C H A P T E R 24

Performance Appraisal
OVERCOMING APPRAISAL INTERVIEW
D I F F I C U L T I E S
Feedback- the greatest tool a manager has
for changing behavior, must be given in an
appropriate manner.

B e f o r e t h e I n t e r v i e w
‡ Make sure that the conditions mentioned
previously have been met and he or she has a
copy of the appraisal form.
‡ Select an appropriate time for the appraisal
conferences
‡ Give the employee a two- to three-day
advance notice of the scheduled appraisal
conference so he or she can be prepared
mentally and emotionally for the interview.
‡ Be personally prepared mentally and
emotionally for the conference
‡ Schedule uninterrupted interview time.
‡ Plan a seating arrangement that reflects
collegiality rather than power.
-Having the person seated across a
large desk from the appraiser
denotes a power²status position;
placing the chairs side by side
denotes collegiality.

D u r i n g t h e I n t e r v i e w
‡ Greet the employee warmly, showing that the
manager and the organization have a sincere
interest in his or her growth.
‡ Begin the conference on a pleasant, informal
note.
‡ Ask the employee to comment on his or her
progress since the last performance appraisal.
‡ Avoid surprises in the appraisal conference.

Cohen (2000) goes so far as to assert that if
the employee first hears about a performance
concern during the appraisal, the manager has
not been doing his or her job.

‡ Use coaching techniques throughout the
conference.
‡ When dealing with an employee who has
several problems³either new or long-
standing³don·t overwhelm him or her at the
conference.
‡ Conduct the conference in a nondirective and
participatory manner.
‡ Focus on the employee·s performance and not
on his or her personal characteristics.
‡ Avoid vague generalities, either positive or
negative, such as ´your skills need a little work··
or ´your performance is fine.··
‡ When delivering performance feedback, be
straightforward and state concerns directly.
‡ Never threaten, intimidate, or use status in
any manner.
‡ Let the employee know that the organization
and the manager are aware of his or her
uniqueness, special interests, and valuable
contributions to the unit.
‡ Make every effort to ensure that there are no
interruptions during the conference.
‡ Use terms and language that are clearly
understood and carry the same meaning for
both parties.
‡ Mutually set goals for further growth or
improvement in the employee·s performance.
‡ Plan on being available for employees to
return retrospectively to discuss the appraisal
review further.

A f t e r t h e I n t e r v i e w
‡ Both the manager and employee need to sign
the appraisal form to document that the
conference was held and that the employee
received the appraisal information.
‡ End the interview on a pleasant note.
‡ Document the goals for further development
that have been agreed on by both parties.
y If the interview reveals specific long-term
coaching needs, the manager should develop a
method of follow-up to ensure such coaching
takes place.

PE R F O RMA NC E MA NA GE ME NT
Some experts in human resource management
have suggested that annual performance
appraisals should be replaced by ongoing
performance management (Coens,Jenkins, &
Block, 2000; Fandray, 2001).



















P e r f o r m a n c e M a n a g e m e n t
-Appraisals are eliminated.
-Instead, the manager places his or her efforts into
ongoing coaching, mutual goal setting, and the
leadership training of subordinates.
-To spend more regularly scheduled face-to-face
time with subordinates.
-´Thus, it is people who are managed, rather than
paper flow··(Fandray, 2001, p. 40).

A n n u a l P e r f o r m a n c e R e v i e w
- performance planning coordinated throughout
the entire organization.
-strategic goals for the year can be identified and
subordinates· roles to achieve those goals can be
openly discussed and planned.

Weizmann also suggests that performance-
managed organizations articulate a set of role-
based competencies and let every employee know
the five or six qualities that define success for every
member of the organization, regardless of job
description.

Then employees can determine how these qualities
translate into performance in specific jobs.
Expectations, then, are not disputable; they are
part of the agreed-upon roles assumed by
subordinates (Fandray, 2001).

COACHING: A MECHANISM FOR INFORMAL
P E R F O R M A N C E A P P R A I S A L
Effective managers and astute leaders
-one of the best methods for improving work
performance and building a team approach.

C o a c h i n g
- contemporary term to convey the spirit of the
manager·s role in informal day-to-day
performance appraisals.
- can guide others into increased competence,
commitment, and confidence as well as helping
them to anticipate options for making vital
connections between their present and future
plans.

C o a c h i n g t e c h n i q u e s
-formal appraisal interview but are especially
effective for encouraging and correcting daily
work performance.

P e r f o r m a n c e c o a c h i n g
-help people through life transitions, can be
instrumental in the mature development of an
individual·s basic values
-can produce high performance in work or other
aspects of people·s lives, can help people develop a
vision and purpose for their endeavors, and can
help with career and life planning (Detmer, 2002;
Robinson-Walker, 2002).

Ref l ec t i ve Pr ac t i c e & C l i ni c a l
Coac hi ng Mant he y ( 2001 )
- to describe a management strategy that fuses
both performance coaching and performance
management.

C l i n i c a l C o a c h i n g
- the manager or mentor meets with an employee
regularly to discuss aspects of his or her work.




















-both individuals determine the agenda jointly
with the goal of an environment of learning
that can span the personal and professional
aspects of the employee·s experience.
-employees can discuss things that have made
them feel angry or discouraged.
-get new ideas and information about how to
deal with situations from someone who often
has experienced the same problems and issues.
-the manager and employee makes the
employee feel validated and part of a larger
team.

C o a c h i n g + I n f o r ma l
p e r f o r ma n c e a p p r a i s a l =
positive modification of behavior. *Leader must
establish a climate in which there is a free
exchange of ideas.

Ma n a g e r i a l S k i l l s -
R o b i n s o n - Wa l k e r ( 2 0 0 2 )
y to succeed and improve work performance.

BECOMI NG EFFECTI VE COACHES:
‡ Be specific, not general, in describing behavior
that needs improvement.
‡ Be descriptive, not evaluative, when
describing what was wrong with the
work performance.
‡ Be certain that the feedback is not self-
serving but meets the needs of the
employee.
‡ Direct the feedback toward behavior that
can be changed.
‡ Use sensitivity in timing the feedback.
‡ Make sure the employee has clearly
understood the feedback and that the
employee·s communication also has been
clearly heard.

INTEGRATING LEADERSHIP ROLES AND
M A N A G E M E N T
F U NC T I O NS I N C O N D U C T I NG
P E R F O R M A N C E A P P R A I S A L S

P e r f o r ma n c e a p p r a i s a l
-major responsibility in the controlling function
of management.
- to conduct meaningful, effective performance
appraisals requires an investment of time,
effort, and practice on the part of the manager.
- it produces growth in the employee and
increases productivity in the organization.
-Integrating leadership into this part of the
controlling phase of the management process
provides an opportunity for sharing,
communicating, and growing.

I NTEGRATE D LEADER²
MANAGER
-is self-aware regarding his or her own biases
and prejudices.
-increases trust in the manager and promotes a
team spirit among employees
- to improve work performance and reduce the
anxiety of performance appraisal.


DULCE A. REYES
BSN IV-OREM
JANUARY 26, 2012
NCM 107
MARIA LUISA H .LOPEZ RC, RN, RM, MAN, DPAC

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