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18.

312: Algebraic Combinatorics Lionel Levine
Lecture 8
Lecture date: March 1, 2011 Notes by: Christopher Policastro
Remark: In the last lecture, someone asked whether all posets could be constructed from
a point using the operations of disjoint union, ordinal sum, cartesian product and expo-
nentiation. This is not possible in general. Consider the poset N := ¦a, b, c, d¦ with Hasse
diagram:
We can see that this poset is not representable as P + Q, P ⊕ Q, P Q, or P
Q
for any
posets P and Q.
The class of posets that can be constructed using disjoint union and ordinal sum are called
series parallel posets. In exercise 3.13 of Stanley, it is shown that a poset is series parallel
iff its Hasse diagram does not contain N as a subdiagram.
Lattices
Recall from last lecture the definition of a lattice:
Definition 1 A poset L is a lattice if every pair of elements x, y has
(i) a least upper bound x ∨ y (called join), and
(ii) a greatest lower bound x ∧ y (called meet);
that is
z ≥ x ∨ y ⇐⇒ z ≥ x and z ≥ y
z ≤ x ∧ y ⇐⇒ z ≤ x and z ≤ y.
For a later result, we will need the following definition.
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Definition 2 An element z of a lattice L is called join irreducible if z ,= z
1
∨ z
2
for
z
1
, z
2
< z.
Observe that the meet and join operations are associative; we note that for meet
w ≤ (x ∧ y) ∧ z ⇔ w ≤ z, x ∧ y ⇔ w ≤ x, y, z
⇔ w ≤ x, y ∧ z ⇔ w ≤ x ∧ (y ∧ z)
and similarly for join
w ≥ (x ∨ y) ∨ z ⇔ w ≥ z, x ∨ y ⇔ w ≥ x, y, z
⇔ w ≥ x, y ∨ z ⇔ w ≥ x ∨ (y ∨ z).
Moreover observe that if L is finite, then L has a unique minimal element
ˆ
0 :=

x∈L
x
and unique maximal element
ˆ
1 :=

x∈L
. By definition
ˆ
0 ∨ x = x,
ˆ
0 ∧ x =
ˆ
0,
and
ˆ
1 ∨ x =
ˆ
1,
ˆ
1 ∧ x = x.
We might want to show that a poset is a lattice, but only know about one operation. The
following lemma tells us that sometimes this is enough.
Lemma 3 If P is a finite poset such that
(i) Every x, y ∈ P have a greatest lower bound.
(ii) P has a unique maximal element
ˆ
1.
then P is a lattice.
Proof: Consider x, y ∈ P. Let S = ¦z ∈ P : z ≥ x, y¦. Note that S ,= ∅ since
ˆ
1 ∈ S. Take
x ∨ y :=

z∈S
z. We see that
z ≥ x, y ∀z ∈ S =⇒ x ∨ y ≥ x, y,
and
w ≥ x, y =⇒ w ∈ S =⇒ w ≥

z∈S
z = x ∨ y.
This shows that P admits a join operation. 2
Notice that by an analogous argument, the same conclusion would follow from the existence
of least upper bounds and a unique minimal element. However the meet operation can
oftentimes be more natural than the join operation. We will see this in Example 6.
8-2
Examples of Lattices
Example 4 (n) Recall that n (handwritten n) is the set [n] with the usual order relations.
We see that i ∧ j = min(i, j) and i ∨ j = max(i, j).
Example 5 (Boolean algebras) Recall that B
n
= T([n]). It is a lattice with meet S∧T =
S ∩ T, and join S ∨ T = S ∪ T. This example reinforces our notation.
Example 6 (Partitions) Let π
n
= ¦partitions of [n]¦ ordered by refinement. Given par-
titions σ = (σ
1
, . . . , σ
k
) and τ = (τ
1
, . . . , τ
l
) define σ ∧ τ as
(nonempty intersections σ
i
∩ τ
j
: 1 ≤ i ≤ k, 1 ≤ j ≤ l).
Since [n] is the unique maximal element of π
n
, Lemma 3 implies that π
n
is a lattice. Showing
that π
n
is a lattice without Lemma 3 would be more difficult because the join of two partitions
has a messy formula.
Example 7 (Vector Spaces) Let V be a vector space, and L be the set of linear subspaces
ordered by inclusion. L is lattice with meet S ∧ T = S ∩ T, and join S ∨ T = S + T =
¦v + w : v ∈ S, w ∈ T¦.
Example 8 (Groups) Let G be a group, and L be the set of subgroups ordered by inclusion.
L is a lattice with meet H ∧ K = H ∩ K, and join H ∨ K = ¸H, K¸.
Note that Examples 7 and 8 are two cases of lattice constructions common to any algebraic
object.
Example 9 (Order-preserving maps) Let P be a poset, and L be a lattice. Recall that
L
P
= ¦order preserving maps P → L¦. L
P
is a lattice with join
(f ∧ g) : P ¸ x → f(x) ∧ g(x) ∈ L,
and meet
(f ∨ g) : P ¸ x → f(x) ∨ g(x) ∈ L.
Distributive Lattices
In this lecture, we will focus on lattices with a certain property that makes them simi-
lar to Boolean algebras. The structure of these lattices is sufficiently nice to allow for a
classification theorem (cf. Theorem 15).
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Definition 10 A lattice L is distributive if the meet and join operations distribute over
each other i.e. for x, y, z ∈ L
(i) (x ∨ y) ∧ z = (x ∧ z) ∨ (y ∧ z)
(ii) (x ∧ y) ∨ z = (x ∨ z) ∧ (y ∨ z).
Notice that a Boolean algebra is distributive since union and intersection distribute over
each other.
Definition 11 Given a poset P, an order ideal of P is a subset I ⊂ P such that for all
x ∈ I, if y ≤ x, then y ∈ I.
Consider for instance the following order ideal of B
3
expressed in terms of it Hasse diagram:
Figure 1: Order ideal of B
3
We will denote the set of order ideals as J(P). Note that J(P) is a poset under inclusion.
We will call an order ideal I ⊂ P principal if it is of the form I = ¸x¸ := ¦y ∈ P : y ≤
P

for some x ∈ P.
Example 12 (Boolean algebras) Let +
n
1 = 1+. . . +1 be the disjoint union of n copies
of 1. Since +
n
1 has no order relations, this means that every subset is an order ideal. So
J(+
n
1) = B
n
.
Example 13 (n) Note that every order ideal of n is of the form ¸b¸ for some b ∈ n. Since
a ≤ b iff ¸a¸ ⊂ ¸b¸, this means that J(n) · n+1.
Example 14 (N) Consider N = ¦a, b, c, d¦ defined at the beginning of lecture. We have
J(N) = ¦∅, ¦a¦, ¦b¦, ¦a, b, c¦, ¦b, d¦, ¦a, b, d¦, ¦a, b, c, d¦, ¦a, b¦¦.
This gives the following Hasse diagram:
8-4
Figure 2: J(N)
Note that if I
1
, I
2
⊂ P are order ideals, then I
1
∩ I
2
and I
1
∪ I
2
are order ideals. Since
unions and intersections distribute over each other, this means that J(P) is a distributive
lattice for any poset P. The following result tells us that if a distributive lattice is finite,
then it must be of this form.
Theorem 15 (Birkoff’s Theorem)
1
Let L be a finite distributive lattice. There exists
a poset P unique up to isomorphism such that L · J(P).
Proof:[Uniqueness] Given J(P) we want to recover P. The subset of principal order ideals
is a copy of P sitting inside J(P). However, we want to describe this subset intrinsically
without reference to P.
Fact 1. Let S ⊂ J(P) be the subset of join irreducible elements. S · P:
Let T ⊂ J(P) be the subset of principal order ideals. Note that T · P, because ¸x¸ ⊂ ¸y¸
iff x ≤
P
y. So it is enough to show that S = T.
(T ⊂ S): Suppose that ¸x¸ = I
1
∪ I
2
for I
1
, I
2
∈ J(P). This means that either x ∈ I
1
or
x ∈ I
2
. So ¸x¸ ⊂ I
1
or ¸x¸ ⊂ I
2
, implying ¸x¸ = I
1
or ¸x¸ = I
2
.
(S ⊂ T): Assume that I ∈ J(P) is not principal. So we can find distinct maximal elements
x and y in I. Note that I −¦x¦ and I −¦y¦ are order ideals. Since
I = (I −¦x¦) ∪ (I −¦y¦)
this implies that I is not join irreducible. 2
We can now show uniqueness. Suppose that J(P) · L · J(Q) for posets P and Q. This
implies that the join irreducible elements of J(P) and J(Q) are isomorphic. So by Fact 1,
we conclude that P · Q. 2
Proof:[Existence] From the proof of uniqueness, we have to show that L = J(P) for P the
join irreducible elements of L.
1
This result is sometimes called the fundamental theorem of finite distributive lattices.
8-5
Fact 2. For y ∈ L there exist y
1
, . . . , y
n
∈ P such that y = y
1
∨ . . . ∨ y
n
. For n minimal,
this expression is unique up to permutation:
An element y ∈ L is either join irreducible, or expressible as y = y
1
∨y
2
for y
1
, y
2
< y. Since
L is finite, we see by induction that an element y ∈ L can be written as y = y
1
∨ . . . ∨ y
n
for y
i
∈ P.
Choose n minimal with this property. Suppose that y
1
∨ . . . ∨ y
n
= y = z
1
∨ . . . ∨ z
n
for
z
j
, y
i
∈ P. Note that y ∧ z
i
= z
i
because z
i
≤ z
1
∨ . . . ∨ z
n
= y. By distributivity
z
i
= z
i
∧ y =
n

j=1
z
i
∧ y
j
.
Since z
i
∈ P, there exists some y
j
such that z
i
= z
i
∧ y
j
. So z
i
≤ y
j
.
Suppose that z
i
, z
j
≤ y
k
for i ,= j. Since join is commutative and associative, we can assume
w.l.o.g that i = 1 and j = 2. Replace z
1
∨z
2
by y
k
in z
1
∨. . . ∨z
n
. So y = y
k
∨(z
3
∨. . . ∨z
n
)
contradicting minimality of n. Therefore σ ∈ S
n
.
Switching the roles of y
i
and z
j
, we obtain τ ∈ S
n
such that y
τ(i)
≤ z
σ(i)
≤ y
i
. By minimality
of n, we see that y
τ(i)
= y
i
. This gives the result. 2
Define a map f : J(P) ¸ I →

x∈I
x ∈ L. By Fact 2, f is surjective.
Define a map g : L ¸ y →

y
i
¸y
i
¸ ∈ J(P) where y = y
1
∨. . . ∨y
n
as in Fact 2. Since union
commutes, this map is well-defined by Fact 2. An order ideal I ⊂ P can be expressed as
I =

i
¸y
i
¸ for ¦y
1
, . . . y
n
¦ ⊂ P the maximal elements of I. Note that
g(y
1
∨ . . . ∨ y
n
) =

i
¸y
i
¸ = I
because n is minimal by maximality of the y
i
. Therefore gf is the identity on J(P). This
implies that f is injective.
(f order-preserving): Suppose that I ⊂ I

for I, I

∈ J(P). We have
f(I

) =

y∈I

y = (

y∈I
y) ∨ (

y∈I

−I
y)
= f(I) ∨ z
for some z ∈ L. This implies that f(I

) ≥ f(I).
8-6
(g order-preserving): Suppose that for I, I

∈ J(P), we have

x∈I
x ≤

y∈I
y. We want to
show that I ⊂ I

. Note

x∈I
x ≤

y∈I

y =⇒ x ≤

y∈I

y ∀x ∈ I
=⇒ x = x ∧ x = (

y∈I

y) ∧ x
=⇒ x =

y∈I

(y ∧ x)
by distributivity. Since x is join irreducible, this implies that x = y ∧x for some y ∈ I

. So
x ≤ y for some y ∈ I

. This means that x ∈ I

because I

is an order ideal. Hence I ⊂ I

.
Therefore J(P)

−→ L. 2
Note that we did not make full use of distributivity; we only needed to know that (x∨y)∧z =
(x ∧ z) ∨ (y ∧ z) for x, y, z ∈ L. Hence property (i) of Definition 10 implies property (ii).
This is a convenient fact for showing that a lattice is distributive, because only property (i)
of Definition 10 needs to be checked.
We will end this lecture with a proposition that gives us another way of thinking about
order ideals that will be useful when we try to compare posets.
Definition 16 Given a poset P, define P

to be the set P with reversed order relations i.e.
x ≤
P
y iff x ≥
P
∗ y.
Proposition 17 J(P) · (2
P
)

.
Proof: Given a map f ∈ 2
P
, let ϕ(f) = f
−1
(1) ⊂ P. Since f is order-preserving, this
implies that ϕ(f) ∈ J(P). So we obtain a map ϕ : 2
P
→ J(P).
Suppose that g ≤
2
P h. If h(x) = 1 for some x ∈ P, then
g ≤
2
P h =⇒ g(x) ≤
P
h(x) =⇒ g(x) = 1.
So if x ∈ ϕ(h) then x ∈ ϕ(g), or equivalently ϕ(h) ≤
J(P)
ϕ(g). Therefore ϕ is order-
reversing.
Given an order ideal I ⊂ P, define a map ψ(I) : P → 2 by
ψ(I)(x) :=

2 if x / ∈ I
1 if x ∈ I
.
Suppose that x ≤
P
y. There exist three cases:
x, y ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 = ψ(I)(y),
8-7
x, y / ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 = ψ(I)(y),
x ∈ I, y / ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 <
2
2 = ψ(I)(y).
So ψ(I)(x) is order-preserving, and we obtain a map ψ : J(P) → 2
P
.
Suppose that I ≤
J(P)
I

. For x ∈ P there exist three cases:
x ∈ I, x ∈ I

=⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 = ψ(I

)(x),
x / ∈ I, x ∈ I

=⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 ≥
2
1 = ψ(I

)(x),
x / ∈ I, x / ∈ I

=⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 = ψ(I

)(x).
So ψ(I)(x) ≥
2
ψ(I

)(x). Since x was arbitrary, this implies that ψ(I) ≥
2
P ψ(I

). Therefore
ψ is order-reversing.
We claim that ϕ and ψ are inverses. Consider f ∈ 2
P
. By definition for x ∈ P,
[ψϕ(f)](x) = [ψ(f
−1
(1))](p)
=

2 if x / ∈ f
−1
(1)
1 if x ∈ f
−1
(1)
=

2 if f(x) = 2
1 if f(x) = 1
= f(x)
Therefore ψϕ(f) = f. Conversely, consider I ∈ J(P). By definition
ϕψ(I) = ψ(I)
−1
(1) = I.
Therefore ϕψ(I) = I. 2
8-8

y ∈ P have a greatest lower bound. Take 1 x ∨ y := z∈S z. y}. We will see this in Example 6. The following lemma tells us that sometimes this is enough. then P is a lattice. and ˆ ∨ x = ˆ ˆ ∧ x = x. We see that z ≥ x. and w ≥ x. Proof: Consider x. x ∧ y ⇔ w ≤ x. we note that for meet w ≤ (x ∧ y) ∧ z ⇔ w ≤ z. y. y ∀z ∈ S =⇒ x ∨ y ≥ x. However the meet operation can oftentimes be more natural than the join operation. Lemma 3 If P is a finite poset such that (i) Every x. By definition ˆ ∨ x = x. y ∨ z ⇔ w ≥ x ∨ (y ∨ z). (ii) P has a unique maximal element ˆ 1. ˆ ∧ x = ˆ 0 0 0. 2 Notice that by an analogous argument. y =⇒ w ∈ S =⇒ w ≥ z∈S x∈L x z = x ∨ y. x ∨ y ⇔ w ≥ x. y ∈ P . y ∧ z ⇔ w ≤ x ∧ (y ∧ z) and similarly for join w ≥ (x ∨ y) ∨ z ⇔ w ≥ z. This shows that P admits a join operation. Let S = {z ∈ P : z ≥ x. but only know about one operation. Note that S = ∅ since ˆ ∈ S. z ⇔ w ≤ x. then L has a unique minimal element ˆ := 0 ˆ := and unique maximal element 1 x∈L . 1 We might want to show that a poset is a lattice. z2 < z. 1 1. z ⇔ w ≥ x. the same conclusion would follow from the existence of least upper bounds and a unique minimal element. y. Observe that the meet and join operations are associative. Moreover observe that if L is finite.Definition 2 An element z of a lattice L is called join irreducible if z = z1 ∨ z2 for z1 . 8-2 . y.

. It is a lattice with meet S∧T = S ∩ T . Example 8 (Groups) Let G be a group. j). Distributive Lattices In this lecture. . and L be a lattice. 1 ≤ j ≤ l). . L is lattice with meet S ∧ T = S ∩ T . w ∈ T }. Lemma 3 implies that πn is a lattice. . Recall that LP = {order preserving maps P → L}. 8-3 . . Theorem 15). Note that Examples 7 and 8 are two cases of lattice constructions common to any algebraic object. K . and L be the set of subgroups ordered by inclusion. Given partitions σ = (σ1 . j) and i ∨ j = max(i. σk ) and τ = (τ1 . L is a lattice with meet H ∧ K = H ∩ K. We see that i ∧ j = min(i. . LP is a lattice with join (f ∧ g) : P and meet (f ∨ g) : P x → f (x) ∨ g(x) ∈ L. τl ) define σ ∧ τ as (nonempty intersections σi ∩ τj : 1 ≤ i ≤ k. The structure of these lattices is sufficiently nice to allow for a classification theorem (cf. and join H ∨ K = H. Example 5 (Boolean algebras) Recall that Bn = P([n]). Showing that πn is a lattice without Lemma 3 would be more difficult because the join of two partitions has a messy formula. Since [n] is the unique maximal element of πn . . and L be the set of linear subspaces ordered by inclusion. Example 7 (Vector Spaces) Let V be a vector space. . and join S ∨ T = S ∪ T . This example reinforces our notation. Example 6 (Partitions) Let πn = {partitions of [n]} ordered by refinement. Example 9 (Order-preserving maps) Let P be a poset. and join S ∨ T = S + T = {v + w : v ∈ S. x → f (x) ∧ g(x) ∈ L.Examples of Lattices Example 4 (n) Recall that n (handwritten n) is the set [n] with the usual order relations. we will focus on lattices with a certain property that makes them similar to Boolean algebras.

c. d}.Definition 10 A lattice L is distributive if the meet and join operations distribute over each other i. Example 13 (n) Note that every order ideal of n is of the form b for some b ∈ n. c}. . b. this means that every subset is an order ideal. Note that J(P ) is a poset under inclusion. d}. We will call an order ideal I ⊂ P principal if it is of the form I = x := {y ∈ P : y ≤P x} for some x ∈ P . {a. z ∈ L (i) (x ∨ y) ∧ z = (x ∧ z) ∨ (y ∧ z) (ii) (x ∧ y) ∨ z = (x ∨ z) ∧ (y ∨ z). {a}. an order ideal of P is a subset I ⊂ P such that for all x ∈ I. b. {a. + 1 be the disjoint union of n copies of 1. b. Since a ≤ b iff a ⊂ b . Example 12 (Boolean algebras) Let +n 1 = 1 + . So J(+n 1) = Bn .e. d} defined at the beginning of lecture. c. Definition 11 Given a poset P . Consider for instance the following order ideal of B3 expressed in terms of it Hasse diagram: Figure 1: Order ideal of B3 We will denote the set of order ideals as J(P ). b. y. {a. Notice that a Boolean algebra is distributive since union and intersection distribute over each other. {a. This gives the following Hasse diagram: 8-4 . if y ≤ x. {b}. Since +n 1 has no order relations. b}}. d}. We have J(N) = {∅. this means that J(n) n+1. {b. Example 14 (N) Consider N = {a. then y ∈ I. for x. .

This implies that the join irreducible elements of J(P ) and J(Q) are isomorphic. So x ⊂ I1 or x ⊂ I2 . (S ⊂ T ): Assume that I ∈ J(P ) is not principal. Let S ⊂ J(P ) be the subset of join irreducible elements. Note that T iff x ≤P y. this means that J(P ) is a distributive lattice for any poset P . implying x = I1 or x = I2 . The subset of principal order ideals is a copy of P sitting inside J(P ). Theorem 15 (Birkoff ’s Theorem) 1 Let L be a finite distributive lattice. then I1 ∩ I2 and I1 ∪ I2 are order ideals. 8-5 . we want to describe this subset intrinsically without reference to P . P: P . There exists a poset P unique up to isomorphism such that L J(P ). we have to show that L = J(P ) for P the join irreducible elements of L. So we can find distinct maximal elements x and y in I. Note that I − {x} and I − {y} are order ideals. The following result tells us that if a distributive lattice is finite. So by Fact 1. Since unions and intersections distribute over each other. 1 This result is sometimes called the fundamental theorem of finite distributive lattices. 2 Proof:[Existence] From the proof of uniqueness. Since I = (I − {x}) ∪ (I − {y}) this implies that I is not join irreducible. we conclude that P Q. 2 We can now show uniqueness. S Let T ⊂ J(P ) be the subset of principal order ideals. However. I2 ∈ J(P ). I2 ⊂ P are order ideals. This means that either x ∈ I1 or x ∈ I2 . Proof:[Uniqueness] Given J(P ) we want to recover P . then it must be of this form.Figure 2: J(N) Note that if I1 . So it is enough to show that S = T . Fact 1. Suppose that J(P ) L J(Q) for posets P and Q. because x ⊂ y (T ⊂ S): Suppose that x = I1 ∪ I2 for I1 .

This gives the result. . there exists some yj such that zi = zi ∧ yj . . . or expressible as y = y1 ∨ y2 for y1 . . . yi ∈ P . . . . This implies that f (I ) ≥ f (I). This implies that f is injective. Since join is commutative and associative. By Fact 2. For n minimal. Switching the roles of yi and zj . We have f (I ) = y∈I y=( y∈I y) ∨ ( y∈I −I y) = f (I) ∨ z for some z ∈ L. this map is well-defined by Fact 2. Since L is finite. ∨ zn = y. . yn ∈ P such that y = y1 ∨ . we see by induction that an element y ∈ L can be written as y = y1 ∨ . ∨ zn ) contradicting minimality of n. zj ≤ yk for i = j. ∨ yn = y = z1 ∨ . Since union commutes. Therefore σ ∈ Sn . Replace z1 ∨ z2 by yk in z1 ∨ . . . yn } ⊂ P the maximal elements of I. we obtain τ ∈ Sn such that yτ (i) ≤ zσ(i) ≤ yi . Define a map g : L y → yi yi ∈ J(P ) where y = y1 ∨ .g that i = 1 and j = 2. . . . . An order ideal I ⊂ P can be expressed as I = i yi for {y1 . f is surjective. . we can assume w. By minimality of n. ∨ yn as in Fact 2. 2 Define a map f : J(P ) I→ x∈I x ∈ L. 8-6 . ∨ yn for yi ∈ P . y2 < y. (f order-preserving): Suppose that I ⊂ I for I. So zi ≤ yj . Note that g(y1 ∨ . Suppose that zi . So y = yk ∨ (z3 ∨ . ∨ zn . . . ∨ zn for zj . . Choose n minimal with this property. . Since zi ∈ P . I ∈ J(P ). . we see that yτ (i) = yi . ∨ yn ) = i yi = I because n is minimal by maximality of the yi . Note that y ∧ zi = zi because zi ≤ z1 ∨ . . Suppose that y1 ∨ . . ∨ yn .l. For y ∈ L there exist y1 .o.Fact 2. . By distributivity n zi = zi ∧ y = j=1 zi ∧ yj . this expression is unique up to permutation: An element y ∈ L is either join irreducible. . Therefore gf is the identity on J(P ).

This means that x ∈ I because I is an order ideal. then g ≤2P h =⇒ g(x) ≤P h(x) =⇒ g(x) = 1. 2 Note that we did not make full use of distributivity. this implies that x = y ∧ x for some y ∈ I . There exist three cases: x. or equivalently ϕ(h) ≤J(P ) ϕ(g). Therefore J(P ) −→ L.(g order-preserving): Suppose that for I. Since f is order-preserving. 8-7 . z ∈ L. Suppose that g ≤2P h. this implies that ϕ(f ) ∈ J(P ). define a map ψ(I) : P → 2 by ψ(I)(x) := 2 if x ∈ I / . Note x≤ x∈I y∈I x∈I x≤ y∈I y. y ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 = ψ(I)(y). We will end this lecture with a proposition that gives us another way of thinking about order ideals that will be useful when we try to compare posets. Hence I ⊂ I . Proposition 17 J(P ) (2P )∗ . We want to y =⇒ x ≤ y∈I y ∀x ∈ I y) ∧ x =⇒ x = x ∧ x = ( y∈I =⇒ x = y∈I (y ∧ x) by distributivity. define P ∗ to be the set P with reversed order relations i. we have show that I ⊂ I . So x ≤ y for some y ∈ I . let ϕ(f ) = f −1 (1) ⊂ P . So we obtain a map ϕ : 2P → J(P ). Given an order ideal I ⊂ P . we only needed to know that (x∨y)∧z = (x ∧ z) ∨ (y ∧ z) for x. Therefore ϕ is orderreversing. I ∈ J(P ). So if x ∈ ϕ(h) then x ∈ ϕ(g). 1 if x ∈ I Suppose that x ≤P y. This is a convenient fact for showing that a lattice is distributive. x ≤P y iff x ≥P ∗ y. Hence property (i) of Definition 10 implies property (ii). y.e. Since x is join irreducible. ∼ Proof: Given a map f ∈ 2P . Definition 16 Given a poset P . If h(x) = 1 for some x ∈ P . because only property (i) of Definition 10 needs to be checked.

x ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 = ψ(I )(x). y ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 = ψ(I)(y). Consider f ∈ 2P . / x ∈ I. Since x was arbitrary.x. and we obtain a map ψ : J(P ) → 2P . x ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 ≥2 1 = ψ(I )(x). this implies that ψ(I) ≥2P ψ(I ). Suppose that I ≤J(P ) I . Therefore ψ is order-reversing. / / So ψ(I)(x) ≥2 ψ(I )(x). Conversely. By definition for x ∈ P . By definition ϕψ(I) = ψ(I)−1 (1) = I. x ∈ I. [ψϕ(f )](x) = [ψ(f −1 (1))](p) = = 2 if x ∈ f −1 (1) / 1 if x ∈ f −1 (1) 2 if f (x) = 2 = f (x) 1 if f (x) = 1 Therefore ψϕ(f ) = f . 2 8-8 . consider I ∈ J(P ). y ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 1 <2 2 = ψ(I)(y). x ∈ I =⇒ ψ(I)(x) = 2 = ψ(I )(x). / x ∈ I. / So ψ(I)(x) is order-preserving. For x ∈ P there exist three cases: x ∈ I. Therefore ϕψ(I) = I. We claim that ϕ and ψ are inverses.