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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 INTRODUCTION TO THE CONCEPT OF STUDY Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability, skill or, in the case of the trait EI model, a self-perceived ability to identify, assess and to control the emotions of oneself, of others, and of groups. In the present scenario, cut throat competition, stretched goals, cultural differences among the diverse workforce and imbalanced work life have lead to increasing levels of stress in employees which in turn also increases the job dissatisfaction. This satisfaction adversely affects the performance of the employees and becomes undesirable and paramount the organization problem. Hence the scientific research shows that the emotionally intelligent person is more adaptive to the environment and more productive for the organization. Therefore, stress due to the job dissatisfaction can prove to be important for making the employees more efficient and effective Research also reveals that emotional quotient contributes 80% in the success of the person as compared to the20% contribution of the intelligence quotient (IQ). Therefore, EQ is undoubtedly a very important dimension of a persons personality. Researchers also suggest that Emotional Intelligence oriented interventions can be successful tools for making employees more job satisfied and stress less. By developing our Emotional Intelligence we can become more productive and successful at what we do, and help others to be more productive and successful too The process and outcomes of Emotional Intelligence development also contains many elements known to reduce stress for individuals and organizations, by decreasing conflicts, improving relationships and understanding and increasing stability, continuity and harmony which leads to the job satisfaction To understand the concept of Emotional Intelligence, it would be useful to have an idea of what emotions are. The word emotion comes from the Latin word motere which means to move. The Oxford English dictionary defines emotions as, any agitation or disturbance of mind, feelings, passion. Emotional intelligence is the capacity for recognizing

our own feelings and those of others, motivating ourselves, and managing emotions well, in ourselves and in our relationships. 1.2 THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY 1.2.1 ANALYZING THE IMPACT OF EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN THEWORKPLACE Emotions are all-pervasive in an organisation. These emotions can either be positive or negative .Both these types of emotion will have an effect on the behaviour of employees and this in turn will affect the total organizational culture. 1.2.2 NEGATIVE EMOTIONS IN WORKPLACE Many organisational problems such as absenteeism, high employee turnover, decreased productivity, etc, can have their roots in the negative emotions in the organization to which authorities have not paid attention. Negative emotions that are not recognized can become toxic in an organisation. If unchecked, this emotion can lead the organization into serious trouble, affecting the normal work-flow of the organization. Following are some of the existence of negative emotions at the workplace. y y y y y y y y Low productivity Absenteeism High employee turnover Lack of motivation Increase in conflicts Loss of team spirit Loss of faith in organisation Reduction in production quality Increase in customer complaints

1.2.3 POSITIVE EMOTIONS IN WORKPLACE Positive emotions in the workplace are those which help in achievements of organisational goals. They can lead to high morale, improved performance, and better job satisfaction. People who have positive emotions can think better and can do their work more effectively. Healthy employees are the asset of organisation as there will be reduced

absenteeism due to sickness and as a result, there will be reduction on spending on medical benefits.

1.2.4 EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN INDIAN ORGANISATIONS Many Indian organisations have realized the importance of emotional intelligence and have come out with innovative ways to motivate employees who are high on emotional quotient and low on monetary cost to the organisation. These reward and recognition programs include cash incentives, gift certificates, stock plans and paid holiday packages all of which are aimed at motivating the employees emotionally. 1.2.5 EMOTIONAL DISSONANCE Emotional dissonance is a state of discrepancy between public displays of emotions and internal experiences of emotions that often follows the process of emotion regulation. Emotional dissonance is associated with high emotional exhaustion, low organizational commitment, and low job satisfaction. Taking the social interaction perspective, workers emotion regulation might beget responses from others during interpersonal encounters that subsequently impact their own job satisfaction. For example: The accumulation of favourable responses to displays of pleasant emotions might positively affect job satisfaction. Performance of emotional labour that produces desired outcomes could increase job satisfaction. 1.2.6 EI AND PERFORMANCE A study of Indian situation confirmed the positive interrelationship between job satisfaction, job performance and job motivation. Recent studies showed that EI based competencies are better predictors of performance than IQ by itself (Cherniss, 2000; Feist and Barron, 1996; Snarey and Vaillant, 1985).Success depends not only on EI, but also on EI based competencies (Goleman, 2001a).Emotional competencies indicate the level of

individuals work performance. That is to say, even though they have similar IQ levels, individuals may have different work performance because of their EI. (Sevinc, 2001; Emmerling and Goleman, 2003). A discriminate function analysis indicated that EI scores were able to fairly identify high and low performers (Bar-On, 2005). An analysis of job competencies at 286 organizations worldwide by Spencer and Spencer (1993) indicated that

eighteen of the 21competencies in their generic model for distinguishing superior from average performers were EI based (Goleman, 2001b). McClelland (1998) investigated that the division of leaders of a global food and beverage company with a critical mass of strengths in EI competencies outperformed yearly revenue targets by a margin of 15 to 20 percent. Among life insurance company CEOs, the very best in terms of corporate growth and profit were those who drew upon a wide range of emotional competencies (Goleman, 2000). (Boyatziss, 1999). Research showed that experienced partners at a large consulting firm contributed significantly more profit to the firm from their accounts if they had demonstrated a significant number of the emotional competencies 1.2.7 USE OF EI IN HR APPLICATIONS The importance of emotional competencies and their relation to performance lead organizations to develop and maintain emotional intelligence in their present employees (Emmer ling and Goleman, 2003). Therefore, human resources (HR) departments use more emotional competencies based applications. There are basically two ways to increase emotional intelligence in an organization: y y Hire people who are emotionally intelligent. Develop emotional intelligence of the current employees (Jacobs, 2001).

For both of the applications, organizations need to determine competency models for every position and job that describe the key competencies that are required for a certain job (McLagan, 1980). These competency models can either be set for the organization itself or determined for every occupation groups such as sale, marketing, HR. To develop the information sources it is necessary to find out the satisfaction level of the employees and suggest measures to improve them. 1.2.8 EI, IQ AND JOB PERFORMANCE Research of EI and job performance shows mixed results: a positive relation has been found in some of the studies, in others there was no relation or an inconsistent one. This led researchers Cote and Miners (2006) to offer a compensatory model between EI and IQ, that posits that the association between EI and job performance becomes more positive as cognitive intelligence decreases, an idea first proposed in the context of academic performance (Petrides, Frederickson, & Furnham, 2004). The results of the former study

supported the compensatory model: employees with low IQ get higher task performance and organizational citizenship behavior directed at the organization, the higher their EI.

1.3 REVIEW OF LITERATURE Zubin R.Mulla (2010)1 in his study examined the impact of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on job performance on a sample of 101 working executives in a pharmaceutical company in Mumbai, India. The impact of EI on job performance is studied while controlling for General Mental Ability (GMA) and the personality factor of conscientiousness. The objective of the study is to investigate the moderating effect of job characteristics on the relationship between EI and Job performance. The results showed that the individuals having high interpersonal interaction on their jobs, EI was significantly related to job performance. On the other hand for individuals having low interpersonal interactions on their jobs, EI was not related to job performance. Khurram Shahzad (2010) 2 in his study reveals the efficacy of the emotional intelligence (EI). The objective of the study focuses on the impact of EI on employees performance among telecom employees in Pakistan. He examined the impact of four significant aspects of EI that is self awareness, self management, social awareness and relationship management. Data was collected from five telecom companies by using

questionnaires. The results revealed that a positive relationship exists between social awareness and relationship management and employees performance while self awareness and self management were not found significantly related to employees performance.

Zubin R.Mulla (2011). Do emotionally intelligent people do well in all jobs? Exploring the moderating role of inter-personal interaction, The Journal of Business Perspective. Vol.14. No.4
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Khurram Shahzad, Muhammad Sarmad, Muhammad Abbas and Muhammad Amanullah Khan (2010). Impact of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on employees performance in telecom sector of Pakistan, African Journal of Business Management Vol.5 (4), pp. 1225-1231

Praveen M. Kulkarni (2009) 3 in his study examined the performance level of managers and supervisors at an automobile retailer in the city of Belgaum. The objective of the study focuses on understanding the emotional intelligence of the managers and supervisors and its link to their performance level on the job. The results confirmed that emotional intelligence has an impact on the performance level of the managers and supervisors. Hassan (2010)4 in his study examined that Emotional intelligence is essential factor responsible for determining success in life and psychological wellbeing plays an important role in shaping the interaction between managers and employees in the work environment. This objective of the study was to understand the performance level of managers and employees in educational administrations. The study focuses on understanding the emotional intelligence of the managers and employees and its link to their performance level on the job. The results confirmed that emotional intelligence has a positive impact on the performance level of the managers and employees in educational administrations. Belal A. Kaifi (2010)5 in his study analysed that it is important to know who can lead and manage an organization to be effective, efficient, and productive. Managers with human skills are needed to help an organization mature and develop. This results indicate that, out of 200 middle Managers, the female middle managers have higher emotional intelligence skills when compared to male middle managers, and that those who have more managerial experience have had more time to enhance their emotional intelligence skills.

Praveen M. Kulkarni, B. Janakiram, D.N.S. Kumar (2009). Emotional Intelligence and Employee Performance as an Indicator for Promotion, a Study of Automobile Industry in the City of Belgaum, Karnataka, India, International Journal of Business and management, Vol.4, No.4 Hassan, Scholar Saeid, Sirous Korahi (2010). Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Performance of Employees, Postmodern Openings, Year 1, No.4, Vol 4 No.4, Vol 4 Belal A. Kaifi, Selaiman A. Noori, (2010). Organizational Management: A Study on Middle Managers,Gender, and Emotional Intelligence Levels, Journal of Business Studies Quarterly 2010, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 13-23
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C. Jayan (2006)6 in his study explored the role of predictive variance of emotional competencies, personality variables and job attitudes in job performance. The sample consisted of 204 middle level managers, who completed Emotional Competency Inventory, Type A Personality Pattern, Job Attitudes Scale and Performance Rating (Self) Scale. Co-worker rating and Superior ratings for these managers were also obtained. Stepwise regression analysis showed that R2 increased from 0.1155 to 0.3369 with addition of each of the seven variables that contributed significantly to the prediction of job performance. Stphane Ct (2006) 7 in his study examined how emotional intelligence and cognitive intelligence are associated with job performance. The objective of the study was to develop and test a compensatory model that posits that the association between emotional intelligence and job performance becomes more positive as cognitive intelligence decreases. The results supported for task performance and organizational citizenship behaviour directed at the organization, but not for organizational citizenship behaviour directed at individuals. Gail Kinman (2010)8 in his study examined the key motivators to enter social work, together with the sources of social support and the coping strategies that students draw on to help them manage the demands of study and placement experiences. The objective of the study was to investigate several emotional and social competencies (i.e. emotional intelligence, reflective ability, empathy and social competence) as potential predictors of resilience. Also examined was whether resilience predicted psychological distress, and the role played by resilience in the relationship between emotional intelligence and distress was assessed.

C. Jayan (2006). Emotional Competence, Personality and Job Attitudes as Predictors of Job Performance, Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology, February 2006, Vol. 32, No.2, 135-144

Stphane Ct (2006). Emotional Intelligence, Cognitive Intelligence, and Job Performance, Administrative Science Quarterly, 51 : 128 Gail Kinman, Louise Grant, (2010). Emotional intelligence, reflective abilities and wellbeing in social workers and related skills in predicting wellbeing and performance in social work practice project report, A Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.
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Craig R. Seal (2006)9 in his study integrated diverse research to provide a theoretical model of the process whereby emotional and social intelligence (ESI) was fostered in organizations. The objective of the study was to provide an overview of the theory of ESI, including the historical contributions and current conceptualizations along with the impact of ESI on performance. Unlike general intelligence or personality, the key assumption and rationale is that ESI can be developed. The results confirmed that ESI may be developed through a process of desirable, sustainable change called Intentional Change Murray R.Barrick (1991)10 in his study investigated the relation of the Big Five personality dimensions (Extraversion, Emotional stability, Agreeableness,

Conscientiousness and Openness to Experience) to three job performance criteria (job proficiency, training proficiency and personal data) for five occupational groups (professionals, police, managers, sales and skilled/semi skilled). The results indicated that one dimension of personality, conscientiousness, showed consistent relations with all job performance criteria for all occupational groups. For the remaining personality dimensions, the estimated true score correlations varied by occupational group and criterion type.

1.4 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM EI is an important tool in human resources planning, job profiling, recruitment, selection, management development career planning and more. It is increasing the relevant to organisation development and indeed developing people and their relationships. Emotional intelligence principles provides a new way to understand and access peoples behaviour, management styles ,attitude ,interpersonal skills and many more. It also paves way to find out their performance in terms of quality results.

Craig R. Seal , richard e. boyatzis , james r. bailey (2006). Fostering Emotional and Social Intelligence in Organizations, Organization Management Journal Linking Theory & Practice: EAM White Papers Series 2006 Vol. 3, No. 3, 190-209 Murray R.Barrick ,Michael K.mount(1991),The big five personality dimensions and job performance Meta analysis,Personal psychology 1991,44
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1.5 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY y y y y To find out the awareness level of employees on emotional intelligence. To study the emotional level of employees and its impact on job performance To access their personal and social competency related to emotional intelligence To provide suggestions in improving the emotional intelligence employees to bring out the decide change in their organisational environment.

1.6 SCOPE OF THE STUDY Emotional intelligence competencies are critical for success in most jobs. It is limited to the employees. Emotional Intelligence is conducted for middle level and top level management to understand once own feeling, the feelings of others, to manage emotions and motivate oneself and others to improve relationship. This study also focuses on the relationship that exists between emotional intelligence of employees and their job performance 1.7 METHODOLOGY: The type of research design used is descriptive study. The main goal of this type of research is to describe the data and characteristics about what is being studied. The idea behind this type of research is to study frequencies, averages, and other statistical calculations. It is used to obtain information concerning the current status of the phenomena to describe "what exists with respect to conditions in a situation. 1.7.1 DATA COLLECTION: The data that is used in this study is Primary data. The method used for collecting this Primary data is Questionnaire . 1.7.2 SAMPLING PROCESS: The sampling process consists of defining the population, determining the sample size and selecting the sampling plan. 1.7.2.1 SAMPLE POPULATION: The total population is 201 employees present in the organization.

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1.7.2.2 SAMPLE SIZE: The size of the sample considered is 132 employees. 1.7.2.3 SAMPLE METHOD: The sampling method used in this study is simple random sampling. The samples are drawn in such a way that each of the members of the population has the same chance of being included in the sample. Each unit of the population must have equal probability of being selected. In this case each employee among the 132 employees have equal probability if being selected. 1.7.3 STATISTICAL TOOLS: The data that is collected is analysed using the Statistical package SSPS 16. The tools that are used are percentage method, and Chi-Square and factor analysis

1.8 LIMITATIONS: y Sample size considered is 132 employees. The suggestions and answers may vary if the sample size is increased. y y y It is difficult to meet all the employees due to time constraint. Since the operators come in shift .it is difficult to collect the information. Fear of expressing the true facts among the respondents may lead to misinterpretation.

1.9 CHAPTER SCHEME: Chapter 1: INTRODUCTION This chapter gives an introduction about the research conducted. It deals with the background study, theoretical background of the study, review of literature, statement of the problem, objectives of the study, scope of the study, research methodology adopted and the limitations of the study. Chapter 2: ORGANIZATIONAL PROFILE

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The chapter organization profile deals with the history of the organization, the management, organization structure, product profile and the market potential, competitive strengths of the company, future plans and the description about various functional areas. Chapter 3: MACRO-MICRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS The chapter micro-macro analysis gives an insight about the industry in the Global scenario as well as the Indian scenario. Chapter 4: DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Analysis and interpretation deals with the analysis of the data collected for the study and the interpretation of the results obtained. Chapter 5: CONCLUSION This chapter deals with the discussions on the findings and the suggested recommendations based on the finding.

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CHAPTER 2

ORGANIZATION PROFILE

2.1 HISTORY OF THE ORGANIZATION The plant which was producing about 5 lakhs pieces of components initially was shifted from Madras to Coimbatore at present premises during 1972. Capacity was increased to 10.5 lakhs pieces in 1980 and still to 16.5 lakhs pieces in 1984. During 1995, manufacture of bushings and thrust washers has been shifted to Thoraipakkam plant for reason of expansion and economy of operations. Consequently the plant capacity has been fixed at 10.5 lakhs pieces of bearings per month. Equipments that were used for manufacture of bushings and thrust washers at Coimbatore have been relocated at Thoraipakkam in Dec 1995 with plant capacity of 6.5 lakhs pieces per month. In order to meet continuous increase in demand for bearings, another plant to manufacture about 9.5 lakhs pieces was setup in Hosur. The entire raw material was being imported till 1967. Since then a facility has been progressively added in manufacture of Steel backed by Copper-Lead bimetallic strips in 1967 by sintering process, powder for copper based alloy in 1987 and Aluminum-Tin strips in 1994 in Strip Mill Plant in Chennai operations.

2.1.1 FOUNDERS PROFILE

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BBL Company is a member of the Amalgamations group, one of Indias largest light engineering conglomerates. Sri.AnanthaRamakrishnan is the founder of the Amalgamations Group. The Amalgamations group serves a cross section of Indian industry covering manufacturing, trading, distribution, printing and publishing.

2.2 MANAGEMENT The Top Management team of BBL comprises of Mr. A. Krishnamoorthy (Chairman & Managing Director) followed by a group of professionals Mr.N.Venkataraman, Mr.A.B.Avery, Mr. S. Gopinath Rao and Mr.K.V.Shetty. Mr.N.P.Mani is the president of BBL and is the key driving force behind the operations strategy. Mr.N.Venkataraman is the vice president of BBL and controls the finance department. Mr.K.Vidhya Shankar is the company secretary. Their management skills have helped in building a core team that works to deliver the strategic plans. Mr. S Krishnan and Mr. Krishna Srinivasan are the Whole-time Directors. Mr.R.Vijayaraghavan is the Additional Director and he would be holding the position of an Independent and Non-Executive Director in the Company. They are committed to ensuring that the group sustains its benchmarks of quality.

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FIGURE 2.1 ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE

CHAIRMAN AND MANAGING DIRECTOR WHOLE TIME DIRECTOR

VICE PRESIDENT-FINANCE

VICE PRESIDENT-OPERATIONS

COMPANY SECRETARY

MANAGER FINANCE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR R&D

GENERAL MANAGER ADMIN

SENIOR MANAGER QUALITY SYSTEMS

DGM HUMAN RESOURCE

ENGINEER R&D

SENIOR ASSISTANT/ ASSISTANT

TECHNICAL ASSISTANT SENIOR OFFICERHUMAN RESOURCES

ASSISTANT ENGINEER R&D

MANAGER MATERIALS PURCHASE

SENIOR ASSISTANT/ ASSISTANT

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EXECUTIVE

SENIOR ASSISTANT/ ASSISTANT

2.3 PRODUCT PROFILE Bimetal Bearings Limited manufactures a wide range of Engine

Bearings, Bushings, Thrust Washers, Alloy Powder and Bimetallic Strips.BBLs product range includes: 2.3.1 Engine Bearings
y

Plated and non plated bearings in copper and aluminium based alloys (leaded & lead free) - 25 mm to 250 mm OD Connecting rod bearings Main bearings Roll formed flange bearings

y y y

2.3.2 Bushings y y y y Bimetallic & steel bushings Conrod bushings, cam bushings, rocker lever bushings 25 mm to 85 mm OD Bushings with ID plating

2.3.3Thrust Washers y Thrust washers upto 225 mm OD

2.3.4 Copper Alloy Powders

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Wide range of water atomised copper and copper based alloy powder for use in sintered bearing materials, sintered parts and friction material

Process established for lead free copper alloy powders

2.3.5 Sintered Copper Alloy Strips y y 0.75 mm upto 5.50 mm thickness 70 mm upto 250 mm width

2.3.6 Aluminium Alloy Strips


y y y

Cladded aluminium alloy strips Upto 5.50 mm thickness 70 mm to 200 mm width

2.4 COMPETITIVE STRENGTH OF THE COMPANY 2.4.1Strength y The greatest strength is the product since it is the critical component used in the engine. y The company makes use of backward integration. The product and raw materials are manufactured in the same company. y The company comes under amalgamations group which comprises of 7000-8000 companies. y No deterioration takes place in the product.

2.4.2Weakness y y y y The company uses the technique of FoxPro. No advanced version is available There is poor modernization in the company. The company is striving for lead free materials. There is a limited scope for increase in turn over.

2.4.3Opportunities y Company has enough facilities for future expansion.

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Bimetal is a cash rich company. The company has a high working capital and huge investments.

2.4.4Threat y The company faces difficulty in facing the innovativeness of foreign market collaborations. y The company has to position itself to acquire appropriate process and material technology to maintain its leadership.

2.5 FUTURE PLANS The future plan of BBL Company is to provide a pollution free environment. The effort so far taken to produce a pollution free environment is that they have bought a machine which emits the metal wastage in the form of pulp rather than pieces. This result in noise free environment. 2.6 DESCRIPTION OF VARIOUS FUNCTIONAL AREAS The company has various functional departments. The Coimbatore division controls the HR, production, finance and marketing departments. Out of which the mullai nagar plant controls the HR and production department. 2.6.1 HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT BBL consists of centralized hierarchy for the HR system. The DGM HR is assisted by senior officer HR and Assistant Manager. Managers and HR of all the plants are supposed to report to the senior manager. The Human resource department is responsible for Human Resource Management. HRM refers to application of management principles to management of people in an organization.HRM consists of people-related functions of Hiring, Training , development, Performance Review, Compensation etc. Job analysis is conducted by applying Skill and Competency matrix. The hiring process consists of three processes

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y y y

Recruitment Process Selection process Final approval and appointment order

2.6.1.1 Recruitment Process The applications are received by the HR department. The resources with reference to job requirements and employee specification are shortlisted and forwarded to the User department. The shortlisted applicants are called for interview by the User department

(HOD). The date, time and venue are fixed in consultation with user department. The applications selected by user department will be scrutinized by HR department for employee specification. 2.6.1.2 Selection Process The selection process is usually on face interview. This is sometimes preceded by written test in case of selection from diploma course. Selection is done by the Interview committee. The Interview committee consists of various grades. The interview committee while selecting, considers grade, fitment and designation of previous experience. While considering previous service of a new entrant, weight age is given to the candidate at 80% level only. Total no of years of experience is calculated which also includes the training period. 2.6.1.3 Final approval and appointment order The HR will forward the recommendations with interview papers to the PresidentOperations for his final approval. The Hr department will forward the appointment order to the President-Operations for signature and communicated with corresponding candidate. A candidate is selected only on unanimous decision of all the members of the interview committee. The committee considers grade, fitment, qualification, age and designation. The applications selected are forwarded to President of Operations for final approval. Orientation program is organized for introduction. This is usually a week for management staff and a month time for the workers. The various training programs are Workshops, seminars etc. Workers are recommended by HR for these programs.

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Training is usually scheduled on annual basis (April-March). Initial training is given by the department head. CD and write ups are provided. Special on job trainings are carried out in Vestibule. Candidates from the plant are trainees and those from external source are probationers. Probationary period is for six months and the performance is recorded in History card. Performance appraisal is evaluated every six months for workers and in on annual basis for management staffs. The appraisal method is 360 .Feedback is usually direct to the workers. Welfare schemes includes y y y y 2.6.2 Incentives Double wage for overtime Bonus 20% from wage Free cost canteen PRODUCTION DEPARTMENT

The Production Process mainly depends on three departments namely, y y y Purchase department Maintenance department Manufacturing departments

2.6.2.1 Purchase department It ensures for specified requirements for all production materials, covering raw materials, subcontracted parts and consumables purchased. The procedures include Sourcing, placement of purchase orders and amendments provide adequate purchasing date, scheduling suppliers including performance rating. A list of approved suppliers (AVL) supplying raw materials, production aids, consumables etc is prepared by purchasing department at Head Office. The main suppliers of raw material are Daido metal, Japan and Strip mill Chennai. 2.6.2.2 Maintenance department The bearings are checked for quality at each and every stage and returned to the machine division. Initial thickness of the bearings is checked using wire gauge, screw gauge, digital

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vernier calliper. The final inspection is automated using light sensors. Three lights of Blue, Green and Red are used y y y GREEN: Ready for dispatch BLUE: Dispatch after rework RED: Bearings are rejected.

The bearings arte auto segregated into row and is finally collected. Five to seven thousand pieces are manufactured per day. Every ten piece is selected and inspection is carried out where process is temporarily paused and resumed. The automated process reduces the time taken for inspection.

2.6.2.3 Manufacturing department The various processes done in this department are, Blanking: This is the first operation in bearing manufacturing. It is the cutting operation of strip by press machine. The name of the company is written on side of the piece. Forming: The blanked pieces is formed by using forming machine and it will change the blanked pieces into half a round of bearing. This includes two operations namely, First form and the Final form. Facing: This operation is to reduce the diameter of the bearing. Chamfering: The chamfer operation means ID chamfer, OD chamfer and facing the bearing. Notch: This is operating with near edge of the bearing, by using V-shaped coining die. Mill Notch: Mill Notch is burr removing operation using Milling cutter. The inner part of notch is finished and is put to correctly match the bearings. Oil Grooving: Grooving operation is done by milling machine. This grooving process is done by oil flow in bearing. Hole piercing: Piercing operation is punching the bearing by using punching die for oil in the bearing. The piercing hole is used to inject the oil inside the bearing.

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Counter sinking: Counter sinking operation is to remove the sharp edge of the oil hole in the bearing. PL shaving: PL shave operation is to maintain crush height of the bearing. This operation is done by using broach knife. ID Boring: Boring operation is the final operation and this operation is done to maintain wall thickness to required measurement. Waste management: The Environmental, Occupational, Health and Safety are well practiced by Waste Management system. This is assisted in eliminatory differentiation of Industrial wastes. It manages shop floor activities and assisted in production and planning of Bush and Ball Bearings. It also monitors the flow of units across different work stations and generates periodic reports on outcomes. Quality assurance: Quality Management System (QMS) is in accordance to ISO/TS 16949:2002 standards. All BBL is ISO 14001:2004 certified. BBL (Coimbatore) is ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007 certified. Stores: The various bearings are stored according to the need of various clients of BBL. Tool room: Various tools used in the process are Blanking punch, Forming punch, Chamfer tool, pickup attachment, Hard metal cutter, Punching die, Counter sink tool, Broach knife, Aero block, Diamond tool, Oil groove cutter, Mill notch cutter, Coining die block. Packaging: This is the final step where all the bearings are packed and exported according to the required specifications of various clients.

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CHAPTER 3

MACRO - MICRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

3.1 MACRO ANALYSIS: Bearing industry is likely to witness good times a head riding an auto sector boom, economic revival and export growth valuations of bearing company have not seen the kind of run up seen by ancillary poor group due to concerns over industry demand supply dynamics and huge presence of unorganized sector. 3.1.1 GROWTH DRIVERS: The demand for bearing industry divided into two key user segments, automobiles and industrial sector growth. The automobile industry is the largest growth driver. The demand of bearings is also linked to heavy duty industrial applications in rolling stock, rolling miles, heavy machinery accounting for 21% percentage of total bearing market user segments of bearings. Heavy Industries Automobile 21% 6%

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General Engineering Segment Electrical equipment &others

28% 45%

3.1.2 INTERNATIONAL SCENARIO OF BEARING INDUSTRY: Bearings worldwide were doing significantly better. Orders were increasing globally and were forecast to grow 6.5 percent per year through 2005 to $42 billion. With supply levels remaining high worldwide, bearing prices overall were stable and not expected to rise in 2003. Conversely, prices for imports were expected to increase in 2003. As bearings from China came into the United States, selling at below market values, the federal government has levied anti-dumping duties of up to 59.3 percent. Lead times for all bearings continued to fall 10 to 20 percent with 60 percent of buyers receiving product within a week, according to one survey. Average lead time was about 2.6 weeks, down 19 percent from one year ago. Supply and demand for different bearing designs - ball, roller, etc. - can vary based primarily upon the types of applications most prevalent in the country's industrial sector. But because each of the major anti-friction bearing designs (i.e., ball and roller, with other types tending to be derived from the major designs) is used in such a wide and diverse array of settings, most countries that comprise significant bearing markets (i.e., over about $100 million per year in annual sales) utilize both types in relatively large amounts. While the industrialized nations tend to exhibit the largest and most mature (and thus most cyclical) bearings markets, the fastest growing markets are usually found within the developing nations of Asia, Latin America and (to a lesser extent) Africa/Mideast. Many such countries have been reforming and liberalizing their economies in recent years, in order to attract external investment capital and develop and expand their industrial sectors. Industrial machinery applications dominate the world bearings markets, accounting for over half of total global demand. Industrialization programs in developing countries tend to involve substantial amounts of such machinery, and while in many cases these countries import machinery already incorporating bearings, the aftermarket tends to be

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sizable. The motor vehicle sector comprises the second largest application for anti-friction bearings in value terms, although it is far smaller than its industrial machinery counterparts Investments and implementation of new production technologies continually improve productivity. With very rapid scientific advances, the bearing technology cycle has been squeezed into shorter periods so that productivity has been growing faster than bearing end-markets. This puts continuous pressure on the industry to consolidate. The entry of China, for example, into world markets has not only created additional capacity, but also lowered prices of some bearings to levels not seen since the 1960s.The China factor has also cut into some of Japan's exports, thus impacting Japan's in country capacity and the United States by lowering general price levels. Eastern Europe, India, and other areas are developing in a similar pattern. In addition, bearing materials and bearing quality have improved and extended bearing life. Longer bearing life reduces the demand for replacement bearings, and thereby, further contributes to surplus capacity. Lastly, the closed Japanese market contributes to overcapacity in slow economic times elsewhere in the world. 3.1.3 MAJOR INDUSTRY PLAYERS: The worldwide automobile industry is dominated by five leading automobile manufacturers corporations namely Toyota, GM, Ford Motor Company, Volkswagen AC and Daimler Chrysler. These corporations have their presence in almost every country and they continue to invest into production facilities in emerging markets namely Latin America, Middle East, Eastern Europe, china and Malaysia and other markets. In south east Asia with the main aim of reducing the production costs. 3.1.4 DEMAND DETERMINANTS: Bearings of various types and sizes are used for different applications. The major applications are as follows:
yAutomobiles

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yRailways yElectrical

Motors

yElectric Fans yDiesel yPumps yMachine Tools yTextile yOther

Engines

machinery and

heavy industries
o o o o o o o

Steel Plants Sugar Plants Process Plants Heavy Engineering Industries Heavy Earth Moving Equipment Cement Plants Power Generation Units

The demand for bearings cane be clubbed under following Categories: 3.1.4.1 Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) Market: The OEM market for bearing represents the demand arising out of the original vehicle and industrial manufacturers. The demand for the OEM market directly depends upon the growth in user industry. OEM market accounts for 40% of total demand of bearing industry. This market is characterized by requirements of high quality, stringent delivery norms and lower margins. OEMs have been facing price competition in their own markets, continue to exert price pressure on the local bearing suppliers. The bearing capacity available in the country is in excess of demand, resulting in price reduction. The OEM bearing market is likely to witness better days ahead on account of up swing in automobile industry and manufacturing sector. 3.1.4.2 Replacement Market:

26

OEM demand is mostly generated in Automobile, Machine manufacturer , Plants manufacturers, where in the bearings is used as part of the new equipment or machinery. Replacement Demand is the after demand where as a part of the maintenance of the machines or rotating machine , the bearings are replaced by new bearings after it is failed as natural life deterioration / wear or tear or due to premature failures and need replacement The replacement market represents the demand arising on account of replacing the used and worn-out bearings. The size of replacement market is dependent on equipment population and frequency of maintenance. Replacement market accounts for 40% of total demand for bearing industry. The margins in this market are relatively higher placed as compared to OEM market. The replacement market is highly price sensitive and has higher share of unorganized players and cheaper imported bearings. Figure 3.1: Bearing Demand Per Sector

In the last two years, Indian automobile and industrial sectors are facing an increased market and economy growth.

27

This has led to higher growth in OEM segment and higher growth in replacement demand. The organized players have been concentrating on improving share in the replacement market, which earlier was dominated mostly by the small scale and cottage industries. 3.1.5 MARKET SIZE: The market for automotive bearings is growing at a rate of almost 27 percent per annum in the year 2005 - 06. This is mainly because of multiple models in every vehicle segment entering the market. The overall automotive industry has grown at the rate of 34 percent per annum from the year 2004. Hence, a definite increase in the demand for bearings in the OE segment is anticipated. Aftermarket demand for automotive bearings is increasing, but at a slower rate as compared to the growth in vehicle population. Manufacturers are expecting sustained growth of 15 percent in the aftermarket mainly due to increase in population of two wheelers, passenger cars, and utility vehicle segments. Some of the restraints faced by the bearings manufacturers are longer life due to improved technology, improved fuel quality, and better maintenance of the vehicles. This reduces the replacement rate, which in turn leads to slower growth in the aftermarket demand. Increase of imports due to a 5 percent decrease in duty rates is affecting the market for the domestic participants. Vehicle owners prefer imported bearings due to lower costs. Cost difference is almost 50 percent between the domestic bearings and the imported bearings. For example, the bearings manufactured in India are priced at Rs.25 and the bearings imported from China are priced at Rs.12 in the year 2004 - 05. There is an increase in imports from China and South Korea due to lower costs and greater demand. There has also been increase in prices of domestic brands as the cost of production has gone up due to increase in steel prices. Indian manufacturers are also facing a threat from the spurious parts manufacturers who manufacture duplicate parts and sell them in the names of both domestic and foreign companies. This is the biggest threat to the

28

Indian manufacturers as this eats away their share in the aftermarket and affects their growth. 3.1.6 INDIA V/S CHINA BEARING INDUSTRY COMPETITIVENESS: In recent years, with the rapid development of machinery industry, Chinese bearing industry is developing at a speed higher than national economy. A lot of national key engineering projects, such as delivery of west gas to the east, transmission of west electricity to the east, transference of south water to the north, Three Gorges reservoir on the Changjiang River, Beijing Olympic Games in 2008, and Shanghai World Exhibition in 2010, will need great amount of machinery as well as great amount of bearings. This situation will provide large market space for bearing industry development. It is estimated that in a few years, bearing market will grow at a speed of over 10%. 3.1.7 STRUCTURAL DEFICIENCIES: The bearing industry also suffers from structural deficiencies, which are making it less competitive in the global market. Low volumes in the domestic industry do not make it feasible to induct technology in the form of high-end automation. This ultimately affects quality. In addition, the industry is fragmented with no economies of scale. Another problem which domestic manufacturers face is that of high cost of imported equipment. Machine tools and precision measuring equipment have to be imported and they invite a custom duty of 25% thus making project costs high and un remunerative to undertake. The third problem is of cost-competitiveness due to higher import duties on raw materials (steel tubes, steel bars, grinding wheels etc). The industry generally does not manufacture special bearings/high precision bearings. Some small scale units also manufacture bearings, but these generally cannot compare in quality or volume with those from the organised sector though a few do make some special designs. The organised sector manufacturers have generally imported the technology from internationally renowned manufacturers. The rolling bearing manufacturers in India mostly manufacture bearings based on the original design and specifications obtained from their collaborators. Generally there

29

is a limited facility available with the bearing manufacturers for research or development of new bearings of indigenous designs. 3.1.8 FUTURE MARKET The international manufacturers have directed the thrust to higher precision, coupled with high productivity. Their efforts are concentrated on improving the quality of the bearings to the highest levels possible. Thus, the life of bearings would be improved, they would carry higher loads and the noise levels would be reduced to the minimum. Though bearing sizes and nomenclature have been standardised, design modifications do take place continually in order to improve the overall performance of the product. New products as such, may not be a significant area of concentration. With the onslaught of excellent quality volume production by the Japanese manufacturers, some bearing manufacturers have moved towards bearings with special applications, including ready assemblies that carry rolling bearings integrated into them. Newer materials such as plastics and even ceramics have been experimented with and developed for special applications. Other manufacturers have re-organised to bring in economy of large volumes, experimented and developed, such as use of plastics and even ceramics. The pace and achievement of the above mentioned goals in bearing manufacture can directly be linked to innovations in machine tools, process technology and material properties. In machine tools, the stress is constantly on improving the precision levels and productivity. Automation at every stage is most common. This is done within the machine and in transfer from machine to machine into line manufacture, to achieve close control on operations and monitor the pre-process corrections. 3.2 MICRO ANALYSIS: 3.2.1 INDIAN SCENARIO OF BEARING INDUSTRY:

30

The Indian Bearing industry makes around 500 types of bearings as against over 30,000 types of bearings being used by the Indian industry. Bulk of these are only of standard types and are used mostly in low-technology areas like fans, electric motors, water pumps, and by the automotive sector. The automobile industry is the largest user segment for Indian bearing market accounting for almost 40% of the total demand. All the segments of the automobile industry are expected to report strong growth in the coming year. Passenger cars continue to grow in double digit drivers by rising aspirations coupled with cheap and easily availability of finance The engineering is the second largest user for Indian bearing market according for 28% of bearing sales. The domestic players are sensing the outsourcing opportunity and have initiated the process of producing a range of bearings for meeting the requirements of the parent or other good customer. The current Indian bearings industry is worth Rs.3500 crore. In this, automotive segment accounts for 45 percent of the revenues, which amount to Rs 1,350 crores and the remaining 55 percent of revenues are being contributed by industrial demand. In the automotive bearings market, the organized segment manufactures cater to 50 percent of the demand. About 15 percent of the production is by the unorganized segment in India, and the remaining 35 percent of demand is fulfilled through imports. Out of the total revenues in the automotive segment, 60 percent of the revenues are contributed by the OEMs and the remaining 40 percent is by the demand from the aftermarket. There has been a growth of 15 percent in the aftermarket segment and OE demand has increased by more than 25 percent from the financial year 2005-06. Though the demand from the aftermarket segment is increasing, the growth rate is declining compared to the year 2005 - 06. In the aftermarket, 6 percent demand is from the engineering applications segment, 5 percent from LCV segment, 4 percent from MUV segment, 8 percent from car segment, 11 percent from tractor segment, and the remaining 15 percent from automotive ancillary segment. Rest of the 50 percent demand is from the Railway sector.

31

Indian manufacturers are taking multiple steps to overcome the challenges facing the Indian market. Manufacturers are investing more in research to develop better technologies, which increase the life of the bearings. Companies are giving a warranty of 1 to 2 years on the bearings. Generally, bearings have been standardised internationally i.e. the boundary dimensions of the product have been laid down. However, with moderate modifications in the standardised designs, bearings have been manufactured and used for various applications the world over. The manufacturing activity in the country started in the late 40's, with the production of small and standard bearings. The Indian industry today manufactures small and medium bearings mainly in five categories, i.e. ball bearings, cylindrical roller bearings, taper roller bearings, spherical roller bearings and needle roller bearings. The popular size range is generally restricted to 140 mm OD, though larger sizes are also manufactured by some units.

3.2.1.1 SEGMENTS OF INDIAN BEARING INDUSTRY: Bearing industry in India is classified into three segments: y y y Organized sector Unorganized sector Imports

3.2.1.1.1 ORGANIZED SECTOR: The organized sector primarily caters to the OEM segment, which are predominantly automotive railways and industrial user. 3.2.1.1.1 UNORGANIZED SECTOR:

32

This sector includes the small scale manufactures of spurious bearing also. The sector contributes to almost 15% of total industry turnover. The sector players have strong regional presence and mainly cater to the needs of the replacement market. 3.2.1.1.1 IMPORTS: Legal import generally represents the specialized bearings not manufactured in India.30% of the total demand for bearing industry is met by imports. While a part of the imports comes through official channels. The replacement market is highly price sensitive and has higher shared of unorganized players and cheaper. 3.2.3 ANALYSIS OF BIMETAL BEARINGS: Bimetal Bearings Limited is one of Indias leading manufacturers of Engine Bearings, Bushings, Thrust Washers, Alloy Powder and Bimetallic Strips BBL currently has a Technology Agreement with Daido Metal Co., Japan covering new range of high performance material including lead free alloys, manufacturing up-gradation, high performance / lead free plating and quality systems across all facilities.BBL has fully integrated manufacturing facilities right from raw material to fully value added finished products.BBL has a strong OEM base covering all segments of the automotive spectrum covering Passenger cars, MUVs, LCVs, M&HCVs, Tractors, Industrial engines and two wheelers apart from catering to the requirements of defence and railway establishments. All BBL facilities are TS 16949 certified. BBL Hosur plant is also ISO 14001 certified. BBL Coimbatore plant is ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001 certified. The other major players who are the competitor for BBL, kirloskar and anand &menon The bimetal bearing ltd consists of four units .These four units are: y y y y Strip mill plant at Chennai Bimetal bearing limited at Coimbatore Bimetal bearing limited at Hosur Bushing plant at Chennai

3.2.3.1CLIENTELE: y TATA.

33

y y y y y y y y

ASHOKA LAYLAND. MAHINDRA NAVISTAR. MARUTI. HYUNDAI. YAMAHA. SUZUKI. SWARAJ MAZADA. AVTEC

VISION: Bimetal Bearings Limited is committed to enhance Customer Satisfaction by providing Products and Services to clearly establish requirements through customer focus and continual improvement in all its process. MISSION: y y y y Improve optimal performance Timely delivery of Products and Services. Increased levels of Customer Satisfaction. Focus on Employee Training and competence

CHAPTER 4

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

This chapter deals with analysis and interpretation of data as collected through questionnaire 4.1 PERCETAGE ANALYSIS 4.1.1 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE

Table 4.1: Age of the Respondents

34

Age(in yrs) Below 25 25 to 30 31 to 40 41 to 50 More than 50 Total Source: Primary data.

No. of Respondents 28 27 11 20 46 132

Percentage 30.7 29.5 12.9 21.5 51.4 100

From the above table it can be understood that 51.4% of the respondents to the age group are in more than 50 and 12.9% of the respondents are in 31 to 40 years category.

Income Below 5000 5001 to 10000 10001 to 15000 15001 to 20000 Total

Table 4.2: Income of the Respondents No .of Respondents Percentage 38 42 42 10 132 39.4 45.3 46.8 11.5 100

Source: Primary data. From the above table it can be inferred that 46.8% of the respondents are in the income category between 10001 to 15000 and 11.5% of the respondents are in the income category between 15001 to 2000

Aware of intelligence Yes No

Table 4.3: Aware of emotional intelligence emotional No .of Respondents Percentage 89 43 132 67.4 32.6 100

Total Source: Primary data.

From the above table it can be inferred that 67.4% of the respondents are aware of emotional intelligence and 32.6% of the respondents are not aware of emotional intelligence.

35

Table 4. 4: Respondents Opinion on Self Awareness Not at all SELF AWARENESS no Iam able to recognize my emotions I do not lose control when i 24 am angry I am aware of the impact my moods have on another people Iam able to express my emotions in an 2 appropriate manner Iam aware of situations that 2 cause me to think negatively % To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 30 % 17.2 no 59 % 54.0 no 22 % no % 100 13.8 23 14.9

100 16.1 40 34.5 37 28.7 21 12.6 10 8.0

100 20 8.0 54 50.6 40 29.9 20 11.5

2.3

38

32.2

46

29.9

61

35.6

100

2.3

31

23.0

45

40.2

35

21.8 21

12.6

100

From the above table it is clear that 54.0% respondents are able to recognize the emotions to some extent. 34.5% respondents are able to control their angry to some extent 50.6% respondents are aware of the impact their moods have on another people to some extent 35.6% respondents are able to express their emotions in an appropriate manner to a great extent 40.2% respondents are aware of situations that cause them to think negatively to some extent Chart 4.1 respondents opinion on self awareness

36

120 100 80 60 40 To a very great extent 20 0 To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

Table4. 5: Respondents Opinion on Emotional Resilience Not at all EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE I act decisively when faced with a tough decision no 8 5.7 44 27.6 48 32.2 47 31.0 3 3.4 100 % To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no % no % no % no %

37

including staff issues I am able to perform consistently when 26 under pressure I am able to press my case in the face of opposition 29 Iam able to deal with challenge or criticism

18.4

6.9

60

56.3

11

12.6 18

5.7

100

21.8

39

33.3

28

20.7

9.2

33

14.9

100

10.3

41 40

35.6 34.5

35 29

28.7 21.8

9 5

10.3 5.7

23 23

14.9 14.9

100

I regulate my work/life balance 20 in order Source: Primary data.

23.0

100

From the above table it is clear that 32.2% respondents can act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues to some extent 56.3 % respondents are able to perform consistently when under pressure to some extent 33.3% respondents are able to press their case in the face of opposition to a little extent 35.6% respondents are able to deal with challenge or criticism to a little extent 34.5%respondents can regulate their work/life balance in order

Chart 4.2 respondents opinion on emotional resilence

38

120 100 80 60 40 20 0 To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

Table4. 6: Respondents Opinion on Inter-personal sensitivity Not at all INTER_PERSON AL no % SENSITIVITY Before Making decision I listen to 1.1 1 the view of others I am aware when 9.2 others are upset 8 I am able to put myself in others 31 shoes and knowledge their feelings I achieve buy in to decisions and 1 ideas for action I take into account the input received from others when 2 making a decision Source: Primary data. To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 24 31 % 16.1 24.1 no 28 42 % 20.7 36.8 no 36 23 % no % 17.2 100 14.9 23 14.9 100 22 24.1 22 1.1 18 2.3 9.2 13.8 46 40 41.4 34.5 39 21.8 35 27.2 100 39 31.8 6 6.9 13.8 38 32.2 23 14.9 23 14.9 100

29.9 25

100

39

From the above table it is clear that 29.9% respondents listen to the view of others before make a decision to a great extent. 36.8% respondents are aware when others are upset to some extent 32.2% respondents are able to put their shelf in others shoes and knowledge their feelings to a little extent 41.4% respondents can achieve buy in to decisions and ideas for action to some extent 34.5% respondents can take into account the input received from others when making a decision to some extent.

Chart 4.3 respondents opinion on inter personal-sensitivity


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

40

Table4.7: Respondents Opinion on influence Not at all INFLUENCE no I listen to the perspective of others before 4 trying to persuade them I provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade 2 others I do not have difficulty persuading others to change their 3 viewpoint I receive a positive response to my views on 6 direction and goals I make sure I know where others are coming 2 from before trying to persuade them Source: Primary data. % 4.6 To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 24 % 27.6 no 37 % 42.5 no 9 % no 16.3 13 % 14.9 100

2.3

10

11.5

26

29.9

21

24.1 15

17.2 100

15 3.4 17 6.9 20 2.3

17.2

33

37.9

21

24.1 2

2.3 100

19.5

28

32.2

18

20.7 5

5.7 100

23.0

34

39.1

16

18.4 2

2.3 100

From the above table it is clear that 42.5% respondents can listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them to some extent 29.9% respondents can provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others to some extent. 37.9%respondents do not have difficulty persuading others to change their viewpoint to some extent. 32.2%respondents can receive a positive response to their views on direction and goals to some extent 39.1% respondents can make sure that they know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them to some extent.

41

Chart 4.4 respondents opinion on influence


90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

Table4.8: Respondents Opinion on Intuitiveness Not at all INTUITIVENES S no I make decisions quickly when 16 necessary I can make decisions without 14 waiting for all the information I am prepared to act upon my inner 10 judgement I am happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous I feel comfortable with risk % 18.4 To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 6 % 6.9 no 28 % 32.2 no 17 % no 19.5 7 % 8.0 100 16.1 16 18.4 34 39.1 3 3.4 7 8.0 100 28 11.5 16 12 13.8 13 10 11.5 14.9 20 23.0 27 31.0 4 4.6 100 18.4 22 25.3 19 21.8 5 5.7 100 32.2 28 32.2 8 9.2 13 14.9 100

Source: Primary data.

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From the above table it is clear that 32.2% respondents can make decisions quickly when necessary to some extent. 39.1%respondents can make decisions without waiting for all the information to some extent 32.2% respondents can prepare to act upon their inner judgement to some extent 25.3%respondents are happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous to some extent 31.0%respondents are feel comfortable with risk to a great extent.

Chart 4.5 respondents opinion on intutiveness


120 100 80 60 40 20 0 To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

43

Table4.9: Respondents Opinion on Conscientiousness Not at all CONSCIENTIOU SNESS no I adhere to expected standards of personal conduct I adhere to prevailing ethical norms when making business 1 decisions I pursue an etical solution to a difficult business issue I lead by example I demonstrate integrity and honesty Source: Primary data. % To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 30 % 23.0 no 31 % 24.1 no 36 % no 29.9 7 % 8.0 100 1.1 11 12.1 39 33.3 48 43.7 5 5.7 100

33 29 32 -

26.4

28

20.7

33

26.4 8

9.2 100

21.8

33

26.4

32

25.3 20

11.5 100

13.8

31

27.6

26

18.4 32

25.3 100

From the above table it is clear that 29.9% respondents can adhere to expected standards of personal conduct to a great extent 43.7% respondents can adhere to prevailing ethical norms when making business decisions to a great extent 26.4%respondents can pursue an ethical solution to a difficult business issue to some extent 26.4% respondents can lead by example to some extent 27.6% respondents can demonstrate integrity and honesty to some extent

44

Chart 4.6 respondents opinion on conscientiousness


90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

Table 4.10: Respondents Opinion on Job Performance Not at all JOB PERFORMANCE no I can able to perform job better even Iam in burn out condition Do you successfully complete projects and meet deadlines Are you satisfied with the existing job environment Does your supervisor assist you in completing 19 the job when you are at problem I feel secure about my continued employment at 1 this organization % To a little To some To a great To a very Total extent extent extent great extent no 19 % 10.3 no 37 % 31.0 no 23 % no 36.4 15 % 27.2 100

13

13.4

31

24.1

49

44.8 19

12.6 100

13 19 10.3 2 1.1

13.4

29

21.8

39

33.3 29

21.8 100

10.3

31

24.1

43

37.9 2

2.3 100

2.3

25

28.7

39

44.8 7

8.0 100

45

Iam clear about what I need to do and how my job performance will be evaluated I have the resources I need 5 to do my job Source: Primary data.

2 3 5.7

2.3

38

32.2

49

44.8 5

5.7

100

3.4

39

44.8

21

24.1 6

6.9

100

From the above table it is clear that 31.0% respondents can able to perform job better even in burn out condition to some extent 44.8% respondents can successfully complete projects and meet deadlines to a great extent 33.3%respondents are satisfied with the existing job environment to a great extent 37.9% respondents says that their supervisor assist in completing the job when they are at problem 44.8% respondents can feel secure about their continued employment at this organization to a great extent. 44..8%respondents can clear about what they need to do and how their job performance will be evaluated to a great extent 44.8% respondents have the resources that need to do their job to some extent Chart 4.7 respondents opinion on job performance
90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

To a very great extent To a great extent To some extent To a little extent Not at all

46

4.2 FACTOR ANALYSIS 4.2.1 FACTORS AFFECTING SELF AWARENESS This part of the analysis helps to reduce a vast number of variables to meaningful interpretable and manageable factors. This analysis is to use find the major factors that cause Self awareness Table 4. 11KMO and Bartlett's Test
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .662 137.324 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.662, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis. Table 4.12 Communalities
Initial Extraction .721 .646 .752 .640 .887

I am able to recognise my emotions I do not lose control when i am angry I am aware of the impact my moods have on other people I am able to express my emotions in an appropriate manner I am aware of situations that cause me to think negatively

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the initial value of the communalities should be 1 and the minimum accepted value is 0.5. It is observed from the table that all parameters are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 2 components are extracted through the principal component analysis.

47

Table 4.13: Total Variance Explained


Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5 2.615 1.031 .685 .421 .248 % of Cumulative % Variance 52.295 52.295 20.611 13.705 8.422 4.966 72.906 86.611 95.034 100.000 Extraction Sum of squared Variations

2.615 1.031

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the percentage of variance by each component. Since only those components whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered. The 2 components have been taken as the factors which constitute 72.90%of variance of the aggregate parameter.

Chart 4.8 Scree plot

From the above scree plot the numbers of components extracted are the 2 factors.

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Table 4.14 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 2 Iam aware of situations that cause me to think negatively Iam aware of the impact my moods have on other people Iam able to recognise my emotions Iam able to express my emotions in an appropriate manner i do not lose control when Iam angry .939 .789 .747 .133 .154 .076 .360 .404 .789 .789

FACTOR 1: y y y FACTOR 2: Iam aware of the situations that cause me to think negatively Iam aware of the impact of my moods have on another people Iam able to recognize my emotions

y y

Iam able to express my emotions in an appropriate manner I do not lose control when Iam angry

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more in self awareness

4.2.2 FACTORS AFFECTING EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE

Table 4.15 KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .612 134.704 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.612, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis.

49

Table 4.16 Communalities


Initial Extraction .690 .789 .768 .845 .681

I act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues I am able to perform consistently when under pressure I am able to press my case in the face of opposition I am able to deal with challenge or criticism I regulate my work\life balance in order to be resilient

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the initial value of the communalities should be 1 and the minimum accepted value is 0.5. It is observed from the table that all parameters are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 2 components are extracted through the principal component analysis. Table 4.17: Total Variance Explained
Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5 2.742 1.032 .541 .488 .198 % of Cumulative % Variance 54.833 20.631 10.817 9.750 3.969 54.833 75.464 86.281 96.031 100.000 2.742 1.032 Extraction Sum of squared Variations

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components

whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered .The 2 components has been taken as factors which constitute 75.46% of variance of the aggregate parameter.

50

Chart 4.9Scree plot

From the above scree plot the number of components extracted are the 2 factors.

Table 4.18 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 2 .061 .263 .886 .691 .689

i am able to deal with challenge or criticism i am able to press my case in the face of opposition i am able to perform consistently when under pressure i regulate my work\life balance in order to be resilient i act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues FACTOR 1: y y Iam able to deal with challenge or criticism Iam able to press my case in the face of opposition

.917 .836 .062 .450 .464

51

FACTOR 2: y y I regulate my work/life balance in order to be resilient I act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more in emotional resilience 4.2.3 FACTORS AFFECTING INTER-PERSONAL SENSITIVITY

Table 4.19 KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .647 143.023 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.647, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis. Table 4.20 Communalities
Initial Extraction .474 .670 .716 .149 .734

Before making a decision i listen to the view of others Iam aware when others are upset Iam able to put myself in others shoes and acknowledge their feelings I achieve 'buy in' decision and ideas for action I take into account the input received from others when making a decision

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the communalities initial value should be 1 and the minimum acceptable value is 0.5. It is observed from the above table that all parameter are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 1 component is extracted through the principal component analysis.

52

Table 4.21: Total Variance Explained


Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5 2.744 .947 .781 .335 .193 % of Cumulative % Variance 54.875 18.941 15.611 6.707 3.867 54.875 73.816 89.426 96.133 100.000 2.744 Extraction Sum of squared Variations

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components considered .The 1 component has been taken as whose Eigen values are more than 1 are

factors which constitute 54.87% of variance of the aggregate parameter. Chart 4.10 Scree plot

From the above screen plot the number of components extracted is 1 factor

53

Table 4.22 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1

I take into account the input received from others when making a decision Iam able to put myself in others shoes and acknowledge their feelings Iam aware when others are upset before making a decision i listen to the view of others I achieve 'buy in' decision and ideas for action FACTOR 1: y y y

.857 .846 .819 .689 .387

I taken into account the input received from others when making a decision I am able to put myself in others shoes and acknowledge their feelings I am aware when others are upset

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more in inter-personal sensitivity

4.2.4 FACTORS AFFECTING INFLUENCE

Table 4.23 KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .601 42.214 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.601, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis.

54

Table 4.24 Communalities


Initial I listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them I provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others I do not have difficulty persuading others to change their viewpoint I receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals I make sure I know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 Extraction .497 .619 .664 .610 .714

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the communalities initial value should be 1 and the minimum acceptable value is 0.5. It is observed from the above table that all parameter are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 2 component is extracted through the principal component analysis. Table 4.25: Total Variance Explained
Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5 1.866 .1.239 .751 .676 .468 % of Cumulative % Variance 37.311 24.779 15.027 13.525 9.358 37.311 62.090 77.117 90.642 100.000 1.866 1.239 Extraction Sum of squared Variations

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components

whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered .The 2 components has been taken as factors which constitute 62.09% of variance of the aggregate parameter.

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Chart 4.11 Scree plot

From the above scree plot the number of components extracted are the 2 factors

Table 4.26 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 I receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals I provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others I listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them I do not have difficulty persuading others to change their .837 .775 .671 .192 .008 Component 2 126 139 218 815 771

viewpoint I make sure i know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them

FACTOR 1: y y y I receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals I provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others I listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them

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FACTOR 2: y y I do not have difficulty persuading others to change their viewpoint I make sure i know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more on influence

4.2.5 FACTORS AFFECTING INTUITIVENESS

Table 4.27 KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .554 42.248 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.554, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis. Table 4.28 Communalities
Initial I make decisions quickly when necessary I can make decisions without waiting for all the 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 Extraction .436 .860 .539 .690 .491

information Iam prepared to act upon my inner judgement


I am happy to make decisions even if the given information

is ambiguous I feel comfortable with risk

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The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the communalities initial value should be 1 and the minimum acceptable value is 0.5. It is observed from the above table that all parameter are well defined by the extracted factor.

Thus the 2 components are extracted through the principal component analysis.

Table 4.29: Total Variance Explained


Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5
1.880 1.136 .873 .674 .437

Extraction Sum of squared Variations

% of Cumulative % Variance
37.605 22.723 17.450 13.475 8.747 37.605 60.328 77.778 91.253 100.000

1.880 1.136

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components

whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered .The 2 components has been taken as factors which constitute 60.32% of variance of the aggregate parameter.

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Chart 4.12 Scree plot

From the above screen plot the number of components extracted are 2 factors.

Table 4.30 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 I receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals I provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others I listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them I do not have difficulty persuading others to change their
.718 .690 .630 .595

Component 2
114 .122 .196 .923

viewpoint I make sure i know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them

.405

.660

FACTOR 1: y y y Iam happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous I feel comfortable with risk I make decisions quickly when necessary

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FACTOR 2: y y I can make decisions without waiting for all the information Iam prepared to act upon my inner judgment

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more on intutiveness

4.2.6 FACTORS AFFECTING CONSCIENTIOUSNESS

Table 4.31 KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .799 123.762 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.799, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis. Table 4.32 Communalities
Initial I adhere to expected standards of personal conduct I adhere to prevailing ethical norms when making business Extraction

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

.708 .520 .690 .627 .373

decisions I pursue an ethical solution to a difficult business issue


I lead by example I demonstrate integrity and honesty

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the communalities initial value should be 1 and the minimum acceptable value is 0.5. It is observed from the above table that all parameter are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 1 component is extracted through the principal component analysis.

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Table 4.33: Total Variance Explained


Component Initial Eigen values Total 1 2 3 4 5
2.918 .783 .594 .411 .295

Extraction Sum of squared Variations

% of Cumulative % Variance
58.358 15.661 11.873 8.213 5.895 58.358 74.018 85.891 94.105 100.000

2.918

The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components

whose Eigen values are more than 1 are considered .The 1 components has been taken as factors which constitute 58.35.% of variance of the aggregate parameter.

Chart 4.13 Scree plot

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From the above scree plot the number of components extracted is 1 factor.

Table 4.34 Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 I adhere to expected standards of personal conduct I pursue an ethical solution to a difficult business issue I lead by example I adhere to prevailing ethical norms when making business
.841 .831 .792 .721 .611

decisions I demonstrate integrity and honesty

FACTOR 1: y y y I adhere to expected standards of personal conduct I pursue an ethical solution to a difficult business issue I lead by example

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more on conscientiousness

4.2.7 FACTORS AFFECTING JOB PERFORMANCE

Table 4.35KMO and Bartlett's Test


Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy. Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square Df Sig. .587 121.783 10 .000

From above table it can be inferred that KMO value is 0.587, which is adequate to conduct factor Analysis.

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Table 4.36 Communalities


Initial I can able to perform job better even iam in burn out Extraction
.784 .533 .774 .765

1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000


1.000 1.000

condition do you successfully complete projects and meet deadlines are you satisfied with the existing job environment does your supervisor assist you in completing the job when you are at problem I feel secure about my continued employment at this organization Iam clear about what i need to do and how my job performance will be evaluated I have the resources i need to do my job

.646

.690 .735

The above table shows the communalities defined for each parameter based on the extracted factor. Therefore the communalities initial value should be 1 and the minimum acceptable value is 0.5. It is observed from the above table that all parameter are well defined by the extracted factor. Thus the 3 components are extracted through the principal component analysis.

Component

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Table 4.37: Total Variance Explained Initial Eigen values Extraction Sum of squared Variations Total % of Cumulative % Variance 2.398 34.256 34.256 2.398 1.370 19.575 53.831 1.370 1.158 16.549 70.379 1.158 .816 11.659 82.038 .673 9.617 91.655 .333 4.761 96.416 .251 3.584 100.000

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The above table shows the most important representation of factor analysis as it is defined by the Percentage of variance by each component. Since only these components

whose Eigen values are more than 3 are considered .The 3 components has been taken as factors which constitute 70.37% of variance of the aggregate parameter.

Chart 4.14 Scree plot

From the above scree plot the number of components extracted is 1 factor.

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Table 4.38Rotated Component Matrix


component 1 Component 2 component 3

do you successfully complete projects and meet deadlines Iam clear about what i need to do and how my job performance will be evaluated I can able to perform job better even Iam in burn out condition I feel secure about my continued employment at this organization does your supervisor assist you in completing the job when you are at problem are you satisfied with the existing job environment I have the resources i need to do my job

.873 .790 -.070 .091 .297 -.106 .500

-.024 .233 .804 .758 .606 .109 .051

-.046 .103 .364 -.252 .278 .867 .695

FACTOR 1:   Do you successfully complete projects and meet deadlines Iam clear about what I need to do and how my job performance will be evaluated FACTOR 2:    I can able to perform job better even Iam in burn out condition I feel secure about my continued employment at this organization Does your supervisor assist you in completing the ob when you are at a problem FACTOR 3:   Are you satisfied with existing job environment I have the resources I need to do my job

Thus these are the major factors in which the organisation must concentrate more in job performance

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4.3 CHI- SQUARE This part of the analysis deals with the relationship between emotional intelligence and job performance To test the relationship between the aware of the situations that cause to think negatively and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis H1: There is no significant relationship between aware of situations that cause to think negatively and complete projects and meet deadlines The Chi-square results are shown below Table 4.39 Relationship between aware of situations that cause to think negatively and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between aware of situations that cause to think negatively and complete projects and meet deadlines. Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.008 Result Reject

The P value is 0.008.so there is a relationship between aware of situations that cause to think negatively and complete projects and meet deadlines To test the relationship between the able to deal with challenge or criticism and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis H2: There is no significant relationship between able to deal with challenge or criticism and complete projects and meet deadlines The Chi-square results are shown below

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Table 4.40 Relationship between able to deal with challenge or criticism and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between able to deal with challenge or criticism and complete projects and meet deadlines Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.004 Result Reject

The P value is 0.004.so there is a relationship between able to deal with challenge or criticism and complete projects and meet deadlines To test the relationship between the taken into account the input received from others when making a decision and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis H3: There is no significant relationship between taken into account the input received from others when making a decision and complete projects and meet deadlines The Chi-square results are shown below Table 4.41 Relationship between taken into account the input received from others when making a decision and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between taken into account the input received from others when making a decision and complete projects and meet deadlines Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.003 Result Reject

The P value is 0.003.so there is a relationship between taken into account the input received from others when making a decision and complete projects and meet deadlines To test the relationship between the receive a positive response to views on direction and goals and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis H4: There is no significant relationship between receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals and complete projects and meet deadlines

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The Chi-square results are shown below Table 4.42 Relationship between receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals and complete projects and meet deadlines Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.005 Result Reject

The P value is 0.005.so there is a relationship between receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals and complete projects and meet deadlines To test the relationship between the happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis H5: There is no significant relationship between happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and complete projects and meet deadlines The Chi-square results are shown below Table 4.43 Relationship between happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and complete projects and meet deadlines Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.001 Result Reject

The P value is 0.001.so there is no relationship between happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and complete projects and meet deadlines To test the relationship between the adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and complete projects and meet deadlines the chi-square test has been done by framing null hypothesis

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H5: There is no significant relationship between adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and complete projects and meet deadlines The Chi-square results are shown below Table 4.44 Relationship between adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and complete projects and meet deadlines Particular Relationship between adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and complete projects and meet deadlines Source: Primary data. Significance Value 0.049 Result Reject

The P value is 0.049.so there is relationship between adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and complete projects and meet deadlines

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CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSION

5.1 FINDINGS The results of the demographic profile of the respondents are as follows,

5.1.1 Demographic Profile of Respondent: The results of the demographic profile of the respondent are as follows: y y Majority (51.4%) of the respondents belong to the age group more than 50. Majority (46.8%) of the respondents belong to the pay group of Rs.10001 Rs.15000.

5.1.2 Awareness of emotional intelligence y 67.4% of the respondents are aware of emotional intelligence and 32.6% of the respondents are not aware of emotional intelligence. 5.1.3 Self awareness y y y Majority( 54.0%)of respondents are able to recognize the emotions Most (34.5%)of respondents are able to control their angry Most (50.6%) of respondents are aware of the impact their moods have on another people y Most( 35.6%) of respondents are able to express their emotions in an appropriate manner y Most (40.2%)of respondents are aware of situations that cause them to think negatively

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5.1.4 Emotional resilience y Most (32.2%) of respondents can act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues y Majority (56.3 %) of respondents are able to perform consistently when under pressure y y y Most (33.3%)of respondents are able to press their case in the face of opposition Most ( 35.6%)of respondents are able to deal with challenge or criticism Most (34.5%)of respondents can regulate their work/life balance in order

5.1.3Inter-personal sensitivity y y y Most (29.9%) of respondents listen to the view of others before make a decision Most (36.8%) of respondents are aware when others are upset Most (32.2%)of respondents are able to put their shelf in others shoes and knowledge their feelings y y Most (41.4%)of respondents can achieve buy in to decisions and ideas for action Most (34.5%) of respondents can take into account the input received from others when making a decision. 5.1.4Influence y Most(42.5%)of respondents can listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them y Most(29.9%)of persuade others y Most(37.9%)of respondents do not have difficulty persuading others to change their viewpoint y Most(32.2%)of respondents can receive a positive response to their views on direction and goals y Most(39.1%)of respondents can make sure that they know where others are coming from before trying to persuade them respondents can provide a rationale for change when trying to

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5.1.5 Intuitiveness y y Most(32.2%)of respondents can make decisions quickly when necessary Most( 39.1%)of respondents can make decisions without waiting for all the information Most(32.2%)of respondents can prepare to act upon their inner judgement y Most(25.3%)of respondents are happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous y Most(31.0%)of respondents are feel comfortable with risk .

5.1.6 Conscientiousness y y Most (29.9%)of respondents can adhere to expected standards of personal conduct Most(43.7%)of respondents can adhere to prevailing ethical norms when making business decisions y y y Most( 26.4%)of respondents can pursue an etical solution to a difficult business issue Most(26.4%)of respondents can lead by example Most( 27.6%)of respondents can demonstrate integrity and honesty .

5.1.7 Job performance y y y y Most(31.0%)of respondents can able to perform job better even in burn out condition Most(44.8%) of respondents can successfully complete projects and meet deadlines Most(33.3%)of respondents are satisfied with the existing job environment Most(37.9%)of respondents says that their supervisor assist in completing the job when they are at problem y Most(44.8%) of respondents can feel secure about their continued employment at this organization y Most( 44.8%)of respondents can clear about what they need to do and how their job performance will be evaluated y Most( 44.8%)of respondents have the resources that need to do their job

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5.2 Factor analysis y The major factor which affects the self awareness are namely aware of the situations that cause to think negatively, aware of the impact of moods have on another people and able to recognize my emotions. y The factor which affects the emotional resilience are namely able to deal with challenge or criticism, able to press my case in the face of opposition. y The factors which affects the inter personal sensitivity are namely, take into account the input received from others when making a decision, able to put myself in others shoes and acknowledge their feelings, aware when others are upset. y The factors which affect the influence are namely, receive a positive response to views on direction and goals, provide a rationale for change when trying to persuade others, and listen to the perspective of others before trying to persuade them. y The factors which affect intuitiveness are namely happy to make decision even if the given information is ambiguous feel comfortable with risk, and make decisions quickly when necessary. y The factors which affects the conscientiousness are namely, adhere to expected standards of personal conduct, pursue an ethical solution to a difficult business issue, and lead by example y The factors which affects the job performance are namely clear about what I need to do and how my job performance will be evaluated

5.3 Relationship between emotional intelligence and job performance y There is a relationship between the aware of situations that cause me to think negatively and successfully complete jobs and meet deadlines. y There is a relationship between able to deal with challenge or criticism and successfully complete projects and meet deadlines y There is a relationship between take into account the input received from others making a decision and successfully complete projects and meet deadlines y There is a relationship between happy to make decisions even if the given information is ambiguous and successfully complete projects and meet deadlines. y There is a relationship between receive a positive response to my views on direction and goals and successfully complete projects and meet deadlines

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There is a relationship between adhere to expected standards of personal conduct and successfully complete projects and meet deadlines

5.4 RECOMMENDATIONS y It is recommended to provide a meditation class for the employees as most of the employees are sensitive in nature which may lead to degradation of their job performance y It is recommended to provide emotional intelligence training to the employees along with the normal training programs y It is recommended to arrange seminars and emotional intelligence awareness programs to the employees by outside experts frequently.

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REFERENCES

JOURNAL y Zubin R.Mulla (2011). Do emotionally intelligent people do well in all jobs? Exploring the moderating role of inter-personal interaction, The Journal of Business Perspective. Vol.14. No.4 y Khurram Shahzad, Muhammad Sarmad, Muhammad Abbas and Muhammad Amanullah Khan (2010). Impact of Emotional Intelligence (EI) on employees performance in telecom sector of Pakistan, African Journal of Business Management Vol.5 (4), pp. 1225-1231 y Praveen M. Kulkarni, B. Janakiram, D.N.S. Kumar (2009). Emotional Intelligence and Employee Performance as an Indicator for Promotion, a Study of Automobile Industryin the City of Belgaum, Karnataka, India, International Journal of Business and management, Vol.4, No.4 y Hassan, Scholar Saeid, Sirous Korahi (2010). Impact of Emotional Intelligence on Performance of Employees, Postmodern Openings, Year 1, No.4, Vol 4 No.4, Vol 4 y Belal A. Kaifi, Selaiman A. Noori, (2010). Organizational Management: A Study on Middle Managers,Gender, and Emotional Intelligence Levels, Journal of Business Studies Quarterly2010, Vol. 1, No. 3, pp. 13-23 y C. Jayan (2006). Emotional Competence, Personality and Job Attitudes asPredictors of Job Performance, Journal of the Indian Academy of AppliedPsychology,February 2006, Vol. 32, No.2, 135-144 y Stphane Ct (2006). Emotional Intelligence, Cognitive Intelligence,and Job Performance, Administrative Science Quarterly, 51 : 128 y Gail Kinman, Louise Grant, (2010). Emotional intelligence, reflective abilities and wellbeing in social workers and related skills in predicting wellbeing and performance in social work practice project report, A Centre for Excellence inTeaching and Learning. y Craig R. Seal , richard e. boyatzis , james r. bailey (2006). Fostering Emotional and Social Intelligence in Organizations, Organization Management Journal Linking Theory & Practice: EAM White Papers Series 2006 Vol. 3, No. 3, 190-209

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BOOKS y Dalip singh (2003), Emotional intelligence at work: A Professional Guide ,Saga publications pvt Ltd. y Daniel Goleman (1996), Emotional intelligence :why it can matter more than IQ, bloomsburg publishing. y Babara.A.kerr(2009), Connecting emotional intelligence to success in the work place, HRDQ

WEBSITES
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101027153041.htm http://www.businessballs.com/eq.htm http://www.eiconsortium.org/reports/what_is_emotional_intelligence.html http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCDV_59.htm http://www.allaboutprosperity.com/articles/emotional-intelligence.htm http://www.bimite.co.in/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence http://psychology.about.com/od/personalitydevelopment/a/emotionalintell.htm

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APPENDIX-1 QUESTIONNAIRE Dear Respondent, I Mahaalakshmi.N doing first year MBA at Sri Ramakrishna Engineering College, Coimbatore, have undertaken a project study on EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ITS IMPACT ON JOB PERFORMANCE in your company. I would kindly make it convenient to spare your valuable time for filling up the below furnished questionnaire. I assumed that the data collected through this questionnaire shall be kept confidential and will be used for project purpose only. 1. Name 2. Age : a) Below 25 3. Gender: a) Male 4. Designation: 5. Years of experience: a) less than 5 b) 5 to 10 6. Department: a) Human resource b) Manufacturing C) others c) 11 to 20 d) more than 20 b) Female ________________________ b) 25 to 30 c) 31 to 40 d) 41 to 50 e) more than 50 : _______________________

if Manufacturing mention a) quality assurance b) plant services c) stores d) tool room

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7. Monthly income: a) Less than 5000 e)Above 20000 8. Do you aware of emotional intelligence? a) Yes b) No b)5000-10000 c)10000-15000 d)15000-20000

Please rate yourself on the following scale

1 = Not at all 2 = To a little extent 3 = To some extent 4 = To a great extent 5 = To a very great extent Not at all To a little extent To some extent 1 1 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 To a great extent To a very great extent 4 5 4 5 4 5

Self Awareness

9 I am able to recognise my emotions 10 I do not lose control when I am angry 11 I am aware of the impact my moods have on other people

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12 I am able to express my emotions in an appropriate manner 13 I am aware of situations that cause me to think negatively

1 1

2 3 2 3

4 5 4 5

Emotional Resilience 14 I act decisively when faced with a tough decision including staff issues 15 I am able to perform consistently when under pressure 16 I am able to press my case in the face of opposition 17 I am able to deal with challenge or criticism 18 I regulate my work/life balance in order to be resilient 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 5 4 5