DMir_1979_08!08!020- Mumia Do Titanic

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DAILY MIRROR, Wedmsday, August 8,1979

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matches are being televised and members of the crowd chant their own versions o wellf known songs and such like, they are, in fact, infringing terms of copyright. That being so, the football clubs concerned are liable to pay the necessary fee for public performances. A friend said I was talking rubbish. A bottle of whisky depends on your answer.
Sorry, but we have to scotch that one for you ~ n d r e w ! first you had our lad Ccorge worried ~t that he might have to fork out- rdyalties for chanting "God Save Our Gracious Team" at the Cup F w l . But the Performina Right Societ tells u i that footbalf grounds have to be licensed to blare out the latest pop opus as pre-match or half-time entertainment, and this licence also takes care of improm tu d'~oncerts,"with or whhout the original lyrics. Mind you, it's only the club and ground itself that's covered by the licence: So if you should decide that "You'll Never Walk Alone" outside the turnstiles, you might have t o r u n for i t " PINTA PETE," Wrythe instead!

ANDREW WOOFSEN, Little Norton Way, Sheffield, S. Yorks, writes: ECENTLY I stated that when football

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THE FOSDYKE SAGA bv Bill Tidv

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DAVlD BUTLER, Snowdon Grove, East Boldon, Tyne and Wear, writes:

Lane, Carshalton, Surrey, writes:

charged 39p--nearly eight shillings in "old" money- A MI right in t h i n g for three small packets of that when the hner peanuts. Titanic made its ill-fated Never again will I .be maiden voyage, it was able to use !ke expression 'carrying a n Egyptian " peanuts to mean mummy? something of little value ! That's right, David. Indeed, Pete. And our us f he a prophetess that farmer friends tellhas mummy was that of the same fate famed durin the reign of befallen that other timeArnenhtep father-in- honour* derogatory law of Tutankhamen. remark, chicken feed " !

T H E other evening in a public bar I was

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DAILY MIRROR, Thursday, September 6, 1979

LIVE

GLetters A N D Y CAPP by Reg Smythe

you told a that he was right in the RECENTLYthinking thatreader lineronTitanic was carrying an Egyptian mummy its illfated maiden voyage. I'm afraid this is ah old myth. The object in question was a mummycase of a priestess of Amen presented to the British Museum about 1889. This case has become the centre of many weird stories — including responsibility for the sinking of the Titanic!

JAMES B. ARCHER, Norton Conyers, Ripon, N. Yorks, writes:

MUMMY WAS A MYTH!

However, in 1934 Sir Wallace Budge, Keeper of Egyptian Antiquities at the Museum, published a detailed refutation of all these tales. He ascribed their origin to the late Mr. Douglas Murray and the late Mr. W. T. Stead, who had said, in print, that the expression on the face on the coffin lid was that of "a living soul in torment" and wished to hold a seance with the purpose Of removing the anguish from the face. The story snowballed and it was rumoured that, because of the "curse" associated with it, Sir Wallace sold the mummy-case to a wealthy American who shipped it on the Titanic. Somehow the American Was supposed to have Write to MS ,, rescued the case but its curse continued so he sold it to a Canadian. The latest owner, experiencing Similar evil happenings, Our address isH>;; decided to send it back to England but it was lost Live Letters* Daily : < when the Empress of Ireland went down in the St Mirror, 33,Hplborri; Lawrence River. That, roughly is the London E C ! P i D Q , legend. The fact is that the mummy-case never left the British Museum. It is still there. But the myth persists, for it is said to give people an odd Mr. J. H. PILGRIM, Cliff feeling if they examine it Crescent, Shalford, too closely. Essex, writes: In case you wish to E thought you would experiment, it is exhibit like number 22542 in the Sec- Planning to share a laugh. permission was ond Egyptian Room. sought for development in our area and this was Thanks, James, but • we'll take your refused. Word for it! I said that the thing to Another point which no do was to appeal. My daughter remarked, doubt contributed to the myth was that W. T. "What does that mean, dad? Do you get on your Stead, a prominent journalist and Spiritualist, knees and grovel?" was himself drowned on JL. It helps! the Titanic.

THE FOSDYKE SAGA by Bill Tidy

Old Codgers

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GARTH by Martin Asbury, John Allard and Jim Edgar

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: TOM THE TEAMSTERTOM S. CURRAN, Lower Cross, Cross Houses, Shrewsbury, Salop, writes:

THE LARKS by Jack Dunkley and Ian Gammidge
ALL RISHT.'A L L R I G H T / I. / BREAK IT I

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. . . I ' V E NOTICEDYOU 'RE EARLY THIS MORNING

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The bullocks were trained by me at Ludlow, Salop, in the early part of 1930.1 then walked them to London, starting on June 19, 1930, and arriving in October. On the way, they were shod at Oxford, and then regularly in London by Jim Haiti-' son, a blacksmith at Kew Bridge. We travelled London SIX TOASTS TODAY, folks. For the Diamond and the suburbs advertisWeddings of Mr. and Mrs. ing and delivering Atora J. H. Nutter, 'Seclusion', Suet five days a week for years, finally North Road, Chesham Bois, nine to Shropshire returning Bucks; Mr. and Mrs. W. war was declared. when Blunden, 111 Brookdale I am now over eighty Road, London, SE6; Mr. and .Mrs. C. Collins, 61, Bulbeiy, but can still recall many amusing incidents during Abbotts Ann, Hants; and my years with the Atora Mr. and Mrs. H. Small, 79 team. Pevereli Drive, Henbury, We can Imagine, Bristol. • Tom. And no doubt For the 62nd anniversary you found yourself in the of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. oxtail soup more than Rivers, 20 Tower Road, once!

about shod oxen being pull the THE lettersI drove that wagon was of usedintothe 1930s. Atora Suet advertising cart great interest to me, because in London

CONGRATS!

THE M R MEN by Roger Hargreaves
The ux>rCd's greatest Civihej author ooiU rioco commence his autobiography,

{everything I from the time I / was smote...)

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Twickenham, Middlesex. And for the 63rd anniver- 1—TODAY'S T H O U G H T — sary of Mr. and Mrs. W. The time for payment comet, Cross, 20 Gingells Green, St. early or late, no earthly debtor but accounts to George, Bristol. _ Fate.—JOHN MASEF1ELD Congratulations all! (1878-1967).

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