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Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Massachusetts School Building Authority


School District Mount Greylock District Contact Rose Ellis TEL: (413) 458-9582 Name of School Mt Greylock Reg High Submission Date 12/14/2011

SOI CERTIFICATION To be eligible to submit a Statement of Interest (SOI), a district must certify the following:
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The district hereby acknowledges and agrees that this SOI is NOT an application for funding and that submission of this SOI in no way commits the MSBA to accept an application, approve an application, provide a grant or any other type of funding, or places any other obligation on the MSBA. The district hereby acknowledges that no district shall have any entitlement to funds from the MSBA, pursuant to M.G.L. c. 70B or the provisions of 963 CMR 2.00. The district hereby acknowledges that the provisions of 963 CMR 2.00 shall apply to the district and all projects for which the district is seeking and/or receiving funds for a portion of a municipally-owned or regionally-owned school facility from the MSBA pursuant to M.G.L. c. 70B. The district hereby acknowledges that this SOI is for one existing municipally-owned or regionally-owned public school facility in the district that is currently used or will be used to educate public PreK-12 students. After the district completes and submits this SOI electronically, the district must sign the required certifications and submit one signed hard copy of the SOI to the MSBA, with all of the required documentation described under the "Vote" tab, on or before the deadline. The district will schedule and hold a meeting at which the School Committee voted, using the specific language contained in the "Vote" tab, to authorize the submission of this SOI. The district will schedule and hold a meeting at which the City Council/Board of Aldermen, Board of Selectmen/equivalent governing body voted, using the specific language contained in the "Vote" tab, to authorize the submission of this SOI. On or before the SOI deadline, the district will submit the minutes of the meeting at which the School Committee votes to authorize the Superintendent to submit this SOI. The MSBA's vote template, which contains specific reference to the school and the priorities for which the SOI is being submitted, will be used, and the minutes will be signed by the Chair. The district has arranged with the City/Town Clerk to certify the vote of the City Council/Board of Aldermen or Board of Selectmen/equivalent governing body to authorize the Superintendent to submit this SOI. The district will use the MSBA's vote template and submit the full text of this vote, which will specifically reference the school and the priorities for which the SOI is being submitted, to the MSBA on or before the SOI deadline. The district hereby acknowledges that this SOI submission will not be complete until the MSBA has received all of the required vote documentation and certification signatures in a format acceptable to the MSBA.

LOCAL CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT/SCHOOL COMMITTEE CHAIR (E.g., Mayor, Town Manager, Board of Selectmen)

Massachusetts School Building Authority

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Chief Executive Officer (print name)

School Committee Chair (print name)

Superintendent of Schools (print name)

(signature) Date

(signature) Date

(signature) Date

Massachusetts School Building Authority

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Massachusetts School Building Authority


School District Mount Greylock District Contact Rose Ellis TEL: (413) 458-9582 Name of School Mt Greylock Reg High Submission Date 12/14/2011

Note The following Priorities have been included in the Statement of Interest: 1. g Replacement or renovation of a building which is structurally unsound or otherwise in a condition seriously jeopardizing b c d e f the health and safety of school children, where no alternative exists. 2. g Elimination of existing severe overcrowding. c d e f 3. g Prevention of the loss of accreditation. b c d e f 4. g Prevention of severe overcrowding expected to result from increased enrollments. c d e f 5. g Replacement, renovation or modernization of school facility systems, such as roofs, windows, boilers, heating and b c d e f ventilation systems, to increase energy conservation and decrease energy related costs in a school facility. 6. g Short term enrollment growth. c d e f 7. g Replacement of or addition to obsolete buildings in order to provide for a full range of programs consistent with state b c d e f and approved local requirements. 8. g Transition from court-ordered and approved racial balance school districts to walk-to, so-called, or other school c d e f districts. Potential Project Scope: Potential New School

Is this SOI the District Priority SOI? YES School name of the District Priority SOI: District Goal for School: Please explain the educational goals of any potential project at this school Mt. Greylock Regional School is embarking on a comprehensive collaborative learning initiative to turn around the schools declining education programming and to prepare students for their future in a rapidly changing world. Vital to this process is a facility that is smaller, more efficient, safer, and supports how students now learn. Our vision focuses on 21st-century learning skills and instruction to maximize student achievement. We have engaged the International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE) to help achieve this goal. With ICLE, we are in the process of developing a comprehensive strategic plan to be implemented over the next year. The plan focuses on 4 areas: 1) increasing teacher professional development; 2) revising the curriculum to reflect the new national standards & to improve instructional methodologies; 3) assessing & improving the Districts technology; & 4) exploring & developing individualized learning, including opportunities for alternative career programs for all students. Faculty and staff are deeply engaged in this process as we work to create an environment that is intellectually challenging for all students. Years of budgetary stress have weakened Mt. Greylocks capacity to serve all its students well. This new educational initiative is needed to reverse declining performance that has occurred as a result of this budget stress. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) has placed the School on Corrective Action status for failure to meet AYP in math. As a result, Mt. Greylock has slipped from a Level 1 to a Level 2 rating in the DESE Accountability and Assessment Framework. Mt. Greylocks failure to meet all of its students needs is also
Massachusetts School Building Authority 3 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

represented in its graduation rate for its low-income students, which declined to 60 percent in FY11. The building is a serious impediment to learning and a major drain on the budget in a District that is already financially struggling to maintain its programs. The New England Association of Schools & Colleges, Inc. (NEASC) Commission on Public Secondary Schools accreditation has placed Mt. Greylock on warning status as a result of longstanding facility issues (See Attachment #1: November 14th, 2011 letter). The building is also a significant detriment to our effort to revive our education programming. Teachers are hindered by outdated classroom & pedagogical tools and enjoy very little interaction across disciplines or grades due to the building's sprawling oversized layout. Ability to use technology is severely hampered by the age of the buildings infrastructure. The building is significantly oversized for the Schools 600 students, built in 1960 and expanded in 1968 to accommodate 1,100 students. Despite its size, the building lacks adequate space for science instruction and labs, nor does it support the latest uses of technology. The building also lacks adequate special education areas or ADA/CMR521 access to key building spaces, which again hinders the School's programming and its ability to meet students' needs. These challenges have led to a loss of students to other public and private schools. In 2010, with the help of the MSBA, after a failed boiler and ceiling collapse, Mt. Greylock replaced the boilers and repaired the unstable ceilings in the locker rooms. Despite the boiler replacement, the building continues to inhibit instruction due to a dysfunctional heating distribution and ventilation system. Many classrooms and large core areas are cold & uncomfortable during winter while others are overheated. The ventilation system is antiquated. CO2, humidity, and noise levels exceed recommended levels. It is not uncommon for students to wear coats and complain of headaches. Many classrooms have been plagued by mold. The recent structural and mechanical failures highlight the urgent need to address the facilitys problems before more money is wasted and educational programs are further threatened. Mt. Greylock spends a disproportionate amount of money on heating due to its inefficient building envelope. The walls, windows and roof are either minimally or un-insulated. Distribution of heat and air intake through the building are also inefficient. A recent energy study concluded that we could save as much as 50% on heating costs if we were housed in a new smaller, very energy-efficient facility (report forthcoming). The building is code non-compliant in at least 5 critical areas: 1) current security and safety devices, 2) a sprinkler system, 3) ADA/CMR 521 mandated building exits and access to classrooms, the gym and library; 4) classroom noise levels, & 5) air quality. Also, some of the original building materials are no longer permitted due to the hazards they cause as they deteriorate. With MSBA help, we can design a smaller, energy-efficient facility that advances the schools educational goals. District's Proposed Schedule: What is the District's proposed schedule to achieve the goal(s) stated above? Educational improvement is underway. We have completed an assessment of strengths & weaknesses & will use the information to develop a strategic plan with implementation in 12 and 13. We have evaluated building air quality, noise levels, and energy efficiency, along with other systems. We have met with town officials to better understand the facilitys code, health, and safety issues. Results are included below. We are reaching out to our communities to educate and solicit input. I have created a Communications Committee which recently organized a Meet & Greet introducing officials and community organizers from both towns to each other. The meeting provided information about our new initiatives and the poor state of the building. Similar meetings and additional outreach will be used going forward. In 2010, Mt. Greylock entered into an agreement to share administration with Superintendency Union 71. Now three districts share one Superintendent and 3 other positions. Is this part of a larger facilities plan? NO If "YES", please provide the following: Facilities Plan Date: Planning Firm: Please provide an overview of the plan including as much detail as necessary to describe the plan, its goals and how the school facility that is the subject of this SOI fits into that plan: Please provide the current student to teacher ratios at the school facility that is the subject of this SOI: 17 students per teacher Please provide the originally planned student to teacher ratios at the school facility that is the subject of this SOI: 17 students per teacher Is there overcrowding at the school facility? YES If "YES", please describe in detail, including specific examples of the overcrowding. Despite decreasing enrollment, the Districts budgetary distress has led to overcrowding in 13 core classes and three electives.
Massachusetts School Building Authority 4 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Oversized classes include a chorus class (57 students), wellness and some natural science, language, mathematics and social science classes (see Attachment #2). Has the district had any recent teacher layoffs or reductions? YES If "YES", how many teaching positions were affected? 2 At which schools in the district? Mt. Greylock Please describe the types of teacher positions that were eliminated (e.g., art, math, science, physical education, etc.). The chorus position was reduced from full- to part-time, a departing wellness teacher was not replaced, language FTEs have been reduced (French is being phased out). Has the district had any recent staff layoffs or reductions? YES If "YES", how many staff positions were affected? 3 At which schools in the district? Mt. Greylock Please describe the types of staff positions that were eliminated (e.g., guidance, administrative, maintenance, etc.). Custodial department FTEs were reduced from seven to six. Two Special Education teaching support staff were eliminated. The shared business director position was replaced with a contracted business service. Please provide a description of the program modifications as a consequence of these teacher and/or staff reductions,including the impact on district class sizes and curriculum. Reductions have resulted in larger class sizes & a reduction in course offerings. Required courses sometimes cannot be taken during the appropriate semester or year. Teachers are stretched across many subject areas diminishing their overall effectiveness. Most vocational & technical programs have been eliminated. The Senior Project, a capstone educational experience central to the educational plan remains on hold. French is being phased out. AP Latin has been eliminated. AP Science classes are now offered every other year. The inadequate science lab facilities require labs be conducted off site. Due to scheduling constraints, off-site labs can only be conducted a few times a year. Many electives have also been eliminated. Mt. Greylock has tried to remedy some of these problems through the use of VHS online learning. The effort is constrained by the limits of the buildings technological infrastructure Please provide a detailed description of your most recent budget approval process including a description of any budget reductions and the impact of those reductions on the district's school facilities, class sizes, and educational program. The budget process for FY2012 (Attachment #3) was stressful in spite of savings from the newly formed collaborative with Williamstown and Lanesborough Elementary Schools which created shared district administration. Increased debt due to recent repairs & renovation & the loss of federal stimulus funds made it difficult to address longstanding educational and building deficiencies effectively. In January, I and my staff prepared a draft budget in consultation with the School Committee's Finance Subcommittee. Aware of the difficult fiscal conditions in each of the member towns, needing to pay for repairs to the gym and replacement of the schools boilers and facing the loss of federal stimulus funding, we presented a total budget about 3% lower than in FY2011 , and assessments that were unchanged for Williamstown and decreased by 1% for Lanesborough to the towns for approval. We were able to address some deficiencies. Large class sizes in English were reduced through the addition of an English teacher and the school's tech hardware budget was increased by about $10,000. Large class sizes (26+) persist in many areas, however (see Attachment #2). The senior project, highlighted by NEASC, remains on hold. Science lab deficiencies continue to hobble the school's capacity to meet curricular requirements on site. A long list of needed technology upgrades and repair & preventative maintenance projects await attention. We presented the budget at public hearings & to the Finance Committees of both towns in March. Our School Committee approved the budget on March 25th, 2011. The Williamstowns Annual Town Meeting approved their assessment on May 17th, 2011. At the town meeting on June 14th , Lanesborough approved a budget more than $30,000 lower than that requested. On August 16th Lanesborough held a second town meeting during which they approved our initial assessment, a reduction of 1% from FY2011.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

General Description
BRIEF BUILDING HISTORY: Please provide a detailed description of when the original building was built, and the date(s) and project scopes(s) of any additions and renovations (maximum of 5000 characters). The original 120,000sf building was constructed in 1960, and was expanded in 1968 with an addition of 63,000sf. The current 183,000sf building houses about 600 students in grades 7-12. Underground heating fuel storage tanks were replaced in 1992. Mt. Greylock installed a new single-layer membrane roof in 2003. A new potable water well, a 15,000 gal storage tank, and upgraded water-conditioning equipment were installed in 2006. Mt. Greylock, with the assistance of the MSBA, has recently completed a two-part emergency repair project to 1) install new boilers, heating system pumps, and an emergency power system; and 2) repair the locker rooms. The locker room repair included the replacement of defective ceilings, the hot water heating system, room heating units, lighting, fire alarm sensors, ventilation units, window areas, lockers, and individual shower stalls. In addition, aged underground LP storage tanks were removed and replaced. TOTAL BUILDING SQUARE FOOTAGE: Please provide the original building square footage PLUS the square footage of any additions. 183000 SITE DESCRIPTION: Please provide a detailed description of the current site and any known existing conditions that would impact a potential project at the site (maximum of 5000 characters). Mt. Greylock is located on a partially wooded, 117-acre site. The building and athletic fields comprise about 53 acres of the site on prime farm land composed of relatively flat-lying (3-8 percent slopes), Amenia silt loam soil (source: MassGIS). There are no known geological or soil conditions that would negatively impact a project at the site. BUILDING ENVELOPE: Please provide a detailed description of the building envelope, types of construction materials used, and any known problems or existing conditions (maximum of 5000 characters). The original 1960 building was built around a large central courtyard with the gymnasium and cafeteria attached via a long corridor creating a large box shape with an L-shaped extension from one side. The 1968 addition included the construction of a new cafeteria and library at the opposite end of the school from the gymnasium, with many interior courtyards and long connecting corridors. The resulting single-story, sprawling building has very extensive exterior wall area for its usable square footage (see Attachment #4). The exterior walls are brick veneer over CMU without insulation or air gap, with an estimated r-value of (1.9 to 2.2). Spalling has occurred in unheated walls when bricks are pushed out or fractured around the window lintels due to freeze/thaw cycles. In the 1960 portions the walls above the windows are plywood-framed instead of brick, covered by painted, light-gauge aluminum. The windows are single-pane glass in aluminum frames, set in hollow-metal wall frames. Aluminum storm windows were added on the inside in the 1970s. The resultant window assemblies have high infiltration loss and very low thermo-insulation value due to thermo-siphoning within the two-inch cavity between the panes. Most window caulk is dried out, cracked with age and in many areas falling out of the joints. The roof is a structural steel deck over steel beams and joists with 3" rigid insulation. The roof covering was replaced in 2003 by single ply Thermoplastic Polyolefin (TPO) membrane. Some insulation was replaced, but the current underlying 3 layer of insulation (Long Term Thermal Resistance (TTR) =18.5) is still inadequate for current energy codes. The total thermal envelope is very inefficient, particularly for a building of only 600 students. The gym, locker room areas, and auxiliary exercise spaces are located 4' higher than the rest of the building and there is not ADA/CMR 521 compliant access between this area and the rest of the building. There is a ramp through the girls locker areas, but it is no longer ADA compliant, creating problems for students and staff. Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the EXTERIOR WALLS ? NO
Massachusetts School Building Authority 6 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 0 Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the ROOF? YES Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 2003 Type Of ROOF: TPO membrane, and some insulation was replaced Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: Single ply TPO membrane. Insulation quality does not meet current standards. Roof water ponding and compressed insulation is evidence of inadequate pitch to drains. Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the WINDOWS? YES Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 1973 Type Of WINDOWS: Single Pane with aluminum triple track storm windows Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: Triple-track aluminum storm windows were installed inside the original single pane windows with a two-inch gap between panes, which results in thermo-siphoning between the panes, reducing the efficacy of the window set. Both sets of windows also have high infiltration rates, resulting in significant heat loss from the building. Caulking maintenance helps to a limited degree, but it is defeated by the poor condition of the original, underlying caulk. The necessity of operating two sets of window openings and corrosion of mechanical parts due to age makes access to fresh air through windows difficult in many areas of the building. In addition, the unsealed, two-inch gap between the window systems makes maintenance and cleaning difficult and time consuming. MECHANICAL and ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS: Please provide a detailed description of the current mechanical and electrical systems and any known problems or existing conditions (maximum of 5000 characters). Triple-track aluminum storm windows were installed inside the original single pane windows with a two-inch gap between panes, which results in thermo-siphoning between the panes, reducing the efficacy of the window set. Both sets of windows also have high infiltration rates, resulting in significant heat loss from the building. Caulking maintenance helps to a limited degree, but it is defeated by the poor condition of the original, underlying caulk. The necessity of operating two sets of window openings and corrosion of mechanical parts due to age makes access to fresh air through windows difficult in many areas of the building. In addition, the unsealed, two-inch gap between the window systems makes maintenance and cleaning difficult and time consuming. Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the BOILERS? YES Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 2010 Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: The three failing original boilers were replaced with four 2.5 mmbtu modular boilers and controls which now use #2 fuel oil. The many distribution pumps were replace with two dual arm variable speed pumps. Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the HVAC SYSTEM ? NO Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 0 Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: Only the Univent heating and ventilation systems in the locker rooms were replaced in 2010 as part of an emergency renovation. There has never been an integrated HVAC system installed at Mt. Greylock, only heating and ventilation systems. Has there been a Major Repair or Replacement of the ELECTRICAL SERVICES AND DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM? YES Year of Last Major Repair or Replacement: 2010 Description of Last Major Repair or Replacement: Repair limited to emergency circuitsIn 2010 the emergency generators were replaced with a new 150 KW exterior unit and new primary distribution . BUILDING INTERIOR: Please provide a detailed description of the current building interior including a description of the flooring systems, finishes, ceilings, lighting, etc. (maximum of 5000 characters).

Massachusetts School Building Authority

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Interior walls are primarily painted CMU or glazed facing tile, with some painted gypsum wall board and the original exterior brick walls where the additions were made. Most floors in the 1960 portion of the building are vinyl asbestos tile (VAT), some of which have been replaced with vinyl composition tile (VCT). In the 1968 portion of the building, the classrooms, library area, and adjacent corridors have VCT flooring. A wood floor with shock adsorption is installed over the original VAT flooring in the Gymnasium. Bathrooms have ceramic flooring. The 1968 cafeteria, one fitness area (originally built as the cafeteria) and lobbies have terrazzo floors. Ceilings are suspended acoustic tile or fixed acoustic tile. All asbestos-containing acoustic tile has been removed from the building (1993 Abatement Project). In the summer of 2009, as part of a National Grid energy audit and upgrade incentive program, old lamps and ballasts were replaced with new T8/T5 lamps and electric ballasts. In addition, ceiling and wall switch decorator style Passive Infrared (PIR) sensors were installed throughout the building. PROGRAMS and OPERATIONS: Please provide a detailed description of the current programs offered and indicate whether there are program components that cannot be offered due to facility constraints, operational constraints, etc. (maximum of 5000 characters). Mt. Greylock is a 7-12 middle and high school with an academic curriculum offering an intellectually rigorous program of studies. We require four years of math and English; three years of social studies/History; a sequence of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. For World languages, we offer Latin and Spanish with the recent addition of limited online offerings. There is strong support for the fine and performing arts. Wellness is required every year and offered five days per week. A total of 10 AP courses are offered on a rotating basis. We have several significantly physically impaired students integrated into core programs. Science education is greatly compromised because deteriorating pipes have led to gas and water shut-offs. There are only two chemical fume hoods serving the ten science rooms. Science labs are very limited by lack of stations, safety equipment, and space. Special education programming and services are also greatly compromised by the physical plant. Resource rooms are converted classrooms and are not adequate for Occupational Therapy (OT) and Physical Therapy (PT) services. These rooms cannot be partitioned into smaller learning suites because of asbestos floor tiling. These spaces lack appropriate lighting for students who have vision problems. Due to the noisy ventilation system, amplification devices, FMs, must be used to assist students with Central Auditory Processing Disorder. The library, gym, and all the classrooms are not ADA/CMR 521 compliant. Technology is also severely limited due to the physical plant. The large, sprawling, single-floor construction has made networking difficult (too many hubs are required due to distances). Classrooms are limited and dated in technology access and wiring. As a result, there is very little integration of technology in the classroom. Performing arts programming has been constrained by the aging auditorium. The seats are in disrepair; the asbestos fire curtain should be removed; and the room lacks current technology for digital presentations. CORE EDUCATIONAL SPACES: Please provide a detailed description of the Core Educational Spaces within the facility, a description of the number and sizes (in square feet) of classrooms, a description of science rooms/labs including ages and most recent updates, and a description of the media center/library (maximum of 5000 characters). All instructional space is original to the 1960 construction and addition in 1968. There are 30 classrooms of 920square feet (sf) each; 10 science rooms of 1000sf each. Science instruction and safety are limited by the inadequate number of fume hoods, and the lack of gas, compressed air, and water. Students do not have access to individual or group lab stations. We have two art rooms of 1200sf. Art activities are limited due to the lack of venting for kiln use. Sinks are not at heights for handicapped students. The auditorium does not have handicapped seating or arrangements for general theater use by the disabled. No rooms were designed for special education, leading to inefficient use of original classrooms and conversions for
Massachusetts School Building Authority 8 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

OT and PT. There is a band room of 1700sf and an orchestra/choral room of 1600sf. Both areas lack adequate soundproofing. We have four computer labs placed in converted 920sf classrooms. Lack of sufficient wiring and network access limit the configuration of lab working space. The library/media center has a 7300sf main level. Some of the stacks on this level are not ADA/CMR 521 compliant. The upper and lower level study/work areas of 1200sf in the Library are not ADA/CMR 521 compliant; the Library loft is closed for this reason. CAPACITY and UTILIZATION: Please provide a detailed description of the current capacity and utilization of the school facility. If the school is overcrowded, please describe steps taken by the administration to address capacity issues. Please also describe in detail any spaces that have been converted from their intended use to be used as classroom space (maximum of 5000 characters). The original 1960 building together with the 1968 addition were designed to hold 1100 students in 183,000sf, and serve a l960's curriculum where large study halls were permitted and special education areas were non-existent. The current enrollment is 600. The lack of mixed use small and/or flexible size rooms means that standardized 920sf rooms are utilized for the instruction of small groups of students. Six classrooms have been converted to special education areas for resource rooms, speech and language pathology, OT & PT services and reading instruction. Four classrooms have been turned into technology labs. One classroom has been turned into a world language recording/listening lab. Some cafeteria space has become a faculty professional development center. A feasibility study is needed to explore more effective and efficient use of overall space in the building, look at opportunities for consolidation, and determine whether the solution should be a renovation or a replacement of all parts of the building. MAINTENANCE and CAPITAL REPAIR: Please provide a detailed description of the districts current maintenance practices, its capital repair program, and the maintenance program in place at the facility that is the subject of this SOI. Please include specific examples of capital repair projects undertaken in the past, including any override or debt exclusion votes that were necessary (maximum of 5000 characters). A capital repair project was approved in 2002 for a new, single-layer TPO membrane roof replacement. In 2010, collapsed locker room ceilings were repaired, and Mt. Greylocks boilers were replaced. The project required debt exclusion votes in the district's towns. In light of the buildings age and recent problems, the new Superintendent reorganized the facilities and custodial departments and directed the development of an aggressive small repair and preventative maintenance plan. She simultaneously appointed a new facilities coordinator who works in conjunction with the custodial staff. In the summer of 2010, the Superintendent met with the custodial staff to assess the concerns and needs of the building. As a result of the assessment, cleaning, maintenance and repair priorities were established. The first priority was addressing reports of mold in the north corridors. Initial testing by an outside consultant was done to create a baseline. A comprehensive cleaning and maintenance plan was designed to begin mid-year through summer 2011. The following work has been completed: (i) all moldy homosote was removed; (ii) all mold-containing classrooms were bombed in winter and spring; (iii) before painting in summer 2011, all north corridor classrooms were bombed for mold, powerwashed and painted; (iv) north corridor floors were stripped, thoroughly cleaned and then rewaxed; (v) all classrooms were cleaned and powerwashed; (vi) the gym, cafeteria, some classrooms, hallways and administrative offices were painted; (vii) all Univents were taken apart, cleaned, and where appropriate, parts replaced; (viii) all Univent filters were replaced with higher quality materials; (iv) all air intake units located on the outside of the building were taken apart and cleaned; (x) all dysfunctional hallway dehumidifiers were removed or disconnected; and (xi) testing for asbestos is being conducted where warranted. The new cleaning and maintenance priorities are being developed into an annual Preventative Maintenance Plan to be overseen and carried out by the new facilities coordinator.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 1 Please provide a detailed description of the perceived health and safety problem(s) below. Attach copies of orders or citations from state and/or local building and/or health officials.

The wiring, ventilation, and fire detection systems at Mt. Greylock have never been upgraded. The building in many areas is out of compliance with federal, state, and local regulations with regard to fire, health (including air quality and acoustics), and safety. These conditions have been documented by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) 2005 report, by a 2006 Dore and Whittier feasibility study, and by recent testing by EDM Engineering (See Attachment #7). Fire Protection & Hazards: There is no fire suppression system in the school. There is no significant water source anywhere near this site that can be used in case of fire (the school uses well water which does not have capacity for fire suppression).The current estimated response time of the volunteer fire department is eleven (11) minutes and the nearest source of water is a brook approximately one mile from the school. The current alarm system is not up to code. There is no fire separation barrier between some areas of the building. The auditorium entrances have the original 30 wide doors which are narrow and undersized, limiting egress during an emergency. The side walls of the auditorium have large decorative acoustic baffles made of wood, which are a fire hazard. The entire back wall of the auditorium is covered with similar acoustic baffles. The control booth installed between the main entrances at the rear of the auditorium is also built of wood. The stage area has a set of manually operated louvers installed high in the exterior wall for emergency smoke evacuation. The auditorium vestibule is narrow and has no fresh air ventilation system, making egress from the auditorium during a fire emergency hazardous. Gas lines in the science labs are shut off due to the failure of pipe material. Security: There is no building security system to control access to the school during times when students are present. The building has multiple entrances and many exits due to the layout and multi-phase construction of the building. Without camera-monitored and electronically-latched doors, Mt. Greylock is vulnerable to intrusion during the school day. Current building security monitoring devices are limited to detecting after-hours intrusion only. Air Quality: Building corridors are minimally ventilated (1968 addition) or not ventilated (1960 original construction) with fresh air. Classroom Univent systems provide fresh air to building corridors when the doors are open. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) measurements in 1997, 2002, and 2011 (see Attachment #6) reveal that occupied classrooms have levels that greatly exceed the 800 ppm limit (in some cases >2000 ppm), indicating a persistent problem in the operation of classroom ventilation systems. The most recent air quality testing by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health on December 2nd , 2011, was conducted after a concerted effort by the new Facilities Manager to clean, re-filter, and fine-tune the classroom Univent systems over the summer and through the fall. Therefore, the results of the 2011 testing which are an improvement over past tests, represent the best-case scenario for the building. Testing was done on a 45F day and is not indicative of air quality during the colder winter months when the Univents will further restrict classroom fresh air intake when in heating mode (see below). As a result of the recent testing, one high school classroom has been closed due to poor air quality and a lack of proper exhaust ventilation. This closure puts a course in jeopardy. The final Department of Public Health testing report is forthcoming. Most rooms in the school are not properly ventilated for fresh air as required by mechanical code. This is confirmed by recent mechanical testing by EDM Engineering of Pittsfield, MA (see HVAC testing results, Attachment #7), of unit ventilators in both the original 1960 and newer 1968 sections of the building. Testing of seven units installed in the original part (1960) of the building showed a range of 166 to 350 cfm for outside air ventilation. Code requires that a 1000sf classroom with 35 occupants have a minimum of 470 cfm of fresh air. Only one classroom of four similarly-sized classrooms tested in the newer (1968) section of the building had reasonable ventilation rates (530 cfm), while the others were below code-mandated rates (307 to 368 cfm) for fresh air ventilation. Four oversized laboratory/work areas had rates of 132cfm, 256cfm, 263cfm, and 493cfm for fresh air ventilation.
Massachusetts School Building Authority 10 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Two double-sized classrooms each serviced by two Univents had rates of 472cfm and 494cfm, respectively. It is important to note that in order to measure the Univent ventilation rates for outside air, it is necessary to lower the thermostat setpoint on the Univent several degrees below the classroom temperature to get the fresh air louvers to open fully. Therefore, the rates of fresh air ventilation recorded during testing are the maximum rate possible in non-heating months. In heating months, the Univent closes the fresh air louvers when heat is called for in the classroom. Therefore, already poor air quality in classrooms becomes worse during heating months (see Air Quality & Heating section below). Acoustic measurements (see Attachment #5) of classroom background noise levels indicate that Univent systems in many classrooms are very loud, leading teachers to shut off the fresh air ventilators to teach. Forgetting to turn back on the Univent system compounds the problem, elevating classroom CO2 levels. Measurements taken in 1997 and 2003 confirm the longstanding nature of this problem. In addition, fresh-air intake vents for classroom Univent systems are installed within inches of the ground, which promotes the introduction of allergens, mold, and moisture into the classrooms, particularly during warm weather months, lowering air quality. There is no air conditioning in any school classroom. Classroom air quality is also compromised because fresh-air intake and exhaust-air ventilation are done at the floor level along the exterior wall. This creates a flow pattern along the exterior wall that does not effectively ventilate the entire room with fresh air. Students cannot perform many standard experiments or activities (e.g., dissections) in Biology and Chemistry classrooms without compromising air quality. Outdated science lab cabinet-style hoods are non-functional as they have dangerously heavy doors that are not currently operable. The Library is ventilated by a large, noisy, roof-mounted boxcar that uses failing original pneumatic controls and a non-functional air conditioning unit with electronic controls installed in 1968. As with the Gymnasium and Auditorium systems, Library exhaust air is ventilated primarily from the floor level while fresh air is introduced at the ceiling level, in contrast to modern HVAC systems which do the reverse. In all cases, the heating systems of these core areas have integrated heating and ventilation systems that can only operate in two modes. In heating mode, fresh air is heated and circulated through the occupied space and the exhaust system is automatically cut off. When the exhaust system is on, the fresh air/heating system is automatically cut off. In the case of the gymnasium, some exhaust vents in the 1960 portion are located on the floor underneath the bleachers. Dust, dirt, and debris from the floor is collected in the vents and re-circulated through the ventilation system in spite of constant maintenance. In addition, the new facility manager recently discovered that heating system pipes share the same space as the return air plenum that runs under the gymnasium floor. It is suspected that the pipe-elbow insulation may contain asbestos. The plenum has been disconnected and the suspected material is being tested.

School bathrooms are odiferous due to poor ventilation, as all fresh air is drawn from poorly ventilated hallways through louvers in the door.

Heating & Air Quality: The heating of classrooms is accomplished through the fresh air vent of the Univent system. When heat is called for by the room thermostat, the fresh air vent is shut down until the desired temperature is reached, which inhibits efforts to improve classroom air quality during heating months. Temperature variations during the day result in repeated cycles of opening and then closing of the fresh-air vent, further compromising air quality as already marginal mechanical ventilation systems are frequently disconnected from fresh air.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

11

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Although the boilers that supply hot water to the heating supply loops have just been replaced with the help of the MSBA, due to the age of the pneumatic controls imbedded in every classroom Univent, classroom temperature control is still problematic. The Facility Manager considers it a good day if 51% of the building is happy.

Classrooms along the north wall can be cold, with students and teachers wearing jackets. In other parts of the building, classrooms are overheated and windows must be opened for fresh air. Both conditions promote lost days due to sickness and are a distraction to the daily educational functioning of the classroom. In addition, the Univent heating coils sit close (<12 inches) to the exterior wall grill, making them susceptible to freezing during cold weather, if the temperature controls in a classroom malfunction or the day is unusually cold. In some cases, interior classrooms fed by roof-mounted fresh air vents have frozen as cold air has cascaded down into the room when the pneumatic temperature-control system failed to properly close vent louvers. Again, preventing heating coil freeze-up means shutting down fresh-air ventilation.

Hazardous Materials: Most floor tiles in the 1960 portion of the building and some pipe insulation contain asbestos. The auditorium stage fire curtain, original to the building, makes use of asbestos materials in the fabric, and may not be functional. As noted above, heating pipes under the gymnasium floor may have asbestos-laden insulation on pipe elbows.

Accessibility: Significant areas of the school are not handicap accessible, particularly during an emergency egress. Many doors do not have ADA compliant hardware. The Auditorium has 30-inch-wide entrance doors that are not ADA compliant. Side entrance doors are at stage level and only accessible by stairs. The pitch of the auditorium seating area is too steep and not ADA compliant.

There is a lack of handicap accessible seating. Access to the gymnasium from some parts of the building requires going outside and entering through the main exterior doors.

Not all interior doors are ADA compliant. Emergency evacuation doors from some classrooms exit to lawn areas that are difficult to maintain for wheelchair use in winter and other adverse weather conditions. Aging Structures: The gymnasium bleachers are a source of concern as they lack several modern safety features due to their age. They require special care and maintenance when being opened and prepared for public use. NEASC noted this problem in their 2005 re-accreditation report.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

12

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 1 Please describe the measures the district has taken to mitigate the problem(s) described above.

Fire Protection: Due to budget constraints, a water storage tank, fire pump, and emergency generator (estimated $3.5 million cost) have not been installed. The new Facility Manager is working to see if the Auditorium smoke control louvers can be mechanically controlled and integrated into the Fire Alarm System. Gas lines in science laboratories have been shut off. Air Quality: Replacement of classroom Univent motors has been done as needed, but is not a practical solution as the new motors are cheaply constructed of lighter materials and are noisier than the original, more solidly constructed motors. Each classroom Univent requires laborious yearly maintenance to maintain an acceptable level of air quality and is power-washed during the summer in addition to routine maintenance (e.g., filters replaced and grills vacuumed). Lawn maintenance crews must be trained and monitored to prevent clippings from being sprayed on Univent exterior vent grills. Classrooms on the North and West sides of the building are dehumidified using portable units. The Orchestra room must be constantly monitored for humidity and is dehumidified in non-heating months and humidified during heating months to prevent damage to instruments. Systematic education of teachers is done to ensure that the Univent bench along the classrooms exterior wall is not covered by classrooms materials (e.g., books, plants or posters), and that noisy Univents are reactivated when possible. The Library boxcar system was evaluated in the late 1980s, but the estimate for replacement was considered too costly. Heating & Air Quality: The newly appointed Facility Manager is systematically cleaning and resetting pneumatic controls in each classroom on an ongoing basis. The new Facility Manager is educating the staff and faculty on the use of the Univent and replacing frozen heating coils when necessary. Hazardous Materials: The maintenance team regularly inspects areas containing asbestos for evidence of exposure and friability. All asbestos-containing pipe insulation exposed below drop ceilings and all asbestos-containing ceiling tiles in the 1968 addition were removed in a 1989 abatement project. All asbestos-containing light ballasts were removed in 1992. In the case of the newly identified issue beneath the gymnasium floor, our new Facility Manager has sealed the exhaust returns that run under the gymnasium floor and is in the process of expediting the testing. As a result of this problem, the capacity of the gymnasium exhaust ventilation system is reduced by more than 60 percent. Accessibility: Five regular bathrooms have had handicapped capable toilet areas installed. The District has installed poweroperated handicap doors at the administrative entrance and replaced door hardware in guidance, the library and administrative offices. Most water fountains are now wheel-chair accessible. The locker room area is now ADA compliant due to a recent renovation (2011) project with MSBA support. The new Facility Manager is working with the new Superintendent to prioritize installation of new door hardware on exterior doors. Other: Two years ago, an estimate for replacement of the bleachers in the gymnasium was requested and received. The estimated cost ($120,000) was not within the District's budget.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

13

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 1 Please provide a detailed explanation of the impact of the problem described in this priority on your district's educational program. Please include specific examples of how the problem prevents the district from delivering the educational program it is required to deliver and how students and/or teachers are directly affected by the problem identified.

Air quality, temperature and heating are known to be important individual elements affecting student achievement. Chronic noise exposure is known to hinder cognitive function and affect reading skills. Many classrooms in the building suffer from either elevated noise levels and/or poor air quality. The poor quality of the mechanical systems supplying fresh air and heating to the classrooms is a daily detriment to the education of the students who use those classrooms. Teachers, in some cases, must turn off fresh air ventilation systems to be heard when they teach. Subsequently, elevated levels of CO2 in the classrooms have a debilitating effect on students when they visit these classrooms. One of the Biology classrooms has a crack in the exterior wall that allows frost into the room during the winter. Coats must be worn in the back of the classroom, but the fresh air introduced through the crack is considered a good thing because the ventilation system serving that classroom is undersized! Another Biology classroom must move to another classroom to perform dissections due to the inability of the ventilation system in the main laboratory classroom to properly provide fresh air. Only the most rudimentary experiments can be performed in the Chemistry laboratory because room ventilation is so poor. Chemistry students must be transported across town to Williams College to perform sophisticated desktop experimentation. Due to transportation costs and scheduling constraints, this can only occur once a semester. There is anecdotal evidence from parents that students sensitive to air quality are prone to sickness or frequent headaches from attending school. There is also great concern that the building may have played a role in some serious teacher and student illnesses in recent years. Three teachers who have taught during the same years in the same or adjacent classrooms were diagnosed with sarcoidosis. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health Bureau of Community Health and Prevention is undertaking a community study of the incidence of these and other serious illnesses (such as thyroid cancer) which have struck faculty and current and former Mt. Greylock students.

Please also provide the following: Name of Firm that performed the Study/Report: Dore and Whittier Architects Date of Study/Report: 7/11/2006 Synopsis of Study/Report: "In the very near future (2-6 years), the communities of Williamstown and Lanesborough will need to expend significant funds just to maintain the physical components of the existing building. The major infrastructure systems within the building have exceeded their expected design life. The current layout (floor plan) of the existing building results in a sprawling 183,000 sf facility. A large percentage of the overall space is dedicated to building circulation (corridors) connecting the original building to the addition built in 1968. Because of the evolution of this building over the years and changes in educational needs, new or existing programs moved into spaces as they became available, which has reduced the capacity for the administration to house programs within optimal adjacencies. This results in significant challenges for students, staff and administrators to implement the educational program on a day to day basis. ...the school is in need of upgrades including all building systems and components, technology, windows, finishes, hazardous
Massachusetts School Building Authority 14 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

materials abatement, etc., in order to prepare the school for the 21st Century and the next 40 to 50 years. It can be confidently stated that the building systems have outlived their useful life and should be upgraded at this time." Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to asbestos?: YES If "YES", please describe the location in the facility, if it is currently friable, and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date.: The school building has asbestos in the form of pipe insulation located above drop ceilings as well as floor tiles located primarily in the classrooms and hallways of the 1960 portion of the school. There are several classrooms with projecting clerestories that have insulated heating pipes running below them. Below drop-ceiling, asbestos-containing materials (asbestos-containing pipe coverings and drop-ceiling tiles) have been removed. The rest has been encapsulated and continues to be monitored for deterioration. Evaluation is ongoing of the newly identified pipe insulation in the air tunnel below the gymnasium floor noted above. Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to an electrical condition?: YES If "YES", please describe the electrical condition, any imminent threat, and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date.: The school floors (slab on grade) provide direct contact with the ground from any outlet circuit in most of the school and should be protected with a Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI) circuit breaker to prevent shock hazards. There is insufficient space in the circuit breaker boxes to install GFIs for each of the problematic circuits. Repair of this problem would require a complete replacement and re-wiring of most of the circuit breaker distribution boxes. The district has installed GFI outlets in those locations deemed most hazardous to students because of the presence of water on the floor (locker rooms, bathrooms, etc). Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to a structural condition?: YES If "YES", please describe the structural condition, any imminent threat, and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date.: The building walls lack vertical reinforcing rods and horizontal ties to reduce or prevent seismic damage. The walls also lack structural top plating that would tie into the roof structure to eliminate wall toppling during a seismic event. These structural elements would also provide additional support during extremely high winds or tornadoes. This type of repair involves a major capital investment. Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to the building envelope?: YES If "YES", please describe the building envelope condition, any imminent threat, and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date.: Temperature control and poor air quality in classrooms is directly related to uninsulated exterior walls and the integration of the Univent heating and fresh air systems which vent directly through the exterior walls of each classroom. During heating months, the frequent demands on the heating system due to heat loss through the exterior walls results in a reduction in classroom fresh air when the heating system is on. The new Facility Manager has instituted a maintenance schedule and continues to fine-tune each classroom Univent system to maximize performance on a case-by-case basis. Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to the roof?: NO If "YES", please describe the roof condition, any imminent threat, and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date.: Is the perceived Health and Safety problem related to accessibility?: YES If "YES", please describe the areas that lack accessibility and the mitigation efforts that the district has undertaken to date. In addition, please submit to the MSBA copies of any federally-required ADA Self-Evaluation Plan and Transition Plan.: The auditorium is not ADA/CMR521 compliant with regard to egress and would be a danger to a handicapped person in an emergency. The gymnasium is partially compliant in that there are paths of egress in an emergency, but not all exits are ADA/CMR521 compliant. In addition, due to the sprawling nature of the building layout, many emergency exits empty onto grassy areas. Powered doors are only available at the building entrance closest to the Superintendents office. The new Facility Manager is working with the new Superintendent to prioritize installation of new door hardware.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

15

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 3 Please provide a detailed description of the "facility-related" issues that are threatening accreditation. Please include in this description details related to the program or facility resources (i.e. Media Center/Library, Science Rooms/Labs, general classroom space, etc.) whose condition or state directly threatens the facilitys accreditation status.

The NEASC accreditation study in 2005 of Mt. Greylock reported that the building does not support all aspects of the educational program and is not conducive to a progressive learning environment. NEASC did not directly threaten accreditation at that time, but recommended that the entire building be renovated or replaced. The district received a deficient rating on the Resources for Learning Standard. Among the NEASC recommendations in this standard are: Meet all health and safety codes Fully comply with ADA handicapped access mandates Develop and implement a plan for the appropriate maintenance and repair of equipment Establish and implement an updated formal technology plan Develop a long-range district/town fiscal plan

More recently, a December 20, 2010, letter from NEASC acknowledged the Districts report of receipt of monies from the MSBA for the upgrade of female and male locker rooms and the heating system. However, the Commission expressed most serious concern that a number of longstanding facility issues had not been addressed in over five years since the NEASC on-site visit and decennial evaluation report of 2005. The letter further states that Failure to resolve these longstanding issues which negatively impact the delivery of the curriculum may prompt the Commission to downgrade the schools accreditation status. On November 14, 2011, a second letter in response to a Special Report from the District reiterated concerns about the facility and requested an additional Special Progress Report, due March 1, 2012, providing detailed and specific information for recommendations including an update of the status of the MSBAs response to the schools latest Statement of Interest, and a time line for seeking voter approval for the proposed construction project that will alleviate the identified needs of the high schools facility. The facility-specific needs identified by NEASC in the December 20, 2010, letter are the complete upgrade of all eight science labs/classrooms and resolution of all ADA issues at Mt. Greylock. Also noted in the original NEASC 2005 site review and report is the facilitys incapacity to provide adequate technological support for the educational program. Areas of the Library/Media Center are not accessible to students with handicapping conditions. The Library/Media Center has a roof-mounted HVAC unit which no longer functions and is not repairable. In addition, the auditorium lacks current digital capacity and screens for effective use of digital technologies in education and the performing arts.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

16

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 3 Please describe the measures the district has taken to mitigate the problem(s) described above.

Recent renovation (2010) of the Locker Rooms and access to the Gymnasium with the help of the MSBA has brought those areas of the building in compliance with ADA requirements. The new Facilities Manager has made bringing the remaining areas of the building into compliance with ADA regulations a priority and is systematically working through the building. Most recently, the water fountains and computer lab on the East corridor have been modified to accommodate wheelchair access. To alleviate problems teaching science in the substandard classroom/lab areas at Mt. Greylock, the District works with Williams College through the Williams Center at Mt. Greylock. This provides Science Outreach programming in support of Mt. Greylock teachers when appropriate to facilitate hands-on science opportunities. The goal of the Science Outreach programs is to create sustainable lab experiences that can be replicated and expanded in future years. Current offerings are listed below. AP Chemistry and AP Physics Labs - Each year--depending on the rotation--three or four advanced Chemistry and Physics labs are held on the Williams campus and are taught in collaboration with Williams Chemistry and Physics professors. This year, Chemistry labs will occur in September, December and the spring. 11th Grade Biology Research Project - All 11th grade biology students design and carry out a science research project. Williams science professors and the Williams science librarians work with Mt. Greylock teachers to support this project. During January, students will visit the Williams campus for science library orientation. Williams professors are available for research conferences as students develop research questions and design their projects. In some cases, students may utilize the resources of one of the college labs. The librarians will be available for research meetings at the Schow Science Library to help students identify and find relevant source materials. BioEyes Lab - Biology classes will participate this spring in this genetics/embryology lab. Using zebra fish and embryos provided by Williams, students will participate in this hands-on science experience designed to introduce students to real scientific methodologies. Where are We? - All day hands-on environmental awareness day for 11th graders in early June. Mt. Greylock students and faculty select from a variety of workshops taught by Williams faculty and community members. Program offerings change yearly. With respect to the challenges in providing adequate technological support of the educational program at Mt. Greylock, the District is working on prioritizing the list of tasks necessary to upgrade the school-wide Wi-Fi network installed in 1998, upgrade classroom computer systems, and add screens and digital projection capabilities to the Auditorium. However, given the age and sprawling layout of the building (runs of digital cable need to be <300 feet), a limited District budget, and more pressing issues related to the accreditation of the districts educational program, it is not clear when this can be accomplished.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

17

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 3 Please provide a detailed explanation of the impact of the problem described in this priority on your district's educational program. Please include specific examples of how the problem prevents the district from delivering the educational program it is required to deliver and how students and/or teachers are directly affected by the problem(s) identified.

The major impact on the districts programming is on the science program offerings. The eight science classroom/labs need to be safe and up-to-date to allow a satisfactory science curriculum as spelled out in the Science Frameworks. Without gas, compressed air, working chemical flume hoods, adequate ventilation and eye-washes, we cannot allow students to conduct the experiments recommended by the Massachusetts Science Frameworks for inquiry-based science training. The science classrooms also lack functioning individual and/or group lab stations, reducing most teachers to doing front-of the-room demonstrations for the students. Special needs support areas are created in spaces originally designed as regular classrooms. These converted areas are not adequate for Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy services. These rooms cannot effectively be partitioned into smaller learning suites because of asbestos floor tiling. Converted classrooms also lack appropriate lighting for students who have vision problems. The noisy ventilation system necessitates the use of special amplification devices for some students.Wheelchair-bound students cannot develop appropriate physical independence because they cannot navigate parts of the facility without human assistance. Also, areas of the Library/Media Center are not accessible to students with handicapping conditions. The current Wi-Fi system used in the facility is old (installed 1998) and slow. There is not sufficient electrical power in most classrooms to support newer technologies used in teaching. Upgrading the capacity of classrooms to use technology consistent with 21st century learning would require the installation of new, hi-capacity digital cable, improved electrical service, and upgraded switches and servers. Classrooms are upgraded to their capacity with requested technology on a case-by-case basis. The auditorium lacks any digital capacity and screens for effective use of digital technologies in education and the performing arts. Effective delivery of digital media to large segments of the school population is currently impossible.

Please also provide the following: Name of accrediting entity:: New England Association of Schools and Colleges Current Accreditation Status: Please provide appropriate number as 1=Passed, 2=Probation, 3=Warning, 4=Lost: 1 If "WARNING", indicate the date accreditation may be switched to Probation or lost:: 3/1/2012 If "PROBATION", indicate the date accreditation may be lost:: Please provide the date of the first accreditation visit that resulted in your current accreditation status.: 5/4/2005 Please provide the date of the follow-up accreditation visit:: 12/1/2008 Are facility-related issues related to Media Center/Library? If yes, please describe in detail in Question 1 below.: YES Are facility-related issues related to Science Rooms/Labs? If yes, please describe in detail in Question 1 below.: YES Are facility-related issues related to general classroom spaces? If yes, please describe in detail in Question 1 below.:
Massachusetts School Building Authority 18 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

NO Are facility-related issues related to SPED? If yes, please describe in detail in Question 1 below: YES Are facility-related issues related to support spaces? If yes, please describe in detail in Question 1 below.: YES Are facility-related issues related to "Other"? If yes, please identify the other area below and describe in detail in Question 1 below.: NO Please describe(maximum of 100 characters):

Massachusetts School Building Authority

19

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 5 Please provide a detailed description of the issues surrounding the school facility systems (e.g., roof, windows, boilers, HVAC system, and/or electrical service and distribution system) that you are indicating require repair or replacement. Please describe all deficiencies to all systems in sufficient detail to explain the problem.

The Dore & Whittier 2006 feasibility study included a facilities assessment which concluded that the infrastructure of the building is old and not energy efficient. The building currently has no wall insulation (brick veneer over single CMU block), old aluminum clad windows and storm windows (2 inch gap) and classroom Univent heating and ventilation systems mounted in uninsulated metal housing with direct access to fresh air through exterior walls. The roof has 3+ inches of insulation with a minimum r-value = 21. The boilers have been replaced, but the dysfunctional distribution system (pneumatic temperature control system) has not, so the system remains inefficient. Any energy conservation measures to the classroom areas of the building would involve wholesale replacement of windows, the re-insulation of all exterior walls on a 183,000 square foot building with interior courtyards, many doors, and an extensive perimeter, as well as the complete removal of the existing Univent system in every classroom and the installation of a new HVAC system capable of servicing the whole building. At a minimum, removal and replacement of the current pneumatic system of temperature control used in most areas of the building would allow better control of temperature set points, but would have to be done in every room of the building (99) serviced by a Univent. Energy conservation measures involving the gymnasium and auditorium would include the removal and installation of a new HVAC system for each area. The exterior walls of the gymnasium would also need to be insulated and the windows replaced. An energy benchmarking study of the current Mt. Greylock facility (2011) by Integrated Eco Strategy, LLC of Williamstown, MA, suggests that an annual savings of up to 50% on heating costs alone is possible with construction of a new green school building (Report forthcoming).

Massachusetts School Building Authority

20

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 5 Please describe the measures the district has already taken to mitigate the problem/issues described in Question 1 above.

With the help of the MSBA, the school has just replaced the original boilers and heat circulating pumps. Lighting fixtures were upgraded with energy efficient units (T8/T5 lamps and electric ballasts) and classrooms and educational support areas had Passive Infrared (PIR) sensors installed in 2009. Replacement of lighting with energy efficient units (T8/T5 lamps and electric ballasts) and Passive Infrared (PIR) sensors has already yielded immediate savings. Two energy-efficient, variable-speed, dual-arm hot water supply pumps replaced 11 continuously operating units resulting in substantially lower electricity consumption. A new roof including 3+ (minimum r-value = 21) of insulation was installed in 2002. Storm windows were installed in the late 1970s. Currently, weekend access to the building is limited so that further temperature reductions can be made. The district has asked for full staff cooperation on turning off lights in instructional areas when vacated and shutting down computers each day and over the weekend. The district now uses a program that shuts down computers automatically when they have been left idle for ten minutes. Temperature set points within the building have been reduced during the heating seasons to conserve fuel for many years. A grant from the State (1989) to reduce energy use in the building was used to block fresh air intakes on all 99 room Univents and all 38 roof mounted fresh air vents. Also, foam was used to block the top of the roof mounted fresh air intakes for the gymnasium. At the time, this was considered the only cost-effective way to reduce energy consumption short of replacing the windows or insulating exterior walls in the sprawling building complex. Due to the poor design of the ventilation systems providing fresh air to the gymnasium, auditorium and interior classrooms through roof mounted vents, cold air cascades down into the building in cold-weather months substantially increasing fuel costs. A temporary remedy, the fresh air vents remained blocked for 3 years. This method of reducing fuel costs has not been repeated, but illustrates the extreme energy inefficiency of the building due to the poor design of the ventilation system.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

21

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 5 Please provide a detailed explanation of the impact of the problem/issues described in Question 1 above on your districts educational program. Please include specific examples of how the problem prevents the district from delivering the educational program it is required to deliver and how students and/or teachers are directly affected by the problem identified.

The age and condition of the heat-distribution system, lack of any wall insulation, and poor quality of the windows have caused the school to run up high energy bills. Energy costs have more than doubled in the last five years. They will continue to increase dramatically and further strain the schools budget, taking much needed funding away from educational programming and limiting the District's capacity to improve its suffering educational program. Most vocational and technical programs have been eliminated. The Senior Project, a capstone educational experience central to the educational plan was eliminated during budget cuts two years ago. In World Languages, French is being phased out and AP Latin has been eliminated. AP Science classes are now offered every other year due to budget constraints. Electives such as Introduction to Philosophy have been eliminated due to problems with the budget. We believe some of these programs could have been saved, if the facility was of a modern, energy-efficient design and the capital used to maintain a highly inefficient building was instead applied to the educational program of the District.

Please also provide the following: Have the systems identified above been examined by an engineer or other trained building professional?: YES If "YES", please provide, the name of the individual and his/her professional affiliation:: Dore and Whittier 2006 Feasibility Study and William O'Neil, engineer & President of Industrial Steel & Boiler Services, Inc. The date of the inspection:: 7/10/2006 A summary of the findings:: The major infrastructure systems within the building (electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilating, and technology) have exceeded their expected design life. The current layout (floor plan) of the existing building results in a sprawling 183,000 square foot facility. A large percentage of the overall space is dedicated to building circulation (corridors) connecting the original building to the subsequent addition built in 1968. Because of the evolution of this building over the years and changes in educational needs, new or existing programs moved into spaces as they became available, which has reduced the capacity for the administration to house programs within optimal adjacencies. This results in significant challenges for students, staff and administrators to implement the educational program on a day to day basis. To be a viable long-term investment for the District, any expenditure of resources should address both the physical and educational needs of the school.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

22

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 7 Please provide a detailed description of the programs not currently available due to facility constraints, the state or local requirement for such programs, and the facility limitations precluding the programs from being offered.

Many aspects of the educational program are limited by the current facility. The 2005 NEASC report found that the present school site and plant, much of which is 51 years old (the remaining portion is 43 years old), do not adequately serve many aspects of the educational program and the support services necessary for student learning. The study also found that the facility is not conducive to a progressive learning environment, does not promote efficient use of educational space, project-based learning or collaborative teaching and needs to be renovated or replaced. We highlight the major deficiencies below. Science Program: Science classrooms/labs are outdated and in most cases have broken equipment or lack the services necessary to support laboratory science education. All lack appropriate safety equipment for fire suppression and chemical spills (e.g., eye wash and chemical shower). All have inadequate ventilation. Fume hoods are antiquated, non-functional, and too few in number (two for ten rooms) to adequately support laboratory instruction. Several classroom/labs do not have sufficient sinks. In several labs, all gas and compressed air lines have been taken out of service. The science classrooms also lack functioning individual and/or group lab stations, reducing most teachers to doing front of the room demonstrations for the students. As noted above, students must be taken off-site to be able to work in proper scientific laboratory spaces. Depending on the science being taught, the quality of instruction is heavily to severely compromised, due to the current condition of the laboratory spaces and the limited number of times that lab field trips can be taken. Technology: The school is not appropriately wired for computer/technical education or general technological support of any educational program at the school. The speed and capacity of the current Wi-Fi system is quite poor. The upgrade of the original Wi-Fi system installed in 1998 is hampered by the sprawling layout of the building, which includes a large central courtyard and several subsidiary courtyards that need to be worked around. One result is that the IT center for the building cannot be put in a central location. The layout also requires a relatively large number of switches, routers, and quantity of cable in order to reach all areas of the building. There are several choke points where the 1968 addition interfaces with the original 1960 structure restricting the routes that can be used when wiring the building. By necessity, computer labs have been created in spaces designed as regular classroom space. Only one of three computer labs is properly wired. No comprehensive technology plan was developed before the system was implemented. This has led to a hodgepodge of routers, switches, repeaters and hubs of various vintages tied together in a "make do" reaction to changing needs. Currently, the District is not able to budget for both infrastructure renovation and updated technological causing bandwidth and protocol problems. Therefore, technology applications within the building are teacher and classroom specific (both hardware and software), rather than universal hardware in each classroom and downloaded applications which "follow" the teacher, thus limiting the flexibility of classroom usage. As a result of these deficiencies, technology is not effectively integrated into the schools curriculum. Experiential/Hands-on Learning: Programming that included traditional technical training in hands-on trades or technology has been eliminated due to the age of the facilities and the districts inability to upgrade in these areas. In particular, existing equipment does not meet modern safety standards. Proper ventilation of these teaching areas is lacking. This is considered a significant loss to the educational program by a significant number of students in the communities served.
Massachusetts School Building Authority 23 Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Special Education: As noted above, the Special Education program delivery is greatly compromised by the buildings problems. Special needs support areas are created in spaces originally designed as regular classrooms. These converted areas are not adequate for Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy services. As noted above, these rooms cannot effectively be partitioned into smaller learning suites because of asbestos floor tiling. Converted classrooms also lack appropriate lighting for students who have vision problems. The noisy ventilation system necessitates the use of special amplification devices. Finally, some wheelchair bound students cannot develop appropriate physical independence because they cannot navigate parts of the facility without human assistance. General Layout: The current layout of the building, which includes multiple courtyards which led to classrooms, with long connecting corridors was designed in the 1960s. It has been necessary for the Districts current educational program to be heavily modified or compromised to fit into this old fashioned layout. Cross-discipline collaboration and coordination of educational programming is only done with extreme effort as school departments are clustered together often in different corridors. Special Education spaces are not well integrated within general education areas. Small group areas are non-existent. The Library/Media Center is not laid out for collaborative/group learning, but is itself designed around a central multi-level, courtyardlike space (with the upper level closed off due to inaccessibility). The gymnasium, locker rooms, and the cafeteria are on the opposite ends of the building from each other. High School students must lengthen their routes to avoid the Middle School corridors when they move to and from the Gymnasium. The layout particularly affects Middle School students as they are used to the more integrated/collaborative spaces of their respective Model-Elementary Schools. Middle School students are shocked by the amount of running down corridors necessary to get to the next classroom on their schedule. The long corridor layout has long compromised the ability of the Middle School to organize around the team approach to teaching.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

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Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 7 Please describe the measures the district has taken or is planning to take in the immediate future to mitigate the problem(s) described above.

The School District will continue to mitigate building problems using creative adaptive techniques to make the best use of the existing infrastructure. The faculty makes the best use they can of the existing space, but there have been no capital improvements for many years other than the roof replacement in 2002, the water supply replacement in 2006, and the recent projects for the boilers and locker rooms. None of these projects have provided upgrades for the instructional infrastructure, which (apart from the addition of computers to the building) remains what it was in 1968. The district has benefited from the donations of used computer systems and a foreign language audio lab from Williams College. The donations over the past three years come to approximately 60-75 used high-end desktop monitors and towers, foreign language lab recording devices, lab desks, and teacher station. As noted in Priority 3, Mt. Greylock has partially mitigated the lack of science labs by arranging for students to work in proper scientific laboratory spaces at Williams College. Scheduling is disruptive and transportation is costly. The school has also made piecemeal improvements in technology and invested in adaptive devices such as FM equipment and screen filters to compensate for excessive noise and lighting problems.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

25

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Priority 7 Please provide a detailed explanation of the impact of the problem described in this priority on your district's educational program. Please include specific examples of how the problem prevents the district from delivering the educational program it is required to deliver and how students and/or teachers are directly affected by the problem identified.

The inefficacy of years of piecemeal efforts to compensate for building deficiencies has contributed to a downward fiscal and educational spiral. As repairs and renovation have forced the District to shift already scarce funds away from instruction, educational programming has suffered both in quality and range of course offerings. As a result of the programming decline, District-eligible student enrollment has declined, further eroding the Schools budget and the institution's capacity to effectively serve the learning needs of its students. We have detailed, above, the many specific ways in which educational programming has suffered as a result of building problems. Inadequate science labs limit the ability of the school to offer a satisfactory science curriculum. The Massachusetts Science Curriculum Framework stresses the importance of "hands-on" activities in the sciences with emphasis on laboratory experiments done by individual students. Many experiments cannot be performed at all due to the lack of gas supply, chemical flume hoods, eye washes, and individual lab stations. Limiting labs to teacher demonstrations means little or no student participation and puts our students in jeopardy of failing to keep pace with those in the many schools in the state and nation that have modern, functional facilities. Special needs educational programming is severely compromised in the many ways noted above and in Priority 3. At the most basic level, Mt. Greylock cannot provide students the opportunity to develop personal independence because they cannot navigate the facility without human assistance. Finally, as noted earlier in this statement, the auditorium is substandard which limits intended and potential use for teaching and the performing arts.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

26

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Vote
Vote of Municipal Governing Body YES: NO: Date: Vote of School Committee YES: NO: Date: Vote of Regional School Committee YES: 7 NO: 0 Date: 12/13/2011

Massachusetts School Building Authority

27

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

Required Form of Vote


The following Form of Vote should be used by both the City Council/Board of Aldermen, Board of Selectmen/equivalent governing body AND the School Committee in voting to approve this Statement of Interest. If a regional school district, the regional school committee should use the following Form of Vote.

Resolved: Having convened in an open meeting on ___________________, the _________________________________________________________________ [City Council/Board of Aldermen,
Board of Selectmen/Equivalent Governing Body, School Committee]

of ___________________________[City/Town/School District],

in accordance with its charter, by-laws, and ordinances, has voted to authorize the Superintendent to submit to the Massachusetts School Building Authority the Statement of Interest dated _____________ for the __________________________________[Name of School] located at _____________________________________________________________________[Address] which describes and explains the following deficiencies and the priority category(s) for which _________________________________________[Name of City/Town/District] may be invited to apply to the Massachusetts School Building Authority in the future _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________[Insert a description of the priority(s) checked off on
the Statement of Interest and a brief description of the deficiency described therein for each priority];

and hereby further specifically

acknowledges that by submitting this Statement of Interest, the Massachusetts School Building Authority in no way guarantees the acceptance or the approval of an application, the awarding of a grant or any other funding commitment from the Massachusetts School Building Authority, or commits the _________________________________ [Name of City/Town/District] to filing an application for funding with the Massachusetts School Building Authority.

Massachusetts School Building Authority

28

Statement of Interest

Name of School

Mt Greylock Reg High

CERTIFICATIONS The undersigned hereby certifies that, to the best of his/her knowledge, information and belief, the statements and information contained in this statement of Interest and attached hereto are true and accurate and that this Statement of Interest has been prepared under the direction of the district school committee and the undersigned is duly authorized to submit this Statement of Interest to the Massachusetts School Building Authority. The undersigned also hereby acknowledges and agrees to provide the Massachusetts School Building Authority, upon request by the Authority, any additional information relating to this Statement of Interest that may be required by the Authority.

LOCAL CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT/SCHOOL COMMITTEE CHAIR (E.g., Mayor, Town Manager, Board of Selectmen) Chief Executive Officer School Committee Chair Superintendent of Schools

(print name)

(print name)

(print name)

(signature) Date

(signature) Date

(signature) Date

Massachusetts School Building Authority

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Statement of Interest