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The Vocab Weekly

MISOGAMY

Origin of Misogamy Its first usage dates back to 1560 - 1656 and unlike its meaning, it is made from the union, of one Greek word misein and English word gam. Effectively, ‘misien/miso’ is the root for hatred and words based on this root in some way or the other signify this sentiment. Let’s have a look at a few of these words: 1. Misogyny: Hatred of women (Gyny stands for women, remember what a gynaecologist does). 2. Misandry: A hatred of a man or of men in general; especially by women (can you figure out what andry would stand for). 3. Misanthrope: Someone who has a hatred or distrust of all people (mankind). Pronunciation: mi-sog-uh-mee, mahyMaster tips to learn Misogamy The dictionary definitions for Misogamy are as follows: 1. Hatred of marriage (noun) Misogamy can be easily related to the word misogyny, meaning hatred of women, which can be one of

It is difficult to imagine how someone can hate something so much. However, after reading about Misogamy, you will know the reason for so many bachelors in our world.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

OBELISK

If you are an architect, you can one day build the most beautiful Obelisk in your garden. If you are a designer, an architect or someone creative, obelisk could mean many different things to you. In case you are none of the above, well read further to know more about the word. Pronunciation: ob-uh-lisk The dictionary definitions for obelisk are as follows: 1. A tapering, four-sided shaft of stone, usually monolithic and having a pyramidal apex. 2. Structure resembling a shaft (beam)

3. Obelisk is also used in printing with the sign ( ), which stands for a reference. In printing it is usually referred to as a dagger.

Master tips to learn Obelisk Obelisk draws a picture of Basilisk, the serpent in Harry Potter and Chamber of secrets. The end part ‘lisk’ in both the words facilitates such correlation. As Harry potter stories are so famous, the correlation will make the learning of the word much easier.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

PROBITY

The word probity when used for you can easily define your character. Probity was easily found when the times were honest. However, today looking for probity is like looking for a grain of wheat in sacks full of haystack. Why so? You will know when you know more about the word.

Pronunciation: proh-bi-tee, prob-i-

Origin This word seems to have contributed a lot in the English and French’s love hate relationship, as English rented this word from the French. French in turn had inherited Probity from the Latin word Probitas, meaning honesty and morality. Probity’s first usage dates back to 15th Century.

The Dictionary Definitions for the word Probity are as follows: 1. Complete and confirmed integrity. (noun) 2. A person having strong moral principles. (noun) 3. Uprightness of character. (noun)

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

RISQUE

As the spelling suggest, the word has been taken from French and being an adjective, it can be used to describe a person who is never hesitant to share those improper sexual jokes. Origin Its first known usage dates back to 1865-70 and it has been derived from the French word Risque, which means to risk. Pronunciation: ri-skey; Fr. rees-key The dictionary definitions for Risque are as follows: 1. Indecent and likely to shock. (adjective) 2. Something suggestive of or bordering on indecency or indelicacy. (adjective) 3. Referring to sex in a rude and a shocking way. (adjective)

Master Tips to learn Risque: Risque sounds like risk, though both the words mean different. However, the word risk, which means something that involves danger can easily be related to the word risqué because a risqué behaviour is always full of risk.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

TURBID

A person is often unable to decide anything when he/she is in turbid condition. Being an adjective, it can be used to describe your state of mind or the glass of water that has been stirred with a spoon. Origin Its first known usage dates back to 1626 and has been derived from a Latin word Turbidus, which means turbid. Pronunciation: tur-bid The dictionary definitions for turbid are as follows: 1. Not clear because of stirred up sediment. (adjective) 2. Thick or dense, as smoke or clouds. (adjective) 3. Confused, muddled or disturbed state of mind. (adjective) Master tips to learn Turbid: Turbid & Turgid: The word turbid can easily be associated with the word turgid, as the difference is just of ‘b’ and ‘g’. Turbid in simple words mean something that is characterised by vagueness or murkiness, on the other hand turgid means something that is characterised by a pompous mannerisms. Both the words can be used to describe a person who is disturbed in case of turbid and a person who maintains a pompous lifestyle in case of turgid.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

UNGUENT

Origin Its first known usage dates back to 14th-15th Century. It is derived from the word unguentum, which was derived from unguere, which means to anoint. The dictionary definitions for unguent are as follows: 1. An ointment or salve, usually liquid or semi-liquid for application to wounds. (noun) 2. A salve for soothing or healing. (noun) 3. Semisolid or liquid balm that is applied on wounds for healing. (noun) Pronunciation: uhng-gwuh nt

Unguent is very commonly used when you get yourself hurt. Yet, Unguent is an uncommon name that no one takes.

Master tip to learn unguent: Unguent can be associated with the word pungent not only due to the same sound, but also because an unguent usually comes with a pungent smell.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

COALESCE

Heard the word coalesce before? Well, in case you have not, there is no need to worry. Have a glance at this video:

See the brown and white elements magically infuse into each other to form the favorite sweet of the world: Cadbury chocolate! Well, that process of merging into one another is called coalescing. Lovers also frequently coalesce into one, though the process is temporary! The dictionary definitions for coalesce are as follows: 1. To grow together; fuse. (verb) 2. To come together so as to form one whole; unite. (verb)

Usage examples for coalesce: 1. It’s important for a team to coalesce and put the best exhibition on show. 2. “Getting Democrats to coalesce behind a particular punishment will be hard.” Newsweek: Capitol Letter: Sacrificing Gary Condit 3. “He said lawmakers could "coalesce" around popular "core elements" of the legislation.” chicagotribune.com -

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

The Vocabulary of Wealth: Words Related to economics

One is bound to come across economics in one’s everyday life. We can’t quite delete money, can we? And this makes it important that we know some of the words that are related to economics. For our purpose, we call them the words of wealth. We introduce you to 10 such words today: 1. Capital: Material wealth used or available for use in the production of more wealth. 2. Paid-Up Capital: That part of the issued capital of a company that has been paid up by the shareholders.

3. Venture capital: Money made available for investment in innovative enterprises or research, especially in high technology, in which both the risk of loss and the potential for profit may be considerable. Also called risk capital.

4. Hedge funds: A fund, usually used by wealthy individuals and institutions, which is allowed to use aggressive strategies that are unavailable to mutual funds, including selling short, leverage, program trading, swaps, arbitrage, and derivatives. Hedge funds are exempt from many of the rules and regulations governing other mutual funds, which allows them to accomplish aggressive investing goals. They are restricted by law to no more than 100 investors per fund, and as a result most hedge funds set extremely high minimum investment amounts, ranging anywhere from $250,000 to over $1 million. As with traditional mutual funds, investors in hedge funds pay a management fee; however, hedge funds also collect a percentage of the profits (usually 20%).

5. Capital Gains: A realized increase in the value of a capital asset, as when a share is sold for more than the price at which it was purchased. Strictly speaking, the term refers to capital appreciation outside the normal courses of business. In India capital gains are subject to Capital Gains Tax (CGT). The tax does not cover gains arising from the sale of personal belongings, including cars or principal dwelling houses, but it does cover gains from the sale of stock exchange securities.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

6. Cost of Capital: The payment made by a firm for using long-term capital used in business. The average cost of capital to a firm that uses several sources of long-term funds (loans, share capital) to finance its investments will depend upon the individual cost of each separate source (for example, interest on loans) weighted in accordance with the proportions of each source used.

7. Dividend: That part of a company’s profit, which Directors decide to distribute to the shareholders. It is generally expressed as a percentage of the nominal value of the capital to which it relates. 8. Deficit Financing: The use of borrowing to finance an excess of expenditure over income. Most often, it refers to governments, who often spend more than they can raise in taxation. The term is normally used in economics to refer to a planned budget deficit incurred in the interests of expanding aggregate demand by relaxing fiscal policy and thus injecting purchasing power into the economy, a policy advocated by Keynes to increase employment in the 1930s. In India, this has been a popular tool to plug the deficit so far, but in future, there are likely be some restrictions on the total amount of deficit financing each year the government can avail of.

9. Deflation: 1. A sustained reduction in the general price levels. Deflation is often accompanied by declines in output and employment and is distinct from ‘disinflation’, which refers to a reduction in the rate of inflation. Deflation can be brought about by either internal or external forces in an open economy. II: A deliberate policy of reducing aggregate demand and output to reduce inflation rate and the quantity of imports and lower the exchange rates, thus improving export performance and the BoP. Aggregate demand may be reduced by fiscal policy (increasing taxes or reducing government expenditure) or money supply. 10. Inflation: Persistent increase in the general level of prices. It can be seen as a devaluing of the worth of money. These are just definitions for some of the words that you encounter in the world of economics. We will come out with another one soon.

Disclaimer: the definitions for these terms are picked up from different sources on the internet.

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

Work Out Zone
Work Out 1: Match the following words with their respective meanings or synonyms. Word 1 Coalesce 2 Misogamy 3 Obelisk 4 Probity 5 Unguent 6 Turbid 7 Risqué Meaning or Synonym A Integrity B Combine C Balm D Hatred of marriage E Stone pillar F Naughty/Spicy G Muddy

Work Out 2: Did you really understand the word? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. A risqué comment is an appropriate one in social gatherings. Unguents are needed when in pain. Turbid water is good for health. Misogamy is a universal trait in man. Probity is important in social conduct. True lovers coalesce in the sea of emotion. yes yes yes yes yes yes no no no no no no

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17

The Vocab Weekly

Answers: Work Out Zone
Work Out 1 1-B, 2-D, 3-E, 4-A, 5-C, 6-G, 7-F Work Out 2 1-no, 2- yes, 3-no, 4-no, 5-yes, 6-yes

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February 1-February 7 | Issue 17