York Giants head coach Tom
Coughlin holds the Vince Lombardi
Trophy after Sundays Super Bowl.
New York Giants defensive end Justin
Tuck celebrates after sacking New
England quarterback Tom Brady.
By BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer
K
PAGE 2B MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S C O R E B O A R D
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
WIZARDS 3.5 Raptors
MAGIC PK Clippers
76ERS 4 Lakers
HAWKS 7.5 Suns
Bulls 9 NETS
KNICKS 4 Jazz
GRIZZLIES 1.5 Spurs
HORNETS [3] Kings
NUGGETS 7.5 Rockets.
BLAZERS PK Thunder
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
LOUISVILLE 4.5 Connecticut
Missouri 5.5 OKLAHOMA
Texas 2.5 TEXAS A&M
Marquette 9.5 DEPAUL
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
MAPLE LEAFS -$170/+$150 Oilers
Red Wings -$140/+$120 COYOTES
DUCKS -$130/+$110 Flames
AME RI C A S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Hornets - Kings circle is for numer-
ous New Orleans injuries.
Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/vegasvigorish.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC middleweight title fight on February 4 in San Anto-
nio, Texas, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. is -$380 vs. Marco Antonio Rubio at +$320; in
the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. is -$600 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$400.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Today
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Berwick at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m.
Dallas at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Northwest, 7:15 p.m.
Hanover Area at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Area, 7:15 p.m.
Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Coughlin, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Worthington Scranton at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 8
p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Altoona at Misericordia, 6 p.m.
PSU Scranton at PSU Wilkes-Barre, 6 p.m.
TUESDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
Crestwood at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer, at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
HS RIFLE
Team Tournament Semifinals, 4 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Dallas at Holy Redeemer, 4 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Wyoming Seminary, 4 p.m.
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West, 4 p.m.
Meyers at Lake-Lehman, 4:30 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Abington Heights, 4:30 p.m.
West Scranton at Scranton High, 4:30 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Valley View, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Honesdale at Lake-Lehman, 7 p.m.
MEN'S BASKETBALL
Lehigh-Carbon at Luzerne CCC, 8 p.m.
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Lehigh-Carbon at Luzerne CCC, 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
HS WRESTLING
(all matches 7 p.m.)
Hanover Area at Scranton Prep
Lackawanna Trail at Tunkhannock
Wyoming Valley West at West Scranton
Valley View at GAR
HS SWIMMING
Wyoming Area at Pittston Area, 4 p.m.
Dunmore at Meyers, 4:30 p.m.
Elk Lake at Scranton Prep, 7 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
PSU Hazleton at PSU York, 8 p.m.
Delaware Valley at Kings, 8 p.m.
Wilkes at FDU-Florham, 8 p.m.
Misericordia at Eastern, 6 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Delaware Valley at Kings, 6 p.m.
Wilkes at FDU-Florham, 6 p.m.
PSU Hazleton at PSU York, 6 p.m.
Misericordia at Eastern, 6 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Kings at Elizabethtown, 7 p.m.
THURSDAY
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
HS BOWLING
Berwick at Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech, 3 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
PIAA Team Championships at Giant Center, Her-
shey
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 8:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
Dallas at Wyoming Area, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
Meyers at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
Hanover Area at Northwest, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Pittston Area at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
PIAA Team Championships at Giant Center, Her-
shey
St. Albans at Wyoming Seminary
COLLEGE SWIMMING
MACSwimChampionships (at Wilkes-Barre CYC),
TBA
COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD
Misericordia at Lafayette, 2 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Ithaca at Wilkes, 7 p.m.
SATURDAY
BOYS BASKETBALL
Bethlehem Catholic at Hazleton Area, 3 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
PIAA Team Championships at Giant Center, Her-
shey
St. Albans at Wyoming Seminary
Tunkhannock at Meyers, 7 p.m.
Scranton Prep at Nanticoke, noon
Wyoming Area at West Scranton, 1 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Abington Heights, 1 p.m.
Dallas at Richard Smoker Tournament, 10 a.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Manhattanville at Kings, 3 p.m.
Wilkes at Eastern, 3 p.m.
Misericordia at Delaware Valley, 3 p.m.
PSU Berks at PSU Hazleton, 3 p.m.
Valley Forge at Luzerne CCC, 3 p.m.
PSU Wilkes Barre at PSU Mont Alto, 3 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Manhattanville at Kings, 1 p.m.
Wilkes at Eastern, 1 p.m.
PSU Wilkes-Barre at PSU Mont Alto, 1 p.m.
Valley Forge at Luzerne CCC, 1 p.m.
Misericordia at Delaware Valley, 1 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
State College Area High at Wyoming Valley West, 1
p.m.
COLLEGE SWIMMING
MACSwimChampionships (at Wilkes-Barre CYC),
TBA
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Kings at Hunter, noon
Wilkes at McDaniel, noon
SUNDAY
COLLEGE SWIMMING
MACSwimChampionships (at Wilkes-Barre CYC),
TBA
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BOSTON RED SOX Agreed to terms with RHP
Alfredo Aceves on a one-year contract.
W H A T S O N T V
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN UConn at Louisville
9 p.m.
ESPN Texas at Texas A&M
NHL
8 p.m.
NBCSN Detroit at Phoenix
SOCCER
2:55 p.m.
ESPN2 Premier League, Tottenhamat Liverpool
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN2 North Carolina at Duke
9 p.m.
ESPN2 Oklahoma at Baylor
Hanover Area has just two
seniors on its roster, which gives
opponents players to target
defensively.
On most nights, though, the
senior charged with filling the
hoop still delivers.
Danielle Tuzinski is among
the Wyoming Valley Confer-
ences top scorers, averaging 19
points per game. More impor-
tantly to the Hawkeyes, the
forward has accounted for near-
ly 40 percent of her teams scor-
ing this season.
We dont get that many
amazing athletes, Hanover
Area coach Steve Horensky said.
Shes accomplished something
with what she does out on the
court.
She reached the 1,000-point
mark last month in a win over
MMI Prep, becoming the first
Hanover Area player to reach
the mark in some time.
It was just an emotional
night, Horensky said. Our last
1,000-point scorer came in 2005.
Its just a great accomplishment
for our program.
Tuzinski is a favorite of oppos-
ing coaches as well, who appre-
ciate her game even though
theyd rather not have a front-
row seat for one of her perform-
ances.
Shes a heck of a player,
Meyers coach Chris Gray said.
Weve been playing against her
for four years ... it feels like a lot
more than that. Im happy for all
shes accomplished, but Ill be
glad to see her go.
BRIGHT FUTURE -- While a
lot of talk centered around Alex-
is Lewis of Holy Redeemer,
there are a number of quality
freshmen getting playing time
around the WVC.
Meyers has a trio of freshmen
who are contributing in Jocelyn
Martinez, Angela Moses and
Salimah Biggs.
Biggs had a big January, scor-
ing 6.4 points per game as the
Mohawks went 5-3, raising their
season record to 8-8.
She has a bright future,
Gray said. The way she can
attack the basket ... she has
great potential. Shes only going
to get better.
Some other notable freshmen
from around the WVC include:
Alexis Steeber and Bri
Floryshak, Berwick, except for
an illness, the duo has appeared
in every Bulldogs game.
Brea Seabrook, GAR, fourth
on the Grenadiers in total
points, and averaging 5.8 points
per game.
Brianna Woznicki, Hazleton
Area, best of a quartet of ninth
graders with the Cougars.
Alana Wilson, Holy Re-
deemer, fourth on the Royals at
6.5 points per game.
Cayle Spencer, Lake-Leh-
man, second on the Black
Knights with 12.8 points per
game.
Rachel Stanziola, MMI
Prep, second on her team in
scoring at 7.7 points per game.
Kelsey Yustat, Northwest,
part of Rangers main six-player
rotation.
Allie Barber and Liz Wa-
leski, Pittston Area, duo has
combined to average more than
15 points per game.
Tara Judge, Wyoming Val-
ley West, has played in every
game for the Spartans.
THE PLAYOFF HUNT -- The
Class 2A race in the WVC,
where three teams will qualify
for the District 2 playoffs, is
getting tight with two weeks left
in the regular season. Lake-
Lehman, currently leading the
WVC-3, is all but in with a 9-1
league mark. Meyers sits at 6-4
thus far, followed by GAR and
Wyoming Seminary (both 4-6)
and Hanover Area (3-7).
Only three teams get in,
Horensky said. Its going to be
a war between GAR, Sem and
us.
Hanover Area travels to
Wyoming Seminary tonight in
what could turn out to be an
elimination game. Wyoming
Seminary and GAR play Feb. 13.
In Class 3A, Holy Redeemer
(8-1, 134 points) tops the points
race for five spots belonging to
WVC teams.
Crestwood (6-3, 116), Nanti-
coke (9-1, 114) and Dallas (6-3,
114) are in good position, while
Pittston Area (5-4, 106) has
struggled of late.
Tunkhannock (4-5, 94) and
Berwick (3-6, 84) are in conten-
tion. They play tonight in Tunk-
hannock in a big game for their
playoff hopes.
The Class A and Class 4A
tourneys are open events.
Meanwhile, in WVC play, the
Division 1 second-half title could
come down to the last night of
the season, as Wyoming Valley
West travels to Hazleton Area
on Feb. 16. Both are currently
3-0. Pittston Area (0-3 second
half) won the first-half title.
In Division 2, Holy Redeemer
leads Dallas by a game in the
standings. The Royals were the
first-half champs.
Division 3 sees Lake-Lehman
in the lead after already beating
first-half champ Nanticoke. The
Black Knights (3-0 second half)
host Meyers tonight.
H I G H S C H O O L G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
Tuzinski continues to impress on young Hanover Area team
By JOHN MEDEIROS
jmedeiros@timesleader.com
N O T E B O O K
Division I League Overall
Wyo. Valley West 3-0 13-5
Hazleton Area 3-0 7-11
Crestwood 2-1 12-5
Pittston Area 0-3 14-4
Coughlin 0-3 1-16
Division II League Overall
Holy Redeemer 3-0 10-7
Dallas 2-1 11-5
Tunkhannock 1-2 12-5
Berwick 1-2 7-11
Wyoming Area 0-3 5-13
Division III League Overall
Lake-Lehman 3-0 12-5
Nanticoke 2-1 16-2
Northwest 2-1 11-7
Meyers 2-1 9-9
GAR 2-1 5-12
Wyoming Seminary 1-2 6-10
Hanover Area 0-3 5-12
MMI Prep 0-3 3-15
W V C S TA N D I N G S
N B A
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia................... 17 7 .708
Boston ............................ 13 10 .565 3
1
2
New York ....................... 9 15 .375 8
New Jersey.................... 8 17 .320 9
1
2
Toronto........................... 8 17 .320 9
1
2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami .............................. 18 6 .750
Atlanta............................. 16 8 .667 2
Orlando........................... 15 9 .625 3
Washington.................... 4 20 .167 14
Charlotte ........................ 3 21 .125 15
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago.......................... 20 6 .769
Indiana............................ 16 7 .696 2
1
2
Milwaukee...................... 10 13 .435 8
1
2
Cleveland ....................... 9 13 .409 9
Detroit ............................. 6 20 .231 14
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio.................. 16 9 .640
Dallas ............................ 14 11 .560 2
Houston ........................ 13 11 .542 2
1
2
Memphis....................... 12 12 .500 3
1
2
New Orleans ................ 4 20 .167 11
1
2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City............... 18 5 .783
Denver............................ 15 9 .625 3
1
2
Utah ................................ 13 9 .591 4
1
2
Portland.......................... 14 10 .583 4
1
2
Minnesota ...................... 12 12 .500 6
1
2
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers.................. 14 7 .667
L.A. Lakers..................... 14 10 .583 1
1
2
Phoenix .......................... 9 14 .391 6
Golden State.................. 8 13 .381 6
Sacramento ................... 8 15 .348 7
Saturday's Games
Philadelphia 98, Atlanta 87
Orlando 85, Indiana 81
L.A. Clippers 107, Washington 81
Cleveland 91, Dallas 88
Detroit 89, New Orleans 87
New York 99, New Jersey 92
Minnesota 100, Houston 91
San Antonio 107, Oklahoma City 96
Chicago 113, Milwaukee 90
Phoenix 95, Charlotte 89
Utah 96, L.A. Lakers 87
Sacramento 114, Golden State 106, OT
Portland 117, Denver 97
Sunday's Games
Boston 98, Memphis 80
Miami 95, Toronto 89
Monday's Games
L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Washington, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Chicago at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Houston at Denver, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Portland, 10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Utah at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
A H L
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. Johns .............. 46 28 12 5 1 62 155 135
Manchester ........... 49 27 20 0 2 56 131 132
Worcester.............. 44 21 14 4 5 51 119 115
Portland ................. 46 22 19 2 3 49 128 145
Providence............ 47 22 20 2 3 49 111 131
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton................ 48 28 13 2 5 63 157 142
Hershey................. 47 26 14 4 3 59 171 142
Norfolk ................... 48 27 18 1 2 57 166 138
Syracuse............... 44 19 18 4 3 45 145 148
Binghamton........... 48 20 25 2 1 43 130 151
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Bridgeport ............. 46 23 18 3 2 51 137 135
Connecticut........... 46 21 16 4 5 51 137 137
Springfield............. 47 22 22 1 2 47 136 145
Albany.................... 45 19 18 5 3 46 115 137
Adirondack............ 46 22 22 1 1 46 128 136
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte................ 48 28 16 2 2 60 140 127
Chicago................. 46 25 17 1 3 54 133 121
Peoria .................... 47 24 20 2 1 51 143 136
Milwaukee ............. 44 23 19 1 1 48 124 117
Rockford................ 47 20 22 1 4 45 139 158
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................. 47 25 17 3 2 55 136 117
Rochester.............. 47 21 17 6 3 51 130 139
Grand Rapids........ 45 19 18 4 4 46 143 145
Lake Erie............... 47 21 22 2 2 46 114 131
Hamilton ................ 45 20 20 1 4 45 112 135
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City...... 47 30 12 2 3 65 139 103
Houston................. 47 23 12 3 9 58 129 127
Abbotsford ............ 47 26 18 3 0 55 114 118
San Antonio .......... 46 24 20 2 0 50 113 125
Texas..................... 45 20 22 1 2 43 132 139
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday's Games
Milwaukee 2, Houston 1
Hershey 4, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 3, SO
Springfield 4, Norfolk 2
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
San Antonio at Hamilton, 10 a.m.
Houston at Chicago, 12 p.m.
Providence at St. Johns, 6 p.m.
Syracuse at Connecticut, 7 p.m.
Portland at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
N H L
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers............... 50 33 12 5 71 141 102
Philadelphia ................ 52 30 16 6 66 173 156
Pittsburgh .................... 53 30 19 4 64 161 138
New Jersey ................. 52 30 19 3 63 149 148
N.Y. Islanders.............. 51 21 22 8 50 125 150
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston.......................... 51 33 16 2 68 180 111
Ottawa.......................... 55 27 21 7 61 161 171
Toronto ........................ 52 27 19 6 60 161 152
Buffalo.......................... 52 22 24 6 50 126 154
Montreal....................... 53 20 24 9 49 137 145
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Florida.......................... 51 24 16 11 59 131 145
Washington................. 52 27 21 4 58 145 149
Winnipeg...................... 54 24 24 6 54 129 150
Tampa Bay................... 51 23 23 5 51 147 173
Carolina ....................... 54 20 25 9 49 137 165
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit .......................... 53 35 16 2 72 171 126
Nashville...................... 53 32 17 4 68 149 136
St. Louis....................... 51 30 14 7 67 126 105
Chicago........................ 53 29 17 7 65 169 158
Columbus .................... 52 14 32 6 34 120 174
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ................... 52 32 15 5 69 167 130
Minnesota.................... 52 25 19 8 58 121 133
Colorado...................... 54 26 25 3 55 135 151
Calgary ........................ 52 24 22 6 54 124 141
Edmonton.................... 52 21 26 5 47 138 152
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 50 29 15 6 64 145 117
Los Angeles ................ 53 25 18 10 60 115 116
Dallas ........................... 51 27 22 2 56 136 144
Phoenix........................ 52 23 21 8 54 136 141
Anaheim ...................... 51 19 24 8 46 132 154
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Saturday's Games
Vancouver 3, Colorado 2, SO
Buffalo 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO
Dallas 2, Minnesota 1, SO
Edmonton 5, Detroit 4, SO
Pittsburgh 2, Boston 1
New Jersey 6, Philadelphia 4
Washington 3, Montreal 0
Toronto 5, Ottawa 0
Carolina 2, Los Angeles 1
Tampa Bay 6, Florida 3
Nashville 3, St. Louis 1
Phoenix 5, San Jose 3
Sunday's Games
Boston 4, Washington 1
New Jersey 5, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Rangers 5, Philadelphia 2
Montreal 3, Winnipeg 0
Monday's Games
Edmonton at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
New Jersey at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Florida at Washington, 7 p.m.
Minnesota at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Winnipeg, 8:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Colorado, 9 p.m.
C O L L E G E
B A S K E T B A L L
Sunday's Scores
EAST
Fairfield 64, Siena 56
Loyola (Md.) 66, St. Peters 55
Penn St.-Abington 95, Keuka 78
Pittsburgh 79, Villanova 70
Rider 74, Niagara 73
West Virginia 87, Providence 84, OT
MIDWEST
Cleveland St. 70, Ill.-Chicago 42
Michigan St. 64, Michigan 54
Minnesota 69, Nebraska 61
Northwestern 74, Illinois 70
Youngstown St. 80, Loyola of Chicago 63
SOUTH
Christopher Newport 85, Ferrum 78
McNeese St. 66, Stephen F. Austin 56
Miami 78, Duke 74, OT
Rhodes 71, Birmingham-Southern 69
Washington (Mo.) 92, Emory 83
Washington Adventist 88, Apprentice 82
SOUTHWEST
No scores reported from the SOUTHWEST.
FAR WEST
No scores reported from the FAR WEST.
Sunday's Women's Scores
EAST
Delaware 68, VCU 49
Drexel 63, Northeastern 41
Hartford 63, Vermont 52
Old Dominion 81, Hofstra 79
Towson 63, Georgia St. 59, OT
Wake Forest 73, Boston College 60
MIDWEST
Dayton 74, Xavier 65
Iowa 83, Indiana 64
Michigan St. 65, Michigan 63
Notre Dame 90, DePaul 70
Penn St. 68, Minnesota 65
Purdue 77, Illinois 66
Saint Louis 56, Duquesne 55
SOUTHWEST
Texas Tech 76, Missouri 49
Tulsa 67, Houston 53
UTEP 45, Rice 41
SOUTH
Florida 84, Mississippi 55
Florida St. 78, Virginia Tech 60
Georgia 81, Alabama 66
James Madison 49, George Mason 45
LSU 61, Kentucky 51
Miami 68, Clemson 47
Southern Miss. 67, East Carolina 57
Tennessee 82, Auburn 61
Tulane 75, SMU 63
UAB 50, Marshall 45
UNC Wilmington 80, William & Mary 77
Vanderbilt 65, Mississippi St. 59
Virginia 55, NC State 47
FAR WEST
Washington 67, Southern Cal 61
G O L F
Waste Management Phoenix
Open Par Scores
Sunday
At TPC Scottsdale
Scottsdale, Ariz.
Purse: $6.1 million
Yardage: 7,216;Par: 71
Final
FedExCup points in parentheses
Kyle Stanley (500),
$1,098,000............................69-66-69-65269 -15
Ben Crane (300), $658,800 69-67-68-66270 -14
Spencer Levin (190),
$414,800 ...............................65-63-68-75271 -13
D.J. Trahan (135),
$292,800 ...............................72-70-64-66272 -12
Brendan Steele (100),
$222,650 ...............................71-69-69-64273 -11
Kevin Na (100), $222,650...66-73-69-65273 -11
Bubba Watson (100),
$222,650 ...............................66-70-67-70273 -11
Bo Van Pelt (78), $170,800.65-71-71-67274 -10
John Rollins (78), $170,80070-70-65-69274 -10
Jason Dufner (78),
$170,800 ...............................64-72-68-70274 -10
Webb Simpson (78),
$170,800 ...............................65-69-68-72274 -10
Trevor Immelman (61),
$128,100 ...............................67-70-69-69275 -9
John Huh (61), $128,100 ....68-66-69-72275 -9
Chris Stroud (61),
$128,100 ...............................68-70-66-71275 -9
Bryce Molder (55),
$100,650 ...............................70-69-71-66276 -8
Keegan Bradley (55),
$100,650 ...............................68-70-71-67276 -8
Rod Pampling (55),
$100,650 ...............................67-71-71-67276 -8
Harris English (55),
$100,650 ...............................70-69-68-69276 -8
Chris Couch (49), $68,843..70-68-72-67277 -7
Pat Perez (49), $68,843 ......69-73-66-69277 -7
Martin Flores (49), $68,843 71-68-68-70277 -7
Bill Haas (49), $68,843........69-68-69-71277 -7
Mark Wilson (49), $68,843..70-69-74-64277 -7
Marc Leishman (49),
$68,843..................................70-68-68-71277 -7
Greg Chalmers (49),
$68,843..................................68-69-67-73277 -7
Jeff Quinney (0), $43,310 ...69-71-70-68278 -6
Rickie Fowler (42), $43,31069-69-71-69278 -6
Derek Lamely (42),
$43,310..................................66-70-72-70278 -6
Gary Woodland (42),
$43,310..................................71-71-70-66278 -6
Harrison Frazar (42),
$43,310..................................66-67-73-72278 -6
Jeff Maggert (42), $43,310 .70-68-68-72278 -6
Phil Mickelson (42),
$43,310..................................68-70-67-73278 -6
Matt Kuchar (35), $31,546 ..69-68-72-70279 -5
Robert Allenby (35),
$31,546..................................71-69-70-69279 -5
Carl Pettersson (35),
$31,546..................................70-69-70-70279 -5
George McNeill (35),
$31,546..................................71-70-70-68279 -5
Heath Slocum (35),
$31,546..................................73-69-69-68279 -5
Charles Howell III (35),
$31,546..................................69-68-71-71279 -5
Seung-Yul Noh (35),
$31,546..................................67-72-68-72279 -5
DURHAM, N.C. Reggie
Johnson scored five of his ca-
reer-high 27 points in overtime
and Miami upset No. 7 Duke
78-74 on Sunday.
Kenny Kadji added 15 points
for the Hurricanes (14-7, 5-3
Atlantic Coast Conference),
who blew a 16-point lead in the
second half, then regrouped to
claim their first victory at Cam-
eron Indoor Stadium and just
their second win over Duke
since joining the ACC.
Seth Curry scored 22 points
and freshman Austin Rivers
added 20 for the Blue Devils
(19-4, 6-2), who missed all six
of their free throws in overtime
and were beaten by a Florida-
based conference rival for the
second time this season.
Rivers and Ryan Kelly missed
3s in the final seconds for Duke
and Johnson added a free throw
with one-tenth of a second
remaining.
Johnson had 12 rebounds.
Durand Scott added 11 points
on 3-of-12 shooting for the Hur-
ricanes, who had a chance to
win it in regulation but couldnt
get a shot off before the buzzer.
Michigan St. 64, Michigan 54
EAST LANSING, Mich.
Draymond Green had 14 points
and 16 rebounds to lead Michi-
gan State.
The Spartans (18-5, 7-3 Big
Ten) ended a three-game skid
in the rivalry and moved into
sole possession of second place
in the conference behind third-
ranked Ohio State.
Green, who matched Michi-
gans rebound total by himself,
played after spraining his left
knee on Tuesday in a loss to
Illinois.
WOMENS ROUNDUP
LSU 61, Kentucky 51
BATON ROUGE, La.
Adrienne Webb scored 16 of her
19 points in the second half and
LSU snapped No. 6 Kentuckys
10-game winning streak with a
61-51 upset on Sunday.
Notre Dame 90, Depaul 70
SOUTH BEND, Ind. Nata-
lie Novosel scored 17 of her 21
points in the first half to help
Notre Dame coast to a victory
over DePaul.
Miami 68, Clemson 47
CORAL GABLES, Fla.
Shenise Johnson scored 19
points to lead Miami to a victo-
ry over Clemson.
Tennessee 82, Auburn 61
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. Glory
Johnson had 14 points and 11
rebounds to help No. 8 Ten-
nessee beat Auburn 82-61 on
Sunday.
Delaware 68, VCU 49
NEWARK, Del. Elena
Delle Donne scored 22 points
to lead four Delaware players in
double figures and the Blue
Hens defeated Virginia Com-
monwealth.
Purdue 77, Illinois 66
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind.
Sam Ostarello scored a career-
high 21 points and matched her
season-high with 13 rebounds
to help Purdue remain on top of
the Big Ten with a victory over
Illinois.
Penn State 68, Minnesota 65
MINNEAPOLIS Mia Nick-
son scored 20 points and Alex
Bentley added 16 points, in-
cluding the go-ahead 3-pointer
with 38.9 seconds to play, to
help Penn State rally for a victo-
ry over Minnesota.
The Lady Lions (18-5, 8-3 Big
Ten) trailed by 15 points in the
first half and still trailed by
three with 90 seconds remain-
ing. But Penn State closed the
game on an 8-2 run to secure
its eighth win in its past 10
games.
Georgia 81, Alabama 66
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. Jas-
mine James and Krista Donald
each scored 18 points to help
Georgia beat Alabama.
Texas Tech 76, Missouri 49
LUBBOCK, Texas Casey
Morris scored 15 points to lead
four Texas Tech players in dou-
ble figures and the Lady Raid-
ers kept Missouri winless in the
Big 12 Conference.
M A J O R C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Hurricanes spring upset
on No. 7 Blue Devils
The Associated Press
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Kyle
Stanley rebounded from a devas-
tating loss to win the Phoenix
Open, overcoming an eight-
stroke deficit Sunday in a come-
back as unlikely as his collapse
last week at Torrey Pines.
In tears seven days ago in San
Diego after blowing a big lead
dropping the final strokes with a
triple-bogey 8 onthe final hole
and losing a playoff, Stanley took
advantage of Spencer Levins
meltdown Sunday to win his first
PGA Tour title.
Stanley closed with a bogey-
free 6-under 65, holing a 4-foot
par putt on the par-4 18th, to fin-
ish at 15-under 269.
Ben Crane had a 66 to finish a
stroke back.
Levin, six strokes ahead enter-
ing the round and seven in front
after one hole, shot a 75 to finish
two strokes behind Stanley.
P R O G O L F
Kyle Stanley rallies for victory
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 3B
S P O R T S
A decision on who will be
coaching Dallas High School
football couldbe comingtoday as
the school board holds a work
session at 7 p.m.
The work session is scheduled
to take place in the board meet-
ing room of the administrative
building, but it couldbemovedto
the elementary school cafeteria
as alargenumber of supporters of
Ted Jackson are expected to at-
tend. Although school boards
usually vote on items at regular
meetings, they can do so at work
sessions.
The Dallas School Boards reg-
ular meeting is scheduled for 7
p.m. Monday, Feb. 13.
Despite Jacksons impressive
recordin27seasons at Dallas and
an outpouring of support, the
school board voted 8-1in Decem-
ber to open his position after he
received a negative review from
high school principal Jeff Shaffer.
Dr. Bruce Goeringer was the only
board member to vote against
opening the position.
Dallas received 14 applicants
for the job, interviewed eight and
brought four in for second inter-
views. Three of them were Jack-
son, Berwick ninth-grade head
coach Scott Dennis and former
Dallas assistant Bob Zaruta.
Those three remain in the run-
ning.
Jackson requested through his
attorney KimBorland a due proc-
ess hearing in front of the school
board. The hearing was held Jan.
23 before a large crowd of Jack-
son supporters. Two days later,
the board voted to keep the posi-
tion open after a vote to retain
Jackson failed 5-3. Dr. Bruce Cos-
lett and Fred Parry joined Goer-
inger in voting for Jackson.
H I G H S C H O O L F O O T B A L L
Dallas decision coming tonight?
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
NEW YORK Artem Anisimov had a
goal and two assists, Henrik Lundqvist
made 21 saves and the New York Rangers
continued their recent success against the
Philadelphia Flyers with a 5-2 fight-filled
victory on Sunday.
Marian Gaborik, Michael Del Zotto, Bran-
don Dubinsky and Ruslan Fedotenko also
scored for Eastern Conference-leading New
York, which has won six straight against
Philadelphia, including their four games this
season. It was Anisimovs first points in 18
games.
Brayden Schenn and Wayne Simmonds
scored for the Flyers, which lost for the
third time in four games. It was their first
game against the Rangers since the Winter
Classic in Philadelphia on Jan. 2.
Lundqvists career-best shutout streak
ended at 182 minutes, 37 seconds when
Schenn scored in the second period, but the
All-Star goaltender still improved to 24-14-4
on the season.
Bruins 4, Capitals 1
WASHINGTON Tim Thomas return
to the nations capital was less political and
more successful, with the goaltender mak-
ing 35 saves in the Boston Bruins win over
the Washington Capitals.
Playing about 10 blocks from the White
House a place he famously avoided be-
cause of his political views two weeks ago
when the reigning Stanley Cup champions
were honored by President Barack Obama
Thomas shut out the Capitals until late
in the third period as the Bruins snapped a
two-game losing streak.
Devils 5, Penguins 2
NEWARK, N.J. Ilya Kovalchuk had a
goal and two assists, and New Jersey ex-
tended its winning streak to four.
Anton Volchenkov, Dainius Zubrus, Zach
Parise and David Clarkson also scored for
the Devils, who remained perfect since the
All Star break while equaling their season-
best win streak. Kovalchuk has been the key
to the surge with three goals and seven
assists in the four games.
Canadiens 3, Jets 0
MONTREAL Carey Price made 23
saves for his third shutout of the season,
Tomas Plekanec had a goal and an assist
and the Canadiens ended a three-game
losing streak.
NBA
Celtics 98, Grizzlies 80
BOSTON Kevin Garnett matched his
season-high with 24 points and grabbed
nine rebounds to lead the Boston Celtics to
their fourth straight win.
Heat 95, Raptors 89
MIAMI LeBron James scored 30
points, Dwyane Wade had 25 and the Miami
Heat survived a shaky fourth quarter to beat
the Toronto Raptors.
N H L / N B A R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
New York Rangers defenseman Anton
Stralman, left, celebrates with goalie Hen-
rik Lundqvist at the conclusion of the
Rangers 5-2 win over the Philadelphia
Flyers in an NHL game at Madison Square
Garden in New York on Sunday.
Rangers top
Philadelphia
The Associated Press
It was just a few years ago that
Coughlin and Lake-Lehman were ho-
vering around the bottom of the
Wyoming Valley Conference Division
I wrestling standings.
The Crusaders went winless in the
division in consecutive seasons --
2008 and 2009 but soundly rebound-
ed and concluded this season as divi-
sional co-champions with Wyoming
Valley West. They followed that with
their first trip to the District 2 Class
3A Duals finals in school history.
A couple years ago we didnt even
have this, Crusaders coach Steve
Stahl said. People forget (the down
years) we went 0-7. Weve come a
long way. I have to commend my
coaching staff. We have the best
coaching staff in the league, hands
down.
Things got so bad for the Black
Knights that they were forfeiting as
many as eight bouts in duals just two
years ago. Times were so trying that
the team dropped down to the confer-
ences Division II in the power setup.
But this season, Lake-Lehman
claimed the division championship
and advanced to the District 2 Class
2A Duals finals.
Where we were last year and two
years ago, these kids have done a
good job, said Lehman coach Tom
Williams.
Both programs were down, but
many fans and wrestling aficionados
could have seen the rise of the teams
nearing because of their long and sto-
ried histories.
The Black Knights moved to the
district finals for a D2 record 11 times
in 16 years and have produced five
PIAA champions, including three in
1981 when they won the PIAA team
championship.
The Crusaders have never pro-
duced a state champion, but have
been successful as a team and with
individuals since the 1940s. Former
Coughlin coach Dana Balum is one of
the winningest coaches in the state
with 461 victories.
Coughlin and Lehman will again be
conference favorites next year as well
in their respective classifications be-
cause only four seniors on each team
wrestled on Saturday night.
NO LACK FOR LACKAWANNA
While the Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence went without a district duals
championship for the first time since
2006 and just the third time in the
16-year history of district duals,
theres a good reason for that.
The Lackawanna League has been
steadily improving and isnt the push-
over conference it once was when the
WVC represented District 2 in the
PIAA Duals Championships in 22 of
the previous 30 slots.
Delaware Valley, which knocked off
Coughlin Saturday night, is ranked
12th in the state according to Premier
PA Rankings and has been in the dis-
trict finals three straight years, now
winning for the second straight time.
Western Wayne, a winner by crite-
ria over Lake-Lehman in the districts
2A final, has picked up two district
dual championships in three years.
The Wildcats have come a long way
since forfeiting out of the tournament
in 2007 when they were the confer-
ences top seed.
Delaware Valley is a power and its
probably one of the best District 2
teams Ive ever seen in my life, West-
ern Wayne coach Dante Terenzio said.
JUST AN OVERSIGHT
Before Saturdays nights District 2
Class 2A Duals final, it was pointed
out on media row that Lake-Lehman
coach Tom Williams had not signed
the weigh-in sheets for his team or his
opponent, Western Wayne.
In some cases if noticed, opposing
head coaches would call out the error
either before or after the dual. If the
situation is brought to the attention of
the head official, the results to that
point are lost and are then referred to
as defaults. So if Lehman had won the
district title, Terenzio could have
challenged the error and his team
would have been victorious.
Even though he said he noticed the
situation, he wasnt going to do chal-
lenge.
I was told about it but I didnt
want to make a big deal out of it be-
cause I dont want to win like that,
Terenzio said. That was just a thing
that they forgot to do. All it is is an
oversight and I wasnt going to worry
about it.
It was just two year ago when the
Wildcats defeated Hanover Area for
the championship and controversy
arose about a wrestler participating in
an improper weight class. That partic-
ular incident only affected one bout,
but could have impacted the entire
dual.
H I G H S C H O O L W R E S T L I N G
Coughlin, Lehman climb back to top
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
TUNKHANNOCK Last year snow
covered with a layer of ice hampered
the hunters who participated in the
Northeast Regional Coyote Hunt, re-
sulting in a harvest of 21 canines one
of the lowest since the annual hunt be-
gan in 2000.
This year, the weather helped. Mild
temperatures, baregroundanddrycon-
ditions resulted in a harvest of 53
coyotes during the three-day hunt,
which wrapped up on Sunday with a fi-
nal weigh-inat the TritonHose Compa-
ny. The harvest was the second-highest
in the hunts history (56 coyotes in
2010), and the 817 hunters that signed
up represented the second-highest to-
tal.
Theres nowind, nosnowandnoice
and the temperature is in the 40s. You
would never expect this for February,
said Bill Kalinauskis, director for Dis-
trict 9of the Pennsylvania Trappers As-
sociation the organization that holds
the yearly event. The conditions were
great for guys using calls and those
hunting with dogs. The weather just
made it easier on everybody.
Hunters paid a $25 registration fee
and a $100 prize was awarded for each
coyotetakenduringthethree-dayhunt.
A $250 prize was handed out for the
heaviest coyote taken each day, and a
$2,000 grand prize was awarded on
Sunday for the heaviest coyote overall.
Bill Corry, of Chester County, won
the top award with a 51.70-pound male
coyoteheshot onSundayat 9:30a.m. in
Sullivan County.
I went out onSaturdayandusedrab-
bit calls and coyote calls and saw noth-
ing, Corry said. I went to the same
spot this morningandusedfawnbleats,
and after 20 minutes he came up 100
yards away.
Sixteenhunters baggedtheir coyotes
using calls, but the bulk were taken
with dogs. Bill Moore, of Bloomsburg,
used dogs to bag a 39.95-pound male
coyote on Sunday morning in Sullivan
County. Moore said conditions
wouldve beenbetter witha light snow
cover to aid in tracking, but he didnt
complain about the mild temper-
atures.
It sure beats being out there in cold
and deep snow, Moore said.
Whilethisyearsharvest wasthesec-
ond-highest in the hunts history,
Moore said he believes coyote num-
bers are lower in areas.
Theres more people hunting and
trapping them. Everyone knows
theyre here, he said. For years no-
body had a clue about coyotes.
Kalinauskis said an increase in fox
populations are an indicator that
coyote numbers are lower. Coyotes
will prey on foxes and chase them out
of their territory.
Still, Kalinauskissaidcoyotepopula-
tions are far fromthreatened.
Theres no shortage. Were never
going to get rid of coyotes no matter
what we do, he said.
To be eligible for the hunt, coyotes
must be harvested over the three-day
period (Friday through Sunday) in
Bradford, Susquehanna, Wayne, Wyom-
ing, Lackawanna, Pike, Luzerne or Sul-
livan counties. District 9 uses the hunt
as its onlyfundraiser of theyear, andthe
proceeds are used to fund a variety of
conservationeducationprograms anda
trapper training school that the organi-
zation holds each summer.
Coyote hunting is popular and guys
just like to get and hunt this time of
year, Kalinauskis said. This has
grown to the point where its the only
fundraiser we need for the year.
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Ramon Yale looks over the weighed coyotes at the annual Northeast Re-
gional Coyote Hunt.
O U T D O O R S
Milder temperatures help
annual hunt be a success
Coyote hunt by county
A breakdown by county of where the
53 coyotes were taken during this
weekends Northeast Regional
Coyote Hunt:
Wyoming 12
Susquehanna 8
Luzerne 7
Sullivan 7
Wayne 7
Lackawanna 6
Bradford 4
Pike - 2
TUNKHANNCOK For a biol-
ogist, this weekends Northeast Re-
gional Coyote Hunt was heaven. As
dozens of coyotes were brought into
the Triton Hose Company to be
weighed, Kyle Van Why, a wildlife
disease biologist with the U.S. De-
partment of Agriculture, saw an
enormous opportunity to collect
plenty of samples needed for studies
and DNA research.
He collected livers for a research
program at Juniata College, blood
samples for a parvovirus study at
Cornell University, DNA samples for
a genetics project at Grove City Col-
lege, stomachs for a study conducted
by Susquehanna University and blood
and heart samples for a parasite
study conducted by the USDA.
Having to obtain so many samples
by trapping coyotes in the field would
be a monumental task. But at coyote
hunts, Van Why said, the samples
come to him.
This hunt is bringing in coyotes
from an eight-county area, so were
getting information from all over, and
all I have to do is spend three days
here at the hunt, Van Why said.
Coyotes are a good indicator spe-
cies, Van Why said, because they can
live four to five years and they eat a
lot of the prey species that carry
diseases, such as mice. The samples,
he said, can offer valuable insight
into the health of wildlife and the
environment.
I go to four or five coyote hunts
across the state to collect samples,
and the hunters are very willing to
participate because theyre interested
to see what we find out, Van Why
said. Coyotes are pretty good in-
dicators of whats in the environ-
ment.
Van Why also sampled the stomach
contents of the coyotes taken during
the hunt. Most contained mice, rab-
bit or deer, he said. The canines
themselves were very healthy this
winter, he added.
Because of the mild weather
theyre not using a lot of their in-
ternal fat, Van Why said. They all
look pretty good.
Coyote event aids researchers
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
HERSHEY The Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton Penguins hex
on the Hershey Bears at Giant
Center finally came to an end
Sunday afternoon.
Cody Eakin and Ryan Potulny
scored against Pens goalie Scott
Munroe in the tiebreaker round,
powering the Bears to a 4-3
shootout victory and halting
Wilkes-Barre/Scrantons nine-
game winning streak on Her-
shey ice.
Brandon DeFazio, Bryan Lerg
and Geoff Walker scored in regu-
lation for the Pens, who hadnt
lost in their rivals rink since
March 27, 2010.
John Hynes team still picked
up a point for the shootout de-
feat. Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
(28-13-2-5, 63
points) remains
atop the Ameri-
can Hockey
Leagues East
Division stand-
ings, four
points clear of
second-place Hershey (26-14-
4-3, 59).
The Pens earned five of a pos-
sible six points this weekend
coming out of the all-star break,
something that pleased their
coach.
Back-to-back games going in-
to the third period with a lead
against two good teams, we defi-
nitely grew this weekend as a
team, Hynes said.
Sean Collins, Chris Bourque
and Mike Carman scored for
Hershey, which had lost six of its
last seven games, including Fri-
days third-period, three-goal
meltdown to Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton at Mohegan Sun Are-
na.
Carmans goal with 12:40 left
in the third period forced over-
time. The Pens had the only two
shots in the five-minute OT but
couldnt score on Bears goalie
Braden Holtby.
The Hershey netminder
chased from Fridays game after
allowing three goals in roughly
three minutes of the third
closed out Sundays win by stop-
ping Paul Thompson, Lerg and
Jason Williams in the shootout.
Only Walker scored in the tie-
breaker for the Pens.
DeFazio opened the scoring
with a short-handed breakaway
goal 3:43 into the game. After
Bourque fumbled the puck away
at his teams offensive blue line,
DeFazio scooped it up and mo-
tored up ice. Shaking off a slash
from Hersheys Patrick McNeill,
DeFazio wired a shot past Holt-
by, off the post and into the net.
It was Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
tons AHL-best 12th short-hand-
ed goal this season, but Collins
responded for Hershey just 74
seconds later with a right-point
shot that beat Munroe through a
screen at 4:57.
Bourque (6:09) and Lerg
(12:46) swapped goals as the
teams headed into the first inter-
mission even at 2-2. It remained
that way until 10:16 of the mid-
dle period when Walker picked
the corner over Holtbys glove
with one second remaining on a
Pens two-man advantage.
A H L
By DAVE SOTTILE
For the Times-Leader 4
BEARS
3
PENGUINS
Bears end Penguins Hershey win streak
C M Y K
PAGE 4B MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S U P E R B O W L X L V I
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
It started on New Yorks 12,
with a little more than 3
1
2 min-
utes left, and ended with Ahmad
Bradshaw easing into the end
zone from 6 yards out. The Patri-
ots decided not to contest the
run, trying to save some time on
theclockfor afinal driveanau-
dacious and risky decision by Pa-
triots coach Bill Belichick. But
New England couldnt get the
ball back in the end zone, with
TomBradys final pass falling just
beyondthe graspof tight endRob
Gronkowski.
Manning also was the MVP in
2008, when his scoring pass to
Plaxico Burress in the final min-
ute allowed New York to upset
Brady and New England, ruining
the Patriots bid for a perfect sea-
son.
Manning now is one of only
INDIANAPOLIS Eli Man-
ning is elite, for sure. A king of
comebacks, too. Andfar, far more
than Peytons little brother now.
Spot-on from beginning to end
Sunday night, Eli Manning won
his second NFLchampionship
and second Super Bowl MVP
award for leading the New
York Giants to a 21-17 victory
over the New England Patriots.
Manningwent 30for 40for 296
yards, with one touchdown pass
and zero interceptions. He
opened the game by becoming
the first quarterback to complete
his first nine attempts in a Super
Bowl. And he finished his work
by directing the nine-play, 88-
yard TD drive that put New York
ahead with 57 seconds left.
five players in NFL history with
multiple Super Bowl MVP
awards. He joinedthe guy he one-
upped yet again in the big game,
Brady, along with Terry Brad-
shaw, Bart Starr and Joe Monta-
na (the only one with three). And
Manning did it in the House that
Peyton Built, the stadium where
his BigBroa four-time regular-
season MVP but owner of only
one Super Bowl title plays for
the Indianapolis Colts.
It just feels good to win a Su-
per Bowl. Doesnt matter where
you are, Manning said, clutch-
ing the silver Vince Lombardi
Trophy. Its been a wild season.
We had a great, tough bunch of
guys who never quit, and had
faith in each other. Im proud of
these guys sticking together.
As usual, he was as good as it
gets down the stretch, in the cru-
cible of the fourth quarter.
Manningledsixgame-winning
drives to bring New York back
from fourth-quarter deficits in
the regular season. So it came as
no surprise he was cool as could
be Sunday, when he was 10 of 14
for 118 yards.
The greatest comeback of all,
though, probably was the way
Manning with plenty of help,
of course steered the Giants
back after they lost five of six
games inone stretchto fall to 7-7.
From there, they won their last
two regular-season games
against the Jets and Cowboys to
sneak into the playoffs as the
NFC East champions, then con-
tinued their surge with four post-
season wins in a row, none at
home.
Another Super Bowl, another MVP for Eli
AP PHOTO
New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning celebrates after the
Giants 21-17 win over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl
XLVI Sunday in Indianapolis. Manning was named MVP
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Pro Football Writer
INDIANAPOLIS Giants running
back Ahmad Bradshaw looked back, saw
no one chasing him, and paused at the
goal line.
Could it really be this easy to score the
winning touchdown in a Super Bowl
game?
The latest showdown between the Gi-
ants and the Patriots came down not to a
last-minute touchdown pass by Eli Man-
ning but a touchdown run that was set up
by a desperate defensive gamble by New
England, leading 17-15 in the final mo-
ments.
Knowing the Giants were in position to
run out the clock and kick a winning field
goal, the Patriots went soft and seemed to
let Bradshaw score on a 6-yard run with
no resistance for a 21-17 lead with 57 sec-
onds left.
Seemingly surprised that no one was
trying to grab him, Bradshaw paused at
the goal line and flipped into the end zone
with a flourish.
Oh, man, it was the best feeling in my
life, Bradshaw said.
Bradshaw plopped into the end zone
painted with the Giants logo and then he
and his teammates watched to see if Tom
Brady could pull off a long-shot chance,
an 80-yard touchdown drive with little
time.
Couldnt do it.
Brady got the Patriots to their own 49-
yard line with 5 seconds left. On the final
play, he eluded a rush and threw into the
middle of the end zone, where a pack of
players from both teams jumped and
clawed for the ball.
It skittered out of the scrum and se-
cured another last-minute Super Bowl
win for the Giants. Four years ago, they
scored the winning touchdown on Man-
nings pass in the closing minute, then
held on to end New Englands try for a
perfect season with a 17-14 victory.
The Patriots wanted to avoid getting in-
to the same situation all over again, and
had a chance when they got the ball back
at their own 8-yard line with 9:24 to go.
They had their chance, driving to mid-
field while draining the clock. It slipped
off their fingertips when Wes Welker
couldnt come down with a pass at the
20-yard line and only 4 minutes to go. Af-
ter one more incompletion, the Patriots
punted and soon found themselves in the
unwanted position of having to gamble on
defense.
AP PHOTO
New York Giants running back Ahmad Bradshaw (44) rolls into the end zone for a touchdown during the second half of Super
Bowl XLVI against the New England Patriots Sundayin Indianapolis. Bradshaws touchdown was the game-winner.
Giants take advantage of gamble
By JOE KAY
AP Sports Writer
Oh, man, it was the best feeling in my life.
Giants running back Ahmad Bradshaw
On scoring the game-winning touchdown
INDIANAPOLIS A season
that began with heartbreak for
New England Patriots owner
Robert Kraft ended with another
loss.
The Patriots made no secret of
wanting to win Sunday nights
game against the New York Gi-
ants for Kraft, whose beloved
wife Myra died of cancer shortly
before the seasonbegan. His grief
is still so deep just the mention of
her name brings tears to his eyes,
and the Patriots have honored
him and her by wearing
patches with her MHK initials
above their hearts. Quarterback
TomBrady even tapped his patch
twice and pointed skyward after
throwing his second touchdown
pass.
But the Patriots couldnt win
one last game for their owner,
with Eli Manning leading the Gi-
ants on an 88-yard game-winning
drive late in the fourth quarter.
Brady had one last chance to win
it for Kraft, but his desperation
heave into the end zone fluttered
to the ground.
It was the second Super Bowl
the Patriots hadlost tothe Giants
in the last four years.
Sad season
ends in loss
for Kraft
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Giants head coach Tom Cough-
lin, left, talks to New England
Patriots chairman and CEO
Robert Kraft before the Super
Bowl Sunday in Indianapolis.
Heres hoping Joe Buck was taking
notes.
The next time the Fox TV lead
announcer works as the NFLs cham-
pionship game, he should look back
at how Al Michaels handled Super
Bowl XLVI.
While Buck is sometimes too
smug for his own good, Michaels is
the consummate pro. His perform-
ance in his eighth Super Bowl assign-
ment was as good or better than the
first seven.
The man of "Miracle on Ice" fame
was a calming influence on a sports
day that rarely is calm. Michaels
made his points succinctly and with-
out the "Im smarter than you" deliv-
ery others implore. He dropped facts
like the Giants having an 86-0 edge
in total yardage midway through the
first quarter and had run 19 plays to
New Englands one as footnotes for
your consumption.
Unlike others that raise their voic-
es on a 1-yard run, Michaels picked
his spots during the Giants 21-17
victory. When he upped the decibels,
it was for effect, not grandstanding.
Even a special human-interest
story didnt cause Michaels to gush
like a radio shock jock. When the
father of Jason Pierre-Paul of the
Giants was pictured in the stands,
Michaels calmly related that the
Haitian-born father, attending his
first game, is blind and was listening
to the game in his native French.
Cris Collinsworth, Michaels ana-
lyst sidekick, started a lot slower and
might have had you yearning for the
good old days of Pat Summerall and
John Madden or at least Jim
Nance and Phil Simms. Collins-
worth, who played in two Super
Bowls as a Bengal, appeared tight at
the opening of the telecast, and
when Michaels later said Madonna
was nervous about performing at
halftime, Collinsworth, who insisted
he never had seen the Patriots so
unsettled at the start of a game,
quipped, "I know the feeling."
But once he got over his butter-
flies, Collinsworth was particularly
informative. Though he and Mi-
chaels didnt immediately pick up
that Tom Bradys intentional ground-
ing while in the end zone would
result in a safety, later on Collins-
worth quickly pointed out that the
Patriots had 12 players on the field, a
penalty that would erase a Victor
Cruz fumble.
When Patriots cornerback Kyle
Arrington couldnt bring down a
Giants receiver, Collinsworth re-
marked: "High school coaches are
cringing at how Arrington tried
tackling (Henry) Hynoski."
While he wasnt as outspoken as
he was earlier in the season, when he
said Giants safety Antrel Rolle had
been "barbecued" by a Cowboys
receiver, Collinsworth questioned
why the Giants tried to defend New
Englands tight ends with lineback-
ers, and complimented Eli Manning
for taking the short passes New
Englands defense was giving him.
In big game,
Al Michaels
in top form
O P I N I O N
By JOHN ROWE
The (Hackensack, N.J.) Record
NEW YORK The repeat perform-
ance was just as good as the first for New
York Giants fans as they watched their
team again beat the New England Patri-
ots 21-17 Sunday in the Super Bowl.
At Stout, a packed sports bar in mid-
town Manhattan, fans erupted into
cheers and dancing as Queens We Are
the Champions blared over speakers.
Eli Manning is the greatest fourth-
quarter comeback quarterback ever,
said Andrew West, 28, of Manhattan.
Overall, it was a great game for both
teams, but the Giants sort of pulled it
out, West said.
Frank Gerald, 39, of Manhattan called
the win, destiny, and said the Giants
had incredible spirit all year long.
It seems like every time people count
them out, the Giants come through and
prove everyone wrong, said Keith Pan-
zarella, 23, of Queens. They are the best
when their backs are against the wall.
The last time the teams met in the big
game in2008, the Giants upset the unde-
feated Patriots 17-14 in one of the most
exciting Super Bowls ever. Two days lat-
er, massive crowds cheeredthe Giants as
they paraded up Broadways Canyon of
Heroes.
NewYork Mayor Michael Bloomberg,
who planned to attend the game in Indi-
anapolis, announcedtheCitywouldhost
a ticker-tape parade and ceremony for
the Super Bowl champions on Tuesday.
Big Blue gave us a game to remem-
ber, and on Tuesday were going to give
them a parade to remember, said
Bloomberg in a statement released after
the game.
NYC fans cheer, dance as their team wins one more championship
AP PHOTO
Bob Shaara, of Little Falls, N.Y., reacts while watching the broadcast of the
Super Bowl between the New York Giants and the New England Patriots, in a
midtown Manhattan bar Sunday.
By KAREN MATTHEWS
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 5B
S U P E R B O W L X L V I
AP PHOTOS
New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz, right, pulls in a 2-yard touchdown pass while being defended by New England Patriots safety James Ihedigbo during the first half of Super Bowl XLVI Sunday in
Indianapolis.
Madonna, right, and Cee Lo Green perform during halftime of the Super Bowl Sunday in Indianapolis.
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady
warms up before Super Bowl XLVI against the
New York Giants Sunday in Indianapolis.
Giants coach Tom Coughlin celebrates his team
dowing a punt inside the Patriots 5-yard line.
New York Giants
defensive end
Justin Tuck
reacts after
sacking New
England Patriots
quarterback Tom
Brady during the
second half of
Super Bowl XLVI
Sunday in Indi-
anapolis.
New England
Patriots running
back Danny
Woodhead (39)
celebrates with
teammates after
scoring a touch-
down during the
first half of Su-
per Bowl XLVI
against the New
York Giants
Sunday in Indi-
anapolis.
New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick watches the ac-
tion during Sundays game.
New York Giants head coach Tom Coughlin watches as Giants wide receiver Ramses Barden catches
a pass during the first half of Super Bowl XLVI Sunday in Indianapolis.
New England Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker (83) catches a pass in front of New York Giants
safety Antrel Rolle (26) during the second half of Super Bowl XLVI Sunday in Indianapolis.
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
C M Y K
PAGE 6B MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S U P E R B O W L X L V I
7
3
5
3
9
3
7
3
7
7
0
5
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
INDIANAPOLISTomBra-
dys two long incompletions inthe
final minutes, andseveral missed
chances throughout the game cost
the NewEnglandPatriots a
chance at another Super Bowl
victory.
It also resultedintheir second
loss to the New
York Giants inthe
big game infour
years, 21-17 on
Sunday.
We just came
upa little bit
short, Brady
said. There were
some missed
opportunities out
there. It was a
very hard-fought
game. We fought
til the end. Im
very proudof
that.
Withjust over
four minutes left,
Brady threwup
the left side to a
wide-openWes Welker. But Bra-
dys most reliable receiver and
the NFLleader with122 catch-
escouldnt hang on.
Minutes later, the Giants then
marchedfor the go-aheadtouch-
downwith57 seconds remaining.
Brady hadone last chance. He
threwa desperationpass half the
lengthof the fieldinto the end
zone.
Rob Gronkowski andAaron
Hernandez went upina mass of
defenders, but the ball fell to the
groundas time ranout.
I thought we playedvery com-
petitive, hadour moments where
we movedthe ball andstopped
them, coachBill Belichick said.
We were inthe leadfor a good
part of the game. We just came up
a couple of plays short.
Pats fans disappointed
BOSTONIt was like 2008 all
over againfor disappointedPatri-
ots fans who watchedas their
teamlost Sunday to the NewYork
Giants inthe Super Bowl for the
secondtime infive years.
Were really sadright now,
saidMolly Mackenzie of Boston,
who was watching the game at a
bar near Fenway Park withtwo
friends. It was a goodgame,
really close.
Hundreds of
police officers
inriot gear
gatheredinthe
streets, focus-
ing onthe
areas near
college cam-
puses and
sports bars,
where previ-
ous celebra-
tions had
turnedwild.
Many were
brought in
fromother
departments
to helpout.
But after the
Giants won21-17, fans quietly filed
back to cars andpublic transit
stations, past the officers lining
the streets.
At Game On, a bar near Fenway,
the atmosphere was tense until
people startedchanting, Lets Go
Pats, Lets Go Pats, withabout
five minutes and30 seconds left to
go andthe Patriots upby 2. Then
the Giants scoreda touchdown,
knocking the windout of their
sails. The bar stayedfull until the
final seconds, whenTomBradys
desperationpass into the end
zone fell just beyondRob Gron-
kowskis grasp.
It was very disappointing,
saidKarenSnyder of Boston, who
was celebrating her birthday
Sunday. Defensively, we should
have done better. We werent
ready for whenthe Giants
changeduptheir offense.
Earlier inthe night, the crowd
got quiet whenthe Patriots trailed
inthe first half, theneruptedinto
dancing, fist-pumping andshout-
ing whenthey took the leadwitha
touchdownright before halftime.
YouknowBrady, saidFrank
Monti, a fanfromNewYork City.
Hes goodfor fourth-quarter
wins. Imnot worried.
At McGreevys 3rdBase Saloon
inthe citys Back Bay neighbor-
hood, where six large TVs anda
framedoval portrait of CoachBill
Belichick hung over the bar, man-
ager Art Santora saidhe hadmet
withthe police andthe liquor
commissionto talk about safety
measures. No one was being
allowedto line upoutside to get
into the packedbar once it was
full that was it.
AP PHOTOS
New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick walks downfield during the closing minutes of Super
Bowl XLVI against the New York Giants Sunday in Indianapolis. The Giants won 21-17.
Missed chances
haunt Patriots
New England Patriots quarter-
back Tom Brady walks off the
field during Sundays Super
Bowl.
By HOWARD ULMAN
AP Sports Writer
Giants 21,
Patriots 17
N.Y. Giants...................... 9 0 6 6 21
New England .................. 0 10 7 0 17
First Quarter
NYGTeam safety, 8:52. N.Y. Giants 2, New
England 0.
NYGCruz 2 pass from Manning (Tynes
kick), 3:24. Drive: 9 plays, 78 yards, 5:28. Key
Plays: Manning 13 pass to Hynoski;Bradshaw
24 run;Team 5-yard too many men on field
penalty on 3rd-and-3. N.Y. Giants 9, New
England 0.
Second Quarter
NEFG Gostkowski 29, 13:48. Drive: 10
plays, 60 yards, 4:36. Key Plays: Brady 15
pass to Branch on 3rd-and-4;Brady 19 pass to
Welker;Welker 10 run. N.Y. Giants 9, New
England 3.
NEWoodhead 4 pass from Brady (Gostkow-
ski kick), :08. Drive: 14 plays, 96 yards, 3:55.
Key Plays: Brady 20 pass to Gronkow-
ski;Brady 10 pass to Hernandez;Brady 12 pass
to Hernandez on 3rd-and-4;Brady 10 pass to
Welker;Brady 11 pass to Woodhead. New
England 10, N.Y. Giants 9.
Third Quarter
NEHernandez 12 pass from Brady (Gost-
kowski kick), 11:20. Drive: 8 plays, 79 yards,
3:40. Key Plays: Brady 21 pass to Ocho-
cinco;Green-Ellis 17 run;Green-Ellis 4 run on
3rd-and-1. New England 17, N.Y. Giants 9.
NYGFG Tynes 38, 6:43. Drive: 10 plays, 45
yards, 4:37. Key Plays: Manning 8 pass to
Nicks on 3rd-and-4;Manning 11 pass to Nicks.
New England 17, N.Y. Giants 12.
NYGFG Tynes 33, :35. Drive: 9 plays, 33
yards, 5:01. Key Plays: Blackmon 10 punt
return to New England 48;Manning 13 pass to
Nicks;Manning 12 pass to Pascoe. New
England 17, N.Y. Giants 15.
Fourth Quarter
NYGBradshaw 6 run (run failed), :57. Drive:
9 plays, 88 yards, 2:49. Key Plays: Manning 38
pass to Manningham;Manning 16 pass to
Manningham;Manning 14 pass to Nicks. N.Y.
Giants 21, New England 17.
A68,658.
NYG NE
FIRST DOWNS................... 26 21
Rushing................................ 7 6
Passing ................................ 18 15
Penalty ................................. 1 0
THIRD DOWN EFF ............ 5-11 6-12
FOURTH DOWN EFF........ 0-0 1-1
TOTAL NET YARDS.......... 396 349
Total Plays ........................... 71 62
Avg Gain............................... 5.6 5.6
NET YARDS RUSHING .... 114 83
Rushes ................................. 28 19
Avg per rush ........................ 4.1 4.4
NET YARDS PASSING..... 282 266
Sacked-Yds lost .................. 3-14 2-10
Gross-Yds passing............. 296 276
Completed-Att. .................... 30-40 27-41
Had Intercepted .................. 0 1
Yards-Pass Play ................. 6.6 6.2
KICKOFFS-EndZone-TB... 5-5-2 5-1-1
PUNTS-Avg. ........................ 4-40.8 3-41.0
Punts blocked...................... 0 0
FGs-PATs blocked ............. 0-0 0-0
TOTAL RETURN YAR-
DAGE ................................... 85 73
Punt Returns ....................... 1-10 0-0
Kickoff Returns.................... 4-75 3-73
Interceptions........................ 1-0 0-0
PENALTIES-Yds ................ 4-24 5-28
FUMBLES-Lost ................... 2-0 0-0
TIME OF POSSESSION... 37:05 22:55
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHINGN.Y. Giants, Bradshaw17-72,
Jacobs 9-37, Ware 1-6, Manning 1-(minus 1).
New England, Green-Ellis 10-44, Welker 2-21,
Woodhead 7-18.
PASSINGN.Y. Giants, Manning
30-40-0-296. New England, Brady
27-41-1-276.
RECEIVINGN.Y. Giants, Nicks 10-109,
Manningham 5-73, Pascoe 4-33, Cruz 4-25,
Bradshaw 2-19, Hynoski 2-19, Ballard 2-10,
Ware 1-8. New England, Hernandez 8-67,
Welker 7-60, Woodhead 4-42, Branch 3-45,
Gronkowski 2-26, Green-Ellis 2-15, Ochocinco
1-21.
PUNT RETURNSN.Y. Giants, Blackmon
1-10. New England, None.
KICKOFF RETURNSN.Y. Giants, Jernigan
3-71, Blackmon 1-4. New England, Edelman
3-73.
TACKLES-ASSISTS-SACKSN.Y. Giants,
Boley 9-1-0, Grant 5-1-0, Phillips 5-1-0,
Blackburn 4-2-0, Tuck 3-0-2, Rolle 3-0-0,
Ross 2-1-0, Williams 2-1-0, Bernard 2-0-0,
Pierre-Paul 2-0-0, Joseph 1-1-0, Paysinger
1-1-0, Amukamara 1-0-0, Canty 1-0-0, Webster
1-0-0, Umenyiora 0-1-0. New England, Mayo
8-3-0, Spikes 8-3-0, McCourty 6-1-0, Molden
5-0-0, Arrington 4-1-0, Anderson 3-2-1
1
2,
Ninkovich 3-1-0
1
2, Moore 3-0-0, Wilfork 3-0-0,
Chung 2-4-0, Ihedigbo 2-3-0, Slater 2-0-0,
Warren 1-1-0, Deaderick 1-0-1, Fletcher 1-0-0,
Gronkowski 1-0-0, Love 1-0-0, Ellis 0-2-0,
White 0-2-0, Gostkowski 0-1-0.
INTERCEPTIONSN.Y. Giants, Blackburn
1-0.
MISSED FIELD GOALSNone.
OFFICIALSReferee John Parry, Ump Carl
Paganelli, HL Tom Stabile, LJ Gary Arthur, FJ
Gary Cavaletto, SJ Laird Hayes, BJ Tony
Steratore, Replay Larry Nemmers.
Time: 3:23.
the football world, and Manning
owns two Super Bowl MVP
awards, the same number as Bra-
dy.
It was a classic can-you-top-
this showdown, and Manning
won. He finished 30-for-40 for
296 yards and one touchdown,
while Brady was 27 for 41for 276
yards, with two TDs and one in-
terception.
Its been a wild game, a wild
season, Manning said. This
isnt about one person. Its about
one team, a team coming togeth-
er.
Manning led six comeback vic-
tories during the season and set
an NFL record with 15 fourth-
quarter touchdown passes. He
showed that brilliance in the
clutch on the winning drive. He
completed five passes, including
a sensational 38-yard sideline
catch by Mario Manningham to
open the drive.
On second down at the Patri-
ots 6 and with only one timeout
remaining, Belichick had his de-
fense stand up as Bradshaw took
the handoff. Bradshaw thought
about stopping short of the end
zone, then tumbled in untou-
ched.
I was yelling to him, Dont
score, dont score, Manning
said. He tried to stop, but he fell
into the end zone.
Brady couldnt answer in the fi-
nal 57 seconds, although his des-
peration pass into the end zone
on the final play fell just beyond
the grasp of All-Pro tight end Rob
Gronkowski. New England
(15-4), winner of 10 straight since
a loss to the Giants in November,
was done.
I want to give the Giants a lot
of credit, Brady said. Its a very
goodfootball teamandthey put a
lot of pressure on us. We just
came up a little bit short.
Brady headed off with his head
bowed, holding his helmet, while
around himwas the wild celebra-
tion by the Giants, NFL cham-
pions for the eighth and per-
haps most unlikely time.
Great toughness, great faith,
and great plays by a number of
guys today, Manning said, de-
flecting some of the attention.
Still, he one-upped Brady. And
Peyton.
It just feels good to win a Su-
per Bowl, it doesnt matter where
you are, Manning said.
It was the fifth trip to a Super
Bowl for Brady and Belichick, ty-
ing the record. And it looked like
a successful one when they
stormed back from a 9-0 deficit
and led 17-9 in the third quarter.
But the Giants, who reached
New England territory on every
possession except a kneeldown
at the end of the first half, got
field goals of 38 and 33 yards
from Lawrence Tynes. And it
looked like Tynes, who kicked
them into the Super Bowl four
years ago at Green Bay and again
this year at SanFrancisco, bothin
overtime, would get called on
again.
Then Belichick, known to try
just about anything in a game,
took a risk that didnt pay off.
I thought we played very com-
petitive. ... We were in the lead
for a good part of the game. We
just came up a couple of plays
short, Belichick said. You dont
feel good after you lose this
game.
The Giants are the first Super
Bowl winner that was outscored
during the regular season. They
were 6-2 after that 24-20 victory
at New England, then lost four
straight and five of six.
Coach Tom Coughlin insisted
the prize was still within reach.
Nowthe Giants are holding tight
to that Vince Lombardi Trophy.
What I was concerned with
was these guys making their own
history, Coughlin said. This is
such a wonderful thing, these
guys carving their own history.
New England had the ball for
all of one play in the first 11 1-2
minutes, and that play was an ut-
ter failure, a rare poor decisionby
Brady. After Steve Weatherfords
punt was downed at the NewEn-
gland 6, Brady dropped to pass in
the end zone and had time. With
everyone covered and Giants de-
fensive end Justin Tuck finally
coming free to provide pressure,
Brady heaved the ball downfield
while still in the pocket.
Only problem: No Patriots re-
ceivers were anywhere near the
pass. The Giants were awarded a
safety for Bradys grounding in
the end zone.
Manning, meanwhile, couldnt
have been more on target early,
hitting six receivers in the first
period, completing his first nine
throws, a Super Bowl record.
He also was aided by Ahmad
Bradshaw, who hardly looked
like a running back with a bad
foot. Bradshaw broke a 24-yard
run, and New England made an-
other critical mistake by having
12 men on the field on a third-
and-3 on which the Giants fum-
bled.
Instead, New York got a first
down at the 6, and two plays later
Victor Cruz beat James Ihedigbo
on a slant to make it 9-0, prompt-
ing Cruz to break into his signa-
ture salsa move.
Mannings first incompletion
didnt come until 1:19 into the
second quarter. At that point, it
was 9-3 after Stephen Gostkow-
skis 29-yard field goal. The Patri-
ots got to the Giants 11, but All-
Pro DE Jason Pierre-Paul
blocked a third-down pass.
Soon after, when the Patriots
had a three-and-out and Pierre-
Paul blocked another throw, Bel-
ichick and offensive coordinator
Bill OBrien had a quick discus-
sion. Then OBrien, soon to take
over as Penn State coach, went
over to the struggling Brady.
The talk must have helped. On
the final series of the opening
half, Brady was masterful. Start-
ing at his 4, and ignoring the last
time the Patriots began a series
in the shadowof the end zone, he
was vintage Brady.
ELI
Continued from Page 1B
AP PHOTO
New York Giants guard Chris Snee hugs a fan while celebrating
after the Giants defeated the New England Patriots 21-17 in Super
Bowl XLVI Sunday.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 7B
S U P E R B O W L X L V I
NEW YORK GI ANTS 21, NEW ENGLAND PATRI OTS 17
INDIANAPOLIS Eli Man-
ning jerseys are all over the
place at Lucas Oil Stadium.
Peyton Mannings little broth-
er has been popular all week in
Peytons town, and Colts fans
seem to be rooting more for
Elis Giants than Tom Bradys
New England Patriots in Sun-
days Super Bowl.
While Eli jerseys were promi-
nent, it didnt take much walk-
ing around to find Colts blue
Peyton Manning jerseys. Those
wearing them were Giants fans
for a day.
Im pulling for Eli, Colts fan
Harry Dimitriaois said. And it
has something to do with Pey-
ton.
Dave Demlow, a Colts season
ticket holder, also wearing a
blue No. 18 jersey, didnt want
to see the Patriots celebrate on
Indys home field. The Colts
and Patriots have had one of
the NFLs most intense rivalries
for the past decade.
We love Eli, we love the
Giants, Demlow said. Any-
body but the Patriots.
NEW JERSEY 2014: Its still
two years away, but there
should be optimism that a
cold-weather Super Bowl in
northern New Jersey in 2014
wont be a frigid one at least
based on the past two years.
Once again, the weather at
MetLife Stadium in East Ruth-
erford, N.J. on Sunday was
perfect for a Super Bowl: sun-
ny, with temperatures around
40 degrees and almost no wind.
The weather was even better
last year. It was sunny, with a
high of 46 and winds out of the
northwest at 10 to 15 mph
and that happened during one
of the worst winters in the New
York metropolitan area.
As for Sundays game be-
tween the Giants and Patriots,
its a pleasant, sunny day with
temperatures in the mid 40s in
Indianapolis. Then again, Lucas
Oil Stadium has a roof and
MetLife Stadium doesnt.
League owners voted in May
2010 to play the title game in
the $1.6 billion stadium co-
owned by the Jets and Giants,
deciding to play the first out-
door title game at a northern
site.
There have been memorable
cold-weather playoff games.
The Giants beat the Packers
23-20 in overtime in the NFC
title game on Jan. 21, 2008, in
Green Bay, Wis., with the tem-
peratures at minus 3 and a
wind chill of minus 24.
Cincinnati beat San Diego
27-7 in the 1981 AFC title game
known as the Freezer Bowl.
The temperature in Ohio was
minus 9, with 35 mph winds
making it feel like minus 59.
Of course, theres the 1967
NFL title game the Ice Bowl
in Green Bay. The Packers beat
Dallas 21-17 in a game played
with the temperature at minus
13 and a wind chill of minus 48.
The coldest kickoff temper-
ature in Super Bowl history
was 39 degrees at Tulane Stadi-
um in New Orleans for the 1972
Super Bowl, when Dallas beat
Miami 24-3. Its been at least 57
degrees for every outdoor Su-
per Bowl since 1975, when it
was 46 degrees.
CONSOLATION PRIZE: No
Super Bowl for Tiquan Under-
wood. A Super Bowl ring?
Maybe.
The seldom-used wide receiv-
er, cut on the eve of Sundays
title game against the New
York Giants, would be eligible
for a championship ring should
the New England Patriots win
their fourth Super Bowl in 11
years.
The move came Saturday
night to make room for defen-
sive end Alex Silvestro, who
was signed from the practice
squad. He played in one game
this season but found himself
with a chance to appear in the
Super Bowl.
Underwood seems to be
handling his release well.
Im Fine, This Will Only
Make Me Stronger, the 24-
year-old said on his Twitter
feed. Tough Times Never Last
But Tough Ppl Do.
And in an earlier tweet: This
Is Nothing But MOTIVA-
TION....
The Patriots signed Under-
wood on Aug. 29 after he was
released by Jacksonville. They
released, signed and released
him again before he rejoined
them on Nov. 24. In five regular
season games he had three
receptions. He had none in two
playoff games.
The move allowed the Patri-
ots to active wide receiver
Chad Ochocinco, who was for
the AFC championship game.
DISNEY OR ARUBA? The
Super Bowl MVP usually walks
away with a shiny new ring and
a trip to Disney World.
Sundays losing team may
have its day in the sun, too.
The Aruba Tourism Author-
ity wants the team that loses
Sundays game between the
Giants and Patriots to visit the
island nation and is offering an
all-expenses-paid trip to lure
them.
Theres no word on whether
either team will accept the
offer, but its unlikely any play-
ers will be shouting Were
going to Aruba.
NO PEYTON PIC: The space
on the north end outside of
Lucas Oil Stadium which nor-
mally has a large photo of Colts
quarterback Peyton Manning
instead has a Patriots logo.
Just to the left of that spot: a
photo of Patriots quarterback
Tom Brady.
Eli, Peyton jerseys plentiful in stadium
By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer
N O T E B O O K
For all the pomp and excess
of Madonnas Super Bowl half-
time show, it is likely to be a sin-
gle extended middle finger by
guest singer M.I.A. that is most
remembered.
The gesture, accompanied by
a barely disguised expletive,
came during a performance of
Madonnas new single, Give
Me All Your Luvin. At the end
of her lines, M.I.A. appeared to
sing I dont give a (expletive),
although it was hard to hear
clearly.
The incident was reminiscent
of Janet Jacksons infamous
wardrobe malfunction eight
years ago -- a surprise risque
moment in front of tens of mil-
lions of unsuspecting viewers.
The brief exposure of Jacksons
nipple during the 2004 halftime
show raised a storm of contro-
versy and put CBS in hot water
with the Federal Communica-
tions Commission.
The Super Bowl, shown on
NBC this year, is routinely
viewed by more than 100 mil-
lion people, the biggest TV
event of the year.
The screen briefly went
blurred after M.I.A.s gesture in
what seemed like a late attempt
to cut out the camera shot. The
NFL, which produces the show,
had no immediate comment.
Madonna had admittedly
been nervous about her per-
formance, hoping to position
herself as the queen of a new
generation of pop stars with an
opulent show and a sharp per-
formance that mixed her new
release with more familiar
songs. She seemed like Roman
royalty when muscle-bound
men carried her extravagant
throne across the football field
to the stage for her opening
song, Vogue.
Guests Cee Lo and dance
rockers LMFAO also appeared
with M.I.A. The singing and
dancing on Vogue was smart-
ly choreographed, as Madonna
moved more deliberately -- she
is 53 -- but still adroitly. She
briefly appeared to stumble at
one point while tryingtomake a
step on the stage set, but reco-
vered in time.
She let a tightrope walker
make the more acrobatic moves
during a performance of Mu-
sic.
Madonna carried gold pom-
pons for a performance of her
new single. Twitter was alight
with questions about the vocals
beinglipsynchedor augmented
by tapes, particularly during
this song.
The best guest was clearly
Cee Lo, who joined Madonna
for the final song, Like a
Prayer. They were joined by a
robedchorus inthe shows most
soaring performance. With a
puff of white smoke, Madonna
disappeared down a trap door
in the stage, and lights on the
field spelled out World Peace.
The veteran stars vocals
were not strong throughout,
lending to a sense of distance.
Still, the finger incident is the
more likely headline from the
event. Earlier, Kelly Clarkson,
Blake Shelton and Miranda
Lambert offered some pregame
patriotism. Shelton and Lam-
bert did a twangy duet on
America the Beautiful and
Clarkson, in a simple black
dress, sang The Star Spangled
Banner without a hitch after
last years performer, Christina
Aguilera, flubbed a line.
AP PHOTOS
Nicki Minaj performs during halftime of Super Bowl XLVI between the New York Giants and the New England Patriots, Sunday in
Indianapolis.
Vulgarities overshadow Madonna
Madonna, right, and Nicki Minaj perform during halftime Sun-
day.
By DAVID BAUDER
AP Entertainment Writer
NEW YORK Forget the bat-
tle between the Giants and the
Pats. The real Super Bowl show-
down is between advertisers.
The Super Bowl is advertis-
ings biggest stage and compa-
nies spent an average of $3.5 mil-
lion for 30-second commercials
for the right to duke it out during
Sundays game. This years ads
use celebrities, nostalgia and sex
appeal to draw in the 111 million-
plus viewers who are expected to
tune in.
Viewers challenge the corpo-
rate community can you really
entertain me on Sunday? says
Bob Horowitz, executive pro-
ducer of the annual CBS Super
Bowls Greatest Commercials
show. The bar is high but I be-
lieve the creative is stepping it up
a notch this year.
Inthe first quarter, automakers
dominated. Audis ad features its
bright LED headlights disrupt-
ing a vampire party. Meanwhile,
Chevys Silverado ad baits rival
Ford in a doomsday scenario.
Chevy Silverado drivers survive
the endof the world, it seems, but
a Ford driver didnt make it. And
Hyundais ad goes for laughs,
showing a cheetah thats meant
to race a Hyundai turns on a by-
stander instead.
Other first-quarter highlights
include a Best Buy ad that shows
the inventors of things like the
camera phone. M&Ms ad fea-
tures a nude M&M who took
off his colored shell at a party.
Here are some other ad high-
lights to look out for during the
remainder of the game:
Sex sells
Several advertisers decided to
use scantily-clad people in their
ads to draw attention.
Clothing retailer H&Ms ad
shows soccer star David Beck-
ham in his underwear.
Online florist Teleflora and au-
tomaker Kia bothuse Victoria Se-
crets model Adriana Lima.
Star power
Celebrities always draw atten-
tion, a fact Super Bowl advertis-
ers continuetousetotheir advan-
tage.
Chrysler, one of nine automak-
ers advertising during the game,
is airing a two-minute Super
Bowl ad that stars Clint East-
wood. The aging actor talks
about the rebirth of Chrysler and
Detroit. This follows the compa-
nys ad last year that starred rap-
per Eminem.
And real-estate company Cen-
tury 21s ad shows that a real es-
tate agent is able to outdo speed
skater Apolo Ohno on the ice,
business mogul DonaldTrumpin
business and former football
player Deion Sanders at an open
house.
Ads battle
for title of
their own
By MAE ANDERSON
AP Business Writer
INDIANAPOLIS Mario
Manningham is no longer the
New York Giants forgotten re-
ceiver.
Manningham emerged from
the shadow of Hakeem Nicks
and Victor Cruz with a catch that
will rival David Tyrees Super
Bowl helmet grab four years ago,
helping the Giants knock off the
New England Patriots 21-17 in
the NFL championship game on
Sunday.
Manninghams catch wasnt as
improbable as Tyrees grab that
led the Giants to a 17-14 win over
New England in 2008. It was just
as clutch and just as timely, and
Tyree was there to see it.
Running a go pattern up the
left sideline on a first-and-10 from
their own 12 and down 17-15,
Manningham made a 38-yard
over-the-shoulder catch between
two defenders and right in front
of Patriots coach Bill Belichick
to help set up Ahmad Bradshaws
game-winning 6-yard run with
57 seconds to go.
Belichick didnt hesitate to
challenge the catch, also contest-
ed by Sterling Moore and Patrick
Chung. Referee John Parry re-
viewed it and saw that Manning-
hamhad both feet inbounds, put-
ting the Giants at midfield.
Manning went back to Man-
ningham on the next three plays.
On the first, the receiver ran the
wrong pattern, but he followed
that with catches of 16 and 2
yards to move the ball to the 32-
yard line.
We just tried to be patient,
said Manningham, who finished
with five catches for 73 yards.
Got to be patient with this
game. We knewbig plays was go-
ing to come, we just had to take
advantage of them.
Two passes to Nicks and a cou-
ple of runs by Bradshaw got the
ball to the 6-yard line, where the
Patriots let Bradshaw score so
they had a chance to win the
game with a last drive.
Tom Brady wound up 51 yards
short when his desperation pass
fell incomplete in the end zone
with no time left, giving the Gi-
ants their second Super Bowl
victory in four years.
Nicks, who led the Giants re-
ceivers in the postseason, had a
team-high 10 catches for 109
yards, while Cruz had four for
25, including a short touchdown.
Forgotten
receiver
delivers
Mario Manningham comes up
with crucial catch during
game-winning drive.
By TOMCANAVAN
AP Sports Writer
C M Y K
PAGE 8B MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 36/24
Average 35/19
Record High 59 in 1991
Record Low -10 in 1918
Yesterday 35
Month to date 144
Year to date 3118
Last year to date 3864
Normal year to date 3764
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date trace
Normal month to date 0.39
Year to date 1.90
Normal year to date 2.76
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 6.04 -0.63 22.0
Towanda 3.72 -0.42 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 4.30 -0.10 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 45-51. Lows: 26-29. Mostly sunny
and mild. Mostly clear tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 49-54. Lows: 32-37. Mostly sunny
and breezy. Mostly clear and breezy
tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 43-47. Lows: 21-30. Mostly sunny
and mild. Becoming partly cloudy
tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 52-53. Lows: 34-36. Mostly sunny
and mild. Mostly clear tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 50-54. Lows: 34-44. Sunny to part-
ly cloudy. Mostly clear tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 28/12/.00 31/21/sn 35/25/s
Atlanta 70/55/.04 58/37/pc 60/41/s
Baltimore 44/35/.00 53/35/s 52/32/s
Boston 35/22/.00 49/33/s 44/27/pc
Buffalo 36/30/.00 43/30/s 32/24/c
Charlotte 56/46/.34 54/34/pc 61/38/s
Chicago 45/29/.00 49/35/s 37/28/c
Cleveland 42/26/.00 42/30/s 34/26/c
Dallas 48/39/.00 53/39/pc 59/36/c
Denver 32/8/.00 35/14/pc 28/16/pc
Detroit 46/22/.00 44/29/s 34/21/c
Honolulu 83/57/.00 78/67/s 77/66/sh
Houston 55/47/.00 59/44/c 63/43/c
Indianapolis 49/32/.00 48/30/s 45/28/c
Las Vegas 61/39/.00 62/43/s 61/45/pc
Los Angeles 74/50/.00 68/52/pc 63/50/r
Miami 78/70/.00 80/68/sh 82/69/pc
Milwaukee 42/32/.00 47/31/s 31/25/pc
Minneapolis 30/27/.00 42/19/s 25/14/s
Myrtle Beach 73/59/.00 56/41/c 61/42/pc
Nashville 56/48/.00 53/31/s 56/35/pc
New Orleans 68/60/.00 64/47/pc 66/46/c
Norfolk 45/43/.30 52/39/pc 55/38/s
Oklahoma City 50/35/.00 54/33/pc 53/28/sh
Omaha 29/16/.00 38/21/s 28/15/c
Orlando 81/60/.00 81/62/sh 80/61/c
Phoenix 72/43/.00 70/45/s 73/48/pc
Pittsburgh 44/29/.00 47/28/s 42/27/pc
Portland, Ore. 53/30/.00 52/35/s 51/37/pc
St. Louis 49/39/.04 51/31/s 49/29/sh
Salt Lake City 42/22/.00 42/27/c 46/31/s
San Antonio 53/43/.14 56/41/c 63/48/c
San Diego 73/50/.00 64/49/pc 63/51/r
San Francisco 59/42/.00 61/50/c 56/44/r
Seattle 56/35/.00 54/34/s 53/36/pc
Tampa 78/67/.00 78/62/sh 79/62/c
Tucson 72/36/.00 71/43/s 73/46/pc
Washington, DC 45/38/.00 54/37/s 53/33/s
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 23/16/.00 27/15/sf 26/14/s
Baghdad 64/34/.00 62/40/s 63/41/c
Beijing 39/21/.00 27/14/s 32/15/s
Berlin 16/1/.09 15/4/s 22/8/c
Buenos Aires 86/70/.00 92/72/t 93/74/t
Dublin 45/37/.00 48/40/sh 43/36/c
Frankfurt 23/5/.00 17/9/s 22/10/c
Hong Kong 70/63/.00 70/62/sh 63/54/sh
Jerusalem 66/43/.00 59/50/c 56/41/sh
London 36/32/.00 40/36/sh 38/30/pc
Mexico City 68/50/.00 65/47/sh 61/45/sh
Montreal 25/3/.00 34/14/c 14/5/s
Moscow 16/7/.00 13/-1/sf 6/-4/pc
Paris 27/21/.00 33/21/pc 29/18/s
Rio de Janeiro 95/77/.00 86/73/s 85/74/s
Riyadh 64/45/.00 69/49/s 71/47/s
Rome 41/28/.00 44/26/pc 45/25/c
San Juan 83/71/.08 83/74/sh 82/73/sh
Tokyo 46/37/.00 53/49/sh 52/38/sh
Warsaw 7/-2/.00 13/0/pc 22/7/c
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
53/35
Reading
52/31
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
47/28
48/29
Harrisburg
52/30
Atlantic City
52/34
New York City
52/36
Syracuse
46/26
Pottsville
48/30
Albany
45/29
Binghamton
Towanda
47/26
47/25
State College
46/29
Poughkeepsie
52/26
53/39
49/35
35/14
57/40
42/19
68/52
62/51
47/30
31/15
54/34
52/36
44/29
58/37
80/68
59/44
78/67
36/24
31/21
54/37
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:10a 5:26p
Tomorrow 7:09a 5:27p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 4:27p 6:00a
Tomorrow 5:36p 6:36a
Full Last New First
Feb. 7 Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 29
It's shaping up to
be another mild
week, but we
could see a few
urries in the
forecast. Today
will start off
chilly, but warm
up to 48 with
plenty of sun-
shine. Tuesday is
looking great as
well, 43, with
mostly sunny
skies. We will see
a few urries
Wednesday
morning and the
high will only
reach 38.
Thursday will be
partly cloudy
with urries. The
high on Friday
will jump back to
42. It will be a
partly cloudy
day with urries.
Mostly cloudy
skies return on
Saturday and
Sunday. The
highs for both
days will only
reach 35, and
urries are in
the forecast.
-Michelle Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: A frontal system will produce showers and isolated thunderstorms over the
Florida Peninsula today, with isolated showers possible from Georgia into the southern Appalachians
and the Carolinas. Light snow showers will also be possible in northern New England. Rain and snow
can also be expected in the central and southern Rockies.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Sunny, mild
TUESDAY
Mostly
sunny
43
29
THURSDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
flurries
40
25
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny,
flurries
42
25
SATURDAY
Mostly
cloudy,
flurries
35
25
SUNDAY
Cloudy,
cooler,
urries
35
20
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny,
urries
38
26
48

26

C M Y K
CLICK S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012
timesleader.com
HEART BALL AT THE
WESTMORELAND CLUB
STORYTIME EVENT AT
BARNES & NOBLE
PAT SOLANO GETS
LEADERSHIP AWARD
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Diane Kane, left, and Stacey Bolesta FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Michele Ruggiero took her children Gabriele and Tonna
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Elaine Fisher and her son-in-law Sal Sciandra
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Matt Dubaskas, left, and Sydney Fry
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Randy Brzoska and son Noah BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Leadership Wilkes-Barre Executive Director Lori Nocito,
left, with Lissa Bryan-Smith
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Heath and Kara LaRose
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Sondra Rivello and daughter Renny BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Former Pittston Mayor Michael Lombardo, right, with
Brent Berger
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
David Stiner, left, and Michelle Merkel
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kelly Purcell and her child Conlon
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom Leighton, left, and Jerry Bonner
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Deborah and Carl Roszkowski
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Danielle Brewington and daughter Madison
BILL TARUTIS/ FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
State Rep. Mike Carroll, left, and Conrad Schintz of Geis-
inger Health System
C M Y K
PAGE 2C MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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HANOVERTWP.: The Hanov-
er Township Amvets Post 59
Ladies Auxiliary will conduct its
monthly meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday.
Newmembers are welcome.
HAZLETON: Rep. Tarah Too-
hil (R-Luzerne) recently an-
nounced that a representative
fromthe American Legion will be
available on a monthly basis at
her district office in Hazleton, 1
W. Broad St., Suite100, to pro-
vide information to local veterans
on a variety of issues.
The service will be provided
free of charge on the second
Tuesday of every month. The first
session is scheduled for 10 a.m.-3
p.m. Feb. 14. Veterans, dependent
spouses and children of veterans
are eligible to receive assistance
regarding Veterans Adminis-
tration benefits, including filing
claims for compensation and
pensions. Membership in the
American Legion is not necessary
to qualify for assistance.
HAZLETON: The Department
of Veterans Affairs Mobile Veter-
ans Center is scheduled to make
a visit to the Laurel Mall, 106
Laurel Mall Road, Hazleton,
starting at 9:30 a.m. on Feb. 14,
weather permitting. The center
provides a variety of services
ranging fromfamily counseling to
drug and alcohol assessments.
Services are provided free of
charge to veterans and their
families.
MOCANAQUA: Mocanaqua
Ladies V.F.W. Auxiliary Memorial
Post 6434 will meet 6 p.m.
Wednesday at the Shickshinny
Senior Center. District President
Marianne will visit.
NEWS FOR
VETERANS
UFCW Federal Credit Union recently made a donation to the Ha-
nover Township Fire Department. Money was raised by employees
through various fundraisers and dress-down days. The fire depart-
ment participated in the UFCW Community Fundraising Picnic, of-
fering safety demonstrations and tours of the Fire Safety House. At
the check presentation, from left: John Hayduk; chief executive offi-
cer, UFCW; Jeff Tudgay, fire chief; and Tammy Kopiak, committee
chairperson.
Credit Union fundraisers benefit fire department
The Luzerne Volunteer Fire Department officers for 2012 were recently installed by Magistrate David Barrila. President Gail Scott was
also awarded a Life Membership in the Department. At the installation, from left, first row: John Tarreto, trustee; Wayne Harger, secretary;
Frank Barber Sr., second deputy chief; Angie Rifenbery, financial secretary; and Frank Barber Jr. vice president. Second row: Magistrate
Barrila; Ron Rahl, fire chief; Jeff Rifenbery, first deputy chief; Steve Gurnari, sergeant at arms; Ed Rahl, first assistant chief; Mike Rahl,
second assistant chief; Gail Scott, president; and Dave Baker Sr., parliamentarian. The treasurer for 2012 is Rob Yakus.
Luzerne Volunteer Fire Department officers sworn in for 2012
Thursday
ASHLEY: The Ashley Memorial
Day Association, 6:30 p.m. at the
American Legion.
MEETINGS
Editors note: A complete list of
Volunteer Opportunities can be
viewed at www.timesleader.com by
clicking Community News under
the People tab. To have your orga-
nization listed, visit the United Way
of Wyoming Valleys volunteer
page at www.unitedwaywb.org. For
more information, contact Kathy
Sweetra at 970-7250 or kswee-
tra@timesleader.com.
Representatives of GUARD Insurance Group, Wilkes-Barre,
recently presented their donation to the United Way of Wyoming
Valley. Thanks to the companys pledge to match employee con-
tributions at 50 cents on the dollar, the total donation from the
company and employees amounted to $92,919. At the check
presentation, from left: Bill Jones, president and chief executive
officer, United Way of Wyoming Valley; Karen Stempowski, human
resources specialist and United Way employee coordinator,
GUARD; Ann Toole, senior vice president of finance and co-chair
for Leadership Giving, GUARD; Amy Zawada, assistant director of
marketing and community impact, United Way; and Carl Witkow-
ski, chief operating officer and executive vice president, GUARD.
GUARD Insurance Group donates to United Way
Big Top Rental of West Pittston recently made a $1,000 donation
to the West Pittston Library to pay for the refurbishing of a donated
copy machine. At the check presentation, from left, are Anne Bram-
blett Barr, director, West Pittston Library, and Olivia and Sophia
Farrell.
Big Top Rental makes donation to library
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 3C
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
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FORD BONUS REBATE....1,000
FMCC REBATE..........1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE....1,250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP......851
6.2L V8, Air, CD, XL Decor
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*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special
APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. BUY FOR prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles
are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
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FORD REBATE............1,500
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OFF LEASE REBATE....1,250
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XL WORK PKG DISCOUNT OFF MSRP....500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP......841
3.7L V6 Engine, XL Plus Pkg.,
Cruise Control, CD, MyKey
Sys., Pwr. Equipment Group,
Pwr. Mirrors, 40/20/40 Split
Seat, XL Decor Group
Super Cab, Auto., Sport Trim, CD, Chrome
Step Bar, Privacy Glass, Sliding Rear Window,
Satellite Radio, Cloth Sport Bucket Seats
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FORD REBATE...............1,500
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FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. .195
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ALL WHEEL DRIVE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
3.5L Engine, MyFord Display, Auto. Climate Control,
Pwr. Mirrors, 17 Steel Wheels, CD, Keyless Entry,
MyKey, Cruise Control, Pwr. Windows, Pwr. Door Locks
FORD BONUS REBATE.......1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.......1,250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.........356
24
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ALL WHEEL DRIVE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
5.4L Auto., PL, PW, 3rd Row Seat, Trailer Tow, Pwr. Liftgate, Driver Vision
Pkg., Rearview Camera, 18 Alum. Wheels, Rear Air/Heat Remote Keyless
Entry, Auto. Lamp, Personal Safety Sys., Safety Canopy, ANti-Theft Sys.,
Tubular Step Bar, CD, Advance Trac w/Roll Stability Control, Climate Control,
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FORD REBATE...............1,000
FORD BONUS REBATE.......1,000
OFF LEASE REBATE.......1,250
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......2,166
ALL WHEEL DRIVE
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse
Sensing Sys., CD, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, PDL, PW,
18 Alum. Wheels, Anti-Theft Sys., Perimeter Alarm,
Sirius Satellite Radio,
FORD REBATE..........1,000
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Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, PW, PDL,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft
Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry, Message Center,
FORD REBATE............500
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FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. .1,445
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C M Y K
PAGE 4C MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must
be typed or computer-generat-
ed. Include your childs name,
age and birthday, parents,
grandparents and great-grand-
parents names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages.
Dont forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
We cannot return photos
submitted for publication in
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photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious
or original professional pho-
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lost, in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birth-
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GUIDELINES
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Sammy Supey, son of Kristine
and SamSupey, is celebrating his
ninth birthday today, Feb. 6. His
sister, Samara Rose, celebrated
her fifth birthday Jan. 3. Sammy
and Samara are the grandchil-
dren of George Chronowski and
the late Barbara Chronowski,
West Wyoming, and Tomand
Mary Supey, West Pittston. They
are the great-grandchildren of
TomSupey Sr. and Genevieve
Labaty, both of Wyoming.
Sammy
and Samara R. Supey
Savannah Marielle Nealon, daugh-
ter of Michael and Katie Nealon,
Canonsburg, is celebrating her 1 1th
birthday today, Feb. 6. Savannah is
a granddaughter of James and
Ann Marie Nealon, Wilkes-Barre,
and Fred and Rose Stamm, Rich-
mond, Va. She has a sister, Kaitlyn,
17, and a brother, Jamie, 8.
Savannah M. Nealon
Michael William Finarelli, son of
Elizabeth and Michael Finarelli,
Dallas, is celebrating his fifth
birthday today, Feb. 6. Michael is
a grandson of Karen and Tho-
mas Finarelli Sr. and Joan and
Bill Abrams, both of Dallas. He is
a great-grandson of Edward
Conologue and the late Helen
Conologue, both of Forty Fort;
the late Matilda Konecke, Moun-
tain Top; and the late Eleanor
Dolan Abrams, Scranton.
Michael W. Finarelli
C.R.H. Realty-Club 79, 79 Blackman St., Wilkes-Barre, recently
made a donation of $1,000 to St. Jude Childrens Hospital in Mem-
phis, Tenn. The check was presented to attorney John Moses, the
local representative from St. Jude Childrens Hospital. The club has
supported the hospital since 1986 and representatives have visited
on several occasions. C.R.H. Realty-Club 79 is also a founding spon-
sor of the national memorial for Flight 93 that crashed in Penn-
sylvania on Sept. 11, 2001. At the check presentation, from left, are
Chuck Hoynowski, owner, Club 79; Moses; and Pearl Warren.
C.R.H Realty Club 79 gives $1,000 to childrens hospital
The Wilkes-Barre Club of the Verizon Telecom Pioneers 7 volun-
teered to help the Salvation Army with its annual kettle campaign.
A large group of Pioneers rang bells at various locations in the
area. The Telephone Pioneers are a nonprofit organization of re-
tired and active members of Verizon Communications. Some of the
bell ringers, from left, are Dee Pavlick, Eileen Pisonick, Rosemary
Gawat and Rose Lee.
Telecom Pioneers partake in kettle campaign
Two employees of Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania
recently spent the day at Childrens Service Center (CSC) sprucing
up the Partial Hospitalization building on the South Franklin Street
campus. Blue Cross has a group of employees who volunteer
throughout the year at various non-profits throughout the com-
munity. They have volunteered for years at CSC as part of the
United Ways Day of Caring in May. Participants, from left: Tiffany
Walter, Blue Cross; Jackie Ratchford, activities coordinator, CSC;
and Megan Trutt, Blue Cross.
Blue Cross employees volunteer at CSC
The Dallas Lions Club is planning its annual Night at the Races on
March 24 at the American Legion, Dallas. Doors open at 5 p.m. with
post time at 5:30 p.m. Admission is $5 per person and includes
food and drinks. Admission is free with the purchase of a horse for
$10. Tickets can be purchased in advance from any Lions member
or at the door. Co-chairmen of the event, from left, are Frank Roll-
man and Don Berlew.
Night at the Races scheduled for March 24
First National Community Bank (FNCB) recently announced a
$2,000 Education Improvement Tax Credit donation to Wilkes Uni-
versity. The gift will support innovative programming at Wilkes,
including Science in Motion, Women Empowered by Science, and
Adventures in Science. At the check presentation, from left: Jerry
Champi, chief operating officer, FNCB; Michael Wood, vice president
of advancement, Wilkes University; Steve Tokach, president and
chief executive officer, FNCB; and Joe Angelella, vice president and
relationship manager, FNCB.
Wilkes University receives educational donation
The Webelos-4 of Pack 281 earned first place at the Cub Scout
Winter Fun Day recently held in Kirby Park. The teams were re-
quired to build a campfire and a shelter that could survive overnight
and to assemble a backpack with survival gear, including first aid,
fire-starting and cooking equipment. Participating Webelos, from
left, are Ayden Carey, Davy Janoski, Jacob Fenske, Taylor Bolesta,
Joey Sabatini and Ben Ross.
Scouts take first place at Winter Fun Day
Connor Mulvey, West Pittston, recently received a Troop Com-
manders Letter of Appreciation from Captain James E. Degnan,
commanding officer, Pennsylvania State Police, Troop P, Wyoming.
Mulvey received the commendation for his actions during the Sep-
tember flooding of 2011. Connor risked his safety to assist his neigh-
bors in securing their properties and evacuating their family and
pets. Mulvey is the son of Michael and Lisa Mulvey. He has a broth-
er, Jimmy Mulvey, West Pittston. He is the grandson of Ronald and
Lynette Villano, West Pittston; Rosaire Mulvey, Moscow; and Michael
and Suzanne Mulvey, Mountain Top. Mulvey is a 10th-grade student
at Holy Redeemer High School, Wilkes-Barre, where he is on the
cross country and track and field teams and is a member of the
Mock Law Society. He is a member of Corpus Christi Parish, Immac-
ulate Conception Church, West Pittston.
Resident commended for bravery during flood
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 5C
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C M Y K
PAGE 6C MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
T E L E V I S I O N
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
CHRONICLE
CHRONICLE (XD-3D) (PG-13)
1:00PM, 3:10PM, 5:20PM, 7:30PM, 9:40PM
A DANGEROUS METHOD (DIGITAL) (R)
2:10PM
ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED
(DIGITAL) (G)
11:55PM, 2:20PM, 4:35PM, 6:50PM
ARTIST, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (3D) (G)
12:00PM, 2:15PM, 4:30PM, 7:00PM, 9:20PM
BIG MIRACLE (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:20PM, 4:00PM, 7:05PM, 9:45PM
CHRONICLE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:55AM, 2:05PM, 4:15PM, 6:25PM, 8:35PM,
10:45PM
CONTRABAND (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM, 3:35PM, 4:55PM, 6:15PM, 7:35PM,
9:00PM, 10:50PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
1:45PM, 4:35PM, 7:20PM, 10:30PM
EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:35PM, 3:30PM, 6:55PM, 9:50PM
GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, THE (2011)
(DIGITAL) (R)
3:15PM, 6:45PM, 10:20PM
GREY, THE (2012) (DIGITAL) (R)
1:40PM, 4:40PM, 7:45PM, 10:40PM
HAYWIRE (DIGITAL) (R)
9:15PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
1:10PM, 4:05PM, 7:00PM, 9:55PM
JOYFUL NOISE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
4:15PM, 10:35PM
MAN ON A LEDGE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, 2:30PM, 5:00PM, 7:50PM, 10;25PM
MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE GHOST PROTOCOL
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM
ONE FOR THE MONEY (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 2:25PM, 4:45PM, 7:10PM, 9:30PM
RED TAILS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:55PM, 4:25PM, 7:25PM, 10:15PM
SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF
SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:15PM, 7:15PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (3D) (R)
4:10PM, 6:30PM, 8:45PM, 11:00PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (DIGITAL) (R)
1:50PM
WOMAN IN BLACK, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 1:25PM, 2:40PM, 3:55PM, 5:10PM,
6:25PM, 7:40PM, 8:55PM, 10:10PM
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Gtterdmmerung LIVE
Saturday, February 11 at 12:00pm only
LA PHIL LIVE Dudamel Conducts Mahler
Saturday, February 18 at 5:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Ernani LIVE
Saturday, February 25 at 12:55pm only
National Theater Live: The Comedy Of Errors
Thursday, March 1 at 7:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Manon LIVE
Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
*Chronicle - PG13 - 95 min.
(1:00), (3:30), 7:20, 9:40
*The Woman In Black - PG13 - 105 min.
(12:50), (3:10), 7:10, 9:30
*Big Miracle - PG - 115 min.
(12:50), (3:15), 7:10, 9:40
One For The Money - PG13 - 100 min.
(12:40), (2:50), 7:20, 9:30
The Iron Lady - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:00), (3:40), 7:30, 10:00
Man On A Ledge - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:10), (3:40), 7:30, 10:10
The Descendants - R - 125 min.
(12:50), (3:40), 7:15, 9:50
The Artist - PG13 - 110 min.
(12:50), (3:10), 7:20, 9:40
The Grey - R - 130 min.
(12:40), (3:20), 7:15, 10:00
The Grey in D-Box - R - 130 min.
(12:40), (3:20), 7:15, 10:00
Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
PG13 - 140 min.
(12:30), (3:30), 7:00, 9:50
Red Tails - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:45), (3:40), 7:00, 9:45
***Underworld Awakening in 3D -
R - 100 min.
(1:20), (3:40), 7:30, 9:50
***Beauty and the Beast in 3D -
G - 95 min.
(12:30), (2:40), (4:45), 7:00, 9:10
Contraband - R - 120 min.
7:00, 9:30
Alvin and the Chipmunks:
Chipwrecked - G - 95 min
(12:30), (2:40), (4:50)
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TV TALK
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 7C
D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: Im 30
years old and have
a close relationship
with my mother, but
something is both-
ering me. When I
was a little girl, my
grandmother gave
me a U.S. savings bond for my birth-
day. My mother refuses to give it to
me. She said that my grandmother
intended it as a wedding gift.
The last time I brought it up, she
got emotional. When my grandmoth-
er died 18 years ago, it was tremen-
dously painful for my mother. I think
the reason Mom wont give me the
money is it makes her feel like her
mom is still around. By letting go of
the bond, she would be letting go of
one more piece of my grandmother.
I also think it makes her sad to pic-
ture her mom not being there at my
wedding. Despite all this, I cant help
but feel shes using this to have some
control over me.
Im studying for my masters de-
gree, and some extra money would be
helpful at the moment. I dont plan on
marrying anyone anytime soon. I feel
sad and angry. Does my mother have
the right to withhold the bond and
decide how and when I can use the
money? Should I drop the issue and
let her choose when to give it to me?
Please help, I need your advice.
30-Year-Old Child
Dear Child: Your grandmother
gave you the bond as a BIRTHDAY
gift. When you became an adult, it
should have been given to you then.
Youre a big girl now, and whether
you decide to marry or not it should
be yours to do with as you wish.
Its time to hand your mother a
large box of tissues and have a heart-
to-heart talk with her about that sav-
ings bond. Dont be surprised if she
finally admits she spent the money.
Dear Abby: How does one let a gum
chewer know, tactfully, that the smell
is revolting? Besides the irritation
and rudeness of chewing/popping
with ones mouth open, certain smells
often affect me physically.
From a young age, I have suffered
from migraine headaches, which can
bring on temporary loss of vision and
vomiting. The scent of certain mints
triggers migraines. My doctor has
warned me to avoid these triggers.
However, in a confined area like an
airplane, or sandwiched between two
chewers at a concert, its impossible. I
become violently ill from the smell. I
have tried politely explaining my situ-
ation, but the chewer is often indiffer-
ent, indignant or unsympathetic.
Abby, Im at a loss. My husband
and I often leave concerts we were
looking forward to because of this
problem. What can one do or say in a
situation when sitting for hours in an
assigned seat next to a gum chewer?
Hurting in Virginia Beach, Va.
Dear Hurting: In a theater, the first
thing you should do is explain the
problem to the gum chewer just as
you did to me. Say that the smell of
certain mints triggers migraines that
sometimes result in spontaneous
vomiting, and ask if the person can
dispose of the gum before you be-
come ill. If the person refuses, ask an
usher to seat you elsewhere.
When youre on an airplane and
trapped in similar circumstances, get
up and ask a flight attendant to locate
a seat for you thats far enough away
so you wont be affected. In most in-
stances, you will be accommodated.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Grandmothers savings bond gift matures into mother/daughter battle
To receive a collection of Abbys most
memorable and most frequently re-
quested poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keepers, P.O.
Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447.
(Postage is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
will come across people who
will take advantage of you. So
be tough. Drive a hard bargain.
Make others pay before they get
what they want from you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). The
same things that make you
cash poor make you soul rich.
Included in the category is any-
thing having to do with the care
and feeding of elders, children,
friends and pets.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You will
go into a situation with a pur-
pose and then rather quickly
completely forget what that
purpose was. Your mind is keen;
however, the situation around
you is filled with distractions.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). Youll
honor others with your atten-
tion, which of course is quite
different from honoring them
with your opinions. Making new
friends and fans is easy for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). When there
is much to do, everyone gets
along well. They have to. When
theres not enough to do, there
will be arguing and dissension.
Your job is to create challenges
and work that keep the team
focused.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). The way
to extra income is easy for you
once you realize how simple it is.
In order to sell your idea, service
or product, pay enough attention
to other people to know what
they are likely to buy.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Theres
potential for unnecessary con-
fusion and miscommunication.
Such trouble can be avoided,
though, by stating what you
want clearly and upfront.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Whatever the task at hand is, do
the hard part first. Youll be hap-
pier for this effort, which shows
strength of character and more
maturity than most people.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You see yourself as a giver, and
others see you as one of the
more generous people they
know. Youre vulnerable to being
unduly tapped by those who
fall into the category of taker.
Precautions will be necessary.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
Note that all really great ideas
initially seem to be improbable,
impertinent or threatening in
some way. Dont let early judg-
ments keep you from making a
real creative breakthrough.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
Because you are open-minded,
curious and willing to take a risk,
youll luck out this afternoon.
The happy consequence of your
good fortune will favorably
affect your social life.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You
love dealing with talented people
and are prepared for the special
challenges that sometimes go
along with this. Youll wisely
choose your words and pick your
battles with great care.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (Feb. 6).
Youll get the distinct impression
that love is on your side, and
youll be right. Try to be support-
ive of family even when loved
ones make choices with which
you dont agree. A wonderful
happening in August makes you
glad you stuck together as a
team. Taurus and Gemini people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 5, 32, 15, 3 and 18.
F U N N I E S MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The Housing Authority of the City of
Pittston will receive bids for the 2010 Cap-
ital Fund Program consisting of one (1)
contract, until 3:00 P.M. (local time) on the
ninth day of February, 2012 at the Offices
of the Housing Authority of the City of
Pittston, Joseph C. Infantino Towers, 500
Kennedy Boulevard, Pittston, Pennsylvania
18640.
The Contract is as follows:
Contract No. 2010-1 Entrance
Door Replacement Project
at Apollo Mid-Rise
Bids will be publicly opened and read
aloud beginning at 3:00 P.M. that same
day in the Community Room of Joseph C.
Infantino Towers.
Online Contracting Documents: Docu-
ments may be obtained on or after Janu-
ary 25, 2012 by contacting the Office of
A+E Group, Inc. Online access will be pro-
vided through the Engineers FTP site.
Printed Contracting Documents: Docu-
ments may be obtained after January 25,
2012 by contacting the Office of A+E
Group, Inc., and payment of a $30.00 non-
refundable fee to A+E Group, Inc.
Each Bid when submitted must be accom-
panied by a Bid Security which shall not be
less than ten (10%) percent of the amount
of the Total Base Bid; a Non-Collusion Affi-
davit; Statement of Bidders Qualification;
and Representations, Certifications and
Other Statements of Bidders HUD Form
5369-A. The successful Bidder will be
required to furnish and pay for a satisfac-
tory Performance Bond and a Labor and
Material Payment Bond.
Refer to other bidding requirements
described in Instruction to Bidders. Bid-
ders must submit their Bid on the Bid Form
provided. Bidders shall not alter this form
in anyway. All Bidders must be registered
on the A+E Group, Inc.'s Bidders List. A
Bidder must obtain Contracting Docu-
ments from A+E Group, Inc. or instruct A+E
Group, Inc. in writing to register the Bidder
on the Bidders List.
Attention is called to the provisions for
Equal Employment Opportunity and the
payment of not less than the minimum
salaries and wages as set forth in the Non
Technical Specifications must be paid on
the Project. All contractors and subcon-
tractors will be required to adhere to Sec-
tion - 3 of the Housing and Urban Develop-
ment Act of 1968 as amended.
The Housing Authority of the City of
Pittston reserves the right to accept or
reject any or all Bids and to waive any
informalities, irregularities. Defects, errors
or omissions in the bidding.
No bid shall be withdrawn for a period of
sixty (60) days subsequent to the opening
of the Bids, without consent of the Hous-
ing Authority of the City of Pittston.
The Housing Authority
of the City of Pittston
William Lisak
Executive Director
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
Wednesday Feb. 8 Special
.35 cent Wings
In House Only. Minimum purchase of a dozen.
Wednesday-Sunday Open at 4 pm
Home of the Original
O-Bar Pizza
MULTIPLE
ESTATES AUCTION
ANTIQUES &
COLLECTIBLES
TRAVERS AUCTIONS
56 Dorchester Dr., Dallas, PA
Tuesday, February 7
th
, 2012
Inspection: 3:30 PM Start Time: 5:00 PM
ANTIQUES (including furniture)
COLLECTIBLES CONTEMPORARY
FURNISHINGS JEWELRY
NICE BOX LOTS + MUCH MORE!!!
Visit us at: www.auctionzip.com (ID #2280)
or www.traversauctions.com
or call 570.674.2631
Travers Auction Barn: RH926
Auctioneer: Steve Traver AU3367L
10% Buyers Premium
LAW
DIRECTORY
Dont Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
Call 829-7130 To Place Your Ad
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
To place your
ad call...829-7130
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
135 Legals/
Public Notices
PENNSYLVANIA
PUBLIC UTILITY
COMMISSION
NOTICE
Application of UGI
Penn Natural Gas,
Inc for approval to
offer, render, furnish
or supply gas utility
service to the public
in additional territo-
ries of Bridgewater,
Forest Lake, Great
Bend, Harmony,
New Milford, and
Oakland Townships,
and Great Bend,
Hallstead, Lanes-
boro, Montrose,
New Milford, Oak-
land and Susque-
hanna Depot Bor-
oughs, Susquehan-
na County, PA.
Docket Number:
A-2012-2284831.
Formal protests and
petitions to inter-
vene must be filed in
accordance with
Title 52 of the Penn-
sylvania Code, on or
before February 21,
2012. All filings
must be made with
the Secretary of the
Pennsylvania Public
Utility Commission,
P. O. Box 3265, Har-
risburg, PA 17105-
3265, with a copy
served on the Appli-
cant. The docu-
ments filed in sup-
port of the Applica-
tion are available for
inspection and
copying at the
Office of the Secre-
tary between the
hours of 8:00 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m., Mon-
day through Friday,
on the Commis-
sions website at
www.puc.state.pa.u
s, and at the Appli-
cants business
address.
Applicant:
UGI Penn Natural
Gas Inc.
Through and By
Counsel:
Mark C. Morrow,
Esquire, Chief
Regulatory Counsel
UGI Corporation
460 North Gulph Rd
King of Prussia, PA
19406
AND
Michael W. Hassell,
Esquire
Christopher T.
Wright, Esquire
Post & Schell, PC
17 North Second St.
12th Floor
Harrisburg, PA
17101-1601
AND
David B.
MacGregor, Esquire
Post & Schell, PC
Four Penn Center
1600 John F.
Kennedy Boulevard
Philadelphia, PA
19103-2808
BY THE
COMMISSION
Rosemary Chiavetta
Secretary
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
110 Lost
ALL
JUNK
CAR,
TRUCKS
&
EQUIPMENT
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
LOST CAT, gold with
striped tail, female
name Juliette front
paws declawed,
green eyes, red
heart collar with
contact info.
REWARD. Duryea
area. 570-457-4547
or 570-656-2777
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
LOST. Beloved,
large male cat.
White with black
spots. Red & yell-
ow collar with name
tag. Answers to
Scruffy. 1/31/12
near Chestnut St.
Swoyersville.
REWARD!
570-332-1075
110 Lost
YELLOW LAB
Lost in the
Larksville area.
Answers to Zack.
No collar.
570-814-0653
120 Found
All Junk
Cars,
Trucks
&
Equipment
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
CAT FOUND; by
Mohegan Sun,
Plains. Large male.
Call to describe.
570-881-1555
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LEGAL NOTICE
Annual Meeting of
the Board of Direc-
tors of the Back
Mountain Memorial
Library will be held
Tuesday evening,
February 7 at 8:00
p.m. at
Appletree Terrace
North Pioneer Ave.,
Dallas, PA
NOTICE TO BID
Wyoming Area
School District
Football Supplies /
Football Recondi-
tioning Bids
Bids for football
supplies & equip-
ment and football
reconditioning for
the 2012-2013
school year will be
received at the
Office of the Secre-
tary, Wyoming Area
School District, 20
Memorial Street,
Exeter, Pennsylva-
nia, 18643, no later
than Friday, Febru-
ary 17, 2012, at
10:00 a.m. at which
time bids will be
opened. Bid specifi-
cations and condi-
tions are available
at the districts busi-
ness office, 20
Memorial Street,
Exeter, Pennsylva-
nia, 18643, Monday
through Friday, 8:00
a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Elizabeth
Gober-Mangan
Secretary of the
Board
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
The Wilkes-Barre
Township Zoning
Hearing Board will
conduct a hearing
upon the following
on February 14,
2012, at 7:00 PM in
the Municipal Build-
ing located at 150
Watson Street,
Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship, PA., 18702.
The public is invited
to attend. Pursuant
to the order issued
by the Court of
Common Pleas of
Luzerne County
regarding the for-
mer Saint Josephs
Monastery property
located at 783 East
Northampton
Street, Wilkes-Barre
Twp. The matter
has been remanded
back to the Zoning
Hearing Board for
further proceedings
to address the
unnecessary hard-
ship requirements
of 53 P.S.10910.2
Thomas Zedollik
Zoning/Code
Enforcement
Officer
145 Prayers
THANK YOU ST
JUDE & BLESSED
MOTHER FOR
PRAYER
ANSWERED. LM
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Active couple
longs to be
blessed with your
newborn to cher-
ish and educate in
our loving home.
EXPENSES PAID
Please call
Kim & Chris
888-942-9899
Need help with
your wedding
planning? The
2012 Oyster
Bridal Extrava-
ganza has it all!
Sunday,
February 26th
Genettis WB.
bridezella.net
CARD READER
40 years
experience
Appointments Sat-
urday & Sunday
Call Mary
570-417-0864
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly,
814-237-7900
150 Special Notices
ALL
JUNK
CAR,
TRUCKS
&
EQUIPMENT
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
This is a nice
week to get
ready for the
next week. I
heard that from a
very wise
man...Listen up
Pack W.
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
SINGING VALENTINES
Feb. 14th
Call 570-709-3716
W-B BARBERSHOP
HARMONY SOCIETY
WORK WANTED
Experienced in
homecare. I will
work in your home
taking care of your
loved one. Person-
al care, meal
preparation & light
housekeeping pro-
vided. References,
background check
also provided.
Salary negotiable.
570-836-9726 or
cell 570-594-4165
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at its finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SUNDAY IN
PHILADELPHIA
MARCH 11, 2012
Brunch @
The Waterworks,
a National Historic
Landmark
Van Gogh Exhibit
@ Philadelphia
Museum of Art
For more details
call
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
CRUISE of a
LIFETIME!
CELEBRITY CRUISE
LINES Newest Ship
SILHOUETTE
12 night
Caribbean
Cruise
from NJ -
no airfare
needed!
ONLY
$1329/PP, TWIN
includes all taxes &
fees
March 29 -
April 10, 2012
Subject to Availability
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRiP
(288-8747)
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`09 REKON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
REDUCED
$3,650.
(570) 814-2554
POLARIS`03
330 MAGNUM
Shaft ride system.
True 4x4. Mossy
oak camo. Cover
included. $3,000
negotiable. Call
570-477-3129
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 110 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk
Kids Quad. Only
$695 takes it away!
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CHEVY 00
Cavalier Z24
Black 2 door,
134,000 miles. Runs
great, has new
water pump. Needs
tires & A/C switch.
Asking $2500
570-233-2117
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DODGE `02 NEON
SXT. 4 door. Auto-
matic. Yellow with
black interior. Power
windows & locks.
FWD. $3,500. Call
570-709-5677 or
570-819-3140
409 Autos under
$5000
LEOS AUTO SALES
92 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
95 CHEVY BLAZER
2 door. 6 cylinder.
Auto. 112K 4x4.
New tires.
$2,150
93 GEO TRACKER
2 door. Soft top,
4 cylinder, 4x4
$1,650
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA 06 TSX
Leather.
Moonroof.
$9,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
AUDI `01 A6
QUATTRO
123,000 miles, 4.2
liter V8, 300hp, sil-
ver with black
leather,heated
steering wheel, new
run flat tires, 17
rims, 22 mpg, Ger-
man mechanic
owned.
$6,495. OBO.
570-822-6785
AUDI `04 A6 QUATTRO
3.0 V6. Silver. New
tires & brakes. 130k
highway miles.
Leather interior.
Heated Seats.
$7,500 or best offer.
570-905-5544
AUDI `05 A4 1.8T
Cabriolet Convert-
ible S-Line. 52K
miles. Auto. All
options. Silver.
Leather interior.
New tires. Must
sell. $17,500 or best
offer 570-954-6060
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `04 325i
Automatic. Dark
blue with black inte-
rior. Showroom con-
dition. 20,000 origi-
nal miles. Garage
kept.
$14,900
(570) 814-8106
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $11,500
OBO. 570-466-2630
412 Autos for Sale
BMW 98 740 IL
White with beige
leather interior.
New tires, sunroof,
heated seats. 5 cd
player 106,000
miles. Excellent
condition.
$5,300. OBO
570-451-3259
570-604-0053
CADILLAC `05 SRX
All wheel drive,
traction control,
3.6 L V-6, power
sunroof, auto-
stick, leather inte-
rior, auto car
starter, factory
installed 6 CD disc
changer, all
power, memory
seat. 39,000
miles.
$21,000
570-453-2771
CHEVROLET `03 SIL-
VERADO
EXTENDED CAB
2500 Series. 4 x 4
pick up. 145K miles.
$6,500, OBO.
570-406-5128
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHEVROLET `08
IMPALA
Excellent condition,
new tires, 4 door,
all power, 34,000
miles. $13,500.
570-836-1673
CHEVROLET `99
CAVALIER
4 door sedan, 4
cylinder, A/C,
fresh tires, new
brakes, garage
kept, non-smoker.
Inside perfect,
outside shiny blue.
Rides, runs, and
handles like new
car. 34,000
original miles.
$4,495
570-313-5538
CHEVROLET 06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 5,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell
REDUCED!
$39,500 FIRM
570-299-9370
Travel
PAGE 2D MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
554 Production/
Operations
554 Production/
Operations
Production / Operations
Full Time Position With Benefits
Recondition and test business telephones.
Good eyesight, hearing and attention to
detail necessary.
Should be self-motivated and team player.
Email resume to:
nepajob@gmail.com
AUTOSERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars,
Trucks
&
Equipment
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
VITOS
&
GINOS
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD, AWD, silver,
grey leather
06 VW PASSAT 3.6
silver, black
leather, sunroof,
66k miles
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
06 DODGE STRATUS
SXT, red
05 CHRYSLER 300C
TOURING, black,
gray, leather
05 DODGE NEON SXT,
red, 4 cyl, auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
burgundy, tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
MAXX, white, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL,
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 SAAB 9-3, silver,
auto, sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 VW JETTA GLS,
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 PLYMOUTH NEON
purple, 4 door,
auto
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS, black
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4s
08 KIA SPORTAGE
black, 4 cylinder
auto, 2WD
07 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LS blue (AWD)
07 Chrysler Aspen
LTD, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT, blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 PONTIAC TURRANT
black/black
leather, sunroof,
AWD
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
AWD, blue auto, V6
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat,
4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
05 FORD F150 XLT,
extra cab, truck,
black, V8, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, burgundy,
auto (AWD)
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO RT
red, 2 tone
leather imterior,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
reg. cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 FORD RANGER XLT
X-CAB, red, auto,
V6, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT XLT, gold,
sunroof, 2 door,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 GMC SIERRA SLE,
extra cab, pewter
silver, V8, 4x4,
truck
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS
black, auto,
2 door AWD
98 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SE, silver, V6, 4x4
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY 95 ASTRO
MARK III CONVERSION
VAN. Hightop. 93K.
7 passenger.
TV/VCP/Stereo.
Loaded. Great con-
dition. $3,495
(570) 574-2199
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. FWD. Leather
interior. Great
shape. A/C. CD.
All power.
$7,200. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
CHRYSLER 04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5900.
570-991-5558
CHRYSLER 08 SEBRING
Leather. Heated
seats. DVD Player.
$10,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
11 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA 3950
miles. Factory War-
ranty. New Condi-
tion. $17,799
10 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT 32K. Silver-
Black. Power slides.
Factory warranty.
$16,899
09 JEEP LIBERY
LIMITED Power sun-
roof. Only 18K. Fac-
tory Warranty.
$19,499
09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$11,799
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. Factory War-
ranty. $11,999
08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed. AWD.
Factory warranty.
$12,899
08 CHEVY
SILVERADO 1500
4x4. Regular Cab.
63K. Factory War-
ranty $12,899
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,399
08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 60k. Factory
warranty. $9,399
05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner. Just
traded. 65K.
$12,799
05 SUZUKI VERONA
LX Auto. 64K. Fac-
tory warranty.
$5,099
01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,599
99 JEEP LARADO
LTD Leather. 75K
$4,799
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
412 Autos for Sale
DODGE `02
DURANGO SLT
All power, 4.7, all
leather, 7 passen-
ger, running boards,
80,000 miles, CD
player, new tires.
$6,500.
570-877-9896
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
FORD `08 ESCAPE
XLT. 56,800 miles.
Grey metallic with
grey cloth interior.
2WD. Auto. Power
windows & locks.
Dual air bags. A/C.
Alloy Wheels. Excel-
lent condition.
$14,500
Trades Welcome
570-328-5497
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S
Excellent condition
inside & out. Garage
kept. Regularly
serviced by dealer,
records available.
Option include alloy
wheels, decklid
spoiler, sport seats,
interior accent light-
ing (blue), Nose
mask and custom
cut floor mats. Dark
grey with black inte-
rior. 56K highway
miles. REDUCED!
$13,300. Call
570-709-4695
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
HONDA 04
Civic LX. 81,000
miles, usual
options, economical
4 cyl. 1.7 liter
engine, runs great.
Includes studded
snows & regular
tires. $9875
570-855-0095
HONDA 08 ACCORD
15K miles. Auto.
Excellent condition!
$15,999
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars,
Trucks &
Equipment
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
412 Autos for Sale
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI 00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LINEUP
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412 Autos for Sale
HYUNDAI 04 ELANTRA
Only 52K miles,
cruise, power win-
dows & locks.
$8,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
LINCOLN 05
TOWN CAR
39K miles. Looks &
runs perfect!
$13,500
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES `92 500 SEL
White with gray
leather interior, 17
custom chrome
wheels, 4 new tires,
new breaks front &
rear. Full tune-up, oil
change & filters
done. Body and
interior are perfect.
Car has all the
options. 133,850
miles. Original price:
$140,000 new. This
is the diplomat ver-
sion. No rust or
dings on this car -
Garage kept. Sell for
$9,500.
Call: 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
Evenings
PONTIAC `96 FIRE-
BIRD
105,000 miles,
auto-matic,, black
with grey interior,
new inspection.
$4,000, OBO.
570-706-6565
PONTIAC 08 VIBE
Low miles. AWD.
$12,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
Biarritz white, con-
vertible,new
$58,000, 3.2 liter, 6
cylinder, 250HP.
Loaded with all the
extra options. Less
than 15,000 miles.
$21,000
570-586-0401
SCION `06 XA
67,000 miles,
power windows &
locks, great gas
mileage.
$8,200/OBO
570-606-5634
SUBARU 10 IMPREZA
OUTBACK SPORT
33,000 miles, new
inspection & tires. 5
speed wagon. Bal-
ance of 6 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty and tire and
wheel insurance.
$19,000 OBO
570-814-9400
TOYOTA 00
SOLARA SE
SUPER CLEAN
All power, new
tires, new back
brakes. 125,000
miles.
$6,400 negotiable.
570-417-8353
TOYOTA 04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA 09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$12,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
VOLKSWAGEN `09
BEETLE
Excellent condition,
20,000 miles, all
power, sun roof,
kayak and bike rack
included. $14,900.
570-864-2300
VOLKSWAGEN
11 JETTA
24K miles. Like
New! Auto. Leather.
$15,999
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `77 COUPE
70,000 original
miles. Leather inte-
rior. Excellent condi-
tion. $2,500. Call
570-282-4272 or
570-877-2385
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 CYLINDER
Very Good
Condition!
$5,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
Chrysler 68 New Yorker
Sedan. 440 Engine.
Power Steering &
brakes. 34,500
original miles.
Always garaged.
Reduced to $6,400
(570) 883-4443
DESOTO CUSTOM
49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In its
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
shes beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
FORD SALEEN 04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
documented #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
PONTIAC `68 CATALINA
Convertible. 400
engine. 2 barrel car-
buretor. Yellow with
black roof and white
wall tires. Black
interior. $4,500
negotiable.
570-696-3513
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 89 2500
SCOTTSDALE
Pickup Truck with
insulated refrigerat-
ed box, cooling unit.
5 speed, rebuilt 8
cylinder. $2,500.
Box only an option.
570-333-4827
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY
DAVIDSON 01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$13,500 or best
offer. 570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON 05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$10,500.
or best offer.
Tony 570-237-1631
HYOSUNG `04 COMET
250. 157 Miles.
Excellent Condition.
$1,200. Call
570-256-7760
POLARIS 00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
WINNEBAGO 02
ADVENTURER
35 Foot, double
slides, V-10 Ford.
Central air, full awn-
ings, one owner,
pet & smoke free.
Excellent condition
and low mileage.
$68,000.
Call 570-594-6496
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,000.
(570) 540-0975
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY `00 SILVERADO
1500. 4x4. 8 box.
Auto. A/C. 121K
miles. $5,995.
570-332-1121
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 03
SILVERADO
4x4. Extra clean.
Local new truck
trade! $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY 10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE 05 RAM 1500
Quad Cab SLT,
alloys & CD play-
er. $16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
DODGE 07 CALIBER
R/T. AWD. Alloys.
$14,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HONDA 08 CRV
AWD. Auto. 34K
miles. Extra Sharp!
$18,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
HONDA 09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
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on an automobile?
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the directions!
HYUNDAI 06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$11,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,495. Scranton.
Trade ins accepted.
570-466-2771
JEEP `98 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder. New
items: 4 tires, bat-
tery, all brakes,
complete exhaust.
$3,895
(570) 417-4731
JEEP 03 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
White. Tan leather
interior. Garage
kept. All available
options, including
moonroof. Tow
package. 76,000
miles. Next inspec-
tion 1/13. $8,995
(570) 674-5655
JEEP 04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
4x4. Auto. 6 cylin-
der. $8,995
WARRANTY
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
JEEP 06 WRANGLER
Only 29K miles!
$15,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP 07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$14,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
NISSAN 09 ROGUE SL
Leather. Moon-
roof. Alloys.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
TOYOTA 02 TACOMA
4WD. SR5. TRD.
V-6. $10,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 06 4 RUNNER
Moonroof. Alloys.
CD Player.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 09 RAV 4
Only 13K miles!
Remote Starter.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR,
TRUCKS
&
EQUIPMENT
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
Position available in
Edwardsville multi-
family housing com-
munity. This is a full
time position, M-F
8:00AM to 4:30PM.
Applicants should
possess proven
management expe-
rience. Subsidized
housing experience
helpful. Must be
dependable, well-
organized, detailed
orientated, capable
of working inde-
pendently, & have
the ability to per-
form multiple tasks.
Computer experi-
ence required.
Medical & vacation
benefits available.
Please send
resume and salary
requirements to
9 Beverly Drive,
Edwardsville, PA
18704 or email
eagleridge01@
comcast.net
EOE
DRS ASSISTANT/
SECRETARY
Seeking an ener-
getic, motivated,
goal-oriented indi-
vidual for immediate
position in a busy,
natural healthcare
setting. People and
computer skills a
MUST. Interested
parties can fax
resumes to:
570-477-3572
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
Are you ready to
build an exciting
career with one of
the most recogniza-
ble companies in
Pennsylvania? Then,
come and join a
leader in heavy con-
struction services
and products. We
offer great wages
and one of the best
benefit packages in
the state. We are
currently looking to
fill a Plant Leader
position in our
Hazleton plant.
To apply, go to WWW.
GOHCAREERS.COM
or visit your local
CareerLink office.
GOH is an Equal
Opportunity
Employer. Females
& minorities are
encouraged to
apply.
SAFE-T-ZONE, INC.
TRAFFIC CONTROL-
FLAGGING COMPANY
100 N. Wilkes-Barre
Blvd., Suite 106
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
P: 570-829-1180
We are now hiring
for the upcoming
season starting
March 1st for
CERTIFIED
FLAGGERS. Hours
Monday-Wednes-
day, 9am- 2pm
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
522 Education/
Training
CHILD CARE
Forty Fort Child
Care Center is now
hiring ASSISTANT
PRE-K TEACHER.
Full Time & Benefits.
PART TIME AIDE.
College students
encouraged to
apply. Email resumes
to: bloomearlyed@
yahoo.com
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Experienced
Delivery Driver
Must know Wilkes-
Barre Area well.
Experienced
Saute Cook
Please apply at:
Franks Pizzeria
198 S Main St
Wilkes-Barre
570 822-2168
After 2
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
COMMERCIAL
APPLICATOR
For turf fertilization
program at a land-
scape company.
Must be experi-
enced. State certi-
fication a plus, but
will train the right
individual.
Apply by mailing
resume to:
Green Valley
Landscaping, Inc.
52 Reese St.,
Plains, PA
18702-1823
Or by email to:
greenvalleyland
@comcast.net
EOE
DATA/ PHONE /SOUND
Our Client is hiring
experienced techni-
cians to install
phones, fiber optics,
data and sound sys-
tems. Customers
include hospitals,
schools, churches
and businesses.
Must interpret blue-
prints, troubleshoot
wiring and read
schematics. Will use
hand tools, laptop,
and climb ladders.
Full time 8am-
4:30pm. Must have
clean driving record.
Contact Harvis
570-542-5330 with
questions or send
resume to:
jobs.harvis@
gmail.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 3D
522 Education/
Training
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
522 Education/
Training
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
Mericle Construction, Inc. seeks a full time
experienced crawler drill operator. Applicant
shall have minimum 5 years site work experi-
ence and be knowledgeable with an Ingersoll
Rand ECM-720, ECM-660 & Atlas Copco F9
drill rig. Applicant will also be expected to
assist with blast hole layout & operate other
equipment as needed.
Salary commensurate with experience for
this local, year-round career opportunity with
full benefit package.
DRILL
OPERATOR
Submit resume or application to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or via Email: hr@mericle.com or
download application at www.mericle.com
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT - EOE
www.dallassd.com
Head Coach
Boys Volleyball
Candidates must possess strong interpersonal and
communication skills. Develop and implement a
district-wide philosophy of the teaching of the
game of volleyball at all levels of the program.
Year-round work on developing the program is a
must. Experience coaching on the varsity level is
preferred.
For clearance information and application
process, visit www.dallassd.com > Employment
page. Mail application packet to:
Mr. Frank Galicki, Superintendent,
Dallas School District,
PO Box 2000, Dallas, PA 18612
Complete application packets, including letter of
interest, district application, references, letters of
recommendation, current Act 34, 151 and 114
clearances, must be received by
DEADLINE: February 13, 2012
Multi-Plastics
Extrusions
Multi-Plastics Extrusions, a leader in the plastics extrusions field,
has several great opportunities for qualified individuals to
become a part of its expanding Maintenance Team.
The following positions are currently available:
Maintenance Mechanic / Electrician
Qualified individuals must have and be able to perform the following
duties:
- A working knowledge of electrical and mechanical equipment
preferably associated with plastic sheet extrusion.
- Safely perform a wide range of duties, relating to installation,
troubleshooting, repair, unscheduled maintenance and preven-
tive maintenance of plastic extrusion equipment with minimal
supervision.
- Locate and diagnose failures, replace defective components and
maintain facility related systems and equipment.
- Conduct troubleshooting of complex equipment and systems.
Evaluate system performance and recommend improvements to
maintenance program and system design.
Applicants should have a Trade School Certificate and 4 years expe-
rience in a maintenance manufacturing environment.
Maintenance Intern
Qualified individuals will be responsible for the following duties:
- General mechanical installation of equipment related to the
sheet extrusion facility under the direction and guidance of expe-
rienced maintenance personnel.
- General maintenance of the facilities and grounds as directed by
the Maintenance Supervisor.
Applicants must be familiar with working in a manufacturing environ-
ment, be able to communicate effectively, and work safely in a fast-
paced environment.
Multi-Plastics Extrusions provides a safe working environment,
excellent compensation opportunities, and a competitive benefits
package including medical, dental, vision, and 401k.
Qualified applicants can fax or e-mail their resumes to:
Multi-Plastics Extrusions
600 Dietrich Avenue
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-1684
E-mail: resume@multi-plastics.com
7
3
6
0
0
8
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
EQUIPMENT DEPOT IN
ALLENTOWN IS HIRING
We are currently
looking for an
experienced &
dependable
Field Service
Technician
for the Hazleton &
Wilkes-Barre area.
If you have your
own tools, experi-
ence with IC and
electrical equip-
ment, the ability to
work with little to no
supervision, great
customer service
and communication
skills.
Please apply at
www.eqdepot.com
You must have a
High School Diplo-
ma or GED, valid dri-
vers license & good
computer skills.
EQUIPMENT DEPOT IS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
www.EQDepot.com
Growing HVAC
Firm Seeks
SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Energy Technolo-
gies, Inc. is expand-
ing and has an
immediate opening
for an experienced
commercial service
technician. Become
part of the success
of this Linc franchise
where service is
central to our busi-
ness. Benefits
include top pay,
flexible health insur-
ance plan, retire-
ment plan, vacation,
company truck,
continuous training,
bonus incentives,
and a professional
atmosphere.
Stop in to fill out an
application or send
resume to:
Mr. Chad Davis
Service Manager
ENERGY
TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
591 North Hunter
Highway
Drums, PA
18222
(570) 788-3845
Ext. 23
www.energyt.com
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
HV HVAC/R AC/R
WWW.RITE-TEMP.COM
Visit our website
for job postings.
CALL 970.7201 OR VISIT
IMPRESSIONSMEDIADIGITAL.COM
WE CAN
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99
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marketing solutions from Impressions Media Digital.
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We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriffs Ofce
PAGE 4D MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 29
Harrys U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
566 Sales/Business
Development
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
JER-DONS
S A N S OUC IA UT O M A RT
W E SA Y YES W HEN OTHERS SA Y N O
100% Gua ra n te e d
Cre d itA pprova l
TA X
REFUN D TIM E
M A NY C A RS FO R
Y O U TO C HO O SE FRO M
JER-DONS
S A NS S OUC IA UT O M A RT
(SansSouci P kw y N ext to N im rod H aven)
H anover Tw p., P A 18706
270-3434
A llV ehicles Safety C hecked & Inspected
W arranty - G roup Insurance A vailable on A llV ehicles
LO W DO W N PA Y M ENTS
FLEXIBLE RA TES / PA Y M ENTS
N e e d A N e w Ca r?
1339N. River Street,
Plains, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
J
O
-
DAN
MOTORS
TAX AND TAGS ADDITIONAL We Now Offer Buy Here-Pay Here!
LOWDOWN PAYMENT CLEAN, INSPECTED VEHICLE
6 MO. WARRANTY ON ALL VEHICLES FULL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
We Service ALL Makes & Models
Family Owned & Operated for over 40 years
07 DODGE DURANGO LTD.
Gray, Hemi, 8 Passenger, 45K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
20,995
01 PONTIAC TRANS AM WS6 CONV
Red, Auto. , 1 of 796 Built! 45K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
19,995
08 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
Blue, Sunroof, 52K, Sharp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
16,995
07 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER
Silver, PW, PDL, Only 45K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
15,995
08 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX
Red, PW, PDL, Only 34K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
14,995
07 DODGE NITRO SXT
White, 4x4, CD, PW, PDL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
14,995
09 PONTIAC G6
Maroon, 4 Door, Only 30K Miles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
14,995
08 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS
Copper, 5 Speed, 48K Miles, Nicely Equipped. . .
$
13,995
07 JEEP LIBERTY
Green, PW, PDL, CD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,995
07 FORD FOCUS SE
Red, 4 Dr. , Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
7,995
98 CADILLAC ELDORADO
Black, 1-Owner, 83K Miles, Very Nice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
7,995
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
THE H & K GROUP
HEAVY TRUCK SHOP
MECHANIC
Evening
or Night Shift.
CDL license -
experienced with
own tools.
Positions
available at the
following
locations:
Lehigh Valley Site
Contractors
Easton, PA
Locust Ridge Site
Contractors
Pocono Lake, PA
Pikes Creek Site
Contractors-
Wyalusing, PA
FULL TIME
ROAD MECHANIC
Mobile Mechanic
to repair equip-
ment at various
locations.
CDL- B, Must
have own tools.
CAT experience
preferred.
Positions
available at the
following
locations:
Lehigh Valley Site
Contractors -
Easton, PA
Hazleton Site
Contractors
Hazleton, PA
Pikes Creek Site
Contractors
Hunlock Creek, PA
Materials Division
based in
Easton, PA
Pre-employment
drug testing.
Fax resume to:
610-222-4955
Email resume to
hr@hkgroup.
com or call
610-222-3578
for details
(EOE)
536 IT/Software
Development
IT SPECIALIST
WNEP-TV in Moosic,
PA has an opening
for an IT specialist
with knowledge of
IP/Network based
systems, routers,
scripting, etc.
We offer a competi-
tive salary & dynam-
ic work environ-
ment.
See details on
our website:
wnep.com
EOE
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
4pm-12mid or 5pm-
11pm. Part and Full
Time. Monday-Fri-
day. Must have
experience in facility
cleaning or general
commercial house-
keeping. Valid
license with vehicle
required. Travel and
mileage is paid.
Willing to work vari-
ous accounts during
the night to help
with general clean-
ing and prep floors .
Great job if you like
fast pace environ-
ment. We want the
best in facility clean-
ing. Uniforms and
paid time off. Apply
online at: www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
Facility Assistants
2nd shift
SOVEREIGN IS NOW HIRING
UP TO $10.50 DOE
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPER
General cleaning,
laundry & babysit-
ting. Experience a
plus. Non-smoker.
Must have car &
references. Dallas
Area. Replies to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2925
15 N. Main St,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
PART TIME CLEANER-
PITTSTON
4pm-7pm Mon-
day-Friday- general
office and restroom
cleaning. Lifting up
to 25 lbs. $9.00 to
start. Apply online at
www.sovereigncs.
com EOE and Drug
Free Workplace.
PITTSTON FACILITY -
CLEANER AND LEAD
7a -3:30pm- Mon-
day-Friday. Must be
able to clean vari-
ous warehouse and
use lift. Previous
lead or on site tem
leader skills
required. Lifting up
to 50lbs. Full time
with benefits and
paid time off after
90 days.
Apply online at www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL-A
Waste hauling to
landfill. Call Brian at
Harvis 542-5330
for application or
forward resume to:
wrrc.jobs@gmail.com
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DRIVERS
Student School Van
Drivers wanted.
Call Jim at
570-589-9181
or Rick at
570-582-1457.
LOOKING TO GROW
DRIVERS WANTED!
CDL Class A
Regional and
OTR Routes
Home daily
Benefit package
includes:
paid holiday and
vacation; health,
vision, and dental
coverage.
Candidates must
be 23 years of
age with at least
2 years tractor
trailer experience.
Drivers paid by
percentage.
Applications can
be filled out online
at www.cds
transportation.com
or emailed to
jmantik@cds
transportation.com
or you can apply
in person at
CDS
Transportation
Jerilyn Mantik
One Passan Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-654-6738
548 Medical/Health
CHILDRENS
SERVICE CENTER OF
WYOMING VALLEY, INC
Local leader in
providing a full
continuum of
behavioral health
care to children/
adolescents and
their families has
the following
position avail-
able:
Psychologist
Full Time & Part Time
One year of post-
doctoral experience
in the field of psy-
chology; and a doc-
toral degree in the
field of psychology
or educational psy-
chology, including a
one-year internship
or one year of
equivalent super-
vised experience.
Two years of pre-
doctoral experience
at a level compara-
ble to the Psycho-
logical Services may
be substituted for
the required year of
post-doctoral expe-
rience. Member-
ship in appropriate
national, state and
local psychological
associations. Licen-
sure by the State of
Pennsylvania is
desirable.
A full job descrip-
tion can be
accessed on our
website at
www.cscwv.org
CSC is dedicated to
creating a thera-
peutic living and
learning environ-
ment for all clients
and team members.
Through implemen-
tation of the innova-
tive Sanctuary
Model of trauma
informed care, Chil-
drens Service Cen-
ter strives to pro-
vide safe, demo-
cratic environments
that are emotionally
intelligent and
socially responsible
for all members of
our community.
More information on
the Sanctuary
Model can be
accessed at www.
sanctuaryweb.com
Please send rsum
and letter of interest
to:
Childrens
Service Center of
Wyoming Valley,
Inc.; Attn: HR
Generalist
335 S. Franklin
Street Wilkes-
Barre, PA 18702
Phone:
(570) 825-6425
Fax:
(570) 301-0929
Email:
hr@e-csc.org
Drug Free Work
Place- EEO -
www.cscwv.org
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
EXPERIENCED HOME
HEALTH RN
Full/Part time cover-
ing Luzerne & Lack-
awanna counties.
Also currently hiring
CNAs & HHAs. Call
Jessica at 570-451-
3050 for an immedi-
ate interview. EOE
NURSING
PrimeCare Medical
is seeking
Part Time/PRN LPNs
to work in the
medical depart-
ment in the
Luzerne County
Juvenile Detention
Center. Contact HR
at 1-800-245-7277
or fax resumes to:
717-651-1865
EOE REF #642
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
OPTICIAN
Wilkes-Barre Area,
PA: Full-time, expe-
rienced and expert
skills in dispensing
and selling luxury
eyewear. Must
have a great sense
of style. Saturday
hours until 2:00 P.M.
required. Salary
and benefits are
commensurate with
experience. Refer-
ences required.
Send resume via
email to:
opticalmgr2012@
gmail.com
Village at
Greenbriar
Assisted
Living
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES - PART TIME
All Shifts
PART TIME COOK
APPLY WITHIN:
4252 Memorial
Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANT
Excellent starting
rate. Flexible
hours. Good work-
ing environment.
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains/Pittston area!
Excellent opportuni-
ty! Send resume to:
PO Box 153
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
PRIVATE DUTY NURSES
RNs/LPNs needed
for a pediatric case
in Hazleton, PA. All
shifts available,
especially over-
nights. Trach and
vent experience
preferred. Full time
hours, competitive
rates, weekly pay!
CareGivers America
570-585-4627
dkaminski@care
giversamerica.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 5D
548 Medical/Health
RN SUPERVISOR
Full Time 3pm-11pm
LPN
Part Time 3pm-11pm
CNA
Part Time 11pm-7am
CNAS
Per Diem All Shifts
LPNS
Per Diem All Shifts
Apply in person to:
MOUNTAIN TOP
SENIOR CARE AND
REHABILITATION
CENTER
185 S. MOUNTAIN
BLVD.
MOUNTAIN TOP, PA.
18707
(570) 474-6377
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!
FCCY is looking for
people to help meet
the growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested in
becoming foster
parents call 1-800-
747-3807. EOE.
JANITOR/CLEANING
CREW
10-12 hrs per week
Days are flexible
BACK-ROOM STOCK
CLERK
10-12 hrs per week
Tue & Fri 7am-12pm
DELI CLERK
15 -20 hrs per week
Nights & weekends
a must.
No calls, apply in
person.
PLYMOUTH
HOMETOWN MARKET
500 W. MAIN ST.
PLYMOUTH, PA.
18651
HOT JOBS
Customer Service,
Telemarketing,
Help Desk,
Desktop Engineers,
Sr Manager of
Deployment Svcs,
Forklift, Warehouse,
Picking/Packing,
Carpenters&Helpers
Warehouse Director,
Marketing Analyst,
Business Developer,
Machine Operators,
CNC Programmers,
General Labors &
Welders
Top $ & Benefits
Email Resume to:
Corey.Rupp@
expresspros.com
or 570.208.7000
554 Production/
Operations
USM
AEROSTRUCTURES
CORP HAS IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS FOR:
CNC PROGRAMMER
MINIMUM 5+ YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Experience with
mastercam
software is a must!
Degree is preferred
but not required.
send resume via
email: r.delvalle@
usmaero.net
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
*INDEPENDENT SALES
REPRESENTATIVE*
A local, highly rep-
utable company is
looking for an Inde-
pendent Sales Rep-
resentative for the
Dallas/Wilkes-Barre
area. Applicants
must possess
excellent customer
service and com-
munication skills.
Previous experi-
ence in advertising
sales a plus. Part
time & Full time
opportunities exist.
PLEASE CALL
570-579-4300
OR EMAIL FRED@
LOOKATOURMENU.COM
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
LIQUOR LICENSE
FOR SALE. Luzerne
County. $23,000.
570-574-7363
MOSS COLLECTOR
who owns/or has
access to large
tract (s), private
woodlands. Must
I.D. moss & eco-
harvest in bulk, dry
& deliver to Hones-
dale. 570-253-4704
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
COIN SET United
mint Presidential $1
set with proof set, 4
coins each set $15.
Belt buckle US with
eagle + 2 rifles.
Tiffany Studio NY
BC235 $15. Wall
clock with spindles,
gold design on
glass, 13 x28, excel-
lent working $80.
570-574-0271
COINS. 3-V nickels
1894-V, 1909-V,
1911-V $60.
570-287-4135
DIE CAST Hess
3003 mini patrol $8.
01 mini racer trans-
port $8. & 04 mini
tanker $8. Sunoco
96 tow truck with
plow $10. Mobil 95
tow truck $10. Ertle
92 True value dia-
mond tanker bank
$10. Exxon humble
tanker 2nd edition
$10. & tanker $10.
Racing champion
Citgo #21 Elliot
Sadler $10. Racing
Champion STP
Richard Petty $5.
matchbox trans-
porter Bill Elliot $10.
570-639-1653
PIANO Livingston
upright player piano,
pump style with
approximate 35
music rolls. Ground
level removal. $125.
570-479-2322
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
FREEZER/upright
17 cu ft $375.
570-825-5133
RANGE kenmore
gas like brand new
$175. 570-793-0811.
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore Elite.
White. FRONT
LOAD. Like new.
Electric dryer.
Storage drawer
on bottom
of each.
$800 for both
570-261-5120
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
CAR SEAT, for baby,
in good condition.
$15. 570-823-2267
726 Clothing
COAT Christian Dior,
camel, size 8, hardly
worn $65.
570-825-5440
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
SHORTS 8 pair of
young mens Ameri-
can Eagle Cargo
shorts, various col-
ors, size 32 & 33.
nice condition. $7.
5 pair young mens
basketball shorts,
Nike & Addias S&M
nice condition. $5.
each. 696-3528
SUITS 3 mens, 42
reg pants 36x29,
good condition $15.
New wool coat 42
reg new $15. 6 pair
mens dress slacks
36x29 $5. each.
570-824-5460
WEDDING GOWN:
custom design
never worn, white
satin, burgundy.
Paid $1400. Asking
$800. OBO.
570-454-5163
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
PC HP P4 with DVD
burner, software,
keyboard, flat moni-
tor $175. LAPTOP -
Gateware P4 with
dvd burner & soft-
ware. $195. DIGITAL
CAMERA hp 7.2
megapixel photos-
mart with 3x zoom,
charger & memory
card $59. 283-2552
732 Exercise
Equipment
EVERLAST heavy
bag. excellent con-
dition. $80.
570-474-0753
TREADMILL Pro
Form-995SEL
Spacesaver. Folds
up when not in use.
Includes Inter-Active
I-Fit Workout Pro-
gram, Handheld
weights. Internet
connectable. Excel-
lent condition. $275.
OBO.570-333-5298
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED, Twin com-
plete. Used 3 times
in guest room.
Excellent condition,
$75. DESK, wooden
computer with
shelves. Excellent
condition. $60
570-822-6577 after
6PM
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, oak, like new
$550. 822-5460
BEDROOM SET: 4
piece. White. Good
condition. $100. Call
570-735-3489
BEDROOM SET: 6
piece, black lac-
quer, includes,
dresser, mirror,
armoire, 2 night
stands, mirror
spread headboard
good for full, queen
or king size. Must
see, $450 814-5477
BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in bags! $150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
DRESSER 6 drawer
with horses painted
on it by artist. $50.
570-599-9975
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
KITCHEN TABLE
solid oak kitchen
$325. Craftsman
yard cart still in box
$55. 5 pc kitchen
table $125.
570-825-5133
LAMPS (2) parlor
stand up, grey metal
& black. $25 each.
570-740-1246
LAMPS brass, solid
brass base with
cream shade. paid
$80 each asking
$50 for pair.
570-474-0753
LOVE SEAT, gray,
good condition $80.
570-822-3410
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
VANITY/makeup
with chair, 40lx
30h, Bombay Fur-
niture Co., dark
wood, good condi-
tion $40. Double
door module OSulli-
van 2lx25 1/2w,
good condition 2
pieces, medium
color $10. each.
570-868-5066
MOUNTAIN TOP
252 Fairview Park
CONTENTS OF
WHOLE HOUSE
PRICES
NEGOTIABLE!
Saturday Feb. 4th
1 to 4 pm
or call for
appointment
570-239-6756
750 Jewelry
VALENTINES DAY
is just around the
corner. Are you
looking for that
special gift for the
man or women in
your life or just a
friend? We have
gold, gold filled,
silver, rings,
necklaces,
watches, trinkets
for both men &
women so why not
come in & see us?
OPEN ON
VALENTINES
DAY!
Visit us as 134 Rt.
11, Larksville or call
570-855-7197
Bring this ad &
we will give you
an extra 10% off
your purchase
of $50 or more.
756 Medical
Equipment
POWER CHAIR
Jazzy Select,
$500. WALKER with
wheels $45.
570-829-2411
REASSURE full rise
protective under-
wear 3 packs of 14
underwear for men
or women size x-
large 58-68 waist
/hip all for $15.
570-735 6638
758 Miscellaneous
All Junk
Cars,
Trucks
&
Equipment
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
6 cab $15. Gong
Show movie DVD
$10. Large frame-
less mirror 36X42
$40. 5 storm win-
dows $15. 740-1246
DRAFTING TABLE
Hamilton-Economy
wood & steel, excel-
lent condition, Foot-
stool, stool & old
drafting tools includ-
ed $150.
570-854-9739
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
NASCAR FANS
large family album
with stories &
mementos of most
famous racing fami-
lies. Published2007.
$20. Jim 655-9474
RECORDS LPs,
78s, 45s, 60s, 70s,
80s & 90s. $1.
each. Religious
rosary, handmade
$5. 570-829-2411
REVERE WARE,
clean, shiny & very
good condition. 16
pieces all $10. each.
CORELLE Butterfly
gold, clean & excel-
lent condition, 111
pieces, .30cents to
41. each. Details
570-639-1653
TIRES. 4 matching
Firestone Firehawk
LTP235/75R15 M/S
with rims. From Toy-
ota 84 truck
Approximately 90%
tread. $160 for all.
570-239-7089
between 8-5.
770 Photo
Equipment
CAMERA Nikon D-
60 gold edition digi-
tal SLR camera with,
2 VR lenses, 1 18-
55 zoom manual
focus, 1 55-200
zoom, battery grip
with 2 batteries,
chargers, bag $350
or best offer.
570-328-6059
776 Sporting Goods
GOLF BALLS: 100
Titleist ProV1 & Pro
V1X,near mint $90.
Driver: Cleveland Hi
Bore Monster XLS 9
Degree, draw
faced, great shape,
$50. 570-401-7052
POOL TABLE bar
room size slate pool
table. $600. Call
Jack 570-824-9166
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19 Toshiba con-
vertor & antenna
$35. Call Bill
570-825-8256
TV 21 Zenith with
remote FREE.
570-714-4410
TV 32 Panasonic
works great. $40. or
make offer.
call 570-388-6603
TV Sanyo 32
square, about 5
years old, analog
ports in front,
remote included.
DVD player Toshiba
with remote & ana-
log cables, 3 years
old. Both excellent
condition, no dam-
age. Both items
together $150/
OBO. 570-262-7075
784 Tools
SNOWTHROWER,
Snapper, 2 stage
with electric start.
works good. $250.
570-388-2137
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED
Pre 1975. Call 856-
571-3618 or email
trebor_crane@yahoo
.com to let me know
what you have. Top
prices paid and
I PAY CASH!
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
PAYING TOP DOLLAR
for Your Gold,
Silver, Scrap Jew-
elry, Sterling Flat-
ware, Diamonds,
Old High School
Rings, Foreign &
American Paper
Money & Coins.
WE WILL BEAT
PRICES!
We Buy Tin and
Iron Toys, Vintage
Coke Machines,
Vintage Brass,
Cash Registers,
Old Costume
Jewelry, Slot
Machines, Lionel
Trains & Antique
Firearms.
IF YOU THINK ITS
OLD BRING IT IN,
WE WILL GIVE
YOU A PRICE.
COME SEE US AT
134 RTE. 11,
Larksville
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars,
Trucks &
Equipment!
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Feb. 3: $1,734.00
LINEUP
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is the best way
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Youre in bussiness
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800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BORDER COLLIE, 1
1/2 year old male,
very affectionate,
Free. 570-388-6420
DOG free to good
home Pomeranian
11 1/2 months old,
male, free cage.
570-779-1093
SHIH TZU PUPPIES
ACA REGISTERED
Male & female
available. Ready
02/21. Will hold
with deposit.
$575
570-714-2032
570-852-9617
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
BALL PYTHON 4,
tank, stand &
accessories includ-
ed $100. please
call (570) 883-7426
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
AVOCA
30 Costello Circle
Fine Line construc-
tion. 4 bedroom 2.5
bath Colonial. Great
floor plan, master
bedroom, walk in
closet. 2 car
garage, fenced in
yard. 2 driveways,
above ground pool
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3162
$248,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
BACK MOUNTAIN
Between Dallas &
Tunkhannock
Updated well main-
tained 2 story house
with 4 bedrooms, 2
kitchens and 2 story
addition. 1 car
garage. On 2 lots.
Can be furnished for
rental income. Lots
of possibilities. Only
asking $153,000.
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search featured
homes in Tunkhan-
nock. $275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
BEAR CREEK
VILLAGE
333 Beaupland
10-1770
Living room has
awesome woodland
views and you will
enjoy the steam/
sauna. Lake and
tennis rights avail-
able with Associa-
tion optional mem-
bership. Minutes
from the Pocono's
and 2 hours to
Philadelphia or New
York. $259,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
CENTERMORELAND
Wyoming County
Home with 30 Acres
This country estate
features 30 acres of
prime land with a
pretty home, ultra
modern kitchen, 2
full modern baths,
bright family room,
den, living room and
3 good sized bed-
rooms. This proper-
ty has open fields
and wooded land, a
stream, several
fieldstone walls and
lots of road
frontage. Equipment
and rights included.
$489,000. 11-3751
Call Jerry Bush Jr.
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate
570-288-2514
COURTDALE
57 White
Rock Terrace
Spacious contem-
porary custom built
home on 6.4 acres
with 4-5 bedrooms
& 3.5 baths. Coun-
try living in town. 3
car garage, heated
in-ground pool, liv-
ing room features
floor to ceiling win-
dows, marble entry-
way with spiral
staircase, spectac-
ular lower level rec
room with wet bar &
gas fireplace. Great
views from 61x9
deck! Home war-
ranty included. All
measurements
approximate.
MLS #11-3971
$ 438,000
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$125,000
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
3 bedroom brick
Cape Cod, with 2
baths, on a corner
lot near
Dallas Schools,
with easy access
to shopping.
MLS# 12-12
$125,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
Charming 2 bed-
room Cape Cod in
Franklin Township.
L-shaped living
room with hard-
wood floors, eat in
kitchen & private
driveway.
$119,900
MLS#11-3255
Call Joe moore
570-288-1401
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DALLAS
Charming 4 bed-
room, 3 bath
home situated on
1 1/4 acre on a
private setting.
Close to schools
and shopping. Liv-
ing room with
beautiful stone
fireplace and built
ins. Hardwood
floors throughout.
Master suite on
1st floor. Kitchen
has cherry cabi-
nets with tile
floors. Screened
porch. Detached
2 car garage.
$365,000
For appointment
570-690-0752
DALLAS
Four bedroom
Colonial with hard-
wood floors in for-
mal dining and living
room. Modern eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with 24
x 30 recreation
room. Deck, hot tub
and ceiling fans.
MLS#11-4504
$229,900
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
Just minutes from
309 this Bi-level is
ideally located near
shopping, schools
and major high-
ways. Complete
with an oak kitchen
with dining area
leading to deck, 3
bedrooms and bath
on the main level
plus L shaped family
room, 4th bedroom,
power room & stor-
age/ laundry area it
awaits its new own-
ers. It offers a spa-
cious rear yard, an
enclosed patio and
has dual access
from 2 streets.
$ 129,900.
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
Two bedroom
condo, 2nd floor.
Living/dining room
combination. 1,200
square feet of easy
living. Two bal-
conies, one car
garage nearby.
Security system,
cedar closet, use of
in ground pool.
$109,000
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS OAK HILL
3 bedroom ranch.
Remodeled kitchen.
Added family room.
Master bedroom
with 1/2 bath. Beau-
tiful oak floor. 3 sea-
son room. Deck &
shed. Garage. 11-
4476. 100x150 lot.
$154,900. Call
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Lush setting on
almost 5 acres with
magnificent stone
walls and fish pond!
This 4400SF home/
offices is in need of
TLC & lots of work.
Living room with oak
walls & coffered oak
ceiling, family room
with large wood
burning fireplace.
Large master suite
with master bath.
Four bedrooms with
three full baths and
two half baths.
Owners had offices
& storage adjacent
to house included in
the 4400SF. Large
two-car garage and
separate out-build-
ing. MLS#11-1628
REDUCED TO
$239,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
DRUMS
263 Trapper
Springs
Beautiful setting on
a corner lot in
Beech Mt resorts
area. 3 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath home has
plenty of extra
space in the finished
basement which
includes washer
dryer hookup, fire-
place, walk out
patio. The 1st floor
master bedroom
has large master
bath with jacuzzi
tub. Breakfast nook
with lots of win-
dows, a partial wrap
around deck and
another deck off the
dining room or fami-
ly room, living room
also has a fireplace.
$179,900. 11-1243
Call Louise Gresh
570-233-8252
CENTURY 21
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
DRUMS
35 Sand Springs Dr
Exceptional quality
home with many
upgrades on level
lot with mature land-
scaping, covered
stone patio, a shed/
playhouse & jungle
gym. 4 bedroom, 2
1/2 bath, study on
1st floor, 2 story
open foyer, kitchen
with island & break-
fast nook open to
family room with
fireplace, formal liv-
ing room & dining
room, all appliances
stay including wash-
er & dryer, laundry
on 2nd floor. Lots of
closet space.
$269,000
Louise Gresh
570-233-8252
CENTURY 21
SELECT GROUP
570-455-8521
906 Homes for Sale
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath2 story
home with
garage and
driveway.
Newer kitchen
and bath. For
more info and
phot os visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DURYEA
1107 Spring Street
Superb two story
with 3 bedrooms & 1
baths. Hardwood
floors, gas heat,
vinyl siding, large
yard with garage.
Call Jim for details.
Offered at $169,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
DURYEA
125 McAlpine St
Ideal starter is this
appealing two bed-
room 2 story with
large lot and 1.5 car
garage. Plenty of off
street parking, in
solid neighborhood.
MLS 11-4313
$85,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, 4 bed-
room, 10 year old
home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or rec room. Mod-
ern oak kitchen,
living room, central
air, in ground pool,
fenced yard, att-
ached 2 car garage.
Great home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732. $239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
youre looking for a
Ranch, dont miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
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INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 6D MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$315,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283. $89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247. $52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath single,
modern kitchen
with appliances,
sunroom, hard-
wood floors on
1st and 2nd
floor. Gas heat,
large yard, OSP.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Nice size four
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
EXETER
REDUCED
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$119,900
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
FORTY FORT
New Listing!
$69,600
35 Bedford St
Great location, sin-
gle dwelling on
large, level lot with 2
car garage. Each
floor has 2 bed-
rooms and bath
(easily convertible
to duplex). Gas
heat. Handymans
special. To settle
estate. 11-4471
GO TO THE TOP...
CALL JANE KOPP
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
235 Pfouts Street
Well cared for 1/2
double with gas
heat, modern
kitchen, 1st floor full
bath & laundry area.
Fenced yard,
detached garage,
front porch, back
yard patio & newer
roof. MLS 11-3436
$46,000
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
146-148 Regal St
Newer kitchens
Large baths
Tenant occupied
3 bedroom each
side.
Call for appointment
$74,900
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
20 Dexter St.,
Nice starter
home with shed -
M MOVE OVE-I -IN N R READY EADY! !
3 bedroom. Fenced
yard. Security sys-
tem. Roof 2006.
Hanover Area
Schools. This home
would be eligible for
the LUZERNE COUNTY
GROWING
HOMEOWNERS
INITIATIVE. Seller will
help with closing
cost expenses.
MONTHLY PAYMENT
$191 ON A 30 YEAR
MORTGAGE- HOW CAN
YOU BEAT THAT?
MLS #11-3023
$39,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HANOVER TWP.
20 Knox Street
Two homes, front &
rear, on 1 lot. One
car garage, patio.
Front home has 3
bedrooms, huge
kitchen, lots of
storage and a
workshop in the
basement; Rear
home features new
kitchen, 2 bed-
rooms and good
storage space.
Call for appointment
$78,900
MLS# 10-4597
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
285 Lyndwood Ave.
Brick 3 bedroom
Ranch with full fin-
ished basement.
Home features
large modern
kitchen, 3 nice size
bedrooms, all with
closets, hall coat
closet, w/w, mod-
ern bath, ceiling
fans, fenced yard.
Private driveway,
newer furnace.
Assessed value and
taxes recently
reduced!
MLS 12-222
$94,900
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
Antonik &
Associates, Inc.
570-735-7494
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on nice
sized lot. Newer
windows, walk up
attic. 3 bedrooms,
nice room sizes,
walk out basement.
Great price you
could move right in.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Double block with
both sides having
nice secluded yards
and decks. Close to
area schools. Wood
floors just redone on
owners side. Won-
derful opportunity to
live in one side and
rent the other side
to help pay your
mortgage!
MLS#11-4537
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-322-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
REDUCED TO
$39,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HANOVER
TOWNSHIP
Very well main-
tained 2-story home
with 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen and
1.5 baths. This home
also has a first floor
laundry room, duct-
less air conditioner,
gas steam heat and
a fenced yard. This
is a beauty! Make an
appointment today!
MLS#11-4433
$79,900
Karen Altavilla
570-283-09100
ext 28
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
12 Oakdale Drive
Completely remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home with
detached garage &
carport on approxi-
mate 1.5 acres in a
nice private setting.
MLS# 11-1776
$129,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise Drive
PRICED TO SELL!
This 4 bedroom has
2 car garage with
extra driveway,
central air, veranda
over garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and wet
bar. Sunroom
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
21 Spring St.
2 or 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home. Large
fenced yard with
shed, 50x200 lot. 3
off street
parking spaces.
By Owner
$99,900
570-825-9867
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom starter
home with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
KINGSTON
220 Wright Ave
Modern 3 bedroom
rancher. Woodburn-
ing fireplace in living
room. Gas heat.
Central air condi-
tioning. Aluminum
siding. Newer roof.
Nice yard. Extras.
(FHA financing:
$3,322 down, $542
month, 4.25% inter-
est, 30 years.) Sell-
er willing to assist
with buyer's closing
costs, up to 6% of
purchase price!
MLS 11-4225
$94,900
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
KINGSTON
29 Landon Ave N
Striking curb appeal!
Beautiful interior
including a gas fire-
place, hardwood
floors, modern
kitchen, all new car-
peting on the sec-
ond floor, extra
large recently
remodeled main
bath, serene back
patio and spacious
yard. MLS#11-3075
$144,900
Call Mary Price
570-696-5418
570-472-1395
906 Homes for Sale
Kingston
3 bedroom bi-level
with two modern,
full baths & one 3/4
bath. Living room
with fireplace and
skylights, built in
china cabinets in
dining room. Lower
level family room
with fireplace and
wet bar. Large
foyer with fireplace.
MLS#11-3064
$289,500
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
38 W. Walnut St.
Charming 4/5 bed-
room with 1.5
baths. Beautifully
appointed kitchen
w/granite counter
tops, cherry cabi-
nets and hardwood
floors. Gas fireplace
in living room, lead-
ed glass windows
in living room and
dining room. Nice
back deck, 2 car
garage and 4 sea-
son front porch.
MLS 11-4103
$179,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
431 Chestnut Ave.
Charming 2 story
single family home
with upgrades,
including new
kitchen cabinets,
furnace, hot water
heater, 200 amp
electric, 2 car
detached garage.
Walk up attic for
additional storage
space. MLS 11-4106
$129,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284. $74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
KINGSTON
794 Woodland Drive
Deceptively spa-
cious. Very well
kept. Quiet location.
Move in condition.
Attractive neighbor-
ing properties. Mod-
est taxes. Newish
furnace and roofing.
Nicely fenced yard.
$129,900. 11-4547
Call Dale Williams
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-256-3343
KINGSTON
799 Floralon Drive
New Listing
Split level, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 baths,
partially finished
family room, gas
heat, air, enclosed
rear porch, att-
ached garage. Fam-
ily neighborhood.
12-97 $120,000
Go To The Top...
CALL JANE KOPP!
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
A Classy Move-in
Ready 5 bed-
room, with recent
updates including
flooring, bathroom,
recessed lighting &
many new widows.
Woodburner on
brick hearth, eat in
kitchen, formal
dining room. Good
room sizes, fenced
yard, patio, private
driveway, walking
distance to park,
shopping, public
transportation,
restaurants, etc.
MLS #11-4283
$132,900.
Call Pat today @
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
570-287-1196
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
Large double, great
older home with all
modern updates.
Pantry, kitchen, liv-
ing room, formal
dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
Collect $1300 rent
from other side.
$195,000
570-288-4203
KINGSTON
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace & more.
11-823
$105,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$119,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON REDUCED!!
177 Third Ave.
Neat as a pin! 3
bedroom, 2.5
baths, end unit
townhome with nice
fenced yard. Bright
Spacious kitchen,
main level family
room, deck w/
retractable awning.
Gas heat/central
air, pull down attic
for storage and 1
car garage. Very
affordable town-
home in great cen-
tral location!
MLS 11-1282
$134,500
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON TWP
573 carverton Rd
Cape Cod with
approx. 3,284 sq. ft.
Living room with
stone fireplace, din-
ing room with sky-
light & stone floor,
semi modern
kitchen with break-
fast area, family
room with fireplace
& vaulted ceiling
master on 1st floor
with master bath, 3
other bedrooms, 2
full baths. Central
air. $725,000.
MLS 11-4056
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
LAFLIN
Lovely brick ranch
home in great
development. 2
bedrooms, 2.5
baths. All hardwood
floors, brand new
roof. 2 family rooms
suitable for mini
apartment. 1st floor
laundry, sunroom,
central air, alarm
system, 1 car
garage. Very good
condition. 11-2437
$200,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LAKE TOWNSHIP
Reduced to
$149,900.
Owner Says Sell!
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 2 bath dou-
blewide on 2 acres
with detached 2 car
garage. Thermal
windows, wood
burning fireplace in
TV room, walk-in
closet, full base-
ment, front and rear
decks.
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
LARKSVILLE
12 First St.
Very well kept
home in a nice
neighborhood. New
kitchen with Corian
counter tops. Newly
painted rooms.
MLS 12-267
$85,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in
move in condi-
tion with updat-
ed kitchen and
baths. Nice yard
with shed and
potential off
street parking.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
LUZERNE
867 Bennett
With just a minimum
amount of TLC, this
is a great starter
home. Nice location
with great view of
Wyoming Valley and
beyond, off street
parking in rear via
alley. All measure-
ments approximate.
BeinG sold as is.
MLS 10-2774
$60,000
Call Michelle
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MESHOPPEN
Novak Road
Lovely, nearly com-
pleted, renovated
Victorian farmhouse
sits high on 7.81
acres featuring
panoramic pastoral
views, high ceilings,
original woodwork,
gutted, rewired,
insulated and sheet-
rocked, newer roof,
vinyl siding, kitchen
and baths. Gas
rights negotiable.
Lots of potential
with TLC. Elk Lake
$129,900
MLS# 11-525 Call
570-696-2468
906 Homes for Sale
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country
living, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck & gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
MOUNTAIN TOP
21 Forest Road
Fairview Heights
ranch featuring 3
spacious bedrooms,
1 1/2 baths, fire-
place, 1st floor laun-
dry, floored attic
with walk-in cedar
closet, 2 car
attached garage.
Newer roof, fur-
nace, water heater
and more! Sellers
are licensed real
estate agents.
MLS 11-3419
$169,000
Tony Desiderio
570-715-7734
Century 21 Smith
Hourigan Group
570-474-6307
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MOUNTAIN TOP
3071 Ablerdeen Rd
Immaculate 4 bed-
room, 2 bath home
on 1 acre. Beautiful-
ly landscaped. In-
ground pool with
solar heat. Custom
Cherry cabinets.
Hardwood floors.
Family room with
gas fireplace. 1 mile
to golf course.
MLS 11-1483
$210,000
Linda Cuono
570-715-7743
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP
33 Valley View Drive
3 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath, 2 car garage,
new roof & hot
water heater, above
ground heated pool,
finished basement.
$210,000
Contact Melissa at
570-430-8263
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$192,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night. Price
to sell, $185,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
MOUNTAIN TOP
Meticulously main-
tained ranch home
in convenient Moun-
tain Top location.
Features include 3
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, charming
foyer entrance,
bright & beautiful liv-
ing room, dining
room opens to mod-
ern eat-in kitchen,
new sun room addi-
tion, large family
room, manicured
lawn with beautiful
hardscape in front.
Large shed, large
unfinished base-
ment with half bath.
MLS#11-3607
$159,900
Chris Jones
570-696-6558
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
MOTIVATED SELLER
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage.
Modern kitchen &
bath, tile floors.
Energy efficient
Ceramic Heat.
MLS#11-2500
$174,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAINTOP
FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP
4 bedroom ranch,
hardwood floors,
1.5 bathrooms, for-
mal dining & living
rooms, finished
basement family
room with dry bar,
exercise room, &
workshop. Two car
garage. MLS# 12-5
$161,200
Call Vieve
570-239-6236,
ext. 2772,
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#11-2600
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 7D
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#11-2600
PRICE REDUCED
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Needs work, but
columns, moldings,
and leaded glass
windows are intact.
MLS #12-133
$42,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
1206 Hanover St. S
Spacious two story
home featuring
large kitchen, living
room, formal dining
room & family room.
3 bedrooms, 1 & 1.5
baths. Well main-
tained property with
a two car detached
garage & nice lot.
Split air system &
partial finished
basement with plen-
ty of storage or pos-
sible apartment.
MLS# 11-2881
$99,900
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
414 Grove Street E
Remodeled 2 story
with new oil furnace,
windows, electric
kitchen, bath, door,
flooring, paint. OSP.
Seller will pay 1st
year property tax.
MLS#11-2760
$85,500
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
NANTICOKE
The potential here is
endless. Former 20
bed personal care
home. Last used as
student housing for
college students,
now it awaits the
new owner. $95,000.
MLS 11-4287. Call
Donna for more
information or to
schedule a showing.
570-947-3824
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
NEWPORT TWP.
Five bedroom
Contemporary has
a vaulted ceiling in
living room with
fireplace.
Hardwood floors in
dining & living
rooms. 1st floor
master bedroom
with walk in closet.
Lower level family
room. Deck,
garage, separate
laundry.
$257,500
MLS#12-170
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
PENN LAKE
Come relax in your
new 3 bedroom
home while enjoying
the view of the lake.
2 of the bedrooms,
living and bright
sunroom all over-
look the beautiful
lake. $279,000.
MLS 11-4385. Call
Donna for more
information or to
schedule an
appointment.
570-947-3824
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$82,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
A lot of house for
the money. Corner
home with lots of
space. 9 rooms, 2
1/2 baths, a bonus
room of 42 x 24.
This home is conve-
niently located near
major highways, air-
port and shopping.
Two car detached
garage and nice
yard.
$75,500
MLS# 10-4350
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes From
$275,000-$595,000
(570) 474-5574
PITTSTON
Price Reduced! Price Reduced!
168 Elizabeth Street
Sturdy ranch in Ore-
gon Section. 3/4
bedrooms, 2 baths.
Price $89,000.
Call Stephen
570-814-4183
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP
SUSCON AREA
New Listing. Won-
derful home on a
huge country size
lot, in a private set-
ting, just off the
beaten path. Eco-
nomical Dual heat
system, central Air
plus ductless unit,
Lower Level family
room, detached 2
car garage, fire-
place & a great
view from the front
porch! MLS 11-3733
$229,900
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON TWP
FOR SALE: $257,500
LUXURY TOWNHOME
New construction:
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath, large entry
with cathedral
ceiling, upstairs
laundry. Oak
kitchen cabinetry,
granite counters
& stainless steel
whirlpool appli-
ances. Open floor
plan is great for
entertaining.
Upgrades include
hardwood floors &
gas fireplace. Two
walk-in closets &
master suite with
private bath fea-
tures cherry/
granite double
vanity, jetted tub.
Attached garage,
full basement, a
great location;
minutes to I-81 &
Turnpike off 315,
7.5 miles north of
Mohegan Sun.
READY FOR OCCUPANCY
Call Susan at
877-442-8439
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$164,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own cabin
in the woods.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
A/C, Hardwood &
wall to wall. Mar-
ble tile master bath
with jetted tub &
separate shower.
$189,500
Call 570-285-5119
PLAINS
46-48 Helen St
Well maintained
double block on
quiet street, great
nei ghbor hood.
Perfect home for
you with one side
paying most of
your mortgage, or
would make a
good investment,
with separate utili-
ties & great rents.
Vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl alu-
minum siding, walk
up large attic from
one side, lower
front & rear porch-
es, with two rear
upper enclosed
porches. $119,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
REDUCED REDUCED
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$34,900 $34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLYMOUTH
Recently remodeled
single family home
with 1st & 2nd floor
baths, modern
kitchen, large family
room with hard-
wood floors.
$70,000
MLS # 10-4618
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
906 Homes for Sale
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 1791 sq. ft.
1/2 double with
wrap around porch,
shed & garage.
Semi modern
kitchen & bath. 3
bedrooms with gas
heat and plenty of
storage. $24,900.
Possible rent to own
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
PRICE REDUCED
$425,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SHAVERTOWN
3 Lehigh St. N
Nice neighborhood
surrounds this
MOVE-IN READY 3
bedroom 2 story.
Wood floors. Built-
in garage. Dallas
School District.
MLS #11-4470
$80,000
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level yard
with shed. Large
sunr oom/ l aundr y
addition. Lower
level family room
with wood stove.
MLS #11-4178
$163,700
Call
Christrine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SHAVERTOWN
2 Oak Drive
Vacant land ready to
build. One of the last
lots left in this Back
Mountain develop-
ment. (1) one acre
lot. Call for details.
MLS 11-1488
$62,400
Christine Pieczynski
570-696-6565
SHAVERTOWN
A home starts with
location and school
district. Triple A
neighborhood and
Dallas School Dis-
trict. Deceiving look-
ing from the exteri-
or-make an appoint-
ment to see this
3600+/-SF home on
three floors. Lots of
oak on the first floor,
kitchen, moldings,
doors, floors. Sec-
ond floor with 4
bedrooms & bonus
room with skylights
& separate comput-
er area, storage
space and walk-in
closets. Very
appealing! Finished
lower level game
room with bath,
three season room
off kitchen and large
adjacent deck for
entertaining, sepa-
rate office/den on
first floor. Dual heat-
ing and air systems,
public utilities.
MLS#11-4064
$349,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
SWEET VALLEY
570 Grassy Pond Rd
Nice country bi-level
on 40 acres with 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, kitchen, living
room, family room,
office & laundry
room plus attached
oversized 2 car
garage with work-
shop, rear deck & 3
sheds. Borders
state game lands.
MLS 11-1094.
$319,900
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
66 Post Office Road
Charming ranch on 1
acre lot. Modern
kitchen, living room
with gas fireplace,
lower level finished,
large deck with
above ground pool,
nicely landscaped.
MLS#11-2627
$164,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED!
4 Oliver Road
Located in the back
part of Oliver Road
in a very private part
of North Lake in
Sweet Valley. Yearn-
ing to be restored,
lake front cape cod
in a very tranquil
setting was formerly
used as a summer
home. MLS 11-2113
$99,000
Jay Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
SWOYERSVILLE
60 Watkins St
Home features 4
bedrooms, a mas-
ter bedroom on 1st
floor with large walk
in closet, ceiling
fans, screened
porch, sunroom and
workshop. New 200
amp service, interi-
or paint & laundry
area in basement.
MLS#12-128
$105,000
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
78 Maltby Ave.
Wonderful family
home in a great
neighborhood. A
large master suite
and family room
addition make this
home a must see!
There is an
inground pool and
attached in-law
suite.
MLS 11-4572
$228,000
Call Kelly
Connolly-Cuba
EXT. 37
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
New Listing!
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home on double lot.
One car garage,
two 3 season
porches, security
system & attic just
insulated.
MLS #12-31
$90,000.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond! $99,700
MLS#11-2253
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
WEST PITTSTON
220 Linden St.
Large 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths.
Detached garage,
inground pool.
Home needs work
on the first floor,
2nd is in very good
condition. Kitchen
cabinets ready to
be reinstalled. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-78
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
313 Race St.
This home needs
someone to rebuild
the former finished
basement and 1st
floor. Being sold as
is. 2nd floor is
move in ready.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-255
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED
18 Atlantic Ave.
Large 2 story home
with 2 baths,
attached garage.
Being sold as-is.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4475
$59,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
550 Johnson St.
Nicely landscaped
corner lot sur-
rounds this brick
front Colonial in
desirable neighbor-
hood. This home
features a spacious
eat in kitchen, 4
bedrooms, 4 baths
including Master
bedroom with mas-
ter bath. 1st floor
laundry and finished
lower level. Enjoy
entertaining under
the covered patio
with hot tub, rear
deck for BBQs and
an above ground
pool. Economical
gas heat only $1224
per yr. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-157
$254,860
Call Michele
Reap
570-905-2336
WEST WYOMING
FRONT VIEW
REAR VIEW
BEAUTIFUL BRICK,
SLATE, MARBLE & WOOD
HOUSE. MUST BE SEEN
TO BE APPRECIATED.
2 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. Great kit-
chen with new
stainless steel app-
liances & custom
cabinets with center
island. Dining room
with stone fireplace
& marble floor.
Hardwood floors in
living room, which
also has stone walls
& eight arched win-
dows. Hand carved
wooden staircase
leads to Master
Bedroom Suite with
large closet & large
second bedroom &
bath. Middle level
with custom pool
room. Lower level
has 1/2 bath, bar &
built in stone & glass
hutches. Two new
self-feed rice coal
stoves keep heating
bills to less than
$400 a year! New
roof with lifetime
guarantee, privacy
fence, and 12
above ground pool
with composite
deck. New 2 story,
1 car garage, & a
long driveway for
plenty of parking.
$199,000, firm.
Showings will be
held weekends for
prequalified buyers
only, please.
Call 570-233-7235
WEST WYOMING
Why pay rent when
you can own this 1/2
double? 3 bed-
rooms. Eat in
kitchen. New roof
installed 12/11.
$49,900
MLS# 10-2780
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
WHY PAY RENT?
Nice half double
with eat in kitchen,
nice yard, shed and
off street parking.
$49,900
MLS # 11-1910
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WILKES-BARRE
100 Darling St
Nice two bedroom
single, gas heat,
enclosed porch,
fenced yard. Close
to downtown & col-
leges. Affordable at
$42,500. Call
TOWN & COUNTRY
REAL ESTATE CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
WILKES-BARRE
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with newer
laminate floors,
vaulted ceiling, 2
large bedrooms.
Finished lower level
with 1/2 bath and
laundry room. Large
family room built in
garage, and wood
pellet stove. No
sign, alarm system.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3290
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
185 West River St
Spacious, quality
home, brick two
story with 6 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 bath, 2
fireplaces, den,
heated sunroom off
living room,
screened porch off
formal dining room,
modern eat-in
kitchen, garage.
Many extras. Sacri-
fice, owner relocat-
ing out of state
Reduced $114,900
MLS 11-2474
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
WILKES-BARRE
2 Story, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1/2 bath
single family. Large
eat-in kitchen, 1st
floor laundry, hard-
wood floors, newer
furnace & water
heater, 1 car
garage. Off street
parking. Quiet one
way street.
$49,900
MLS 11-4171
Call Jim Banos
Coldwell Banker
Rundle
570-991-1883
WILKES-BARRE
241 Dana Street
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 1.5 baths with
textured ceilings,
updated kitchen, all
appliances including
dishwasher, tiled
bath with whirlpool
tub, 2nd floor laun-
dry room. Replace-
ment windows.
DRASTIC
REDUCTION
$60,000
MLS# 11-88
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
WILKES-BARRE
35 Murray St.
Large well kept 6
bedroom home in
quiet neighborhood.
Off street parking,
good size back
yard. Owner very
motivated to sell.
MLS 10-3668
$77,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
39 W. Chestnut St.
Lots of room in this
single with 3 floors
of living space. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
with hardwood
floors throughout,
natural woodwork,
all windows have
been replaced,
laundry/pantry off of
kitchen. 4x10 entry
foyer, space for 2
additional bed-
rooms on the 3rd
floor. Roof is new.
MLS 11-325
$69,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
49 Hillard St.
Great 3 bedroom
home with large
modern kitchen.
Ductless air condi-
tioning on 1st floor.
Laundry on 2nd
floor. Nice deck and
fenced in yard. Off
street parking for 2
cards via rear alley
MLS 11-2896
$85,000
Call Shelby
Watchilla
570-762-6969
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
495-497 S. Grant St
Nice double block in
good condition with
2 bedrooms on
each side. New vinyl
siding. Bathrooms
recently remodeled.
Roof is 2 years old.
Fully rented. Ten-
ants pay all utilities.
MLS11-580.$53,500
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
60 Saint Clair St
Great 4 bedroom
home with new
kitchen, furnace and
bath. Laundry room
off kitchen. Newer
windows and roof.
Hardwood on first
floor. Off street
parking. Older one
car garage. Walk up
attic. MLS 11-1478
$69,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
Great 3 bedroom
home in mint condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors, fenced lot,
garage. MLS#11-2834
$79,000.
(570) 237-1032
(570) 288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
Great Investment.
Quiet street close to
everything. Nice
size rooms. Both
sides currently rent-
ed. Off street park-
ing in back with a 1
car garage.
$89,900. MLS 11-
4207. Call Donna for
more information or
to schedule a show-
ing. 570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Handyman Special
Extra large duplex
with 7 bedrooms, 2
baths, fireplace,
screened porch, full
basement and 2 car
garage on double
lot in Wilkes-Barre
City. $58,000.
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
PAGE 8D MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Ofce Rentals
Full Service Leases Custom Design Renovations Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial Utilities Parking Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDER HOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior painting &
drywall install
All types of residen-
tial remodeling.
Kitchens & baths.
Specializing in Win-
dows & Vinyl Siding.
Solar light tunnels.
30 years experi-
ence. BBB. PA025042
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-287-1982
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price!
BATHROOMS,
KITCHENS,
ROOFING, SID-
ING, DECKS,
WINDOWS, etc.
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates.
(570) 332-7023
1024 Building &
Remodeling
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
See Us At
The
Home
Show
March
2, 3 & 4th
at the
Kingston
Armory
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
1030 Carpet
Cleaning
Alan & Lindas
Carpet and/or
Chair Cleaning
2 FOR $39
570-826-7035
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
1132 Handyman
Services
COMPLETE
MAINTENANCE
Roofing, siding,
plumbing, electric,
drywall, painting,
rough and finished
carpentry, lawn
service and more.
Residential
& Commercial
570-852-9281
1132 Handyman
Services
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
RUSSELLS
Property & Lawn
Mai ntenance
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
All types of interior
and exterior home
& business repairs
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
Mikes $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
570-826-1883
VERY CHEAP
JUNK REMOVAL!
Licensed,
Insured & Bonded.
Will beat any price,
guaranteed! Free
Estimates. Over
10,000 served.
570-693-3932
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding,
Hazard tree
removal, Grading,
Drainage, Lot clear-
ing, Snow plowing,
Stone/Soil delivery.
Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
Junk
Cars,
Trucks &
Equipment
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AWESOME INTERIORS
Quality Interior &
Exterior Painting.
Owner Present
on Every Job.
Satisfaction Guar-
anteed.
36 Years Exp.
570-885-3614
FREE ESTIMATES
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Prices starting at
$100/room.
570-762-6889
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
FREE Estimates
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
1252 Roofing &
Siding
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
Commercial
Industrial
Residential
DRIVEWAYS
SIDEWALKS
SALTING
VITO & GINOS
570-574-1275
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
1297 Tree Care
TOPS TREE
SERVICE, LLC
Total Tree Work.
Free Estimates,
Fully Insured.
570-520-4073
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Large, stately brick
home in Historic Dis-
trict. Large eat-in
kitchen, dining room
2 fireplaces, 5 full
baths & 2 half baths.
Huge master with
office. Large 3rd
floor bedroom. 2
story attic. Custom
woodwork & hard-
wood floors. Leaded
glass, large closets
with built-ins. Needs
some updates. With
large income apt.
with separate
entrance.
Call for
appointment.
ASKING $300,000
Call 570-706-5917
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath home, with 3
season porch and
detached 1 car
garage. Good
starter home in
well established
neighborhood.
Family owned for
many years.
MLS#11-4464
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
NOW REDUCED!
191 Andover St.
Lovely single family
3 bedroom home
with lots of space.
Finished 3rd floor,
balcony porch off of
2nd floor bedroom,
gas hot air heat,
central air and
much more.
Must see!
MLS 11-59
$66,000
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
PARSONS
Reduced - $69,900
262 Stucker Ave &
Extra Lot (3rd street
after baseball field)
7 room (3 bed-
rooms), 1 1/2 baths.
Lower Level has
family room and 1
car attached
garage. To settle
Estate. Drastically
reduced. Original
price $119,900, now
reduced $69,900.
10-2472
Call Joe Bruno
570-824-4560
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
32 Wilson St
No need for flood or
mine subsidence
insurance. 2 story, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
home in a safe,
quiet neighborhood.
Aluminum siding.
Corner, 105x50 lot.
Fenced in yard.
Appraised at
$57,000. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-826-1458
for appointment
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
60 Kulp St.
3-4 bedroom, 2
story home with
well kept hardwood
floors throughout.
Private driveway
with parking for 2
cards and nearly all
replacement win-
dows. MLS 11-2897
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$65,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WILKES-BARRE
PINE RIDGE ESTATES
1007 Morgan Drive
Beautiful two-story
traditional home
located high & dry in
Pine Ridge Estates,
one of Wilkes-
Barres newest
developments. Fea-
tures 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, master
suite with walk-in
closet, 9 ceilings
and hardwoods on
1st floor, family room
with gas fireplace,
two-car garage and
deck. MLS#11-3479
$229,900
Karen Ryan
570-283-9100 x14
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
1702 W. Eighth St.
1 story Ranch with
100x200 lot, paved
driveway, new
energy star
replacement win-
dows. Excellent
starter home. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2912
NEW PRICE
$84, 500
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
WYOMING
40 Fifth st
Very nice 2 family,
one side move in
the other rented
separate utilities, 6
rooms each side
plus 1/2 bath
upstairs each side.
Wonderful neigh-
borhood plus short
walking distance to
Wyoming Avenue.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4027. $124,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
906 Homes for Sale
WYOMING
768 Lewis Road
Dallas school dis-
trict - Lovely cedar
sided ranch home
on 2.7 acres with
gorgeous setting
overlooking pond.
Heated in ground
pool, 2 car garage,
plus one car garage
with workshop, cen-
tral A/C, finished
basement. Loft area
overlooking 2 story
living room, hot tub.
$5,000.00 carpet
allowance. 10-3570
$275,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
YATESVILLE
New Listing. Beauti-
ful home in Willow
View that shows
Pride of Owner-
ship thruout! Spa-
cious Florida room
that leads to a pri-
vate yard with
extensive landscap-
ing, brand new roof,
3 baths, 4 bed-
rooms, lower level
family room & more!
MLS 11-3714
$298,500
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Marys St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
BACK MOUNTAIN/
HARVEYS LAKE
Restaurant/Bar for
sale. 8,525sf. Turn-
key with seating for
125, bar area seats
24, includes all
equipment, fixtures,
two walk-in coolers,
furnishings, kitchen
equipment, & liquor
license. Two apart-
ments with long
term tenants, gas
heat, handicap
accessible, high
traffic area.
MLS#11-4332
$499,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
HANOVER TWP
22 W. Germania St
This 6,600 sq. ft.
concrete block build-
ing has multiple
uses. 5 offices &
kitchenette. Over
5,800 sq. ft. ware-
house space (high
ceilings). 2 overhead
doors. $85,000
MLS 10-1326
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
JENKINS TWP.
1334 Main St.
1 story, 2,600
sq. ft. commePr-
cial building,
masonry con-
struction with
offices and
warehousing.
Central air,
alarm system
and parking.
Great for con-
tractors or
anyone with
office/storage
needs. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3156
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
7 Hoyt St
Nice duplex zoned
commercial, can be
used for offices as
well as residential.
All separate utilities.
Keep apt. space or
convert to commer-
cial office space.
Adjacent lot for sale
by same owner.
MLS 11-2176
$85,900
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
LARKSVILLE
View this view! You
no longer have to go
into the city to
watch the 4th of
July fireworks! Enjoy
home ownership.
Architecturally built
split level, living
room with beamed
ceiling and wood
burning fireplace,
large dining room
with hardwood
flooring, tiled office
with glass views,
two bedrooms, two
baths, family room,
hobby room, green
house, fish pond,
raised gardens,
grape vines, fruit
trees, 1+/- acres of
property, 2-car
detached garage.
MLS#11-1079
REDUCED TO
$229,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
LUZERNE
Over 10,000SF of
storage space in
two buildings. Room
to build another
building, profession-
al, car wash,
restaurant, salon.
Minutes from Cross
Valley Expressway
Exit 6. Survey, storm
water/drainage
control plan and soil
and erosion sedi-
mentation control
plan completed if
you choose to build
a building on the
property. Also a por-
tion is available for
rent. MLS#10-320
REDUCED TO
$199,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church
St.
Great 2 family in
move in condi-
tion on both
sides, Separate
utilities, 6
rooms each. 3
car detached
garage in super
neighborhood.
Walking dis-
tance to col-
lege. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$123,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
166 Vine St.
Nice three family
home in good loca-
tion, fully occupied.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-220
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
Duplex. Aluminum
siding, oil heat, semi
- modern kitchens,
long term tenant. On
a spacious 50 x
150 lot. Motivated
Seller. REDUCED.
$37,900
Anne Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PITTSTON
Rear 49 James St.
Two 2 bedroom
apartments, fully
rented with sepa-
rate utilities on a
quiet street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-219
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
SALE OR LEASE
PRICE REDUCED
Modern office build-
ing, parking for 12
cars. Will remodel
to suit tenant.
$1800/mo or pur-
chase for
$449,000
MLS 11-751
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
107-109 E. Carey St.
High traffic, high
potential location
with enough space
for 2 second floor
apartments. A
stones throw away
from the casino.
Large front win-
dows for showroom
display. Basement &
sub - basement for
additional storage
or workspace.
PRICE REDUCED
$99,500
MLS# 10-1919
Call Stanley
(570) 817-0111
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
PLYMOUTH
155 E Walnut St.
Good investment
property knocking
on your door. Don't
miss out, come and
see for yourself.
Also included in the
sale of the property
is the lot behind the
home. Lot size is
25X75, known as
147 Cherry St.
$82,000
MLS# 10-2666
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
WEST WYOMING
331 Holden St
10-847
Many possibilities
for this building. 40 +
parking spaces, 5
offices, 3 baths and
warehouse.
$249,000 with
option to lease
Maria Huggler
Classic Properties
570-587-7000
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 PAGE 9D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
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NOW LEASING!
Leasing Office located at:
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*income restrictions apply
For seniors age 62+ or disabled according to social security guidelines
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
A Place To
Call Home
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
WILKES-BARRE
98-100 Lockhart St
Great Investment
Opportunity.
Separate utilities.
Motivated seller!
MLS 11-4330
$80,000
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
PRICE REDUCED!
$65,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
38 Wedgewood Dr.
Laurelbrook Estates
Lot featuring 3.22
acres with great
privacy on cul-de-
sac. Has been perc
tested and has
underground utili-
ties. 4 miles to PA
Turnpike entrance.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-114
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
COURTDALE
175x130 sloping lot
with some trees.
Public sewer, water,
gas. $9,500. To set-
tle Estate. 570-287-
5775 or 332-1048
DALLAS
$135,000
SPECTACULAR
WATER VIEW!
2 acres overlooking
Huntsville
Reservoir. Building
site cleared but
much of woodlands
preserved. Perc &
site prep done.
MLS # 11-2550.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
63 acres. Wooded
parcel. 5,000 road-
front on 2 paved
roads. Level &
rolling. In Dallas Twp.
$425,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS
Lot 2 Marlington Ct
THINKING OF BUILDING?
.76 acre beautiful
building lot on a cul-
de-sac in desirable
neighborhood.
Covenants apply.
Public utilities.
Dallas School
District.
MLS #11-4401
$ 64,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LAFLIN
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
BUILD YOUR
DREAM HOME
on one of the last
available lots in
desirable Laflin.
Convenient location
near highways, air-
port, casino &
shopping.
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
$34,900
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes From
$275,000-$595,000
(570) 474-5574
SHAVERTOWN
1 Oak Dr.
Vacant land ready to
build. One of the last
lots left in this Back
Mountain develop-
ment. Just over (4)
four acres. Call for
details. MLS 11-1486
$82,400
Christine Pieczynski
570-696-6565
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
ASHLEY PARK
Double wide home.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. 3 season
deck & carport,
new appliances,
many upgrades,
near Rts 81, 309 &
Hanover Industrial
Park $54,500.
Serious Calls Only.
(570) 826-0887
PITTSTON TWP.
95 Redman
2 bedroom. Vinyl
siding, shingled
roof. Clean. NEEDS
NO WORK. Minutes
from I81 & Turnpike.
Excellent Condition.
$19,900.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
Short or long term
Excellent
Neighborhood
Private Tenant
Parking
$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
74 W. Hartford St
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor. Fridge, stove,
washer/dryer
included. Wall to
wall carpet. No
pets. Security, appli-
cation fee + utilities.
$550/month.
570-479-2559
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $650 & 725
rent includes heat/
water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, first
floor, large modern
eat in kitchen with
appliances, bath,
carpeting, ample
parking, $495.
570-696-1866
BACK MOUNTAIN
Cozy 2 bedroom.
Heat & Appliances.
$575/ month.
570-574-2588
DALLAS
Modern 1st floor, 1
bedroom with all
appliances. Off
street parking. No
pets. $550 per
month + utilities.
570-639-1462
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUMORE
Two bedroom 1
bathroom apart-
ment on Apple St.
$600/month + utili-
ties. Available 1/15.
(570) 815-5334
DUPONT
Totally renovated 6
room apartment with
balcony. Partially fur-
nished. Brand new
fridge / electric
range & electric
washer/ dryer. along
with new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 2
bedroom + large
attic loft bedroom,
1.5 bath, partially fin-
ished basement.
Lots of closet space.
Easy access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking. $750 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-762-8265
DURYEA
1 bedroom apart-
ment + den in con-
verted school. 10 ft.
ceilings, open plan
Living Room, Dining
area & modern
Kitchen, all appli-
ances, mini-blinds,
neutral colors, hard-
wood floors, laun-
dry, off-street park-
ing. $675. Call
570-451-1982
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom with
basement for stor-
age. Private ent-
rance with rear
yard. All new appli-
ances included.
Washer/dryer, sew-
er included. Pets
considered. $425/
month + 1 month
security.
Call 570-606-7884
between 9am &
9pm or Call
570-256-7837
before 9am &
after 9pm
EDWARDSVILLE
3/4 bedrooms, wat-
er & sewer. Off-
street parking. $500
/month + security.
Tenant pays for
trash, electric, gas
heat & registration
fee.
Call 570-814-7562
EXETER
2 bedroom, modern
kitchen and bath,
Includes OSP
stove, fridge, heat,
water, sewer.
No Pets. $650.
570-693-1294
FORTY FORT
1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, washer
/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
gas heat, nice
kitchen & bath, new
flooring, optional
garage. Wash-
er/dryer included
$ 6 8 5 / m o n t h .
Call after 6 p.m.
570-220-6533
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
ing, central air, off
street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
appointment.
FORTY FORT
WYOMING
AVE
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient, first
floor, appli-
ances, laundry,
parking.
STAFFED PRO-
F E S S I O N A L
MANAGEMENT
NO PETS/
S M O K I N G
$465 + UTILI-
TIES/2 YEARS.
288-1422
HANOVER TWP.
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, cherry
hardwood floors,
stainless appli-
ances, European
tile kitchen & bath.
Parking, A/C, cathe-
dral ceilings, fire-
place, balcony
$790/month.
Call 570-650-0278
HUDSON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hook-
up, full basement,
no pets. $625/mon-
th, water & sewer
paid, security.
570-829-5378
JENKINS TWP.
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room. All utilities
included. Refrigera-
tor & stove. No
pets. Available
now. $600 month.
Call
570-362-0942
KINGSTON
1 bedroom. Avail-
able now. $425 +
security & electric.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
1st floor. Large 2
bedroom. Remod-
eled. Stove refriger-
ator. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $675 Heat
included. Call
570-814-0843 or
570-696-3090
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, wall to wall,
refrigerator & stove,
heat & hot water.
Off-street parking.
No pets. No smok-
ing. $550/month, +
security & refer-
ences .
570-288-3119
KINGSTON
Awsome 2 bedroom
apartments! New
appliances, wash-
er/dryer on site,
garage parking, no
pets. 2nd floor -
$925 & 1st floor -
$1,075. Heat, water,
& sewer included.
Call 570-417-2049
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
3 bedrooms, pantry
w/eat in kitchen. All
appliances. 2.5
baths, separate tub
showers. No pets
or smoking.
$1500/mo plus
security & utilities.
Call 570-288-4203
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted, security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $715.
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled, 3
bedroom 1/2 double
with carpet, paint,
1.5 bath, washer/
dryer hook up, gas
heat, $700 + utilities.
Call 570-814-0843
or 570-696-3090
KINGSTON
SPACIOUS 1/2 DOUBLES
3 bedrooms, back
yard. Separate utili-
ties. No pets. Back-
ground & security.
$750/month.
570-242-8380
KINGSTON
Spacious 3rd floor,
2 bedrooms, porch,
off street parking.
Heat & water
included. New
fridge & stove. Pet
Friendly. $550 +
security. Call
570-287-5282
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
$725, with discount.
All new hardwood
floors and tile. New
cabinets/bathroom.
Dishwasher, garb-
age disposal. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up.
Off street parking.
Facebook us at
BOVO Rentals
570-328-9984
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MCADOO
Newly constructed
1 & 2 bedroom 2nd
floor apartments.
Modern kitchen:
stainless steel
appliances, granite
countertops. Pri-
vate laundry. Off
street parking. No
pets. Includes heat,
water, garbage &
sewer. References
& security deposit
required. $850
Call (570) 929-2843
for appointment
MOOSIC
4 rooms. 2nd floor.
Heat, water &
sewer included.
$695 + security &
references. Call
570-457-7854
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom with full
kitchen. Remodeled
recently, first floor,
ample parking. Hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
On Rt 309 - close
to all amenities! No
pets. Non smoking.
$560/month + secu-
rity & references.
570-239-3827
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, washer/dryer
hookup, off street
parking. No pets.
$470/month,
heat, water, & hot
water incl.
570-855-3958 leave
message.
NANTICOKE
603 HANOVER ST
2nd floor, 1
bedroom. No pets.
$500 + security,
utilities & lease.
Photos available.
570-542-5330
NANTICOKE
625 S. Walnut St.
1st floor, 2 bed-
rooms, hardwood
floors, kitchen with
appliances and din-
ing room, shared
yard. Basement
with w/d hookup,
front porch. Water
and garbage incl.
$475 plus electric
and security
570-814-1356
NANTICOKE
East State Street
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. Mod-
ern kitchen & bath-
rooms. All appli-
ances. Ample stor-
age. Some utilities
included. $475 &
$585 per month.
Call (570) 239-2741
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
apartment.
221 Pine St.
$520/month, sewer
& garbage included,
security deposit
required. Call
610-393-7884
NANTICOKE
Ready Immediately!
Spacious 2nd floor
non smoking, 2
bedroom. W/w car-
peting, all appli-
ances incl. w/d.
Electric heat. Tons
of storage, off
street parking. Yard
and porch.
$480/mo, 1 month
security, refer-
ences. Water and
sewage incl. tenant
pays other utilities
570-650-3358
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, pets
negotiable. $525/
month, water and
sewer paid,
security and lease
required. Call after
4pm. 570-237-6277
PITTSTON
3 room, wall to wall
carpet, appliances
washer/dryer hook-
up, includes all utili-
ties except electric.
No pets
$500/month +
security
Call 570-655-1606
PITTSTON
South Main Street
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
includes heat, stove
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook-
up, sewer, front &
back porches,
fenced yard & pri-
vate parking. Lawn
maintained. No
Pets. $675/month
570-654-2257
PLAINS
1st floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location. No
smoking. No pets.
$550 + utilities.
570-714-9234
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer/dry-
er hookup, with
stove & refrigerator.
No pets. Refer-
ences required.
$500/month + sec-
urity + heat & lights.
570-779-4903
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedroom, private
setting with pond.
1.5 baths. Ultra
modern kitchen
with appliances,
dishwasher &
microwave includ-
ed. Plenty of closet
& storage. Wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Private drive.
$1,100/month.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Security deposit
required.
Call 570-760-2362
SWOYERSVILLE
New 1 bedroom, 1st
floor. Quiet area.
All appliances
included, coin-op
laundry. Off street
parking. No pets.
$430. Water/sewer
included. Security &
references. Call
570-239-7770
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom luxury
apartment. Living
room, kitchen. Cen-
tral Air. Off Street
parking. All appli-
ances included.
570-430-3095
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room kitchen, living
room, bath, and
attic storage.
Refrigerator and
stove provided.
Heat, water, and
sewer included.
Quiet neighbor-
hood, out of flood
zone. No pets.
$540/month
lease, 1st., security
deposit, and refer-
ences required.
570-466-1545
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST PITTSTON
HIGH AND DRY
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment, 2nd floor.
Recently renovated.
Sewer & appliances
included. Off street
parking. Security.
No pets.
$500/month +
utilities & gas heat.
570-586-0417
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room apartment.
All appliances.
Washer/ dryer. Off
street parking. No
pets. $525 + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
570-954-2972
WEST WYOMING
429 West 8th Street
New 2 bedroom
with off street park-
ing, private patio,
washer/dryer, stove
included. No pets.
$575/mos + security
Sewer & garbage
included other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiency 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
1.5 bedroom, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove
provided, no pets, .
Heat & water paid.
$560/month + secu-
rity deposit.
Call 570-829-1598
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
1.5 bedrooms,
newly renovated
building. Washer &
dryer available.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
460 Scott Street
2 units. Fridge &
stove included.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. No pets. Securi-
ty, application fee +
utilities.
1 bedroom 1st floor,
$450.
1 bedroom 3rd
floor, $400.
570-479-2559
WILKES-BARRE
A spotless living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 2 bedroom,
bath, yard, base-
ment, off street
parking. Irving
Place. $430 + utili-
ties. 570-266-5336
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio & 1 bed-
room apts. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors electronically
locked. Studio -
$450. 1 bedroom -
$550. Water &
sewer paid. One
month/security de-
posit. Call
570-793-6377 or
570-208-9301 after
9:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
BOWMAN STREET
2 bedrooms
$725 Month
per month.
All utilities
included
Call Ken
@ 570-706-6145
to schedule a
viewing.
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom,
duplex. Stove, hook-
ups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking
$475 + utilities.
Call 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
CROSS VALLEY
ACCESS
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient
1 bedroom,
appliances,
laundry, park-
ing. STAFFED
PROFESSIONAL
MANAGEMENT.
NO PETS/
SMOKING/$465
+ UTILITIES.
2 YEARS.
AMERICA REALTY
288-1422
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
Modern, 1st floor
apartment. 2 bed-
room, 1.5 baths, off-
street parking. No
pets, no smokers.
Security & credit/
background check
required. $550/
month + utilities.
570-881-4078
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
813 N Washington
Street
2nd floor. 1 bed-
room, wall to wall
carpet, new paint &
flooring, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances, laundry facil-
ities, enclosed
porch. Heat, hot
water and cable
included. $520 +
electric & security.
No pets.
Call 570-814-1356
WILKES-BARRE
PARSONS
2nd floor, 3 rooms +
laundry room.
No pets.
$380 + utilities.
570-824-1082
WILKES-BARRE
Short Term OK!
Studio near Wilkes.
Furniture available.
Lease till June or
August. $450. All
utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
1 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, laundry room.
$800. All appliances
& utilities except
electric included.
Call 570-574-3065
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH WELLES ST.
Available February
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New paint &
carpet, enclosed
porch. Heat, hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
$625 + security.
Section 8 Welcome.
570-589-9767
WILKES-BARRE
TWO BEDROOM UNIT
For lease, available
immediately, 1 bath-
room, refrigerator &
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, 2nd floor.
$500 per month +
utilities, references,
security & back-
ground check
570-735-4074
Leave message
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
water included
2 bedroom
single family
6 bedroom
large half double
HANOVER
2 bedroom
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom
large, water
included
PITTSTON
Large 1
bedroom water
included
KINGSTON
3 Bedroom Half
Double
LUZERNE
2 bedroom
water included
OLD FORGE
2 bedroom
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
by General Hospital
3 bedroom. All reno-
vated. 1,200 sf.
Parking space.
$730/month + utili-
ties, negotiable. Call
Agnes
347-495-4566
570-793-9449
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Quiet neighborhood.
Apartment near
Mohegan Sun, Mall
& Arena. 1 bed-
room, living room,
kitchen & bath.
Recently remod-
eled. New Stove,
washer, dryer &
fridge. included.
Heat, hot water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Off
street parking. $600
/mo. + security. Ref-
erences, credit &
background checks
required.
Call 570-861-2264
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WYOMING
1 bedroom 2nd floor
at $675/month. Off
street parking. Non
smoking. No pets.
Bonus walk up attic
with tons of stor-
age. Heat, water,
garbage, sewer
included. 1 month
security, credit
check & references.
1 year lease.
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
WYOMING
Large 2 bedroom,
1st floor, lease,
security, section 8
accepted. Handicap
accessible, $695 +
electric. All other
utilities included.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
3800 SF, will divide
Office / Retail
Call 570-829-1206
EXETER
OFFICE/
STOREFRONT
1079 WYOMING AVE.,
available immedi-
ately, utilities pro-
vided. $300/month
with security
deposit. Call
570-693-2804
for an appointment
LUZERNE
125 Main Street
Office or Retail
Space available
with over 2,000 sq.
ft. plus attached
garage. High
traffic area. $650/
month + utilities.
Call 570-331-3600
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICE OR STORE
NANTICOKE
1280 sq ft. 3 phase
power, central air
conditioning. Handi-
cap accessible rest
room. All utilities by
tenant. Garbage
included. $900 per
month for a 5 year
lease.
570-735-5064.
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON
Main St. 1350 sq. ft.
building. Formerly
an appliance store.
$750/mo.
570-654-1243
PLAINS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
1,500 SQ.FT.
1350 River Road
Excellent location
for small business
or office. Will re-
model to suit tenant.
Call 570-760-3714
or 570-237-5664
RETAIL BUILDING
WILKES-BARRE TWP
12,000 sf. Route
309. Exit 165 off I81.
570-823-1719
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
315 PLAZA
1750 sf former
Physician Office.
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WILKES-BARRE
GREAT BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
1,500 square foot
available for rent.
Restaurant with
some equipment.
Excellent street vis-
ibility at the Hazle &
Park Triangle. Also,
Middle East Bakery
for sale or rent.
call Pete for details
at 570-301-8200
PAGE 10D MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains Twp.
WAREHOUSE
Laird St. Complex,
Will divide for multi-
ple tenants. Rea-
sonable rates. Easy
Interstate access.
Lease 132,500
sq.ft., 12 loading
docks, 30 ft ceilings,
sprinkler, acres of
parking. Offices
Available
570-655-9732
ext. 312
WYOMING
72 x 200 VACANT
COMMERCIAL LOT
233 Wyoming Ave,
Rt. 11 (1/4 mile from
proposed Walmart)
For Sale or lease.
$96,000.
570-388-6669
947 Garages
WEST PITTSTON
4 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9x11. $55/
month. No electric.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
ALDEN / NANTICOKE
3 Bedrooms. Gas
Heat. Hookups.
Parking. Large yard.
No Pets. $539 + util-
ities Security $300
570-824-8786
ASHLEY
2 bedroom apart-
ment, Careys
Patch, completely
remodeled. Appli-
ances included with
washer & dryer.
Full yard &
off street parking.
No smoking. $650.
Call Will at
570-417-5186
EXETER
Recently remodeled
4-5 bedroom half
double with large
rooms. Off street
parking. Yard. $800
+ utilities. Call
570-299-7103
FORTY FORT
3 bedroom, excel-
lent condition, great
location. Off street
parking. Storage
basement. Washer/
dryer included.
$650 + utilities.
By application.
570-954-0505
HANOVER TWP.
221 Boland Ave
1 bedroom.
$325+utilities
Call Mark at
(570) 899-2835
(917) 345-9060
HANOVER TWP.
$650/month, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
dining room & eat
in kitchen. Appli-
ances, washer/dry-
er hook up. Off
street parking. Wat-
er, sewer & recy-
clables included.
Security, references
& credit check. No
pets. 570-824-3223
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, new wall to
wall carpeting,
freshly painted, par-
tial A/C, gas heat,
large fenced in
yard, walking dis-
tance to Kingston
Corners. All appli-
ances, off-street
parking, no pets.
$675/month, plus
utilities, & 2 months
security.
Application &
references.
Call 570-639-4907
LARKSVILLE
3 bedrooms, all
appliances, gas
heat. Includes sew-
er & garbage. Off-
street parking, no
pets. $625/month +
utilities, 1st, last &
security.
NO SECTION 8
570-762-7850
MINERS MILLS
Section W-B. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath. No
pets. $215 per week
(all utilities included)
References, Lease
& Security deposit
(570) 881-7864
NANTICOKE
1207 Prospect St
3 bedrooms. Hard-
wood floors. Eat-in
kitchen with appli-
ances, including
dishwasher. 1.5
bath. Washer/dryer
hook up. Basement
& front porch.
Sewer & garbage
included. No pets.
No smoking. $625 +
utilities & security.
570-814-1356
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
Must See!
$850 + utilities,
lease & security. NO
PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
950 Half Doubles
WANAMIE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, $575/
month, plus utilities.
Section 8 OK
Call 610-393-7884
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom, living
room, dining room
kitchen. Totally
remodeled. 1st floor.
Washer/dryer hook
up. Off street park-
ing. $575/month +
security.
570-299-7103
WEST WYOMING
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath, quiet area, off
street parking.
ABSOLUTELY NO
PETS. $650/mo +
security and refer-
ences. Utilities
by tenant.
570-430-3851
leave message
WILKES-BARRE
322 New Hancock
3 bedroom. 1 bath.
Available April 1st.
Call for details.
Call (570) 819-1473
WILKES-BARRE/PARSONS
Spacious. Newly
remodeled. 1300 sf.
3 bedroom. Off
street parking.
Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer. No
pets. $650/month +
utilities & security
570-474-9248
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Nice 3 bedroom
half double. 1,400
sf. $695 + utilities.
Pets considered.
No CEO.
Section 8 welcome.
570-899-8173
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Nice 3 bedroom
with eat in kitchen &
walk up attic. Walk-
ing distance to
school & parks.
$700/month + utili-
ties & 1 month secu-
rity. (570) 793-9449
WYOMING
Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove provid-
ed, no pets, w/w
carpeting, $800/
month, plus utilities,
& $1,000 security
deposit.
Call 570-693-2804
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
BEAR CREEK VILLAGE
LAKE COMMUNITY
4 bedroom. 1.5
bath. 2 car garage.
Beautiful wooded 2
acre lot. Fenced
back yard. Full
basement. Attic for
storage. Washer,
dryer, fridge &
freezer. Large deck.
$1,200/month + utili-
ties (water &
garbage paid). No
cats. References &
credit check
required.
570-262-0571 John
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,000 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
DRUMS
SAND SPRINGS
Golf Community
Luxurious 1900 sq.
feet Townhouse.
Modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, 1 stall
garage. 3 minutes
to interstates 81 &
80. $1400 + utilities.
Call 570-582-4575
HUDSON/PLAINS
Single 2 bedroom.
Gas Heat. $675/
month + utilities.
Section 8 accepted.
570-825-5451
HUDSON/PLAINS
Single 2 bedroom.
Gas Heat. $675/
month + utilities.
Section 8 accepted.
570-825-5451
KINGSTON
A spotless 4 bed-
room, 1 bath cape
on Dawes Ave;
Fenced yard, base-
ment, Off-street
parking. $685 + utili-
ties. Call
570-266-5336
LARKSVILLE
2 bedroom, living
room, kitchen and
bath. Great view!
Section 8 wel-
come. Utilities by
tenant $650/mo
plus security
Call 570-814-8299
0r 570-779-0918
953Houses for Rent
LARKSVILLE
Conveniently locat-
ed. Spacious 4 bed-
room single. Gas
heat. Off street
parking. Lease, no
pets. Security. Call
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
LINE UP
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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PITTSTON
Beautiful ranch
home with
attached garage.
3 bedroom 1.5
baths All new tile,
hardwood floors,
granite counters,
paint & carpets.
Closest house
rental to new that
you will find. We
handle all property
maintenance. No
Pets. $1,100 per
month. Utilities Not
Included Call
570-237-0425
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
SWOYERSVILLE
Renovated 2 bed-
room mobile home
with central air, new
carpeting, modern
kitchen with all
appliances, nice
neighborhood,
fenced yard and off
street parking. No
pets. Security &
lease. $495 + all util-
ities. 570-690-3086
WEST PITTSTON
2 bed, 2 bath ranch
with new kitchen &
beautiful river view.
Appliances included
$1,200/mos + utili-
ties. MLS# 11-4275
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family
house, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, large living
& dining rooms, ex-
tra room, eat-in-kit-
chen, finished attic.
Backyard & drive-
way. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $750/
month + utilities, 1
month security.
Call 609-356-8416
WILKES-BARRE
Two 3 Bedrooms
$675-$625
One 2 bedroom
$585.
Plus all utilities
References & secu-
rity. No pets.
570-766-1881
WILKES-BARRE TWP.
SUMMIT PLACE
3 bedroom town-
house, behind VA
Hospital. All new
everything. Kitchen
appliances, parking.
$850 + utilities. Call
Joe 570-592-1606
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Available March/April
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only.
XM and OnStar fees applicable. Low APR to well qualified buyers.Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
821-2772 1-800-444-7172
601 K id d e rS tre e t, W ilke s -Ba rre , P A
V A L L E Y
CHE V ROL E T
K E N W A L L A CE S
V isitus24/ 7a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m
General M otors
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CERT IFIED
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SPECIAL
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
PURCHASE
TH E SE P R ICE S
CAN NOT B E
R E P E ATE D !
L im ite d
Tim e Offe r
2010 Chevy Cobalt
LS LT
2DR 4DR
#Z2615,2.2L DOHC VVT
4 Speed,Autom atic,Deluxe
FrontBucketSeats,Air
Conditioning,XM Satellite
Radio,OnStar,AM /FM /
CD/M P3,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
Starting
At
$
13,950
*
2011 Chevy Aveo LT
#Z2571,1.6L ECOTEC DOHC
4 Cyl.,Autom atic,Tinted Glass,
AM /FM /CD/M P3,Spoiler,
Power W indows,A/C,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,TiltW heel,
Cruise Control,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
13,999
*
6 AV EO S AV AILABLE
2011 Chevy HHR LT
#Z2540,2.2L Auto.,
Stabilitrak,A/C,PW ,PDL,
Deluxe FrontBuckets,Running
Boards,Traction Control,
AM /FM Stereo w/ CD,
Luggage RoofRails,Power
Drivers Seat,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
13,999
*
1 0 HHRS AV AILABLE
2010 & 2011 Chevy M alibu
#Z2451,2.4L DOHC,
Autom atic,Rem ote
Keyless Entry,A/C,PW ,
PDL,Power M irrors,
AM /FM /CD,Front
BucketSeats,Body Side
M oldings,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
15,999
*
1 0 M ALIBUS AV AILABLE
2011 Chevy Cruze LT
#Z2523,1.4L ECOTEC VVT DOHC
4 Cyl.,Turbo 6 Speed,Autom atic
Transm ission,A/C,PW ,PDL,Front
BucketSeats,16SteelW heels,XM
Satellite Radio,OnStar w/ Auto Crash
Response & Turn-By-Turn N avigation,
AM /FM / CD/M P3,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
17,999
*
1 1 CRUZES
AV AILABLE
LT & LTZ
2011 Chevy Im pala LT
#Z2595,3.5L V6,Auto.,A/C,
PW ,PDL,Power M irrors,Power
Drivers Seat,XM Satellite Radio,
AM /FM /CD,Tilt,Heated Front
BucketSeats,Bose Stereo,
Alum inum W heels,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
17,995
*
2011 Chevy Traverse AW D
#Z2596,3.6L V6 Auto.,Traction
Control,A/C,8 Passenger,2nd &
3rd Row SplitBench,Power
Options,Power Driver Seat,Rear
Spoiler,18Alum .W heels,Power
Heated M irrors,LOW M ILES
SALE
PRICE
$
27,950
*
3 TRAV ERSES AV AILABLE 8 IM PALAS AV AILABLE
Lea ther
W E W A N T YOUR TRA DE !
$$TOP DOL L A R$$
FINANCING
AS LO W AS
2.
9% APR
AV AILABLE
1 0 CO BALTS AV AILABLE
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Starting
At
Scan From
M obile
Device For
M ore
Specials
WVONMO VALLEV
UV MEME PAV MEME UV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Think
Cars
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
FREE GAS when you nance a vehicle
up to 36 months
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
JOIN AWINNINGTEAM
Customer Service Supervisor
Vector Security, Inc this regions most respected
name in the security alarm industry is expanding
its Customer Service Team. If you thrive on
helping people and if you want to make a differ-
ence at work, then we are the work place that you
are looking for!
We offer full time positions with an exceptional
benefit package:
Our qualifications for joining this winning team
include good oral and written communication
skills, above average computer skills, answering
escalated customer calls. Qualified candidates
MUST be flexible and have prior supervisory
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check and drug screen is required.
Send cover letter and resume to:
HR Manager
Vector Security
23 Casey Avenue; Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Fax: 970-6232
Email: wbjobs@vectorsecurity.com
EOE
Competitive Wages
Medical and Dental
Prescription Plan
Paid Training
Disability
Tuition Reimbursement
401K with Company Matching
CNAs
Certified Nurse Assistants
Do you enjoy helping others?
Would you like a career in healthcare?
We are looking for
Full & Part Time 3-11 & 11-7
CNAs to provide quality care
For our residents
All Shifts Available!
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Apply in person 395 Middle Road
Nanticoke
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