COLONEL- MALCOLM

OF POLTALLOCH

CAMPBELL COLLECTION

ANNALS
OF

THE KINGDOM OF IEELAND,
BY THE FODR MASTERS,
FBOM

THE EARLIEST PERIOD TO THE YEAR
A TRANSLATION, AND COPIOUS

1616.

EDITED FBOM MSS. IN THE LIBRAE! OF THE EOYAL IEISH ACADEMY AND OF TRINITY COLLEGE, DUBLIN, WITH
NOTES,

BY JOHN O'DONOVAN,

LLD., M.E.I.A.,

BARRISTER AT LAW.

" Olim Eegibus parebant, nunc per Principes factionibus et studiis trahuntur : nee aliud adversus validissimas gentes quam quod in commune non consulunt Rarus duabus tribusve civitatibus ad propulsandnm commune periculum conventus ita dum singuli pugnant nniversi vincuntur." TACITUS, c. 12.
pro nobis utUina,
:

AGRIOOLA,

SECOND EDITION.
VOL.
III.

DUBLIN: HODGES, SMITH, AND CO., GRAFTON-STREET,
BOOKSELLERS TO THE UNIVERSITY.

1856.

DUBLIN
Pvintrt at
tt)

:

amUcrsitij ^'Jitss,

BT

M. H. GILL.

B

emeam
QO1S CflttlOSO
1172.
at)6.

Qoip Chpiopo mile ceo peachcmojac

U(X CaCllCllN comapba TTlaeo6i 5 DO ecc. ae&a ua rmn&in (t>o muincip aipi& loca con) eppcop copcaije ecc peap Ian Oo pach Oe eippibe, cuip oije a^up fgna a cumpipe.
8

t>o

O'Cahan
but
it is

O'Kane, O'Carliam.-Thisnameisanglicised in old law documents, inquisitions, &c.,
at present

of the monasteries are mentioned, as O'Farrelly,

Comharba of St. Mogue, Comharba of
St.

at

Drumlane O'Fergus,
;

north of Ireland,
families of the

made O'Kane, or Kane, in the and the form O'Kane is adopted
in Ireland, of

throughout this translation. There were several

Mogue, at Rossinver ; but when the Bishop of Ferns is meant, he is simply called Comharba of St. Mogue, without the addition
of the

name

whom

the

name

most powerful and celebrated were seated in the baronies of Keenaght, Tirkeeran, and Coleraine,
in the present county of

Giolla-Aedha,

of the place. i. e. servant of St. Aodh, or
Giolla occurs so frequently, names of men, that I shall
all,

Aldus.

The word
it

Londonderry

;

but

it

as the first part of the

would not appear that the ecclesiastic, whose death is here recorded, was of this sept.
b

explain

here, once for

on the authority of
ancients,
;

Colgan.

Giolla, especially

among the

Successor of Maidoc, Maodhog, or Aedhan,
anglicised

signified a youth,

now

Bishop of used in these Annals to denote Bishop of Ferns.

Mogue and Aidan, was the first Ferns, and successor of Maodhog is
signifies

and hence

it

but now generally a servant happened that families who were
call their

devoted to certain saints, took care to

The word comapba
ecclesiastical or lay,

successor, either

sons after them, prefixing the word Giolla, intimating that they were to be the servants or

these Annals.

but generally the former in There were two other ecclesias-

devotees of those saints.

tical establishments,

called

the abbots of which were Comharbas of Mogue, or Maidoc, viz. Eossinver, in the county of Leitrim, and Drumlane, in the

Shortly after the introduction of Christianity, we meet many names of men formed by prefixing the word Giolla to
the names of the celebrated saints of the
first

age

of the Irish Church, as

Giolla- Ailbhe,

Giolla-

county of Cavan ; but whenever the
to,

abbots of these places are referred

the names

Phatraig, Giolla-Chiarain, which mean servant of St. Ailbhe, servant of St. Patrick, servant of

AOTALS OF THE Km(JDOM OF IEELMD.
THE AGE OF CHKIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1172.

thousand one hundred seventy-two.

successor of Maidoc", died.
c d Giolla Aedha O'Muidhin (of the family of Errew of Lough Con ), Bishop of 6 Cork, died. He was a man full of the grace of God, the tower of the virginity

and wisdom of
St. Kieran.

his time.
be found that there were
Jesus; Giolla-Muire, the servant of Mary. These

And it will

very few saints of celebrity, from whose names those of men were not formed by the prefixing
of Giolla, as Giolla-Ailbhe, Giolla- Aodha, Giolla-

names were

latinized

by some writers

in

modern

times, Marianus, Christianus, Patricianus, Bri-

gidianus, &c. &c.

But when an

adjective, signi-

Aodhain,

Giolla -Breanainn,

Giolla

-

Bhrighde,

Giolla-Chaomain, Giolla-Chainnigh, Giolla-Dachaisse,

fying a colour, or quality of the mind or body, is postfixed to Giolla, then it has its ancient signi-

Giolla -Chaoimhgin,

Giolla -Chiarainn,

Giolla-Dacholmain, Giolla-Choluim, Giolla-Cho-

main, Giolla -Chomghaill, Giolla - Domhangairt,
Giolla-Finnein, Giolla-Fionnain, Giolla-Mochua,
Giolla-Molaisse, Giolla-Moninne, Giolla-Phatruig, &c. &c.

namely, a youth, a boy, or a man in his bloom, as Giolla-dubh, i. e. the black, or blackhaired youth ; Giolla-ruadh, i. e. the red-haired
fication,

youth

;

Giolla -riabhach, the

swarthy youth

;

Giolla-buidhe, the yellow youth; Giolla-odhar, Giolla-Maol, &c. &c.

This word was not only prefixed to the names
of saints, but also to the

name

of God, Christ,

The family the Editor.

name O'Muidhin

is

unknown

to

the Trinity, the Virgin

Mary; and some were
from

named from

saints in general, as well as

d Of Errew of Lough Con, Ctipio 6oca Con, now Errew on Lough Con, in the parish of

the angels in general, as Giolla-na-naomh, i. e. the servant of the saints ; Giolla-na-naingeal,
i. e. the servant of the angels ; Giolla-De, the servant of God; and Giolla-an-Choimhdhe, i. e. the servant of the Lord ; Giolla-na-Trionoide,

Crossmolina, in the barony of Tirawley, and county of Mayo. There was an ancient church

See the year Tighernan 1413. See also Genealogy, &c., of the Hy-Fiachrach, p. 239, note '.
here, dedicated to St.

the servant of the Trinity ; Giolla-Chriost, the servant of Christ ; Giolla- losa, the servant of

The word parh, Grace of God, path oe which is now used to denote prosperity or luck,

e

1

B 2

[1172.

Cicchfpnac ua maoileom corhopba ciapdin cluaria mic noip Do ecc. Cicchfpnan ua Ruaipc acchfpna bpfipne ajup Conmaicne agup pfp curhachca moip ppi pe poca Do rhapbab (.1. rlachcja) la hujo Oe laci Domnall mac Gnnaba ui Ruaipc Dia cenel pepin boi imaille piull agup la
i
i

Ruccpac a cfnn agup a copp 50 Docpaib co an cfnn uap Dopup an ouine ina pcac beapcchach cliac. T?o coccbab cpuaj Do jaoibealaib. T?o cpochab beop an copp ppia hac cliac acuaic
ppiu.

T?o Di'cfnnab e leo.

agup a coppa pnap.

is

translate the Latin

employed throughout the Leabfiar Breac to word gratia, from which the
Tiernagh O^Malone: in the original,dcchfp-

modern word jpapa has been obviously derived.
1

Druim Tiprad See Annals of Inisfallen, at the year 547, and Ussher's Primordia, p. 956, and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol.
ii.

pp. 62-59.
h

nach ua ITIaoileoin
or Cijeapnach, which

The name Cicchlpnach
is

Tiernan

O'Bourke,

<^c.,

Cicchfpnan ua

a lord, and

is

derived fromUijeapna, synonymous with the proper name

Dominic,

pronounced Tiernagh, and shall be so written throughout this translation. The name ITIaoileoin, is written in ancient Irish characters
is

The name Cijfpnan, or Cijjeapnan, Ruaipc. is a diminutive of Ctjeapnach, and may be inIt has been anterpreted "Little Dominic."
glicised
this is the

Tiernan throughout this translation, as form it has assumed in the surname
is still

on a tombstone at Clonmacnoise,

Mac

Tiernan, which

common

in

the

maerjohaiN
i.

eps;

county of

Eoscommon.

Dervorgilla,

in Irish

e.

Mael-Johannis, Bishop.

tDeapBpopgaill, the wife of this Tiernan, who is generally supposed to have been the immediate

'

The word maol, tnael, or moel, like giolla, has two significations, namely, a chief, and a tonsured monk. It was anciently prefixed, like
Giolla, to the

names of
as

names of men,
naill,

saints, to form proper IDaol Colaim, IDaol Seac-

by the English, the monastery of Drogheda, in the year 11 93,. in the eighty-fifth year of her age. She was, therefore, born in the year 1108, and
died
in

cause of the invasion of Ireland

saints

which mean the servant or devotee of the Columb and Secundinus but when an
;

was in her sixty-fourth year at the death of Tiernan, and in her forty-fourth year when
she eloped with Dermot, King of Leinster, in 1152, who was then in the sixty-second year of

adjective

is

post-fixed to MAOL, it has

its

ancient

signification, as
g

Maoldubh,

i.

e.

the black chief.
celebrated
Irish

Kieran,

Ciapdn.

This

saint died in the year 549. Cluain mac nois, or, as it is now anglicised, Clonmacnoise, was a

Dermot was expelled in the seventieth See Dr. O'Conor's Prolegomena year of his age ad Annales, p. 146 ; and also O'Reilly's Essay on
his age.

famous monastery near the Shannon, in the barony of Garry Castle, and King's County. The

the Brehon Laws, where he vainly attempts to clear the character of Dervorgilla from the charge
of having wilfully eloped from her husband. The family of O'TJuaipc, now usually called in English

name
if it

is

sometimes written Cluain

muc

Nois, as

of Nos.

meant the insulated meadow, or pasturage The place was more anciently called

O'Rourke, were anciently Kings of Connaught, but they were put down by the more

1172.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
f
,

Lord of Breifny and Conmaicne, a man of great slain at Tlachtgha by Hugo de power for a long time, was treacherously Annadh O'Rourke, one of his own tribe, who was Lacy and Donnell", the son of beheaded by them, and they conveyed his head and along with them. He was over the gate of the forbody ignominiously to Dublin. The head was placed tress, as a spectacle of intense pity to the Irish, and the body was gibbeted, with
,

Tiernagh O'Malone h Tiernan 0'Rourke

8 successor of Kieran of Clonmacnoise, died.

1

1

the feet upwards, at the northern side of Dublin.

powerful family of the O'Conors, and then be-

local traditions, establishes its identity

with the

came

chiefs of Breifny.

It is stated in the

Book

of Fenagh, that this Tiernan acquired dominion over the entire region extending from sea to sea,
that
is,

The identity of Tlachtgha ancient Tlachtgha. with the Hill of Ward was first proved by the
Editor in a letter

now

from the

sea, at

the borders of Ulster and

nance Survey
tion

Office,

preserved at the OrdPhoenix Park. The situa-

Connaught, to Drogheda. The territories of Breifny and Conmaicne, which comprised Tiernan's principality, would embrace, according to this passage, the counties of Leitrim, Longford,

of Tlachtgha has been already given by Mr. Hardiman in a note to the Statute of Kil-

kenny, p. 84, on the authority of a communication from the Editor.
k

and Cavan, but no part of the county of Meath
or Louth.
'

common among
Dr. Lanigan, in his Ecclesiasti-

Donnell, in the original t)orhnaU, is still the Irish, as the proper name of

Tlachtgha

cal History of Ireland (vol. iv. p. 223), says,

that Tiernan O'Ruairc was slain on a hill not
far

a man, but always anglicised Daniel. The Editor, however, has used the form Donnell throughout this translation, because it is closer to the original
Irish form,

from Dublin, by

Griffin, a

nephew of Mau-

and

is

found in the older law docu-

rice Fitz Gerald. Tlachtgha, however, is not near

Dublin, but was the

name

of a hill

much

cele-

ments, inquisitions, &c., and in the anglicised forms of names of places throughout Ireland, as
well as in the family names, O'Donnell and Donnell.
1

brated in ancient Irish history for the druidic fires lighted there annually on the 1st of No-

Mac

vember, in times of paganism, and described as
situated in that portion of Meath which originally belonged to Munster. It is the place now called

Over

the gate,

was the Danish

fortress of Dublin,

uap oopap an ouine. This which occu-

the Hill of Ward, which
vicinity of
is

lies in

the immediate

pied the greater part of the hill on which the present castle of Dublin stands.

Athboy

in the

county of Meath, as

m The
Lower

northern side of Dublin

The northern
II.

evident from the

fact, that in these annals

side of Dublin, at this time,

was near the present

and other authorities Athboy is often called 6 ui be Claccja, or Athboy of Tlachtgha, to tinguish it from other places of the name
in Ireland. This Hill of Ward
is

Or
dis-

Castle-yard.

At

the arrival of Henry

Athboy

the whole extent of Dublin was, in length, from Corn Market to the Lower Castle-yard ; and, in
breadth, from the Liffey, then covering Essexstreet, to Little Sheep-street,

crowned with a

magnificent ancient rath, consisting of three circumvallations, which, connected with the historical references to the
locality,

now
is

Ship-street,

where a part of the town wall

yet standing.

and the present

Rioghachca

[1173.

Oorhnall o peapgail coipeac Conmaicne Do rhapbab la muinncip pij
Safari.

maipe mac rtiupcaba coipeac muinncipe bipn Do rhapbab la haeb mac Qenjupa a^up la cloinn afoa DO uib eacoac ulab.
TTlaol

OiapmaiD ua cae&laiji Do

ecc.

ITlai&m pop cenel neo^ain pia pplaicbfpcac ua maoloopaib ajjup pia ccenel cconaill. Do bepcpaD ap a&bal poppa cpia naem miopbal De ajup
naerh pacpaicc ajup naerh colaim cille ipa cealla po oipccpfo inDpin. Can cuaipc coiccib Connacc an cfcpamab peace Do cabaipc la giollu

macliacc corhopba pacpaicc ajup Ppforhaib Gpenn, co hapDmacha.

caoipeac cloirine aeilabpa peccaipe chaca TTlonaij Ma plana bacap DO mapbab la Donnplebe ua neochaba pi ulab piull. fcoppa .1. maice ulab Do mapbab OuinDplebe inD.
TTlac

^M^Pf 001 ?

i

"

Chief of Conmaicne

That

is,

of South Con-

of Eochaidh Cobha, to distinguish

it

from Ui

maicne, or Anghaile, which in latter ages comprised the entire of the county of Longford.

Eathach Mumhan, Ui Eathach Muaidhe, and other tribes and districts called Ui Eathach, in
different parts of Ireland.
q

Birn

Mulmurry Mac Murrough, Lord of Muintir The name JTlaolniaipe or TTIuoltnuipe,
the servant of the Virgin.Mary.

signifies

The
;

maio

Dermot G'Kaelly. The Irish name t)iapis anglicised Dermot in the older law do-

name is correctly latinized Marianus, by Colgan but the Editor thinks Mulmurry a more appropriate anglicised form, as it is found in ancient
law documents, inquisitions, &c. Mac Murrougli has also been adopted throughout, as an anglicised

cuments, inquisitions, &c., relating to Ireland, and in the family name Mac Dermot. It is

now

almost invariably rendered Jeremiah, but the Editor prefers the form Dermot, as it comes nearer the original Irish. This family, who now
anglicise their

form of Ulac lTlupcha6a.

Muintir Birn,
terri-

name

Kelly, were located in the

IDumncip bipn, was the ancient name of a

south of ancient Ossory, and were chiefs of the

tory in Tyrone, bordering upon the barony of Trough, in the county of Monaghan.
P

The Clann Aodha of Ui Eathach Uladh

Ui Berchon, now Ibercon, lying the Eiver Barrow, in the county of Kilr along kenny. O'Heerin thus speaks of O'Caelluidhe,
territory of

Claim Aodha,
the tribe

i. e. the clan or race of Hugh, was name of the Magennises and it also became the name of their territory but they
;

or O'Kaelly, in his topographical

poem

:

;

aferwards extended their power over all Ui Ethach Cobha, now the baronies of Upper and

Ui 6eapchon an Bpuic b'uioe; Ri na cpiclie O' Caollaije, Clap na peaona ap cpom oo ril,
Ctn ponti op 6eapb'a bpaom-jil. " Ui Bearchon of the yellow surface King of the district is O'Kaelly,
Plain of the tribe,
;

Lower Iveagh, in the county of Down, and, as O'Dugan informs us, over all Ulidia. Ro jabpac Ulao uile, "They took all Ulidia."
Topographical Poem.

This

territory

was

called
i.

Ui Eathach
descendants

Uladh, or Ui Eathach Cobha,

e.

The land over

who heavily return, the bright-watered Barrow."

1173.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
slain

Donnell O'Farrell, chief of Conmaicne", was
of England.

by the people of the King
slain

Mulmurry Mac Murrough Lord of Muintir Birn, was of Ui Eathach Uladh". gennis and the Claim- Aodha
,

by Hugh Ma-

Dermot O'Kaelly"
r

died.
3

defeated by Flaherty O'Muldorry and the Kinel Conneir. They [the Kinel Connell] made prodigious havoc of them, through the holy miracles of God, of St. Patrick, and St. Columbkille, whose churches

The Kinel Owen were

they [the Kinel
fourth time

Owen] had plundered.
visitation" of the

The complete
of Ireland, to

by Giolla MacLiag Armagh.

province of Connaught was performed the [Gelasius], successor of St. Patrick and Primate

Giolla Epscoip", chief of Clann-Aeilabhra, legislator of Cath Monaigh*, was treacherously slain by Donslevy O'Haughy, king of Ulidia*. The chiefs of
Ulidia,
[i. e.

Mac

who were

as guarantees

between them, put Donslevy

to death for

it

for his crime].
i.

r

Kinel Owen, Cenel n-eojum,

e.

the race

to collect dues, or obtain donations for the erection or repairing of churches or monasteries.
*

of Eoghan, the son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. This Eoghan died in the year 465, and was

Mac

Giolla Epscoip

This name would be

buried at Uisce Chaoin, now Eskaheen, an old church in the barony of Inishowen, in the northeast of the

anglicised

Mac
is

Gillespick,

and

is

the same which

in Scotland

county of Donegal.

This tribe pos-

sessed the present counties of Tyrone

and London-

naigh

derry, and originally the baronies of Inishowen and Raphoe, but these were, in later ages, ceded
to the Kinel Connell.
5

of Cath Mosomewhere in the present county of Down, but its extent or exact situation has not
is

w Cath

now Mac Gillespie. The territory Monaigh

been discovered.
*

Ulidia,

Ulao

Uladh

was

the

original

O'Muldorry, O'lDaoloopaio.

This name no

name

of the entire province of Ulster,

until

longer exists in Tirconnell, but there are a few of the name in Dublin and in Westmeath, who
it Muldarry. Kinel Connell, Cenel cconaill, i. e. the race of Conall or Connell, who died in the year 464,

the fifth century, when it was dismembered by the Hy-Niall, and the name confined solely to

anglicise
c

the present counties of Down and Antrim, which,
after the establishment of surnames,

became the

principality of O'h-Eochadha

and who was the brother of Eoghan, or Owen, ancestor of the Kinel Owen. This tribe possessed, in later ages, the entire of the

O'Haughy), and

his correlatives.

(now anglicised The founders

county of

Tirconnell,
u

now

Donegal.

A visitation,

Cuaipc

A journey performed
by the bishop
or abbot,

of the principality of Oirghialla, or Oriel, in the fourth century, deprived the ancient Ultonians of that part of their kingdom which ex-

into particular districts

tended from Lough Neagh to the Boyne ; and the sons of Niall of the Nine Hostages, in the

Rio^hachca emeaNN.
Cpeac
pill

[1173.

ClnDuib uf ttuaipc, a 5up la Sa^anachaib ap muinncip co pujpac bu, ajup bpoiD net hQnnjaile, agup ap muinncip mejiollsan lomba. Sloijeab leo Dopibipi co hdpoachab Gppcoip TTlel gup po aipjpfc an cfp ap mebon, agup Do pocaip leo oomnall ua peapjail, caoipeac muinnla

mac

cipe hanjaile Don cup pin.

Seanab cleipeac nGpenn la coijeab connacc laechaib cleipchib occ cuaim Da judlann im Ruaibpi ua concobaip ajup im Chabla ua nDubcaij oo coipeapDaD leo. Qipoeppcop Uuama agup cpi ceampaill

aois chraioso
Qoip cpiopo mile,
cfcc,

1173.
cpf.

peachcmojac, a

niuipfbac ua cobraij eppcop Doipe, ajup 17aca bor, mac oije, leacc lojrhop, gfm glomiDe, 17eDla polupca, cipDe caipccfba na hfgna, cpaop cnuapaij na canoine, lap cciobnacal bib agup eDaij Do boccaib agup DO
aibilgneacaib,

lap

noiponeab Saccapc agup Deochon agup aepa jaca

jpaiDh, lap nacnuabujab eacclup niomba, lap ccoippeaccab cempall ajup peljeab, lap

nofnam lolap mamipDpeac ajup pecclep, agup gaca lubpa ecclupcacDa lap mbuaib ccpabaib, oilicpi ajup airpicche. T?o paoib a ppiopaD Do cum nimi nOuibpecclfp colaim cille nOoipe an 10. la Do pebpa.
i i

century, seized upon the northern and western parts of Ulster; so that the ancient inhafifth

their country, -which comprised the entire of the of Longford. According to the

present county

Clanna-Rury and Dal-Fiatachs, were shut up within the bounds of the present counties of Down and Antrim but their counbitants, viz. the
;

O'Farrells derived genealogical Irish MSS., the this tribe name from Anghaile, the great grandfather of Fearghal, from

whom they derived their
is

try,

though circumscribed,

still

retained its an-

cient appellation.

The

writers of Irish history

surname in the tenth century, z Muintir Magilligan, which

usually called

have therefore used the form Ulidia, to denote the circumscribed territory of the Clanna Eury,

Muintir Giollgain throughout these Annals, was the tribe name of the O'Quins of Annaly, who

and Ultonia, to denote

all

Ulster
c.

See O'Flap.

herty's Ogygia, Part III.

78,

372;

also

were seated in the barony of Ardagh, in the present county of Longford, as will be more distinctly

Ussher's Primordia, pp. 816, 1048 ; O'Conor's Dissertations on the History of Ireland, 2nd edit
p.

shewn
a

176
y

;

and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of
ii.

Ireland, vol.

p. 28.

under the year 1234. Mel, Bishop Mel, who was one of Bishop the disciples of St. Patrick, is still the patron sa i n t of the diocese of Ardagh, and the ruins of
in a note
his original

Annaly, or Anghaile, was the tribe name of the O'Farrells, and it also became the name of

church are

still

to

be seen in the

vil-

lage of Ardagh, in the county of Longford.

1173.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
son of

9

The

Annadh O'Rourke and
afterwards

the English treacherously plundered the
z
,

inhabitants of
prisoners.

y Annaly and Muintir Magilligan

They

made

carrying off many cows and another incursion into Ardagh of Bishop
O'Farrell, chief of

Mel",

and ravaged the country generally, and slew Donnell Annaly, on that occasion.

A synod of the

clergy and laity of Ireland was convened at

Tuam,

in the

and Kyley [Catholicus] O'Duffy, province of Connaught, by Roderic O'Conor Archbishop of Tuam, and three churches were consecrated by them.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1173.

thousand one hundred seventy-three.

a son of chastity, a precious a transparent gem, a brilliant star, a treasury of wisdom, and a fruitful stone, branch of the canon, after having bestowed food and raiment upon the poor

Murray O'Coffey", Bishop of Derry and Raphoe,

and the

destitute, after

ecclesiastical

having ordained priests and deacons, and men of every rank, re-built many churches, consecrated many churches and

burial-places,
fulfilled

founded many monasteries and Regles's [i. e. abbey churches], and every ecclesiastical duty and after having gained the palm for piety, pilgrimage, and repentance, resigned his spirit to heaven in the Duibhregles;

of Columbkille, in Derry, on the 10th day of February.
Murray (JCoffey, TTluipfoach ua CoKraij. The name muipeaoach, which is explained
h

A great

miracle

11

erected

1164, by Flaherty O'Brollaghan. Concerning the situation of this old church, see

in

neapna,
is

would appear
it is

by Michael O'Clery, though it be derived from muip, the sea, now obsolete as the proper name of a man, but
a lord, to

Trias T/iaum.,
d

p.

398.

preserved in the surname Murray, and has been anglicised Murray throughout this translation.

The family name O'Cobraij is anglicised Coffey in the northern half of Ireland, but sometimes barbarously, Cow/tiff, in the south. The Editor has adopted O'Coifey

This passage is thus rather loosely, but elegantly, translated by Colgan, in his Annals of Derry: "S. Muredachus O Dubhthaich" [recte O'Cobhthaigh], " Episcopus Dorensis et Robothensis, vir virginitatis, sen
miracle, fyc
castitatis intactas, lapis pretiosus,

A great

gemma

vitrea,

throughout

this

work.

sydus praofulgidum, area et custos Ecclesise sedulus, et conservator canonum Ecclesise ; postquam

The Dubh-Regles was the Duibhregles name of the ancient abbey church founded
by
St.

multos pauperes, et egenos enutrierit ; Prassbyteros, Diaconos, aliosque diuersorum ordinum,

called

Columbkille at Derry ; it was probably Dubh, or black, in contradistinction from

Deo consecrauerit postquam diuersa monasteria
;

et Ecclesias extruxerit,

et consecrauerit

;

post

the

new Templemore,

or

cathedral

church,

palmam

pcenitentise, peregrinationis, abstinentitu

10

[1173.

an oibce Dopca Do poillpiuleo an ba poppel Do na jab o cha lapnieipge co muichDfooil agup an Dap lonnamail caoipe compocpaibe Do'n ooman baoi pibe pop comlapaD ajup an mbaile agup a cocr poipbfp. Ro eipijpfo cac moipe ceneb Do eipgi op

Do

ponaD miopbail mop

ip in oiDche

acbar

.1.

uile,

boi ariilaiD pin le muip uaip anoap leo po ba la boi ann a$up po

anoip.

Conainj ua haenjupa cfnn candnac popa cpe Do ecc. Gccpu ua miabachdn, Gppcop cluana Do ecc ina SeanDacaiD lap nDeccbearhaib. CionaeD ua Ronain Gppcop glinne Da locha Do ecc.
TTlaoiliopu

mac an

baipD Gppcop cluana peapca bpfnainn Do ecc.

TTlaolmochca ua maoilpeacnaill abb cluana mic noip DO ecc. Cpeac mop la haeD mac aenjupa ajup la cloinn ae6a. 17o aipccpfo

& reliqua religiosissima; vitas exercitia ad Dominum migrauitinEcclesiaDorensi,-DMiAn^ nun;

" A. D. 1173. There was English translation: a great miracle shewed in the night he died,
viz.

cupata, die 10 Febr.

Miraculum solemne patradecessit :

tum

est ea nocte

qua

nam a media nocte

the night to brighten from the middest to Cockcrow, and all the world burning, and a

vsque mane tota non solum ciuitas, sed et vicinia ingenti splendore, ad instar iubaris diurni,
circumfusa resplenduit : et columna insuper ignea visa est ex ciuitate ascendere, et versus
orientalem

great flame of fire rising out of the town, and

went East and by South and every body got upp thinking it was day, and was so untill the
;

ay re was cleare."

Austrum

tendere.

Quo

prodigio

Here

it is

to be

remarked that neither

this

excitati ciues tanti spectaculi testes

vsque ad

translator nor Colgan has rendered the phrase

ortum
titere.

solis, et

venerabundi postea prascones exTrias Thaum., p. 504.

Quat. Mag."

The phrase cpaob cnuapaij na canome, " conservator canonum is translated ecclesia;" by Colgan, is more correctly rendered
which

pe muip anoip, which literally means east of the In the Annals of Kilronan, the reading is sea. 7 po boi ariilaio pin co himeal in aieoip,
to the borders of the sky." of pe tnuip anoip is, that the inhabitants of the east coast of Ulster saw the
it

" and

was thus

The meaning

"the

fruitful tree

of the Canon'.' in the old

translation of the Annals of Ulster.

The account of

this miracle is given in the
:

sky illumined over the visible portions of Scotland on the east side of the sea. For the meaning of the preposition le, pe, or pp , in such phrases as pe muip anoip, see the Editor's Irish e Grammar, p. 314, line 1, and p. 439, note , and
1

Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster as follows A. D. 1173. t)o ponao oono mipbuil mop ip in aioce aobar .1. in 06015 Do polupcugas oca
lapmeipji co jaiptn
in

coilij 7 in

ooman

uile

pop lapab 7 coep mop ceineo oeipji op in baile 7 a cocc poipbep 7 eipji DO cac uile in sap leo pob 6 in laa, 7 po boi amlaio pein pe

Cormac's Glossary, voce TTlo^ Gime, where FP muip anaip is used to express "on the east side
1

of the sea."
e

CoiMing O'Hennessy, Conainj ua haenjupa.
is

muip anoip.

It is

thus rendered in the old

The name Conaing, which

explained pij,

1173.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

11

was performed on the night of his death namely, the dark night was illumined from midnight to day-break and the people thought that the neighbouring in one blaze of light and the likeparts of the world which were visible, were
;

;

ness of a large globe of fire arose over the town, and
direction
light
;

moved

in a south-easterly
it

;

and
it

all

persons arose
also thus
e
,

from

their beds,

imagining that
sea.

was day-

and

was

on the east side of the

Conaing O'Hennessy
Ettru O'Meehan
after having spent a
f
,

head of the canons of Eoscrea,

died.

Bishop of Cluain [Clonard], died at an advanced age,
life.

good
8
,

Kenny O'Konan
Maelisa

Mac

Bishop of Glendalough, died. Ward", Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan', died.

Maelmochta O'Melaghlin*, Abbot of Clonmacnoise, died. A great plunder was made by Hugh Magennis and the Clann-Aedha. They plundered the large third of Armagh but this man was killed in three months
1 ;

after this

plundering of

Armagh.
Ballymacward, in the cantred of Sodhan, in Hy-Many See O'Flaherty Ogygia, p. 327.
'

a

king, in Comae's Glossary, is now obsolete as the proper name of a man, but is preserved in the family name O'Conaing, under the anglicised

form of Gunning. The family name
jjupa,

Ua

h-Cten-

is now invariably anglicised Hennesy. This family was anciently seated in the territory of Clann Colgan, in the barony of Lower

Clonfert, a bishop's see in the south-east of the county of Galway. k Maelmochta O'Melaghlin, ITlaelinocfica ua
'

maoilpeacnaill.
nifies

The name TTIaolTnochca

sig-

the servant or devoted of St. Mochta, or

Philipstown, in the King's County, and adjoining the conspicuous hill of Croghan.
1

Mocteus, first abbot and patron saint of Louth. This family is generally called O'Maoilseachlainn,
or O'Maoileachlainn, which was
anglicised O'Melaghlin,
first

O'Meehan,

Ua ITIia&achan

This name

is

correctly

most parts of Ireland. g Kenny O'Ronan, Cionaeo Ua T?onam. The name Cionaeo is anglicised Kineth by the
still

common

in

but

now

Mac Loughlin. They

are

named

incorrectly after their great

progenitor, Maelseachlainn or Malachy the Se-

Scotch

;

but Kenny by the

Irish, in the family

name Kenny.
as the proper

It is obsolete

name

of a

among the latter man. O'Ronan is still
in

cond, Monarch of Ireland, who was dethroned by Brian Borumha, and who died in 1022. The name Mael-Scachnaill signifies servant of
St.

common

as a family

name

many

parts of Ire-

Seachnall,

or
in

land, but the O' is never prefixed in the anglicised form, which is Eonayne, in the south of

Dunshaughlin
of this family.
1

Secundinus, the patron of Meath, and the tutelary saint

Ireland.
h

Maelisa

Mac Ward,
were seated
at

TTlaoilipu

Hlac an
poets

Large third, rpian mop. Colgan, in the Annals of Armagh (Trias. Thaum. p. 300), thus
speaks of the ancient divisions of that city " 1112. Arx Ardmachana cum templis, dun:
:

baino.

This family,

who were hereditary

to O' Kelly,

Muine Chasain and
C

12

Rioshachcct
l?o

emeaNR
F eap ipm
i

[1174.

maca. cpmn mop apoa
on opccain
pin

mapbab Dan an

ccionn cpf mfp

mpp

apDa macha. Do mapbao la mac a acap Oomnall bpfjach ua maoileclamn Rf TTliDe la muincip Caejacdm noupmai^h pem la hapc ua maoileclamn agup
i

colaim

cille.

5iollu

macbacc mac RuaiDpi corhapba pacpaicc ppfomaiD QpDa maca

Ian DO jloine cpoiDe ppi Dia ajup. ppi Daoinib ajup 6penn uile mac oije oia ceoaoin DO ecc 50 pechcnach lap pfnDacaiD coccame, 27, mapra bliabain ochrmojac a aoipi. ajup baoi pme pe ccaipcc ip in peccmaD

mp

bliabna Decc

i

nabDaine coluim

cille

i

nOoipe pia ccomapbup pacpaicc.
1174.

CIO1S

CR1OSO

Qoip cpiopD mile, ceD, peaccmojacc, aceacaip. ua connaccam eppcop pil TTluipeaDaig Do ecc. Dal apame pfp aipmiDITlaolpaccpaicc ua banain, Gppcop ConDepe Do gloine cpoiDe DO ecc co peaccnac inD neac Ian Do naime, Do cfnnpa
TTiaoilfopa
-] -|

hf colaim cille

mp SeanoacaiD cojhaiDe. ^lollu mochaiDbeo abb maimpDpeac pfccaip TTloD cpeabop caipippi Don coimbeab DO ecc an
mojac bliaDam a
plann
uile, Saoi,
(.1.

-|

p6il

31.

napDmaca, Do TTlhapca Secci

aeip.

plopenc) ua

5P malT1 aipopfp
eaccna Diaba
tioris

lecchinn
-|

eapgna eolac

ip in

apoa maca, i Gpenn DorhariDa, lap mbeic bbabain
disciplinffi

platece in

Trian Massain,

et tertiani

Trian-mar

vitse,

et

bonarum litterarum
fre-

incendio deuastantur."

gratia in
dictis

magno immero olim Hiberniam

"

Ex

hoc loco

&

aliis

colligimus ciuitatem quatuor olim partes fuisse
1092,

supra ad annum Ardmachanam in
diuisam.

quentare solebant."

See also Stuart's History of

Armagh.

Prima
:

m

Sil-Murray,

Rath-Ardmacha, i. Arx Ardmachana, dicebatur Secunda Trian-mor, id est tertia portio maior

progeny, race,

muipeaoai^, i. e. the or descendants of Muireadhaeh
Siol

:

Tertia Trian Massan, id est tertia portio Massan. Quarta, Trian saxon, id est, tertia portio Saxo-

Muilleathan, king of Connaught, who died in the year 701. The principal families among

them were O'Conor Don, O'Conor Roe, O'Finaghty of Clanconway, O'Flanagan ofClancahill, and Mageraghty. The Liber Regalis Visitationis
of 1615, places the following fourteen parishes in the deanery of Silmury, which was coexten-

num, appellata ex eo, quod vel mercatores
:

quod nomen
vel
illi

videtur,

adepta

(quod verosimilius
inhabitauerint.

est)

studiosi Anglosaxones

Nam

Monachi

et studiosi

Anglisaxones abstrac-

1174.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

13

Donnell Breaghach [the Bregian] O'Melaghlin, King of Meath, was slain by the son of his own father [step-brother], Art O'Melaghlin, and by Muintir
Laeghachain, at
Gilla

Durrow

of Columbkille.

Mac Liag

[Gelasius], the son of Rory, the successor of St. Patrick,

and Primate of Armagh, and of all Ireland, a son of chastity, filled with purity of heart towards God and man, died in righteousness, at a venerable old age,
on the 27th of March, being the Wednesday after Easter, and in the eightyseventh year of his age. He had been sixteen years in the abbacy of St. Columbkille, at Derry, before he

became successor of

St.

Patrick.
i

p

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1174.

thousand one hundred seventy-four.

Maelisa O'Connaghtan, Bishop of Sil-Murray [Elphin], died. Maelpatrick O'Banan", Bishop of Connor and Dalaradia a venerable man, full of sanctity, meekness, and purity of heart, died in righteousness, in Hy,

Columbkille, at a venerable old age. Gilla Mochaibeo, Abbot of the monastery of SS. Peter and Paul at Armagh, a diligent and faithful servant of the Lord, died on the 31st day of March, in
the seventieth year of his age.

Flann

[i.

e.

Florentius] O'Gorman, chief Lecturer of

Armagh, and of

all

Ireland, a learned sage,
sive

and versed in sacred and profane philosophy,
the north between
in
n
it

after

with the territory Elphin, Kilmacumshy, Shankill, Ballinakill, Kilcorkey, Baslick, Kilkivgan (Kilkeevin), Ballintober, Kilcooley, Kil:

and the River Boyle were

Moylurg O'Banan,

See Moylurg.

O 6anam

There were several
in Ireland.
It is

lukin (now Killuckin),

Ogulla,

Roscommon,

distinct families of this

name

Fuerty, Drumtemple. This, however, is not a complete list of all the parishes in Silmurry, for the parishes belonging
to monasteries,

now

anglicised

Bannah and Banon, but

incor-

rectly Banim in Kilkenny.

by the late

celebrated novel writer

and those of which the
list,

tithes

Bishop of Connor and Dalaradia,
of Connor and

i.e.

Bishop
to

belonged to laymen, are omitted. The
ever, as far
as
it

how-

Down.

Dalaradia, according to

goes, is very useful to the

the Book of Lecan, extended from
Slieve Mis

Newry

topographer, as it proves

where Moylurg and

Silmurry meet. The parishes of Shankill, Killmacumshy, and Kilcorkey, were in Sil-Murry,
while Kilcolagh, and
all

(now Slemmish, in the present county of Antrim), and from the sea to Linn
Duachaill,

now Magheralin,
Down.

in the

west of the

the parishes lying to

present county of

14

[11T4.

Saxaib ace pocchlaim, i piche bliaDan ele 05 acbae co pomrheac ip in cfcppiochnarh 1 05 pollariinacchab Scol Gpenn, caoin pia ccaipg lapp an SeaccmojjaD bliaDan a aoipi.

ap pichic

i

pppancaib

i

-\

ua Dubcaijj abb maimpcpec dca Da laapcc pop buill Do ecc. TCuaibpi ua ceapbaill cijjeapna 6le Do rimpbab ap lap innpi clocpann. Conjalac ua Coinpiacla cijeapna cfcba Do ecc.
Tffuipjfp

TTlaolpuanaib ua ciapba cijeapna caipppi Do mapbab i mebail la gallaib dca cliac, .1. la mac cupmn, ~\ la mac Ctoba uf peapjail, -\ la ceallac

ua pionballdm cijeapna Delbria moipe. Paipce lapcaip miDe Do cup le cacaip cluana mic noip Do peip cleipeac
Gpenn. Sluaicceab lap
Dia
in

lapla DinbpaD TTluriian.

hiniDfjail poppo.
in aipfp

Oc

cualacrap na

SluaicceaD ele la Ruai&pi goill T?uai6pi Do rocc ip in

mumain
p

cara

ppiu, po cocuippioc goill

dca cliar

Dm

paijiD

"|

ni

Died happily, acbac co poinmeac

Colgan

was venerated here on the

renders this phrase "pie in Domino obdormivit," in his Annals of Armagh. In the Annals of
Ulster the phrase " died peaceably."
is

"Decembr

1.

1st day of December The holy bishop Mac Cainne of
:

acbac co pcamail, i. e. The whole passage is thus
:

Ath-da-larg." learn from the Annals of Boyle and Ware, that in the middle of the 12th century, the

We

rendered in the old translation

" A. D. 1174.

Flan O' Gorman, Archlector of
Ireland
all,

a skillfull notorious

Ardmagh and man in divine

abbey of Mellifont, in Louth, sent out a swarm of monks who had settled in several localities
before

knowledge, and also Mundane, after being 21 yeares in France and England learning, and 20 yeares keeping scoole in Ireland, he died peaceably the 13 Kal. of April, on Wednesday before Easter, in the 70th yeare of his age."
q

they procured a permanent establishment on the banks of the Eiver Boyle. In August, 1 148, they settled at Grellechdinach, where Peter O'Mordha became their first abbot. He was
afterwards promoted to the see of Clonfert, and was succeeded in the abbacy by Hugh O'Maccain,

Maurice O'Duffy, ITIuipjeapuaDuBcaij.
different
rriuipip, is anglicised

who removed

the convent to Drumconaind.

The name minpjeap, which seems
from
r

Maurice throughout

this translation.

succeeded by Maurice O'Duffy, who remained there nearly three years, when he

He was

removed
(i.

Ath da laarg

e.

ac oa ab ul, vadum dua-

to Bunfinny,

now Buninna,

near Ton-

rego, in the

county of Sligo, and after having

rumfwearum, vide Trias Thaum., p. 173, n. 23), now the abbey of Boyle. There was an ancient
Irish tion

resided there for

monastery or church here before the erecof the great Cistercian one by Maurice

two years and six months, at length fixed his family at Boyle (opposite the ford of dc oa krapcc), in the year 1161, where
this
font,

O'Duffy; as we learn from the Irish Calendar of
the O'Clerys, that the holy bishop

Mac Cainne

abbey was founded as a daughter of Melliand dedicated to the Virgin Mary. See
at this year.

Annals of Boyle,

1174.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

15

and twenty having spent twenty-one years of study in France and England, p in directing and governing the schools of Ireland, died happily on other
years
the

before Easter, in the seventieth year of his age. r Maurice O'Duffy" Abbot of the monastery of Ath da laarg

Wednesday

,

,

on

the

River

Boyle, died.

Rory
1

O'Carroll,
.

Lord of Ely was
,

8

slain in the

middle of the island of Inish-

cloghran

Congalagh O'Coinfiacla", Lord of TefBa, died.

Mulrony O'Keary, Lord of Carbury

v
,

was treacherously

slain

by the Galls

[Ostmen] of Dublin, i. e. by Mac Turnin, assisted by the son of w O'Farrell, and Kellagh O'Finnallan, Lord of Delvin-More
.

Hugh
by

The

diocese of

Westmeath was annexed

to the

city of Clonmacnoise,

consent of the clergy of Ireland. The Earl led an army to plunder Munster another army to defend
Roderic's
it

;

King Roderic marched with

When the English had heard of against them. arrival in Munster, for the purpose of giving them battle, they
noise
states,

This abbey was sometimes called TTlainipcip

by Connell Macgeoghegan, the

translator

Qra

t>a

laapj,

i.

e.

ford of two forks, but gene-

rally TTlaimpcip

of the (Kiver)

laapcc, see s Ely, Bile
called

na 6uille, i. e. the monastery For the meaning of Boyle. MS. Trin. Coll., Class H. 13. p. 360.
O'Carroll's territory, generally

under the year 1076, that " Carbifey O'Kiergie was then called Bremyngham's
country."

The family name O'Ciardha

is

now

anglicised, correctly enough, Keary,

but some-

Ely O'Carroll, comprised the baronies of Clonlisk and Ballybritt, in the south of the
pre-

times incorrectly Carey, and is common in the counties of Meath and Westmeath. ITlaolpuanai6,

which

signifies the

ruddy

chief, is anglicised
;

sent King's County.
1

Inishcloghran,

imp clocpomn.

It is

an

is-

land in Lough Eee, in the Eiver Shannon. note under the year 1193.
u

See

for alMulrony throughout it is now obsolete as a Christian name, though it is preserved in the surname Mulrony. w in now the of

this

translation

Delvin-More,

barony

Delvin,

O'Coinfiacla.
Teffia,

This name

is

now

obsolete in

which

is

an extensive district in "West-

the east of the county of Westmeath. See iii. c. 82. The family of O'FinOgygia, part
nallan were soon after conquered

meath.
*

See note under the year 1207.

by Hugh de
Gilbert

Midrony O'Keary, Lord of Carbury O'Keary, maolpuanai6 ua ciapoa ci^eapna Caipbpe ua Ciapoa This territory, about the situation of which Irish writers have committed most
unaccountable blunders, is the barony of Carbury, in the north-west of the county of Kildare.
In the translation of the Annals of Clonmac-

Lacy,

who granted
;

this

territory to

Nugent, the ancestor of the present Marquis of Westmeath and the O'Finnallans have been
for

many

poverty. rony of Delvin in 1837, he did not find
this family in their original locality.

centuries in a state of obscurity and When the Editor examined the ba-

many

of

16
|io

eirceavw.

[1174.

Canaic Oorhnall ua bpiain, -\ haipipeab leo 50 pan^accap 50 ouplap. cenmoca tal ccaip, -] cac mpcaip connacc, -\ mopcac pil ITluipea&aij
an oipim fifjpluaij po paccbab lap
ecep sallaib,
-\

pi

T?ucu6pi.

TCo pijeab

cac cpoba

Oeoib cpe nfpc ^aomelaib an t>u fin, 50 po ppaoineab po becc bo jallaib ip lommbualca pop na jallaib, po mapbab peer cceo beo ap in cac pin Do in cac pin, co nac ceapna ace ciopuaippi bfcc
-\

Thurles, in Irish Duplap, a name signifying "strong fort," now a small but well-known town in the county of Tipperary. In the Bodleian copy of the

1

exercitus in
veniens,

eorum interim auxilium ex

edicto

cum apud Ossyriam

forte pernoctaret:

Annals of Innisfallen,

it is

called

Princeps Duuenaldus vir sua in gente non improuidus, ipsorum aduentus
ecce Limiricensium
diluexploratione certissima prsescius, summo manu armata irruens in incautos, culo cum
4. milites

Durlus Ui Fogarta, i. e. O'Fogarty's Durlus, from its situation in the territory of Elyogarty.

neapc lommbualca. From this phrase it would appear that both parties fought with stubbornness and bravery. This
''Dint offighting,

qui

aliis

praeerant

&

400. Ostman-

norum
auditis,

viros

simul

intere'mit.

His

autem

Comite Guaterfordiam

cum

confusione

entry has been abstracted by the Four Masters from the continuation of the Annals of Tighernach.

reuerso, casus istius occasione, totus Hibernia;

According to Giraldus Cambrensis, the

populus in Anglos vnanimiter insurgunt ita vt Comes tanquam obsessus, Guaterfordiensi
:

detachment sent from Dublin were slaughtered
in Ossory

nusquam ab urbe

discederet.

Eothericus vero

by

the Irish,

who

attacked them early

in the morning, while sleeping in their camp.

Connactiensis Synnenensis fluuii fluenta transcurrens in manu valida Mediam inuasit. Cunc-

sisted of

Giraldus also informs us that this party conOstmen, or Dano-Irish soldiers, and

taque eiusdem castra vacua vsque ad ipsos Dublinise

fines

igne combusta,

soloque confracta

that the

was four hundred, besides four knights by whom they were commanded. Giraldus devotes the third chapter of
oif

number cut

redegit."

Hanmer states, upon what authority the Editor has never been able to discover, that
one of the four knights who commanded these Ostmen soldiers was an Irishman, by name

the second book of his Hibernia Expugnata to the description of this event ; and as he is so
directly opposed to the Irish annalists,

and has
it is

O'Grame.

As

the English and Irish accounts

been followed by Cox, Leland, and others, but fair to lay his words before the reader " Dublinensium
Interfeclio

:

of this event in Irish history differ so much, the Editor thinks it necessary to give here, for the

apud Ossyriam.
maris
:

His

ita completis, familiaque tarn

quam
Rey-

use of the future Irish historian, the various notices of it in the older Irish annals. In the

terras

successibus egregie refecta
patris,

dum

Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster,
noticed in the following brief
:

it

is

mundus ob
bilis

quern audierat, obitum, novidel. viri Guilielmi Giraldida;, remenso

manner A. D. 1174. Cach t)upluip la t)omnall huu

pelago, in

Cambriam

recessisset
:

:

Herueius

ite-

rum se mundo

constabularium gerens vt absente Eeyaliquid agere videretur Comitem cum
:

mbpiain 7 la concobup maenrhai^e pop cip mic napepip .1. pig pqxan.

mum-

"A. D.

1174.

The

battle of Thurles

by Don-

fainilia Cassiliam duxit.

Dubliuensium autem

nell O'Brien,

and by Conor Moinmoy, against

1174.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
;
11
.

17

solicited to their assistance the Galls

delay

till

they came to Thurles

[Ostmen] of Dublin and these made no Thither came Donnell O'Brien and the Dal-

cassians, the battalion of West Connaught, the great battalion of the Sil-Murray, brave besides numerous other good troops left there by the King, Eoderic.

A

battle

was fought between the English and Irish dint of fighting y English were finally defeated by
.

at this place, in

which the

Seventeen hundred of the

the people of Fitz-Empress,

i.

e.

the king of

hundred.
is

The literal
:

translation of the passage

England." In the Annals of Boyle, a compilation of the
thirteenth century,
it is

as follows

entered thus:
est

"A.

D. 1174. Helium Durlas comissum

"A. D. 1174. great army was led by the Earl of Strigule to plunder Munster ; and he sent messengers to Dublin, desiring all the
Galls left there to join him ; and a battalion of knights, officers, and soldiers well armed came
to him,

A

cum Anglicis et Dubliniensibm a Domnallo Rege* Mumunie et Concobaro Maenmaigi cum suis, in
quo Anglici defecerunt ad mortem,
perierunt."
et

Dublinienses

and they

all

marched

to

Durlus-O'Fothere defeated

garty.

But Donell More O'Brien

In the older Annals of Innisfallen, preserved
in the Bodleian Library (Rawlinson, 503), the

the Earl and the knights, and slew four of the knights, and seven hundred of their men.

number

slain

is

said to

be about seven hundred,

not seventeen hundred, as the Continuator of

Tighernach, and from him the Four Masters have it. The entry is as follows
:

When that news came to the hearing of the people of Waterford, they killed the two hundred who were guarding the town. Then the
Earl went on an island near the town [the Little Island], and remained there for a month, and

A. D. 1174. Sluaj;eo la Jy^laib Jjlapa 50 cancacap in h-Gli, co po cinolpucap Domnall

ua 6piain
up

50 tiuplap ui poco po cuipeo each ecappu, co pomaio cupca,
7

Guaomumam
^lapa
in

then went back again to Dublin." The reader is also referred to Ware's Annals, cap. 6, regnant. Hen. II., to Cambremis Eversus,
Leland's History of Ireland, vol. i. b. 1 , p. 99, and the Abbe Mac-Geoghegan's Histoire d'lrlande, torn. ii. p. 9, where the Abbe writes
p. 89,
:

)ulla\b

each,

paulo plup cecioepunc.
i

quo Dec. uel Conpcapla puipc
in

laipji cum Ducencip alnp cecibepunc la jallaib noum fein.

was marched by the came into Ely ; and green they Donnell O'Brien and the men of Thornond
Galls
till

" A. D. 11 74.

An army

" L'armee etant restee sans chef par la retraite de Eeymond, Strongbow en donna le commande-

ment

a Hervey. Ce Capitaine voulant tenter & faire des incursions du cote de Limefortune,
rick,

flocked to

Thurles,

and a battle was fought

assembla

les

between them, and the green Galls were defeated in the battle, in quo dec. vel paulo plus
ceciderunt.

Dublin,

& marcha du

troupes de Waterford & de cote de Cashil ; mais

The Constable
others,

of Waterford, with
slain

two hundred
their

were

by the Galls of

ayant ete rencontre a Durlas Hy-Ogarta, aujourd'hui Thurles, dans le pays d'Ormond, par Koderick O'Connor le Monarque, son armee
fut entierement defaite,
resterent sur le

own

fortress."

&

dix-sept cens Anglois

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen also, the number slain is stated to be seven

champ

de bataille.

Wareus

donne

la gloire

de cette action a Donald O'Brien

18

aNNdta uio^hachca eiReawN.

[1175.

Caeo piDe F o mela Dia cij 50 popcla^e. on mpla. gallcnb im ua bpiain Dia cig lap ccopccup. dn cijeapna apa6 DO mapbao U maelpeclainn 6 Oonna 5

Soa, r

QO1S C171OSO

1175.
cuig.

a doip CpiopD mile, cfcc, peaccmojacc,

cille Dapa DO ecc. ceppoc ua bpiain, eppoc an clepij cuipp eppcop ulaD, DO ecc. ITlaoiliopa mac mac capmuic eppcop ulab Do ecc. ^lolla Domnaill colaim cille cuip eccna -\ emj, F ea P plaicbfpcac ua bpolcain comopba ap a eaccna Dia ccuccacop cleipij Sipfnn cacaoip.eppcoip ap a peabup Dia ccapccup comopbup me, DO ecc co peaccnac mp rcpeablaiD cojai&e maclmcc ua bpandin DO oiponeab ina colaim cille,

On

-]

-)

i

nouibpecclep iona& ip in abboame.

-|

jiollu

TTlaibm pop cenel nfnoa pia

neacmapcac ua ccacain,

-\

pia mall ua

njaipmleaoaij

-[

ap mop Do cop poppa.

mibi Do cpochaD la ^allaib TTlajnup ua maoilpeaclumn cicchfpna aiprip
lap ppeallab pctip in at: rpuim.
Roi de Limerick, & diminue beaucoup la perte Cet echec causa tant de chagrin des Anglois.

au Comte Strongbow, qu'il s'enferma pour quelque tema a Waterford sans voir personne."
Mr. Moore, however, without making any
allusion
to

Cox says Cox, distinctly state that they were. 27, without, however, (Hibernia Anglicana), p. this massacre was quoting any authority, that Donald [Fitzpatrick], prince of perpetrated by but he observes, that the soldiers cut
Ossory,
off

the Irish accounts of this event,

were of that sort of the
*

citizens of

Dublin

gives full

credence to Giraldus's story, and thus manufactures it for the use of posterity "
:

called Easterlings.

A

reinforcement from

the garrison of Dublin, which the Earl had ordered to join him at
Cashel, having rested for a night at Ossory on
their march,

the

name

which is Waterford, in Irish, pope laipje, of the city of Waterford at the present
Irish.

day in

were surprised sleeping in their

Both names seem to be of Danish latter is most probably derived origin, from a Danish chieftain, Lairge, who is menand the
tioned in these Annals at the year 95 1 a Ara. The territory of O'Donnagan,
.

quarters

by a strong party under Donald O'Brian, and the greater number of them put

and

almost unresistingly to the sword." History of He does not even inform Ireland, vol.ii. p. 273. us that the soldiers thus massacred were Ost-

afterwards of a powerful branch of the O'Briens, the chief of whom was styled Mac-I-Brien-Ara,
is is

now

called Ara,

and sometimes Duharra, and

men, though Giraldus, and even Sir Richard

a half barony in the county of Tipperary bor-

1175]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

19

of them survived with the English were slain in this battle, and only a few O'Brien returned Earl, who proceeded in sorrow to his house at Waterford*.

home

in triumph.
,

b a Melaghlin O'Donnagan, Lord of Ara was slain by 0'Cona[ing ].

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand one

1175.
seventy-five.

hundred

O'Brien, Bishop of Kildare, died.

Maelisa
Giolla

Mac an Chlerigh Cuirr, Bishop of Ulidia (Down), Donnell Mac Cormac, Bishop of Ulidia, died.

died.

Flaherty O'Brollaghan, successor 'of St. Columbkille, a tower of wisdom and hospitality, a man to whom, on account of his goodness and wisdom, the
clergy of Ireland had presented a bishop's chair, and to whom the presidency of Hy [lona] had been offered, died in righteousness, after exemplary sickand Gilla Mac Liag O'Branan was ness, in the Duibhregles of Columbkille
;

appointed in his place in the

abbacy

.

The Kinel-Endad were
Eachmarcach 0'Kane
e
,

defeated,

and a great slaughter made of them by
after

and Niall O'Gormly. Manus O' Melaghlin, Lord of East Meath, was hanged by the English, they had acted treacherously towards him at Trim.
dering on the River Shannon.
b

O'Conaing.
is

The

last syllable of this

name

Lifford and Letterkenny.

Lough Foyle and Lough S willy, that is, between The Kinel-Enda were
descended from Enda, the youngest son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, monarch of Ireland,
e

effaced in the original,

but

it is

here restored

from the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen.
O'Conaing resided at Caislean Ui Chonaing, now
corruptly called Castleconnell, in the

county of
to

rain

Eachmarcach CFKane, Gacmapcac The name Gacmapcac, which
is

Ua Casignifies

Limerick.
c

See note
is

Peacenach

under the year 1 1 75. used in the Leabhar Breac
J,

horse-rider, egues,

the old translation

Eghmarkagh in of the Annals of Ulster. The
anglicised
is

translate the Latin pius,

and nempechcncic, imit

surname

Ua Caram,

anglicised

O'Cahan

plus.
d

O'Clery explains
i.e. just,

by the

modern word

pipenca,

upright.

throughout the same work, and in most AngloIrish records previous to the year 1700; but
the form

Kinel-Enda, Cinel 6noa, otherwise called

O'Kane

is

now

so

well established

was a territory comprising thirty quarters of land in the present county of Donegal, lying south of Inishowen, between the arms of
Tir-Enda,

in the north of Ireland,

that the Editor has

thought See p.

the best to adopt in this translation. 8 2, note
it
.

D 2

20
Oorhnall caemdmac

[1175.

mac oiapmaoa
i

T?i

laijfn Do

mapbao

la

hua poipci

cepn

~\

la

hua nualldm
ua mbpidin.

ppioll.

TTlac Oorhnaill mic

Donncaba cicchfpna opppaiji Do rhapbab

meabail

la Domnall

Uaohg mac

Do rhapbab. pfpjhail ui Ruaipc
ui

DiapmaiD mac caibg
bpiain DO ballab
(.1.

bpiain
i

-]

TTlaejamain

mac coipbealbaij

ui

ma

cij bubein

ccaiplen uf conaing) la Dorhnall ua

mbpiam
.1.

-j

TTlac ui

ui concobhaip DiapmaiD Do ecc mprcain. Ctgup mac an leicoepcc Concobaip copcmobpuab DO mapbaoh beop la Dorhnall ip in 16

ceona.
and his brother Eochy, or Enna Kinsellagh, were both illegitimate.
8

f

Dannett Kavanagh, t)orhnall Caorhanac.
the illegitimate son of Dermot, King of and the ancestor of the most distin-

He was

Leinster,

O'Foirtkcern

This name
;

is

probably that

guished branches of the family of Mac Murrough,

now made O'puaprum
Foran.
h

anglicised Forehan, or

now Kavanagh.
now

He was

called

Caorhanac

from having been fostered at Cill Chaoitiam,
Kilcavan, near Gorey, in the county of

O'Nolan,

O'Nuallam

He was chief of the
O'Flaherty that the

Dermot Mac Murrough's only legitimate son, Conor, was put to death by Roderic O'Conor, monarch of Ireland, to whom
Wexford.
he had been given as a hostage by Dermot. Hib. Expug., lib. i. cc. 10, 17. This Donnell,

barony of Fotharta Fea, now the barony of Forth, in the county of Carlow.
informs us (Ogygia, Part
last
iii.

c.

65),

who had hereditary possessions died not long before his own time. The here,
O'Nuallan
family are,
territory.
'

however,

still

respectable

in

the

though illegitimate, became the most powerful of the Mac Murroughs, and attempted to become king of Leinster, but his sister Eva, the wife of
the Earl Strongbow, having proved his illegitimacy, he never was able to, attain to that

The son of Donnell, son of Donough.

He was

Gillapatrick, son of Donnell, son of Donough, who was son of the Gillapatrick, from whom the

See Hibernia Expugnata, lib. dignity where Giraldus writes " Murchardides
:

i.

c. 3,

family of Mac Gillapatrick, now Fitzpatrick, derived their name and origin.
ancient Ossory was a very large territory, extending, in the time of Aengus Oisreithe, in the third century, from the River
i

autem

Ossory

The

audito eorum aduentu
(prasmisso
filio,

cum viris

quasi quingentis

tamen Duuenaldo natural! eiusdem
legitimo, in sua

et

quanquam non

tamen

Barrow

to the River Suir,

and from the Slieve

gente prreualido) adeos statim ouanter accessit." See also Pedigree of the in the

Kavanaghs

Bloom mountains to the meeting of the Three Waters but at the period of the introduction of
;

Carew

Collection of

MSS.

in the
it is

Lambeth

Li-

Christianity
it is

it

comprised no part of Munster, for

brary, No. 635, in which

stated that Eva,

referred to in all the lives of the primitive

the wife of the Earl Strongbow, to whom Dermot had bequeathed the kingdom of Leinster,

Irish saints as forming the south-western portion of Leinster, in fact, what the present diocese of

proved in England and Ireland that

this Donnell,

Ossory

is.

See Life of

St. Patrick,

quoted

1175.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
f
,

21

Donnell Kavanagh
slain

the son of Dermot,

King of

Leinster,

was treacherously was treacherously

by O'Foirtchern and O'Nolan". The son of Donnell, son of Donough' Lord of Ossory
1

8

j ,

,

slain

by Donnell O'Brien.
k
,

Teige

the son of Farrell O'Rourke, was killed.
1

Dermot, the son of Teige O'Brien, and Mahon the son of Turlough O'Brien, were deprived of sight in their own house at Castleconning", by Donand Dermot died soon after and Mac an Leithdheirg O'Conor, nell O'Brien
,

m

;

;

(i.

e.

the son of O'Conor

Corcomroe

),

was

also slain

by Donnell on the same

day.

by Ussher
sargy
is

in his Primordia, p. 855, where Osdescribed as " occidentalis Laginensium

being that most commonly found in old law

documents, inquisitions, and most Anglo-Irish
records.
n

of St. Cronan, published plaga." where we read: " Mater vero ejus by Fleming,
life

Also the

Castleconning,

Cairlen ui Chonamj,

i.

e.

Sochla, id est, Larga, vocabatur quse erat de occidental!

O'Conaing's, or Gunning's Castle,

now

corruptly

Laginiensium plaga, id

est

Osraigi

anglicised Castleconnell. O'Conaing

was Lord of
is

oriunda."

O'Dugan, in his topographical poem,

Aos Greine, the

situation

of which
:

thus

and Keating, in his History of Ireland, reign of Aodh Mac Ainmire, describe Ossory as extendIn the lating from Slieve Bloom to the sea.
Ossory has been understood as comprising the country of the Fitzpatricks, or the barony of Upper Ossory, in the Queen's
ter

described in O'Brien's Dictionary " Aos-Greine, the small county of Limerick,

from the

hill called

Knockgreine to Limerick,

centuries

the ancient patrimony of the O'Conuings, whose principal castle, near Limerick, was called Caislean

O'Conaing,

or

Castle

Connell

;

Aos-tri-

county
k

;

but

its

ancient extent

is

preserved in

maighe from
is

Owny to Limerick."

Castleconnell

the diocese.

now

a village situated about six miles to the

This name, which signifies a poet, and which was used in the last century as an opprobrious name for a vulgar Irishman,
Teige, Ccroj;.

east of Limerick.

like

cised

Paddy in the present century, is now angliTimothy and Thady, and sometimes latinand even Theophilus.
said

The barony of Corcomroe, Copcmoopuao. Corcumroe, in the west of the county of Clare, preserves the name of this territory, but the
was unquestionably more extensive than the barony, and comprised not only this
territory

ised Thaddceus
1

Makon,

marjammn,
is
;

by Spenser

to

barony but

also

the entire of the barony

of

signify a bear,

proper name of the form Mahon, as
sitions

now anglicised Matthew, as the a man but the Editor prefers
it is

Burrin, in the east of which the abbey of Corcumroe is situated. According to the Irish
genealogical books,
this

used in the Irish Inqui-

territory derived

its

places,

and law documents, and also in names of and in the family name Mac Mahon.

CoipoeulBach, now generally anglicised Terence; but the Editor has used the form Turlough throughout this translation, it
Turlough,

m

name from Core Modhruadh, the great grandson of Rury Mor, monarchof Ireland, A. M. 3845,
and the ancestor of the families of O'Loughlin Burrin, and O'Conor Corcumroe, the ancient proprietors of these two baronies.

22

[1176.
i

mumain, tto Ruampi ua cconcobaip la Rij 6peann Don ua mbpiam a cuabmurhain po mill an cfp 50 mop lonnapb Domnall
Slucocchfo la
~\

chup

fin.
-\

comopba Concobop mac Concoille abb ftecclepa poil, ] pfoaip, hi TCoimh lap nool Do accallaim comopba pfcDacpaicc mpccain Do ecc
caip.

ua maolmuaiD, ciccfpna pfp cceall Do ^lolla coluim mac concobaip meg cochlain cpe meabail.

mapbab

la Puaibpi

QO1S CR1OSO
Goip CpiopD,
pabap,
-|

1176.

mile, ceD,

peaccmojaD, ape.
-]

Ceanannup Do papujab Do jallaib DO uib bpiuin. Lughmaj Do papujab Do Sajcaib. Niall mac mec lochlamn Do rhapbab la muinncip bpandin
.

(.1.

t>dl

mbuinne).
p

Mac

Concoille

This name

is

now

obsolete,

or translated Cox, or
i

Woods.

been followed by Archdall, O'Conor, Lanigan, and all other writers on Irish topography ; nor
this etymology questioned till the locality was examined, in 1837, for the Ordnance Survey, by the Editor, who found that this is one of

This family O'Molloy, Ua maolmuaib. descends from IDaolmuaib, a name signifying noble or venerable chieftain [muao i. uapal no

was

aipmiom, Cor.

Glos.~\,

who was lord

of the terri-

those inadvertent errors into which Ussher has
fallen

tory of Feara Ceall, and was slain in the year 1019- He was descended from Fiacha, the third
son of King Niall of the Nine Hostages. The name of this territory is still preserved in that of the
small barony of Fircal, in the south-west of the King's County ; but we have the most satisfactory

with
as

from his want of intimate acquaintance The Irish name, the Irish language.
in

now pronounced

Westmeath,

is

baile

poBuip, which means the town of Fore, and not the town of Books; and Ussher was led into
this error

evidence to prove that

it

originally comprised the

by the similarity of the pronunciation of both combinations, for baile poBaip and bail'
leabaip are not very dissimilar to the ear. According to the life of St. Fechin, who founded
a monastery here in the seventh century, this
place was originally called Gleann Fobhar ; and it is probable that the term Fobhar was origi-

baronies of Fircal, Ballycowan, and Ballyboy, in the same county. The name Ua tTlaolmuaib,

was

originally anglicised

O'Mulmoy, but

it

is

now invariably written without the second m. ' Mac Coghlan See note on Dealbhna Eathra,
at the year 1178.
5

Fore, pabap, or pob'ap.

Ussher (Primorcalled
;

nally applied to the remarkable springs which flow from the hill into the mill-pond at the
village of Fore, for the
is

dia, p.

966) states that Fore

is

by the Irish
and he has

Bailie Leabhair, the

town of books

explained in

word pobap, or popup, an old Irish glossary, called

1176.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

23

Roderic O'Conor, King of Ireland, marched with an army into Munster; he expelled Donnell O'Brien from Thomond, and much wasted the country on
that expedition.

Conor Mac Concoille p Abbot of the church of SS. Peter and Paul, and
,

afterwards successor of
fer

St.

Patrick, died at
Peter.

Rome, having gone

thither to con-

with the successor of
Gillacolum 0'Molloy
q

St.
,

Lord of Fircall, was treacherously
r
.

slain

by Rory, the

son

of Conor Mac Coghlan

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1176.

thousand one hundred seventy-six.
.

u 8 Fore and Kells' were laid waste by the English, and by the Hy-Briuin T Louth was laid waste by the Saxons.

Niall, the
rn -Buinne".

son of

Mac

Loughlin, was slain by Muintir Branan,

i.

e.

the Bai-

Oeipbpiup oo'n eojna an ^ijpe, as signifyBesides ing the same as cobap, a spring. these celebrated rills which turn the mill of
St. Fechin,

proprietor.

There is another Ceancmnup in the

county of Kilkenny, which is also anglicised Kells. The castle of Kells referred to on the
next page (or rather reedification of it), stood not many years since opposite Cross-street, in the

there are in Gleann Fobhar, as
called,

it

was originally

two other wells dedicated to St. Fechin, one called cobap na Cojaine, and the other OaBach peichin. For the legend
connected with the

town of
part of

Kells, in the

county of Meath, but no
Tradition ascribes
its

it

now

remains.

and mill of Fore, see Life of St. Fechin, published by Colgan in Acta Sanctorum, 20th January. For some account
rills

de Lacy. u uiB bpuim, i.e. the descendants Hy-Briuin, of Brian, son of Eochaidh Muighmheodhain,
erection to

Hugh

of the state of Fore in 1682, see Sir
Piers's account of
first vol.

Henry

monarch of Ireland

in

the fourth
this race,

Westmeath, published in the of Vallancey's Collectanea ; and for a

There were many septs of

century. but the

description of the ancient remains there in 1837,
see a letter written

people here referred to are probably the HyBriuin-Breifne, which was the tribe name

by the Editor

at

Eathowen,

of the O'Kourkes, O'Keillys, and their correlatives.
'

dated October 13th, 1837,

preserved at the Ordnance Survey Office, Phoenix Park. 1 This name was first anKells, Ceanannup See Ussher,
signifies

now

Louth, lu^riiaj

The name

is

sometimes

glicised Kenlis.
p.

De

Primordiis,

691.

The name
and
is

the head seat, or

written luBmaj, and Colgan thinks that it signifies either the plain of Lugh, a man's name, or " the plain of herbs Lugi campus seu campus
:

residence,

now

translated Headfort, in the

herbidus."

Acta Sanctorum,

p. 731, col. 2, n. 7.

name

of the seat and title of the present noble

w

Dal-Buinne, t)ul m6uinne, anglicised Dal-

24
Injfn Ruaibpi ui concobaip
(.1.

[1176.
pi

Gjieann), bfn plaicbfpcai

ui

maoiloo-

paib DO rhapbab la macaib

ui caipellain.

bfnmibe injfn Donnchaba uf cfpbaill, bfn Chonrhaije pfp If Do ecc. chfpna ua rcuipcpe
-\ ~\

ui plainn,

baineic-

Dal apaibe Do rhapCumaije ua plainn cicchfpna ua cruipcpe, pfp If, la pfpaib If. ba& la commibe la a bparaip pen Do Dorhnall ua bpiain a luimneac cpia popbaipi Do Sa^ain Do lonnapbab
-\

ofnarh 66 poppa.

CaipDiall gall

56: bfnarh
(.1.

i

ccfnannup.
in

Ctn ciapla Sa^anach

Piocapo) Do ecc

cich

cliar Do bainne aillpi
-\

na naorh apcfna ipa po jab ap a coip Do miopbailip bpicchoe colaim cille Qc connaipc piurh peipin bpijic anDaplaip 05 a ceallu po milleab laipp.
rhapbab.
Boyne.
This tribe was
seated near

Neagh, in the present county of
their territory
district

Lough Antrim and
;

of Oriel, in an ancient Antiphonarium, formerly belonging to the cathedral church of Armagh,

was nearly coextensive with the of Killultagh, which was a part of the

and now preserved MSS. in the Library
(Class B. Tab.
1.

in

Ussher's collection of

county of
in the

Down

in the year 1662, though

now

of Trinity College, Dublin No. 1). It has been recently
literal

county of Antrim. According to the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, at the
year 1176, this tribe of Dal-Buinne was seated in the territory of Moylinny, which extended

published, with a

Petrie's Inquiry into the Origin

English translation, in and Uses of the

Round Towers
1

of Ireland, p. 389.

Gooey O'Flynn,

cumaije ua plainn
is

The

from Lough Neagh to near Carrickfergus. For the descent of the Dal Buinne, the reader is
referred to O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 46. For a list of the parish churches and chapels in this territory about the year 1291, see Pope

name of this family

now

anglicised

O'Lynn in

the north of Ireland, and by some incorrectly made Lindsay. Their territory lay between the
present county of

Lower Bann, Lough Neagh, and the sea, in the Antrim but there seems to
;

Nicholas's Taxation of the Dioceses of Down and

liam Reeves,
*

Connor and Dromore, edited by the Rev. WilM. B.
Benmee, bfnmiDe, denotes woman or lady
of a
also
It was very common as the proper woman among the ancient Irish, as 6eanmurhan, meaning "woman, or

have been another branch of them in the barony of Loughinsholyn, in the south of the county of
Derry, where they gave name to Lough Inish O'Lynn, i. e. the lake of O'Lynn's island, near the village of Desartmartin, and also to Desert

of Meaih.

name
was
y

Lyn and Monaster Lynn,
bourhood.

in the

same neigh-

lady of Munster."

OfDonough 0''Carroll, t)onnchaoa ui CeaptiaiU This was O'Carroll, chief of Oriel, not
of Ely O'Carroll. There the death of this respecting
is

The pedigree of this famous family, who were the senior branch of the Clanna Rury of Uladh,
or Ulidia,
College,
is thus given in a MS. in Trinity Dublin, Class H. 1. 15. p. 266, line

entry Donough O'Carroll

a curious

28:

1176.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
of Roderic O'Conor,

25

The daughter

King of

Ireland,

and wife of Flaherty

O'Muldory, was killed by the sons of O'Carellan. Benmee*, the daughter of Donough O'CarrolP, and wife of Cooey OTlynn, lady of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee, died.
2 a Cooey O'Flynn Lord of Hy-Tuirtre Cumee, his own brother, dnd the Firlee.
, ,

Firlee,

and Dalaradia, was

slain

by

The English were
siege to them.

driven from Limerick by Donnell O'Brien, by laying

An

English castle was in progress of erection at Kells. The English Earl (i. e. Richard") died in Dublin, of an ulcer which had

and of

broken out in his foot through the miracles of SS. Bridget and Columbkille, all the other saints whose churches had been destroyed by him. He

saw, as he thought, St. Bridget in the act of killing him.
*
1.

Rory, the son of
DonnelL,

2. 3. 4.

who was

son of

name of a

Hy-Tuirtre, Ui Cuipcpe, was the ancient territory in the county of Antrim,

Cumee, or Cu-Midhe.
i

lying to the east of Lough Neagh. The parishes of Racavan, Ramoan, Donnagorr, and Killead, the church of Dun ChilleBice,
begs, in the parish

Murtough, or Moriertagh.
Alexander.

now Downkilly-

5.
6.
7. 8. 9.

Cumee, or Cu-Midhe.
Cooley, or Cu-Uladh.

ofDrummaul, and the island of Inis Toide, now Church Island, in Lough Beg, were included in this territory, which was
the

Cumee, or Cu-Midhe.
Rory.
Foley.

name of a deanery in Colgan's time. See Trias Tkaum., p. 183. The tribe called the Firlee, and sometimes

10.
1
1
.

Mac
I

Kieran.

Fir Li of the Bann, were originally seated on the west side of that river, but at this period they

12. 13.
14.

Hugh, or Aodh.
Donnagan.
Forgartagh.

were unquestionably on the east of it. They were probably driven from their original locality

15. Flann, the progenitor,

a quo the O'Lynns

[Ui toinn],

& c & c up
.
.

by the family of O'Kane, who, at this period, had possession of all the district lying between Lough Foyle and the Bann. For the descent of
the Fir Li of the Bann, see Ogygia, part
c.
iii.

to Colla Uais,

monarch

of Ireland in the fourth century.

name Cu maighe, meaning dog, or greyhound of the plain, and Cumidhe, dog, or greyhound of Meath, were very common among this The former is anglicised Cooey, and family.
'

The

76 ; Ogygia Vindicated, Dedication, p. Ivi ; and Duald Mac Firbis's Genealogical Book,

Marquis of Drogheda's copy, pp. 95, 1 28. b The English Earl, i. e. Richard de Clare, Earl
of Strigul, commonly called Strongbow.

Matthew
1

the
tion.

latter

Cumee,

throughout

this

transla-

Paris inserts the death of this earl at the same

year

;

but Pembridge places

it

about the

st

of

E

26

aNNcitu
i

KIUIIU.UIIOVJ. eineciNN.

[1176.

Caiplfn Sldine milleaDh oipsiall

mac meclochlainn
la haipjiallaib.

mbpium i pfp -| la ciccheapna cenel neojam -| la cenel neojain buben -\ l?o mapbpac cuicc cfcc no nf ap uille Do na gallaib la
i -\

co na pluaj, ap po bap oc paibe RiocapD plemeann miDe DO opccam la TTlaoileaclainn ua

caeb ban, leanam

mbfchaiD ap in ccaipoiall. eac co na cfpna Duine Ro papaijce cpi caipcceoill im mibe ap nabapach* ap uarhan cenel neojain l?io.1. caipciall cfnannpa, caipplfn calacpoma ] caiplen Doipe paccpaic.
l?i

Don chup pin. capD plemenn pein Do mapbaD DO lo&baipc la puaiopi ua concobaip baile biacaij

Gpeann Don

coirn-

6e& i Do naoim beapac 50 bpac .1. baile cuama achaD. IciaD Slana na hojua Dubcaij aipDeppcop cuama, aipeaccac ua RoDuib, Dilpi 50 bpac. CaDla ua TTlaoilbpeanainn, Ignaiohe ua plann ua pionnachca, aoD ua ploinn, Ruapc mannacam, fyollu an coimDeD mac an leapcaip, ua hainliji, concobap mac
-|

Dia DiapmaDa, a ccopaijeacc an baile pin DO bfic 05 6 ua cconcobaip -| o pi op a lonaiD.

-|

05 beapac 50 bpac

Domnall mac coipoealbaij
nacc, opDan, Smacc maij eo na Sa^an.
-|

Concobaip cicchfpna cuaipcceipc Cona aDnacal Dfjcomaiple na njaomeaV Do ecc
ui
i -|

Oorhnall

mac coipDealbaij

ui

bpiain piojoarhna
rationis
belli

murhan Do

ecc.

May, 1177, and Giraldus Cambrensis about the 1st of June. In the Dublin copy of the Annals
of Innisfallen, Strongbow is called the greatest destroyer of the clergy and laity that came to

&

refugii

signum manebat. In vtraque

fortuna stabilis

&

constans,

nee casibus

aduersis desperatione fluctuans ; nee secundis Hibernia Expugnata, vlla leuitate discurrens."
lib.
i.

Ireland since the time of Turgesius.
racter
is

His chahis

cap. 27,

Camden. Francofurti,

M.D.CIII.

thus given by Giraldus,
:

who was

p. 774.
c

cotemporary " Comiti vero modus hie

Slane, Slaine,

now

generally called Guile

erat.

Vir subrufus,

Slaine in Irish.

It is a small village near the

lentiginosus, oculis glaucis, facie foeminea, voce
exili,

collo contracto,

per cetera fere cuncta,

Boyne, midway between Navan and Drogheda, in the county of Meath. The site of Fleming's
Castle
is

corpore precero, vir liberalis

&

lenis.

Quod

re

now

occupied by the seat of the Mar-

non
rare.

poterat,

verborum suauitate componebat.
:

Togatus & inermis parere paratior, quam impeExtra bellum plus militis, quam Duels

quess of Conyngham. 4 Besides women, children, and horses, le caeb

Ducis quam omnia suorum audens consilio
in bello vero plus

militis
:

habens

:

Nihil

vnquam

ex

se vel

sumens.

armis aggrediens, vel animositate praeIn proelio positus fixum suis recupe-

ban leanam 7 eac This was evidently copied by the Four Masters from the Annals of Ulster, in which the original reads as follows ou in po mapbao cec no ni ip moo oo jallaiB pe caeb ban 7 leanum 7 ec in caipceoil oo mapbao
:

1176.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
castle of Slane
,

27

which was Richard Fleming with his forces, and from which he used to ravage Oriel, Hy-Briuin, and Meath, was plundered by the KinelMelaghlin, the son of Mac Loughlin, Lord of the Kinel-Owen, by Owen themselves and the men of Oriel. They killed five hundred or more of

The

in

the English, besides

women,

children,
castle.

and

horses'

1

;

and not one individual

escaped with his

life

from the

Three

castles

were
f
.

left

desolate in

Meath on the following

day, through fear of the Kinel-Owen, viz. the castle of

Kells, the castle of Galtrim',

and the

castle of Derrypatrick

Richard Fleming

himself was slain on this occasion.
ballybetagh was granted in perpetuity by Roderic O'Conor, King of 8 The followIreland, viz. the townland of Toomaghy to God and St. Berach.
ing were the sureties of that perpetual gift Keyly [Catholicus] O'Duffy, Archbishop of Tuam Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv Flann O'Finnaghty Hugh O'Flynn
: ;

A

;

;

;

Rourke O'Mulrenin Ignatius O'Monahan Gilla-an-choimhdhe Mac-an-leastair O'Hanly and Conor Mac Dermot who were to guarantee that this townland was to remain for ever the property of God and St. Berach, from O'Conor and
; ;

;

;

;

his representative.

the glory, the moderator,

Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Conor, Lord of the north of Connaught, and the good adviser of the Irish people, died, and
at

was interred

Mayo

of the Saxons.

Donnell, the son of Turlough O'Brien, the heir apparent to the kingdom of Munster, died.
co nu cepna oume

i

mbechaio ap

in caipeel.

Thus rendered
Ulster Annals
:

in

the old translation of the

" where one hundred and more

who was knighted having killed O'Kelly and his esquire, in the See battle of Athenry, in the year 1316. q. v.
the town of Athenry, but
for

were

besides women and and the horses of the castle, soe as children, none living escaped out of the castle."
killed of the Galls,
'

Hibernia Anglicana, by Sir Richard Cox, p. 96.
Derrypatrick, a ruins of an old castle, townland containing the in a parish of the same name, in the barony of
f

Ooipe

pacpaic,

now

The
the

castle

of Caltruim

Cpo ma, Le. the castle of Gal trim.
now

Caiplen Cala Gal trim is
a moat,

Deece,

and county of Meath..

See Ordnance

name of a townland, containing
The

Map
g

of Meath, sheet 43.

in a parish of the same name, in the barony of

Toomaghy,

cuaim acao

A

ballybetagh

Deece, and county of Meath.

district be-

was the

thirtieth part of a triocha cead, or ba-

longing to this castle was an ancient palatinate, and gave the title of Baron to the family of whose ancestor had been a butcher in Hussey,

rony. It contained four quarters, or seisreaghs, each seisreagh containing 120 acres of the large Irish measure. The name of this ballybetagh is

E2

28

rcioshachcg emeaNN.
Oomnall ua
mailli cijeajina urhaill
1x165
-[

[1177.

Do

ecc.

Oiapmair mac copbmaic mac pfm copbmac liarhanac

la a capcaij pi Dfpmuman DO jabail a muinrip copbmac DO rhapbab hi ppiull la

bubein i Diapmaic DO jabail a cijeapnaip mpam. Oomnall mac jiollapacpaicc tijeapna oppaije DO ecc. dob mac jiollabpoiDi ui puaipc Do ecc. Oomnall mac jiolla pacpaic cijeapna caipppe ua cciapba, Do mapbab DO aiqiiojab la peapaib mioe, -j ppull Dua maoileclamn (.1. Qpr), -\ dpc Do bonnchab ua maoileclainn agup plann pije (no cicceapnup) Do cabaipc a mac Do mapbab la caipppe ua cciapba.
i

QO1S CR1OSO

1177.

a peace. Qoip CpiopD mile, cecc peaccmojac,
bfic Uiuiamip capoinal Do ceacc nGpinn. SeanaD clfipeac Gpenn Do abbaib iman ccapDinal in arh cliar an cfo Domnac Don eccip eppcopaib copsup i po cmnpfo DeirhiDe lomDa na comailceap.
i -|

coinleapcc ncchfpna cenel neojain pe heaoh la hapD^al 1 RiojDamna 6peann Do mapbab la maoileaclamn ua loclainn ~[ ua laclainn apDjal peipin Do comruicim la hua nell ap an laraip pin.

Qeb O

Nell

.1.

an

macaom

-|

Sluaicchfo la lohn DO cuipc
now
forgotten.
It

-\

lap na piDipmib
set at liberty.

i

noal

apame

i

co Dun
states, in

must have been applied

to a

Giraldus Cambrensis
ii.

large townland, since subdivided into quarters, somewhere near Kilbarry, in the north-east side

his Hibernia Expugnata, lib.

c.

17,

that this

of the county of Eoscommon, where St. Berach's But the name principal church is situated.
does not appear in any form on the
for
h

he pubLegate held a synod at Dublin, in which lished the King of England's title to Ireland, and
all that pronounced excommunication against should oppose it ; that he also gave leave to the and monasEnglish, to take out of the churches

Down Survey

Connaught, or on the Ordnance Survey. Cardinal Vivianus He was sent to Ireland
III.,

by Pope Alexander

as apostolic Legate,

According to Rogerus Hoveden, and the Chronicle of Man at this year, Vivianus was in the
Isle of

Man on Christmas-day with King Gothred.

corn and other provisions as often as they should require them, always paying the true value for the same. To which Hanmer most " He filled his bagges with impertinently adds the sinnes of the people ; the English captaines
teries
:

After Epiphany he landed at Downpatrick, and on his way to Dublin was taken prisoner by the
soldiers of

understanding of

it,

gave him in charge, either

John de Courcy, by

whom

he was

to depart the land, or to goe to the warres, and with them, and no longer to reserve for

pay

1177-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

29

Donnell O'Malley, Lord of Umallia [theOwles, in the county of Mayo], died. Dermot,the son of CormacMacCarthy, King of Desmond, was taken prisoner

by
his

his

own son, Cormac Liathanach; but Cormac was treacherously slain by own people, and Dermot then re-assumed his lordship. Donnell Mac Gillapatrick [now Fitzpatrick], Lord of Ossory, died.
Hugh, the son of
Gilla-Broidi O'Eourke, died.

Lord of Carbury O'Keary, was treacherously slain by O'Melaghlin (i. e. Art), upon which Art was deposed by the men of Meath, and his kingdom (or lordship) was given to Donough and his son Flann was slain by the inhabitants of Carbury O'Melaghlin
Donnell, son of Gillapatrick [O'Keary],
;

O'Keary.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1177.
seven.

thousand one hundred seventy and

of the clergy of Ireland, both bishops and abbots, was convened by this cardinal on the first Sunday in and they enacted many ordinances not now observed. Lent,
Toinleasc, who had been for some time Lord of the Kinel-Owen, and heir presumptive to the throne of Ireland, was slain by Melaghlin O'Loughlin and Ardgal O'Loughlin; but Ardgal himself fell on the spot by O'Neill. An army was led by John De Courcy and the knights into Dalaradia and

Cardinal Vivianus" arrived in Ireland.

A synod

Hugh

O'Neill, popularly called

an

Macaemh
1

j

ceive

money
fact

for

nought."

Hammer's

Chronicle,

membris neruosis

&

ossosis, staturse grandis,

&

edition of 1809, pp.

295, 296.

See also the

corpore perualido, viribus immensis,
singularis, vir fortis

audacise

same

given as true history by Sir Richard

&

bellator ab adolescentia.

Cox
1

in his Hibernia Anglicana, pp. 33, 34.

O'Loughlin

The name of

this

family,

Semper semper grauioris periculi pondus arripiens. Adeo belli cupidus & ardens,
vt militi

in acie primus,

which was the senior branch of the northern
Hy-Niall,
J

dux

pnefectus, ducali plerunque de-

is

now generally written Mac Loughlin.
Courcy.

serta constantia

Ducem

exuens, et militem in:

John

De

He

set out

from Dublin,

and in four days arrived at Downpatrick. The character and personal appearance of this extraordinary man are thus described by his cotemporary, Giraldus Cambrensis " Erat itaque lohannes vir albus & procerus,
:

duens, inter primes impetuosus & preeceps turma vacillante suorum, nimia vincendi cupiditate victoriam amississe videretur. Et quan-

& plus militis inermis tamen modestus, habens, ac sobrius, & Ecclesie Christ! debitam reuerenquam quam
in

armis immoderatus,

D uc s
i

30

[1177.

oa
apaibe.

majibpac Oorhnall mac mic carapaij cicclifjina Dal l?o hoijicceaD lay na po milleab Dun Da Ifrjlapp la lohn
l?o
~\ -\
:

tiam prsestans, diuino cultui per omnia deditus
Gratiseque superna;, quoties
ei successerat,

brensis

;

but Dr. Hanmer, who knew but

little

cum

gratiarum actione totum ascribens, Deoq; dans
gloriam, quoties aliquod fecerat gloriosura. Sed quoniam, vt ait Tullius, Nihil simplici in genere,

of Irish families or history, supposing that by Dunleuus (which he reads incorrectly Dunlenus)

Giraldus meant O'Donnell, he speaks throughout of the chief who contended with De Courcy,
at

omni ex parte perfectum natura expoliuit nimiae parcitatis & inconstantise nceui, niueum
:

Down,

as O'Donell

!

Giraldus,

who was

co-

tantse

laudis

nitorem

denigrauerant.
filia sibi

Regis

temporary with Sir John De Courcy, speaks in high terms of the valour of the King of

itaque Manniae Gotredi

legitime copu:

Down, who contended with him on
sion.

this occa-

lata, post varia belli diuturni proelia

&

graues

It appears that the Pope's Legate, Cardi-

vtrinque conflictus,
neis incastellauit.

tandem in arce

victories
locis idola-

nal Vivianus, happened to be at Downpatrick

plane constitutus, Vltoniam vndique

& nusquam

(non absque

to prevail

on De Courcy's arrival, and that he endeavoured on De Courcy to withdraw his forces

bore plurimo)
videtur

& inedia,

firmissima stabiliuit.
:

multisque periculis, pace Hoc autem mini notabile

from Down, on condition that Dunlevus should

pay tribute to the King of England.

De Courcy

quod grandes hi quatuor Hibernica;

expugnationis postes, Steplianides, Herueius, Beymundus, & Johannes de Curcy (occulto qui-

refusing to comply, Dunlevus, encouraged by the suggestions of the Legate, collected his forces, and attacked the English, we are told,

dem Dei

iudicio, sed

nunquam

iniusto) legiti-

with astonishing bravery
Giraldus's

;

but
he

if

we

believe

mam

ex sponsis prolem suscipere non meruerunt. Quintum autem his Meylerium adiunxerim, qui legitimam vsque hodie de sponsa prolem non suscepit. Sed hsec de lohanne sum-

statement,

that

mustered ten

Curcy

warriors, who, fighting manfully with spears and battle-axes, were defeated by three hundred English soldiers, com(viriliter)

thousand

matim,
toribus
lib. ii.

&
;

quasi sub epilogo commemorantes,

grandiaq

eiusdem

gesta, suis explicanda scrip-

manded by twenty-two knights, we must conclude that his people were either very feeble
or very unskilful warriors. the conquest of Down by
sixteenth

reliquentes."

Hibernia

Expugnata,

Giraldus describes

cap. xvii.

De Courcy

in the

Donnell, son of Cahasagk, tDomnall mac In the Dublin copy of the Annals Cacar-aij
of Ulster, and in the Annals of Kilronan, he
called
nell,
is

k

chapter of the second book of his Hibernia Expugnala, where he writes as follows " Videns autem Dunleuus se verbis minime
:

Domnall mac mic Carupaij,

i.

e.

Don-

profecturum,

corrogatis

vndiq;

viribus

cum

son of the son, i. e. grandson of Cahasagh. In the Dublin copy of the Annals of
Innisfallen,

10. bellatoruni millibus infra 8. dies hostes in

vrbe

viriliter

inuadit.

In hac etenim insula

the chieftain
at

who contended with De Courcy Down, on this occasion, is called Rory Mac

sicut et in
bellica

omni

natione, gens borealis magis

semper

et truculenta reperitur, &c., &c.
itaq;

Donslevy ; and it is certain that the family name was Mac Donslevy at this time, though it was originally Cfh-Eockadha (O'Haughy). The

"
Prospiciens
acriter

lohannes hostiles
:

acies

ad vrbem accedere

quanquam manu

name

is

latinized

Durdeuus by Giraldus Cam-

modica, tamen perualida, potius obuiam exire, & viribus dimicando, belli fata tentare, quam

1177-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
leathghlas; they slew Donnell, the grandson of Cathasach",

31

to

Dun da

Lord of

Dalaradia.

Dun
quod

da leathghlas was plundered and destroyed by John and the
in vrbis angulo temriter

exili municipio,

from

sea to sea,

but that he was defeated and

erexerat, diutius ab hoste claudi,

&

fame

confici

taken prisoner, and the greater part of his
slain

men

longe proeelegit.
in

Igitur atroci bello conserto,

by Eory Mac Donslevy
set

;

that he was after-

dine perfuso.

primo eminus sagittarum iaculorumq; granDeinde cominus lanceffi lanoeis,
:

wards

at liberty

;

and that the English,

securibus enses confligentes
vtrinq;

ad tartara inultos
igitur
clypeus,
ensis,

transmittunt.

Dum

acerrimo

by De Courcy and a valiant knight called Eoger Poer, again attacked the Irish and made a great slaughter
taking fresh courage, being led on
of
St.

Martis conflictu,
repeUitur vmbo
:

lam dypeo
Ense minax
qui gladii

vmbone
8f

them

;

and took from them the croziers of
St.

pede pes,

Finghin and

Eonan, and that then

all

cuspids

cuspis:

loannis ictus

hie

cerneret, qualiter

nunc caput ab humeris, nunc

armos a corpore, nunc brachia separabat, viri bellatoris vires digne possit commendare. Multis

the English of Dublin went to the assistance These Annals then add : of De Courcy. " O'Neill [rede Mac Loughlin], at Melaghlin the head of the Kinel-Owen, and Eory Mac

igitur in hoc conflictu se strenue gerentibus

:

Roger, tamen Poerius adolescens imberbis
fiauus, pulcher

&
in

Donslevy, at the head of the Ulidians, accompanied by the Archbishop of Armagh, Gilla-

&

procerus (qui

postmodum

Lechlinia?

&

Ossyrias partibus emicuit) secunobtinuit.

dam non immerito laudem
itaq; diuq;

Post

an-choimdedh O'Carran, the Bishop of Ulidia, and the clergy of the north of Ireland, repaired with their noble relics to Downpatrick, to take

graues tamine belliq; congressus, tandem loannis virtuti cessit victoria hostium multitudine magna
:

ambiguos, nimis impari cer-

from John De Courcy. fierce battle was between them, in which the Kinel-Owen fought
it

A

per marinam glisin, quo transfugerant, inter-

and Ulidians were defeated, with the loss of five hundred me"n, among whom were Donnell
O'Laverty, chief of Clann Hamill ; Conor O'Carellan, chief of

empta."

And

again, in his short recapitulation of the

Clann-Dermot

;

Gilla

Mac Liag
Choim-

battles of

De Courcy, towards

the end of the

O'Donnelly, chief of Ferdroma; Gilla-an

same chapter: " In duobus

itaque magnis prasliis Johannes
victor
enituit.

dedh Mac Tomulty, chief of Clann Mongan ; and the chiefs of Clann Cartan and Clann
Fogarty.

apud

Dunam

In primo post
lulii,

purificationem.

In secundo circa Calendas

Bishop of

The Archbishop of Armagh, the Down, and all the clergy, were taken

in natiuitate Sancti lohannis, vir de

quindecim
multitu-

virorum militibus
nuit
dine.

[al.

millibus] victoriam obti-

prisoners ; and the English got possession of the croziers of St. Comgall and St. Dachiarog, the

cum paucissimis, hostium extincta
Tertium erat apud Ferly in
is

Canoin Phatruic

[i.

e.

the

prseda? cap-

sides a bell called Ceolan

Book of Armagh], bean Tighearna. They

tione," &c.

stated in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, a work which seems to have been
It

afterwards, however, set the bishops at liberty, and restored the Canoin Phatruic and the bell,

but they killed

all

the inferior clergy, and kept

very much interpolated, that John De Courcy on this occasion erected a strong fort of stones and clay at Down, and drew a ditch or wall

which" [remarks this "are still in the hands of the English." compiler] Dr. Hanmer, in describing this battle,
the other noble relics,

32
piDipib cainic
i

[1177.

na pocpaiDe.
-|

Oo ponab

Dona caiplen leo arm ap a
-|

mai&m po

6f

ap ulcaib

maiDm pop cenel eojam

pop aipgiallaib aipm

in

cloinne DiapmaDa -] giollumacpo Ttmpbab concobop o caipealldin coipeac TCo gonao ann beop Dorhnall ua liacc ua Donnjaile roipec pfp nopoma.

plaicbfpcaij Do poijoib jup ba
poil in

mapb

e laparh Do na gonaib pin
-\

i

pecclep
-[

leo cenmochaicpibe. Udmic nuib cuiprpe -| i ppfpaib lohn DO cuipr co na pocpaiDi an peace ceOna If. Ro loipcc CuTnibe ua plainn aipceap maije perhe. T?o loipccpfc Dona
picche.
i

dpDmaca lap ccaicfrh cuipp cpiopo l?o mapbab Dona maice lom&a aile

a pola, lap nonjab

aich-

cul pacain, i ceallu iom6a

oile.

Niall

ua ^aipmleabaij cicchfpna

pfp

maije hire

-|

cenel fnoa DO mapto the

by Eoderic [OConor] and O'Donnett, king of Duune ! the Monarque See his Chronicle, Dublin edition of 1809,
and Cox (Hibernia Anglicana), p. 32, gravely repeats this blunder as true history. By this expedition and battle were fulfilled, in
p.

that De Courcy was opposed

citizens that the

enemy would wade up

knees in their blood.

Stanihurst, enlarging on

300

;

a slight hint thrown out by Giraldus in his account of these prophecies, writes thatDe Courcy,
in his anxiety to adapt these prophecies to

him-

the opinion of both parties,

two prophecies,

which would appear to have depressed the spirit of the Ultonians, and animated De Courcy and
his superstitious followers for further conquests.

self, took every care to adapt himself to the prophecies, and with that view provided for his equipment, on his expedition to Downpatrick, a

white horse, a shield with birds painted upon it, and all the other predicted appendages of the
predestined conqueror of Ulster ; so that he sallied forth like an actor dressed to perform a

The one was
to

a prophecy among the Britons, said have been delivered by Merlin of Caermarthen, in the latter part of the fifth century, and which had declared that " a white knight, sit-

part

!

This, however,

is

overdrawing the pictiire

;

for Giraldus says that

De Courcy happened by
upon a white horse

ting on a white horse, and bearing birds on his
shield,

mere chance

(forte) to ride

would be the

first

that with force of
(" Miles

arms would enter and invade Ulster."

on this occasion, and had little birds (aviculas) painted on his shield, evidently the cognizance
of his family ; but he distinctly states, however, that De Courcy always carried about with him
a book in the Irish language, containing the prophecies of St. Columbkille, as a mirror in

albus, albo residens equo, aues in clypeo gerens, Vltoniam hostili inuasione primus intrabit.")

The other was a prophecy ascribed to Saint Columbkille, who had foreseen this battle not
long after the time of Merlin, and ten in Irish that a certain

who had

writ-

which the achievements which he himself was
predestined to perform were to be seen ; to which
Stanihurst, drawing on his imagination, impertinently adds, that he slept with this book under his pillow " Ad dormiendum proficiscens, eun!

pauper and beggar,

and fugitive from another country (" quondam pauperem & mendicum & quasi de aliis terris fugacem") would come to Down with a small army and obtain possession of the
town, and that such would be the slaughter of the

dem sub

cubicularis lecti pulvino collocaret."

The charge brought by Dr. Hanmer against Cam-

1177.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
who came
in his army.

33

knights

A

castle

which they defeated the Ulidians twice, slew Conor O'Carellan, chief of Clandermot
of nelly, chief

was erected by them there, out of and the Kinel-Owen and Oriels once,
1
,

Feardroma

m
;

and Gilla-Macliag O'Donand Donnell O'Flaherty [now Laverty] was so
of his
the

wounded by arrows on this occasion, that he died church of St. Paul at Armagh, after having received

wounds

in the

body and blood of Christ, and after extreme unction and penance. Many other chieftains were also slain by them besides these. During the same expedition, John [De Courcy] proceeded with his forces to Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee before his arrival, however,
;

Cumee O'Flynn had
Niall O'Gormly,
brensis, that

set

Annoy" on

fire;

but they burned Coleraine and

many

other churches on this incursion.

Lord of the men of Magh-Ithe and Kinel-Enda, was
tions,

having malevolent feelings towards De Courcy, he slightly passed over and misrepresented his actions, seems very unfounded, for Cambrensis speaks of the noble achievements of this

which never

at

any period belonged to the

O'Donnellys.
n

Armoy, Qicfpmui^e

The author of the

knight in terms of the highest admiration, saying that he would leave his grand exploits to be
blazoned by
alluding to the

Tripartite Life of St. Patrick, which was translated and published by Colgan, in his Trias

time

De Courcy's own writers, evidently monk Jocelyn, who was at the employed by De Courcy to write the Life
" Sed hasc de Johanne Curcy

"Artkermugia prcecipua civitas Dalriedinorum." It was anciently a bishop's see,

Thaum.,

calls this

and an ecclesiastical town of consequence; but in
Colgan's time it was only a small village in the It is still called by its anterritory of Eeuta.
cient

of St. Patrick.

summatim,

&

quasi sub epilogo commemorantes,

name

in Irish,

but

is

anglicised

Armoy.

grandiaq; eiusdem gesta suis explacanda scriptoribus reliquentes." Hiber. lib. ii.

It retains at present
its

no monumental evidence of

Expugnat.

c.

17.
1

cient

ancient importance except a part of an anround tower, which, however, is no small
its

The name is yet preserved in a parish in the barony of Tirkeeran, Clondermot, in the county of Derry, east of the Foyle. The O'Caireallans are still numerous in this parish,
Clandermot.

proof of
describes

ancient ecclesiastical importance.

Colgan in his Acta S. S., p. 377, col. 2, note 6,
it

as follows

:

"Est hodie vicus tan turn
a Dunliffsia"

exiguus in regione
circiter millibus

Reuta juxta Oceanum octo

but the name

variously anglicised Carlan, Curlaud, Carellan, Carelton, &c.

is

passuum

[Duni.

luce] "distans."

m Feardroma
tory in the
Cauldfield,

This was an ancient

terri-

county of Tyrone, containing Castleanciently
district

the plain of Ith,

Magh-Ithe and Kinel-Enda. Magh is said to have derived

Ithe,
its

e.

name
who,

Ballydonnelly, and the See note on Ballydonsurrounding at the year 1531. It is to be distinnelly,

from

Ith, the uncle of Milesius of Spain,

according to some of the Irish Shanachies, was slain by the Tuatha De Dananns, at Drumline,

guished from the townland of papopuim, or Fardrome, mentioned in the Donegal Inquisi-

near Lifford,

this plain See of Ireland, Haliday's edition, Keating's History

and buried in

34
-]

[1177-

la cloinn DiapmaDa ap lap Doipe ba6 la oonnchab ua ccaipeallain colainn cille ap po loipcceao ceac paip cfcup cfpna mall am ac app noopup an cicche lapccam. Oa pome Dona OonnchaD ua po mapb'aD
-|
-]
i

caipelldm ojpic ppi Dia ppi colaim cille -| ppi mumncip Doipe annpin cap a cfnn pen -] cap cfnn a pleacca .1. a rhamchine pen, a rhec, a ua, -| a lapmua
rpia biclie Do colaim cille
biacai
.1.
i
]

Do mumncpi
66ib.

601 pe.

ppappaD Domnaij moip
i
i

Do paD
i

T?o lobbaip Dona baile Doib beop TTlac piabac

Oo njioll cpi pichic bo. n6pinn ip in amipip pin ponaD imoppa ceac Don clfipeac nionaD an cije po loipcceaD ua&a pop ua
copn ap pfpp boi
17o hiocaD uile ppipp jac ap loipcceab imbe. Do paDpac njaipmlea&aij. clann nDiapmaoa uile lop^niom cap a ccfnn pen uacha. TTlupcaD mac Ruai&pi in Concobaip Do bpeic TThle coca co na piDipib

commain Do milleaD Connacc ap ulca ppi RuaiDpi. Ro loipccceallu an cipe ap pfo Dona Connaccaij po cfooip cuaim Do gualann cfna ap na haipipofp 501 II inncib. T?o chuippfc lapccam mai&m popp na l?o Dall RuaiDpi a mac Sallaib po Diochuippfc ap eccin ap an cip mcc. mupchaD ccionab an cupaip pin.
laip 50 T?op
-|
-]
i

p.

266, and note on

Druim

lighean, in these

Annals, at the year 1522.
of the parish

From the situation church called Domhnach more
Ithe,

parish church, near the village of Castlefin, in the barony of Raphoe and county of Donegal.
It

was

in the territory of Magh-Ithe, of
lord.

which

Muighelthe, or the great church ofMagh

O'Gormly was

From

this passage it ap-

now Donaghmore,
Ithe
is

it is quite evident that Magh the tract of level land in the barony of

pears that O'Carellan had seized

upon some of

The territory Raphoe, Lagan. of Kinel-Enda lay immediately south of Inishcalled the

now

O'Gormly's territory, after he had killed him. q The tan-coloured son This is a fanciful

name given

to the goblet.

The

adjective piaBac,

owen, and comprised the parishes of Raymoaghy aridTaughboyne. See Colgan's^cta Sanctorum,
Life of St. Baithenus.

pronounced in the south of Ireland as if written piac, and anglicised Reagh in names of men and
places, signifies tan-coloured, or greyish,

The Editor has

a copy

and

is

of the will of O'Gallagher, who was steward to the celebrated Red Hugh O'Donnell, in which it
is

translated fuscus,

by Philip O'Sullevan Beare,
See

in his

History of the Irish Catholics.
et

stated that

Kinel-Enda contained thirty quari.

pp. 123, 145,
1

passim.

ters of land.
p

Near Donaghmore, Oorhnac mop,

e.

the

great church, generally called Doirinac mop ITluije Ice, as in the Tripartite Life of St. Patrick,

This expedition. The Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen contains the following account of this excursion
:

" A. D. 1177.

A

great

army was

led

by the

and

in O'Donnell's Life of St. Columbkille,
p.

apud Colgan. Trias Thaum.,

390.

It is a

English of Dublin and Tullyard [near Trim] into Connaught. They proceeded first to Eos-

1177-]
slain

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

35

by Donough O'Carellan and the Clandermot in the middle of Deny The house in which he was was first set on fire, and afterwards, Columbkille.
as

he was endeavouring to
of the house.

effect his

way

Donough

escape out of it, he was killed in the doorO'Carellan then made his perfect peace with God,

St. Columbkille, and the family [i. e. clergy] of Deny, for himself and his descendants, and confirmed his own mainchine (gifts) and those of his sons,

grandsons, and descendants, for ever, to St. Columbkille and the family of He also granted to them a ballybetagh near Donaghmore p and, moreDerry.
,

over, delivered up to

them the most valuable goblet

at that time in Ireland,

which goblet was called Mac Riabhach [i. e. the tan-coloured sonq ], as a pledge for sixty cows. There was also a house erected for the cleric, in lieu of
burned over the head of O'Gormly, and reparation was made by him for all damage caused by the burning. All the Clandermot gave likewise full satisfaction on their own behalf.
that

Murrough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, brought Milo de Cogan and knights with him to Roscommon, to ravage Connaught, to annoy Roderic
father.

his
his

The Connacians immediately burned Tuam and other churches, to prevent the English from quartering in them. They afterwards defeated the
English, and forcibly drove

them out of the country

[of

Connaught]

;

and

Roderic put out the eyes of his son, in revenge for this expedition'.
common, where they remained for three nights, Here they were joined by Murrough, the son
of Roderic O'Conor,
battle during all this excursion,
for the

Con-

nacians had

fled,

with their cattle and other

who guided them through
at the time hap.

the province.

King Roderic

pened to be on his

-regal visitation,

and was in

moveable property, into the fastnesses of the country. On this occasion Tuam was evacuated, and the churches of Kilbannan, Kilmaine, Lackagh, Kilcahill, and Roskeen, and the castle of

lar-Connaught when the news
lish

of this irruption

into his territories reached his ear.

The Eng-

proceeded through the Plain of Connaught, burning the country as they passed along, ineluding the churches of Elphin, Fert-Geige,

three nights at

Galway, were burned. The English remained Tuam, without being able to ob-

tain provisions, or gaining

Imleagh Fordeorach, Imleagh an Bhroghadhia, and Dunamon, and making their way to Ath

any advantage ; here they were informed that the men of Connaught, and Munster were on their march to give them
battle,

Mogha and Fiodh Monach, and passing over the Togher [causeway] of Moin Coinneadha,
and through the great road of Lig Gnathaile, and the ford of Athfinn, near Dunmore, proceeded but they made no prey or directly to Tuam
;

true, for they

time to

which indeed they soon perceived to be saw that Roderic gave them no consider, for he drew up his forces for
flight,

an engagement. The English took to and escaped to Tochar mona Coinneadha.

They

were, however, hotly pursued and attacked as

F2

36

awwata Rioghachca

eircectNN.

[1178.

TTlaibm pop ua maoilDopaib -] pop cenel cconaill cenel fntia im mac ccaipealldin die in po mapbab dp

pm
ui

cconcobop ua im Seappaij
-|

maicib lomba apcheana. Oorhnall ua heaghpa ciccfpna Cuijne Do ecc.

QOIS CR1OSO,
Qoip CpiopD
mile, ceo,

1178.

peacrmojar a hocc.

bccchall column mic luijbeac DO bfic ace lomacallarh pe na cleipeac

pfm co piabnac. Oorhnall ua poccapca eppcop oppaije Do ecc. ^lollu cpiopD ua heochaib eppcop Conmaicne Do

ecc.

Concobap mac conallaij ui luinij Do gabdil coipijeacca ceneil TTioen 1 Dorhnall mac Dorhnaill ui gainmleabaij Do lonnapbab a maij iche ninip ccionn pence Do cum oormchaDa uf Duib&iopma. Cenel moien eojain
i

i

laparh Do cun concobaip mic conallaij a coipijeacr, i a ccfnnup Do cabaipc Do Dorhnall mac Dorhnaill ui gaijimlea&aij. ITluinncep Dorhnaill .1. mac
giollu
i

caec

uf

eDepla

-]

ui

plannajdin Do

mapbab concobaip mic

conallaij

ccoij Dorhnaill pfipin
pin.

i

pappab an can

Ro

meabail ap comaipce aipcinnij na hfpnaibe boi ina lonnapbpac laparh cenel TTlodin Dorhnall ua jaipmthe churches were burned by the Connacians themselves, and that the English, who were five

they were crossing the Togher, or causeway, where they would have been defeated had not
the son of Roderic assisted and guided them. .

They next proceeded

directly to Oran-O'Clabby, and passed the next night there, and on the day following went on their retreat to Athleague,

hundred and forty in number, lost only three of "Rothericum vero Conactiss printheir men
!

cipem

cum

3.

exercitibus magnis in sylua qua-

dam prope Sinnenum obuium
graui utrinq; conflictu,

habens, inito
tribus tan turn

where they were overtaken

at the ford

demum

by

they did not know their losses until were clear out of the province. they For this, and other previous offences, Murrough

a party of Connacians, attack upon them, and

who made

a vigorous

satellitibus equestribus amissis,

&

interemptis

hostium multis, Dubliniam indemnis euasit." s This is the ColColum Mac Luighdheach

O'Conor, the son of Roderic, had his eyes put out by the Sil-Murray, with the consent of his
father."

man, son of Lughaidh (of the race of Niall of the Nine Hostages), whose festival is marked in the
Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys, at the

2nd of
able to

Giraldus Cambrensis, in his account of Milo de Cogan's excursion into

February.

The Editor has not been

Connaught

(Hibernia Expugnata,

lib.

ii.

c. 1 7), asserts,

that

discover this entry in any of the older annals. ' The O'Loonys were afterwards 0''Loony

1178.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

37

O'Muldory and the Kinel-Connell were defeated by Conor O'Carellun in a and many other distinguished men of the Kinel-Enda battle, in which O' Sherry

were

slain.

Donnell O'Hara, Lord of Leyny

[in the

now

county of Sligo], died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand one
8

1178.
seventy-eight.
its cleric.

hundred

The

crozier of

Columb Mac Luighdheach openly conversed with

Donnell O'Fogarty, bishop of Ossory, died.
Gilchreest O'Hoey, bishop of Conmaicne [Ardagh], died. Conor, the son of Conallagh O'Loony', assumed the chieftainship of KinelMoeii"; and Donnell, the son of Donnell
Ithe into Inishowen, to
v

O'Gormly

,

was banished from
In three months

Moy
after-

Donough O'Duibhdhiorma".

wards, the Kinel-Moen deposed Conor, the son of Conallagh, and gave back the chieftainship to Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly. The people of Donnell O'Gormly, namely, Gilla Caech O'Ederla, and the O'Flanagans, trea-

cherously slew O'Loony in Donnell's own house, even while he was under the protection of the Erenagh of Urney*, who was with him at the time. Upon
this the

Kinel-Moen drove Donnell O'Gormly from the chieftainship, and
w

set

driven into the wild mountainous district of

Muintir-Loony, in the north of the county of Tyrone. u Kinel-Moen The Kinel-Moen, or race, or
descendants of Moen,

The country of O'Duibhdhiorma was called Bredach, and comprised the eastern half of Inishowen. This is to be distin1

O Duibhdhivrma.

guished from the half cantred of Bredach in Tirawley, in the county of Mayo, the patrimonial inheritance of O'Toghda, who was descended

whom
now

the principal family of were the O'Gormlys, inhabited that tract

called the barony of Kaphoe, which was then a part of Tir Eoghain, or Tyrone. In after times this tribe was driven across the river

from Muireadhach, son of Fergus, son of AmhO'Duibhdhiorma was algaidh, a quo Tirawley.
of the Kinel-Owen, and his family had their tomb in the old church of Moville, near Lough

Foyle by the O'Donnells, and their original country was added to Tirconnell.
"

of Ulster, preserved in the State Papers' Office, shews the country of who was the chief of

O'Gormly.

An old map

The name is still numerous in the baFoyle. rony of Inishowen, but corruptly anglicised to
Diarmid, and sometimes, but rarely,
to

Mac

O'Gormly, originally Kinel-Moen, as extending from near Derry

Dermot, though always pronounced O'OuiB-

to

biapma by the
*

natives
i.

when speaking
e.

Irish.

Strabane.

Urney, Gpnaioe,

Oratorium.

A parish

38
i

[1178.

ccfnnup popaib. cu^pac T?uai&pi ua plaicbfpcaij leabaij a coipijeacc cenel TTlodin. OomTTleabal DO bfnam la cpib macaib ui plairbfpcaig pop
-\

nall

jaipmleabaij oo rhapbab leo, [-]] Uicchfpnan mac Rajnaill mic Domnaill occap DO mainb Cenel moain immaille ppiu. la cenel moain a ccopac Rajnall mac eacmapcaij uf cardin Do mapbab

mac

oorhnaill

ui

]

an cpampaib pin cona ina biojail pioe Do pocaip galac ua luinij "] TTluipmeabail pempaice ceapcac ua peacam, i ap na Diojail beop Do ponab in
pop cenel TTloain.

^aer mop

ip in

mbliabain

pi.

Ro

la piobdp, l?o cpapccaip pailje.

T?o

cpapccaip Dona pe pichic cpann i nooipe colaim cille. lohn DO cuipc co na allmupchaib Do ceacr co macaipe Chonaille, Do

ponpac oipccne ann. baoap oibce lonjpuipc
partly in the county of Tyrone, and partly in the county of Donegal, extending to the south of Lifford.
i

i

njlionn pije lapam.
saint

Oo

bCpc

for
tion.
a

which the

had a peculiar venerai.

Machaire Chonaille,

e.

the plain of Conaille
level

O'Flaherty,
is

in

Irish

Ua

This name

still

common
is

plairBfpcaij; in the counties of

Muirtheimhne, a territory comprising the

Donegal, Derry, and Tyrone, but, by an aspiration of the initial p,

sometimes LafFerty

anglicised Laverty, and See note on O'Flainn,

part of the present county of Louth, as appears from the ancient Lives of St. Bridget and St. Monenna, and from the Festilogy of Aengus, and

where a similar suppression of the initial p takes place in the modern anglicised form
O'Lynn.
z

other calendars, which place in this territory the churches of Faughard, Iniskeen, Kill Uinche,

and Druim Ineascluinn.
the

This district retained

name

of Machaire Chonaille in the seven-

Derry- Columbkille

This passage
:

is

given

teenth century, as

we

in the

Annals of Kilronan, as follows " A. D. 1178. 5 ao ^ ao&al DO roijecc ip in mbliaoain

Ussher, who,
St.

in his notices

learn from Archbishop of St. Bridget and

pi, co po cpapcaip bloib vhoip &o coillcib 7 o'pibbaibib, 7 oo pail^ib pa riiopa ppi I6p, 7 co cpapcaip pop pe picic palac, uel paulo

Monenna, has the following notice of this " Intra alterum autem a Dundalkia territory
:

miliarium, in Louthiano Comitatu

&

territorio

olim Conayl-Murthemni
(in
4" ipsa sanctissima

8f

Campo

Murthernene
viget, de

plup,

a nooipe

colaitti cille.

quo Conaleorum gens maxime

qua
ut

" A. D. 1178.

A great

wind occurred in

this

Monenna

procreata

est ;

year, which prostrated a great portion of the woods, forests, and great oaks, and prostrated

habet in

libri

secundi Vita?

illius initio

Conchu-

among the rest six score oaks, vel paulo plus, in Roboreto Columbce Cille."

branus) hodie Maghery-Conall dicto, posita est villa Pochard : quern locum nativitatis Brigidce
virginis

habitum

fuisse,

&

in Vita Malachia;
totivis vici-

The word puil, plur. pailge, signifies an oak tree. The oak wood of Derry-Columbkille, now Londonderry, is specially mentioned in
O'Donnell's Life of Columbkille, as an object

notavit olim Bernardus,
nise traditio

&

hodierna

Fochardam Brigid<e earn appellantis
Primordia, pp. 705,

etiam nunc confirmat."
706.

The Conaleorum gens here mentioned

1178.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
y

39

up Rory 0'Flaherty

as their chieftain

:

but the three sons of this

OTlaherty

acted a treacherous part towards the Kinel-Moen; they slew Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Gormly, Tiernan, the son of Randal Mac Donnell, and eight other gentlemen of the Kinel-Moen. Randal, the son of Eachmarcach O'Kane, had been slain by the Kinel-Moen in the beginning of this summer, and in re-

venge of
in

this

were

slain

revenge of this, moreover, the aforesaid act of treachery against the Kinel-Moen.

Galagh O'Loony and Murtough O'Petan; and it was was committed

A violent
of trees.

It prostrated oaks.
z
.

wind-storm occurred in this year it caused a great destruction It prostrated one hundred and twenty trees in
;

Derry-Columbkille

John De Courcy with
committed depredations

his foreigners repaired to

Machaire Conaille a
b
,

,

and

there.

They encamped

for a night in Glenree

where

were the descendants of Conall Cearnach, the most distinguished of the heroes of the Red Branch in Ulster, who flourished early in the first See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. century.
c.

and Kilronan, and in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, it is emphatically stated that
the English were dreadfully slaughtered here
:

Ro mebaio
poppu.
this

47.
b

pop gallaiB 7 po cutpeo oepj ap The number of the English slain on

In Glenree,

i

the River Righe. brief enumeration of the battles of

njlionn pige, i. e. the vale of Giraldus Cambfensis, in his

De Courcy,
book of

occasion is not stated in the Annals of Ulster or Kilronan, but it is given in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen as four

in the sixteenth chapter of the second

hundred

his Hibernia Expugnata, calls this his fifth battle,

Newry. In
it is

and says that he fought it at the bridge of this he is right as to the place; but,

added that the battle was and that O'Hanvy, chief of Newry, Omeath, and one hundred of the Irish, were killed, and that Murrough O'Carroll, King of
;

and

it is

fought at

quite evident from the older Irish Annals that he has transposed the order of the battles,

for

he was not in Ireland when De Courcy
Giraldus came
first to

first

Rory Mac Donslevy O'Haughy (O'h-eochaoa), were victors. The name Rory is, however, incorrect for, on the death of DonOriel,

and

;

invaded Ulster.

Ireland

in 1 183, and again in 1 185, as tutor to the Earl of Moreton, afterwards King John. The bridge of Newry well agrees with the Glenn Righe of the Irish Annals, for the river of was an-

the grandson of Cahasagh, Cu-Uladh, the son of Conor, who was son of Donslevy, son of Eochaidh, became the chief of the Dal-Fiatachs.
nell,

Newry

ciently called the Righe, and the valley through which it flows bore the appellation of Glenn

Cu-Uladh (i. e. dog of Duald Mac Firbis in his Ulidia) given by He was succeeded genealogical work, p. 510.
this
is

The pedigree of

Giraldus states Righe. the victor in this battle:

De Courcy was "Quintum apud Ponthat

by Rory Mac Donslevy, who is introduced in the interpolated Annals of Innisfallen as the
chieftain

tem luori

who opposed

in reditu

sua victor evasit."

ab Anglia, unde tamen ad But in the Annals of Ulster

Down,

in the first battle in

with that love of dull

John De Courcy at Dr. Hanmer, 177. invention which distinSir
1

40

emectNN.
-]

[1178.

fflupcaD ua cfpbaill cicchfpna Oipjiall

cu ulan
-]

mac

Duinnpleb'e

.1.

l?f

ula6 puabaipc bioDbab poppa gup po nrnpbao co leir Diob. Copcpacap ceD Do na gaoibealaib ua njeapna ua meic rnaca.

$up po bdbab
i

ceicpi ceo ppiorjuin an data im

namppec

ib Uuipcpe. Do ctnpc lap rcpioll DO opccain Dal apai6e If Deabaib Doporh Uucc Dona cumiDe ua plainn ricchfpna ua ccuipcpe pfp

<Cainic lohn

-]

-]

guished him, metamorphoses this Bory Mac Donslevy into Eoderic O'Conor, Monarch of
Ireland.

tended from this Glenree to Lough Erne, and
comprised the counties of Louth, Armagh, Monaghan, and in later ages the whole of the

The exact

situation of the valley of Glenree

had never been known to any Irish historical or topographical writer in modern times, till it was
identified

county of Fermanagh, as we learn from O'Dugan, who, in his togographical poem, places
Tooraah, the country of O'Flanagan, in the north-west of Fermanagh ; Lurg, the country of O'Muldoon, in the north of the same county ;

by the Editor

of this

work when em1

in ploy ed on the Ordnance Survey

834. Keating,

Duald MacFirbis, O'Flaherty, and all the ancient
Bardic writers of the history of Ireland, state
the territory of Oriel, deprived the Ultonians of that portion
that the three Collas,

and the entire of Maguire's country in it. That the county of Fermanagh was considered a part
sion of it,

who formed

of Oriel, at least since the Maguires got possesis further corroborated by the fact, that

kingdom extending from Gleann Eighe, and Loch n-Eathach, westwards. The general
of their

throughout these Annals Maguire is called the It is stated in a pillar and prop of the Oriels.
manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin (H. 3. 18. p. 783), that the boundary between Oriel and
Ulidia,

opinion was, that the territory of Oirghiall, or Oriel, comprised the present counties of Louth,

Armagh, and Monaghan, and that Uladli or
Ulidia, the circumscribed territory of the ancient Clanna Eury, was,

or ancient Ultonians,

or the Clann Colla and Clanna Eury, was made in the west side

when formed

into shire-

of Glenree from

ground, styled the county of Down, from Down, its principal town. This having been established,
the Editor, during his examination of the ancient

Newry upwards, and that the Clanna Eury never extended their territory beyond it. This boundary, which consists of a
fosse

topography of Ulster, was led to look for Glenree somewhere on the boundary between the counaccordingly, on the documents, he found that, on an examining ancient map of the country lying between Lough Erne and Dundalk, preserved in the
ties
;

and rampart of great extent, still remains in some places in tolerable preservation, and is
called

of

Armagh and

Down and

in English,

by the strange name of the Danes' Cast, ea " n na muice ouibe, i.e. and

^

Vattey of the Black Pig, in Irish.

For

a

minute

description of this ancient boundary the reader
is

referred to Stuart's Historical

Memoirs of the
III.,

State Papers' Office, the vale of the
is

called

"

Glenree," and the river
1

Newry Eiver " Owen itself

City of

Armagh, Appendix, No.

pp. 585,

586.
c

Glenree fiuvius.""

He

also

found that in the

Hy-Meith Macha.

Now

the barony of

Mo-

Ulster Inquisitions the remarkable place near

Newry

called

Fathom,

is

denominated Glenree

naghan, in the county of Monaghan. This was otherwise called Hy-Meith Tire, to distinguish
it

Magaffee.

Oriel,

or Oirghialla, anciently ex-

from Hy-Meith Mara, now Onieath, a moun-

1178.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

41

Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, and Cooley Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, made a hostile attack upon them, and drowned and otherwise killed four hundred and fifty of them. One hundred of the Irish, together with O'Hanvy, c Lord of Hy-Meith-Macha fell in the heat of the battle. John De Courcy soon after proceeded to plunder Dalaradia and Hy-Tuirtre; and Cumee O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee d gave battle to him and
,

,

tainous district lying between Carlingford and Newry, in the county of Louth. This is evident

Ii

may be

curious to remark here, as an ex-

ample of the

manner

in

which

Irish history has

from the Tripartite Life of St. Patrick, published by Colgan, and from the Irish Calendars, which
place in
it

been manufactured by English writers, how Dr. Hanmer changes the Ferly of Cambrensis into

and Kilmore,

the churches of Tehallan, Tullycorbet, all situated in the present barony

Ferny

;

and attempts by the sheer force of
to

impudence
instance.

break down his evidence in this

of Monaghan ; and the former authority states that the place called Omna Benne was on the

boundary between

it

and Crich Mughdhorn, now

says that Cambrensis lightly the achievements of De Courcy, overskipped partly upon private grudge, for that Sir John

He

"

the barony of Cremourne, in the county of Monaghan. For the descent of the Hy-Meith, see

De Courcy
in Ireland,

allowed him not for Vicar-general 1 and secretary to the state ; yet that

Mac

O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 76 ; and Duald Firbis's Pedigrees. Harris is totally incor-

the certainty of his exploits hath been preserved,

rect in his account of the situation of the districts called
vol.
d
ii.

Hy-Meith

See his edition of Ware,

and in Latine, committed to paper by a Fryer in the North, the which booke Oneil brought to Armagh, and was translated into English by
[George] Dowdall, Primate there Anno 1551." If, however, the account which Hanmer gives
of this battle, in direct opposition to Giraldus and the Irish Annals, has been taken from this

p. 51.

Firlee, pip li, a tribe and territory situated on theBann, in the county of Antrim. Ogygia,

See note under the year 1176. part Grinldui Cambrensis writes this name Ferly,
iii.

c.

76.

and

states that

here,

De Courcy fought his third battle where he lost all his men except eleven.
:

book, it would appear to be a work compiled at a comparatively modern period, and perhaps first written in Latin on paper as he states. Hanmer
(or his author)

" Tertium erat apud Ferly in Prsedse captione, vbi ob arctam viae transitum

His words are

not knowing the situation of

sic post graues tandem congressus & anxios lohannis victa succubuit, aliis interemptis, pars
:

Ferly, found no difficulty in changing the name to Ferny, a well-known territory in Oriel, in which the Mac Mahons were noted rebels in

aliis

per nemora dispersis, vt vix lohanni 11.
Ipse vero vir-

Hanmer's time
Sir

;

and takes occasion to introduce
1 1

milites superstites adhsesissent.
tutis

inuicta:

cum

tantilla

suorum paucitate
multitudine con-

John De Courcy in the rebel Mac Mahon.

78, as fighting against
it is

Now

worthy of

re-

per 30. milliaria se

ab

hostili

mark here

tinue defendendo, equis amissis omnibus vsq; ad Castrum suum duobus diebus & noctibus, ieiunii, arinati

that Hanmer's cotemporary, Spenser, writes that Mac Mahou was of English descent,

and that the

first

of them, an Englishman,

named

pedites,

miro conatu mcmoriaq; digHiber. Expugnata,
1. ii.

nissimo euaserunt."

c.

16.

Fitu-Ursula, came to Ireland with his relative Robert deVere, Earl of Oxford [1385], and de-

G

42 co na jallaib ipuibe. pacpaic, coluim cille

[1178.

Ro meabaio
-)

poppa.

bpenamn.
i

Ocup

a nap epia rhiojibailib lohn pein ap eccin ap co eeapna
l?o cuip

cpeaccnaishce co painic co hac [cliar]. nac cliar Conprapla pij Sa^an
pocpaiDe DO cocc 50 cluain mic noip. Do pome Dia 1 cicche an eappcoip.

naiprfp mibe co na T?o aipgpfo an baile ace na cempaill
(.1.

hugo),

i

-|

"] ciapdn miopbaile poillpi poppa, uaip cararh no rionabpab Do Dfnarh gup po elaibpfo a cuipp ni po cumaingpfo cluana apabapac.

Qbann na gaillme Do cpacchab ppi pe laice aicfnca. Na po baiDiO umre 6 cen co na hiapcc Do cionol la luce an Dum
ccoiccmne.
generating into a wild Irishman, changed his to Mac Mahon, which is a translation of
Fitz-Ursula, or son of the bear.

huile
~\

aiDme
i

an npi

Courcy

many
is

gifts,

and made him his Goship,

name

which

a league of amitie highly esteemed in

Both

stories

Ireland.
Castles,

were evidently invented to turn them to account against the Mac Mahons of Ferny and Oriel who
were then very troublesome to the government. But it is well known that the Mac Mahons were
not chiefs of Oriel, or Uriel, in
for it appears,
all

Whereupon Courcy gave him two with their demesnes, to hold of him. Within one month after, this Mac Mahon [recte
O'Lyn], returning to his vomit, brake downe the Castles, and made them even with the
ground.
Sir John

De

Courcy's time,

De

Courcy sent unto him

from the concurrent testimony of the Irish annals, that O' Carroll was then king

to

know

the cause that

moved him

to

fall

to

this villanie: his

or chief lord of Oriel, and that the

Mac Mahons,
some

not to
it

answer was, that he promised hold stones of him, but the land, and that

who

are a collateral branch of the O'Carrolls,
as chiefs of Oriel for

were not heard of
time after
history in

De

Courcy's disappearance from Irish 1205. Hanmer manufactures the

was cpntrary to his nature to couche himself within cold stones, the woods being so nigh, where he might better warme himself, with
other slender and scornefull answers."

He

then

story as follows,

and his version of

it is

gravely

quoted as true history by Cox, Leland, Ledwich, and Stuart, who were not able to detect the forgery,
cessor

goes on to give a detailed account of a prey taken, and a battle fought, in which, of the
eleven thousand Irishmen,

but each echoing the
:

tale of his prede-

escaped with

their

lives.

only two hundred But the Doctor is

Courcy fought was in Ferny, against eleven thousand Irishmen the occasion was thus, Courcy had
:

" The third battaile that Sir John

De

obliged to confess that there was a totally different account of this battle (alluding to that

already quoted from Cambrensis), which, howhe feels inclined not to believe " There
ever,
:

builded

many
[recte

Castles throughout Vlster, and

" are," he says,

some out of the schoole of envy,

especially in

Mahon

Ferny [recte Ferly], where Mac O'Lyn] dwelled this Mac Mahon [recte O'Lyn] with solemn protestations vowed to become a true and faithful
;

grace to disgrace Courcy, that report the story otherwise, which deliver not wherein he

with

was

to

be honoured, but wherein he was
la

foiled,

subject,

gave

fortuna de

guerra

;

that he was driven, with

1178.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

43

and defeated them with great slaughter, through the miracles of and John himself escaped with difficulty, Patrick, Columbkille, and Brendan 6 being severely wounded, and fled to Dublin
his foreigners,
;
.

The
Hugo)

Constable of the King of England in Dublin and East Meath (namely, marched with his forces to Clonmacnoise, and plundered all the

God and Kieran wrought town, except the churches and the bishop's houses. a manifest miracle against them, for they were unable to rest or sleep, until
they had secretly absconded from Cuirr Cluana on the next day. The Kiver Galliv (Gal way) was dried up for a period of a natural day f all the articles that had been lost in it from remotest times, as well as its fish, were
;

collected
general.

by the inhabitants of the

fortress,

and by the people of the country

in

eleven persons in armes, to travaile a foote some
30. miles, for the space of
still

dayes, the enemy which they lay not downe), pursuing (the

two

Machaire Chonaille, and Cuailgne, and took a prey of a thousand cows but Murrough O'Car;

roll,

King of
;

Oriel

;

Mulrony O'Boylan, Chief of

all fasting

without any

relief, till

he came to an

OLD

Castle of his owne,

which savoureth not

and Gillapatrick O'Hanvy, Chief of Mugdorna [Cremourne], pursued and overtook
Dartry

altogether of truth, but forwards with the history."
p.

them

:

a battle ensued, in which the English

Hanmer's

Chronicle, Dubl.

edit.

1809,

309.
Dublin, or cliac

were routed, and deprived of the prey ; and John De Courcy betook himself for shelter to
the castle of Skreen-Columbkille, which he himself

The

latter part of this
;

name

autograph original but is here restored from Maurice Gorman's copy, which had been made from the autograph before
is

destroyed in the

had

built."

Hanmer gives
sion,
is

a strange version of this excur-

evidently from the Book of Howth, whicli

the edge of the paper was
to

worn away. The place

a collection of traditional stories, written

by

which De Courcy fled on this occasion is not mentioned in the Annals of Ulster or those of
Kilronan, or in the Dublin or Bodleian copy of the Annals of Innisfallen ; and it is highly pro-

an Anglo-Irish Romancer in the fifteenth or sixteenth century.
f

aicneb

Natural day, laice aiceanca. The word is used in ancient Irish writings to de-

bable that he fled to Downpatrick, not to Dublin. Under this year the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster has a brief notice of

in his

note nature, and aiceanra, natural. O'Flaherty, Account of lar-Connaught (printed for

an attack

upon John De Courcy in the territory of Cuailgne, which is not in any of the other Annuide

the Archasological Society), notices this occurrence as follows, from which it will be seen that

any other year, except the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, in which it is entered under the year 1 1 80, as folnals,

under

this or

he had other Annals besides those of the $###BOT_TEXT###gt;ur Masters " There is an island, where the river
:

issues

from

the lake,

now

called

Olen

na

lows

:

mbrahar, or the Fryars Isle, but anciently Olen na gclereagh, i. e. the Clergy's Isle for the Irish
;

"A.

D. 1180.

John De Courcy plundered

Annals mention

that,

anno 1178, from midnight

G

[1178.

TTlaibm pia nape ua maoilechlamn, -| pia nuib pailje, ]im n^allaib Hlhaoileachlainn mbCcc, ~\ pop Dpeim Do pfpaib belbna eacpa, pop pop
-] -|

cfchba DU

mapbab TTluipeaDhac mac an rpionnaigh. C(o6 ua plaicbfpraij cicclifpna mpuaip Connacc Do ecc
in

po

i

neanach

Duin.

Qmaljaib mag amalgam Do mapbab la pol nanmchaoha. TTlaelpeclainn bfcc ua maoileclainn Do gabdil cije pop Qpc ua maoiplann mac meg arhaljaib caoipeac ap, ann la TTlaelpeclainn. calpaije Do mapbab
leaclamn,
]

Qpc Do ceapnub
river

-\

to noon.
Isle to

Galway

the sea; and

much

became dry from Clergy fish, and goods long
found by the people of See note under the
This was originally a

of the territories of Leix and Ophaly, made in the reign of Philip and Mary, the original of

afore

drowned

therein,

which on vellum
tish

is

now

preserved in the Bri-

the town."

pp. 28, 29-

year 1191.
*

copies in the MS. Library of Trinity College, Dublin, and at the Ordnance

Museum, and

Offaly,

Ui police

very extensive territory in Leinster, and the Before the principality of the O'Conors Faly.
English invasion it comprised the present baronies of eastern and western Ophaly, in the County of Kildare, those of upper and lower
Philipstown, and those of Geshil, Warrenstown, and Coolestown, in the King's County, as well
as those of Portnahinch

Survey Office, Phoenix Park, Dublin. See note on Clann Maoilughra, or Clanmaliere, under the
year 1193.
h

Dealbhna Eathra,

called

Dealbhna Meg

Cochlain in these Annals, at the years 1572 and 1601. This territory comprised the entire of
the present barony of Garrycastle in the King's County, except the parish of Lusmagh, which

and Tinnahinch, in the

belonged

to Sil

Anmchadha, or O'Madden's

Queen's County.

vasion, however, wrested from O'Conor Faly and his correlatives

Shortly after the English inthe Fitzgeralds of Kildare

country, and which is still a part of the diocese of Clonfert. See Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, p. 1 32, col. 2 ; Keating, in the reign of Niall
Cailne
;

portion of his original territory of Ui Failghe comprised within the present county of
that

O'Flaherty's Ogygia,

part

iii.

c.

82

;

and De Burgo's Hibernia Dominicana, pp. 305,
306.
'

Kildare, and

now

called the baronies of eastern

and western Ophaly. There were then two Ophalys formed out of the ancient Ui Failghe,
namely, the English Ophaly, in the county of Kildare, giving the title of baron to a branch of
the Fitzgeralds ; and the Irish Ui Failghe, exinto the present King's and Queen's tending
Counties, as already specified, and giving the Irish title of King of Ui Failghe to O'Conor
Faly, the supposed senior representative of Rosa Failghe, the eldest son of Cathaoir Mor, monarch

Aniuidown,

Gunuch Oum, an

ancient cathe-

dral on the

margin of Lough Corrib, in the See" barony of Clare, and county of Galway f note infra, A. D. 1 179.
,

k

Sil- Anmchadha.

This was the tribe name
also applied to their

of the O'Maddens,

and was

country, which

ages comprised the of Longford in the county of Galway, barony and the parish of Lusmagh in the King's County,
in latter

on the east

side of the

Shannon.

See Tribes
Irish

of Ireland in the second century.
herty's Oyygia, part
iii.

See O'Fla-

ami Customs efHy-Mtmy, published by the

c.

59, and an old map

x Archaeological Society in 1843, p. 69, note .

1178.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
victory
,

45

was gained by Art O'Melaglilin, the people of Offaly g and the Delvin Eathra" and Melaghlin Beg, and a party of English, over the people of the men of Teffia; in the battle, Murray, the son of the Sinnagh (the Fox), was slain.

A

his

Lord of West Connaught, died at Annadown k Awley Mac Awley was killed by the Sil-Anmchadha the house of Art O'Melaghlin, who made Melaghlin Beg O'Melaghlin took of Mac Awley chief of Calry, was killed escape out of it; but Flann, the son
1

Hugh

O'Flaherty,

.

.

1

,

m

by Melaghlin
the chief of Calry an chala, which comprised the parish of Bally loughloe, in the county of Westmeath.
1

Mac Awley

He was

Brandon

Hill, in

Kerry, was desolated.

In the
it

Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen

is

m The Bodleian copy of the Annals of
actions of the English in Munster,

Innis-

stated, that during this war several of the Eugenian septs fled from their original territories.

fallen has the following brief notice of the trans-

which

is

omitted by the Four Masters: A. D. 1178. Copcach DO mpiuD la mac true t)orinnaill

"A. D. 1178. There was a very great war between the O'Briens and Mac Carthys, so that they desolated the entire country from Limerick
to Cork,

and from the plain of Derryrnore to
Hill,
fled to the

ua Capihaij;
TTlilio

Popbaip la 7 la jullaib jlapa. Occam 7 la Hlac Scemni Copcaij.
i

Brandon
of

Eoghan

and the greater part of the race woods of Ivahagh, south

la buoin Dib 50 h-Gcliao Da eo, 50 po Da la, 7 Da eochi innci, 7 appm 50 baoap

Gupup

of the River Lee, and others to

mond. On

this occasion the

Kerry and ThoHy-Conaill Gabhra

Copcaij; apip ooib.

lap pin Doib ap

ammup

Puipclaipje 50 po climolpacap na ^aeoil cucu illanaipoe lip mop, 50 po mapbaic ule

and the Hy-Donovane fled southwards over the Mangartan mountain."
Dr. O'Brien, in his History of the House of
O'Brien,
in the first

Cork was plundered by the of Donnell, who was the grandson of grandson Carthach and the green Galls. Cork was beD. 1178.
sieged by Milo Cogan and Fitz Stephen. party of their people made an excursion to

pene. " A.

name, Rebus Hibernicis, thus very correctly paraphrases this passage. "A. D. 1178. Donal O'Brien, at
distressed

published by Vallancey, in his own volume of the Collectanea de

A

the head of the entire Dal Cassian tribe, greatly and reduced all the Eugenians, laid
fire

Aghadoe, where they remained two days and two nights, and then returned again to Cork.
After this they went towards Waterford
the Irish gathered against
;

waste their country with

and sword, and

but
of

obliged the dispersed Eugenians to seek for shelter in the woods and fastnesses of Ive

Lismore, and nearly killed Under this year also the same Annals record a
desolating

them at the them all."

hill

Eachach, on the south side of the Lee.

In this

war between the

Irish inhabitants of

Thomond and Desmond, during which

the whole

expedition they routed the O'Donovans of IveFigeinte, or Cairbre Aodhbha, in the county of Limerick, and the O'Collins of Ive-Conaill Gabhra, or Lower Connallo in said county, be-

country extending from Limerick to Cork, and from the plain of Derryrnore, near Koscrea, to

yond the mountain of Mangerton, ern parts of the county of Cork

to the west:

here these

46

uiohachca
QO1S CR1OSO
Cloip Cjiiopo mile, ceo,

[1179-

1179.
naoi.

peaccmogar, a

Cuacal ua Connachcaij eppcop cfpe bpiuin caiman ua fcannlamaipcinneac cluana, giollu Dorhnaij ua popanndin aipcinneac apoa pparha,
-|

TTlaelmaipe

mac

giollu

colmain Secnap apoa ppaca DO ecc.
being powerfully
of Limerick

two exiled Eugenian
assisted

families,

by the O'Mahonys, made new settlements for themselves in the ancient properties
of the O'Donoghues, O'Learies, and O'Driscolls, to which three families the O'Mahonys were

Ui Piojeince pe paionop clap Concae luimnig aniu History of Ireland ;
:

Reign of Diarmaid Mac Ceirbheoil and Conall
Caol. in his Ogygia, pp. 380,

O'Flaherty has the following notice of it 381 "Anno 366. Crim:

always

declared enemies,

to

the

borders

of

thannus films Fidachi Heberio e semine Achaio

Lough Leane, where Auliff Mor O'Donoghue, surnamed Cuimsinach, had made some settlements before
year 1200.
this epoch."

Mogmedonio
nise

sororio

suo Temorise extremum

diem quiete claudenti substituitur Rex Hiberaunis tredecim.

See note under the

Transmarinis expeditio:

The
to

territory of Hy-Figeinte, here referred
its

nibus in Gallia, et Britannia ineinorabilis erat uxorem habuit Fidengam e regio Connactise
stemnate, sed nullam sobolem reliquit.

by Dr. O'Brien, derived

name from the

descendants of Fiacha Figeinte, son of Daire Cearb, who was the son of Oilioll Flannbeg,

" Crimthanni regis abavus Fiachus latus vertex rex Momonias duos Olillos genuit Flannmor
et

King

of Munster, in the latter part of the third

century, and comprised the barony of Coshma, and all that portion of the present county of

Flannbeg cognominibus distinctos. Olillus Flannmor rex Momoniae sobolis expers Olillum
Olillo Flannbeg Flannbeg fratrem adoptavit. Momonia: superant Achaius rex Momonia:, regi

Limerick lying to the west of the Eiver Maigue.
Its situation is thus described in the Life of St.

Darius Kearb, ex quo O'Donnowan, Lugaduis
et Eugenius.

Molua, who was
geiiite
:

descended from Fiacha Fidh-

" Et venit [Molua] ad Mumeniam, et
.i.

lustravit patriam

qua- gens est in

suam, Nepotes Fidgenti, medio Mumenie, a media planicie Mumenie usque ad medium Montis Luachra in occidente ad australem plagam fluminis Synna."
Vitce S,

" Darius Kearb prseter Fidachum Crimthanni et Mongfinnse reginaa Hibernise patrem regis, genuit Fiachum Figente, et

Achaium

Liatha-

nach, ex quo Hy-Liathan in agro Corcagiensi. Fiacho Figente nomen et originem debet Hy-

Molue, Abbatis

et

Confessoris, as in the

Codex Killkenniensis
14. F. 135.
lin,
i

in Marshe's Library, v. 3.

Figenta regio olim variis principibus Celebris in media Momonia? planicie usque ad medium

H.

3. 17. p.

In a MS. in Trinity College, Dub748, it is described thus hip
:

mentis Luachra in Kierrigia ad australem Sinanni fluminis ripam ; licet hodie hoc nomine
vix nota, sed Limericensis comitatus planities
appellata."

frp u P'o"' 7

cpich hua piogfmbce o tuachaip 6pum co & P U P'5 co 6uaip. " The country
is

of the Hy-Fidgeinnte

from Luachair Bruin to
Keating

Bruree, and from Bruree to Buais."
describes this

Nothing has yet been discovered to prove whether the O' Donovans ever returned to their
original territory of Cairbre

territory as the plain of the county

Aobhdha, in the

117!).]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

47

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age

1179.

one hundred seventy-nine. of Christ, one thousand

Tuathal O'Connaghty, Bishop of Tir-Briuin"; Colman O'Scanlan, Erenagh and Mulmurry of Cloyne Gilladowny O'Forannan, Erenagh of Ardstraw
;
;

Mac

Gillacolum, seachnab" (prior) of Ardstraw, died.
that " in the time of Malachias

after this expulpresent county of Limerick, sion. It is stated in Lewis's Topograghical Dic-

Mac Aodha,
archbishope

of of

West Connaught

extraction,

that Dermot tionary, under the article Croom, O' Donovan was possessed of the territory of

Tuam

[ab an. 1313,

ad ann. 1348], after a long

Coshma

in the reign of

King John, when he

debate for many years before and in his time, the cathedrall of Enaghdun was, anno 1321,

built the Castle of Croom on the River Maigue; but the Editor has not been able to discover

united to the see of Tuam, by the finall decision of Pope John the Twenty-second." Duald Mac
Firbis
states,

any original or trustworthy authority for this statement. It would appear, however, that all
the

in his Genealogical work, that

Clann-Donovan were not driven out of

Aodh, the son of Eochaidh Tirmcharna, was the first that granted Eanach Duin to God and St.
Brendan.
Erenagh,

Aobhdha in 1 178, as the name has been common in many parts of the county of very
Cairbre

Gipcinneac

This term

is
:

exaip-

Limerick, particularly the parish of Kilmoylan ; and in the year 1551, John Donevan, Rector of
Derrygallavan, in the diocese of Limerick, obtained a grant of denization.
(Inrolled 5

plained as follows in

Cormac's Glossary

cin&ech

.1.

apcenbach, apcop jjpece, ercelpup

lacine oicicup.
.).

Edw.

uapal-ceno

Qipcmoecli Din .1. epceno oj, comlan. " Airchindech, i. e.
erchend ogh,
e.

VI.
n

f.

r.

19.)

arcendach, archos Grece excehus Latine dicitur.

Bishop of Tir-Briuin.
as Tir

territories in Ireland called Tir

There were many Briuin and Hy-

Airchindech then,

i.

e.

i.

a noble

Briuin,

Briuin

Breifne, Ily- Briuin Seola, &c.

na Sinna, Hy-Briuin Sir James Ware

perfect head." In theLeabkarBreac, fol.76, a, b, the term is used to denote a president or super-

intendent, and

is

applied to Satan,

who

is

styled

mentions a Tuathal O'Connachtaigh, Bishop of Hua mbriuin, which he explains by Enaghdune,
as attending

"

A irchinneck

of hell and prince of death," cup-

at the Council of Kells in 1152,

cinoech ippipn 7 cafpech in baip. The first mention made of this office in these Annals occurs at the year 788.

who would appear to be the same whose death is here recorded, for Enaghdune was the capital of
the Hy-Briuin Seola, or O'Flahertys, and their correlatives. See Ussher's Primordia, p. 955.

cinoeach Cpepoib moip, oecc,

Thus t)oimreach, aip" Doimhe.
i.

theach, airchinneach of the great Trevet, died." From this period forward, however, all the annalists frequently

Roderic O'Flaherty, in his account of the territory of lar-Connaught, states that the cathedral of the seigniory of the O'Flahertys was "Enaghdun, dedicated to St. Brendan, the 16th of May,

in his Treatise

mention this office. Ussher, on Corbes, Herenachs, and Ter-

mon

Lands, published in the second

Number

of

Vallancey's Collectanea, asserts that the office of

Anno

Christi 577, there deceased, in the barony

Herenach and Archdeacon was the same

;

and

of Clare, on the brink of

Lough Orbsen."

But

Connell Mageoghegan, in his Translation of the

48

aNNdta Rio^hachua
Qpo maca Dolopccab
ecci|i

eirceciNN.

[1179.

cemplaib

-|

pecclfpaib ace pecclfp bpicchDe

1

ceampall na ppfpca namd. Cealla cipe heojam o pleb buD ofp Do polmujab cpe coccab, i com~\

ua neachoac Do ecc Do galop rpi noibci lap na puabacdn cicchfpna canoine pacpaicc Do jap poirhe. lonnapbab cpe pdpuccab Do cloinn nDiapmaDa uile Sfb DO bfham Do bonnchab ua caipealldin la hua nsaipmleabaij, amlaib mac mfnman Dfpbpacaip la cenel TTloen mnd an oonnchaib pempaice. ba hann po naibmpfo a pf6 pe apoile

puachab, cepce,

oocmacaiD.

Ua

-|

-j

pibe

i

na heaccailpe fpin, Dorhnaij moip ceampall apDa ppara po mionnaib na hfpname. Uainic Dona ua gaipmleaDaig .1. arhlaoib ap na rhapac Do DonncaiD ui caipeallain Ro mapbab pom cuingeab cuilleab pldna co ceac an cighe ppiabnaipi a Dfpbpeaap lap an aipeachca a noopup
]

po cfooip

i

rop
.1.

.1.

bfn Donncaba.

Ro mapbab
ui

beop cpiup Dia muinncfp

i

maille ppipp

cionafb

mac

aipc

bpacdin,

-|

mac

giollu

cpiopD mec copbmaic mec

peoDain .1. Dfpb comalca Donncaib ui caipeallain. QpDppaca Domnac mop an Gapnaibe

********

DO polmujab la pfpaib maighe hiche.
Annals of Clonmacnoise, always renders aipcmnech by archdeacon. In this, however, it is
founded the church, and called it by the name of that saint, and then gave the land to some
clerke, not being in orders,

more than probable that both Ussher and Mageoghegan are mistaken.
another term to express the

and to his heires

for

The

annalists

have

office of

archdeacon,

with this intent, that he should keep the church clean and well repaired, keep hospitality,
ever
;

and

it is

quite certain that the archdeacon was

always in holy orders, whereas the airchinnech

and give almes to the poore, for the soul's health of the founder. This man and his heires had

was always a layman, or

at least

one

who had

merely received primam tonsuram. The origin and duties of the office of Herenach are stated
as follows to

name of Erenach. The Erenach was also to make a weekly commemoration of the founder
the
in the

church

;

he had always

primam

tonsuram,
a voice in

John Davies, in his letter " For the Erenach the Earl of Salisbury

by

Sir

but took no other orders.
the chapter,

He had

:

:

when they

consulted about their

There are few parishes of any compass or extent where there is not an Erenach, which, being an
office

revenues, and paid a certaine yearly rent to the Bishop, besides a fine upon the marriage of every

of the Church, took beginning in this

man-

nef

lord or gentleman had a direction to build a church, he did first dedicate some
:

when any

of his daughters, which they call a Loughinipy ; he gave a subsidy to the Bishop at his first entrance into the bishoprick, the certainty of
all

good portion of land to some saint or other, whom he chose to be his patron ; then he

which duties appears in the Bishop's Register ; and these duties grew unto the Bishop, first be-

1179-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

49

Armagh was

q burned, as well churches as regleses excepting only Regies

Brighde and Teampull na bh-Fearta. The churches of Tyrone, from the mountain southwards, were left in consequence of war and intestine commotion, famine, and distress.

desolate,

O'Rogan, Lord of Iveagh, died of three nights' sickness, shortly after he

had been expelled for violating the Canoin-Phatruigr peace was concluded by Donough O'Carellan and
.

A

all

the Clandermot

with the Kinel-Moen and O'Gormly

(i.

e.

Auliffe, the son of Menman, brother-

This peace was concluded between them in-law of the aforesaid Donough). in the church of Ardstraw, upon the relics of that church and those of Donagh-

more and Urney. On the following day, O'Gormly (Auliife) repaired to the house of Donough O'Carellan to demand further guarantees, but was killed in the middle of the meeting, in the doorway of the house, in the presence of
his

own

sister,
;

along with him son of Cormac Mac Reodan, the foster-brother of
Ardstraw', Donaghmore, Urney, desolated by the men of Magh Ithe.

the wife of Donough. Three of his people were also killed namely, Kenny, son of Art O'Bracan the son of Gilchreest,
;

**************

Donough O'Carellan

5
.

were

cause the Erenach could not be created, nor the

church dedicated without the consent of the
Bishop." P Seachnab
nals,

scription of this manuscript written by the famous Antiquary Lhuyd, and published by Dr.

O'Conor

in his

Rerum Hibernicarum
Ivii, Iviii,

Scriptores,

At
is

Seachnab

the year 1089 of these Anexplained by Prior : in Cor-

vol.

i.

Epist. Nunc. pp.

with an English translation,

and reprinted, by Sir William

mac's Glossary
i.

e.

vice abbot.

explained secundus abbas, The Irish word peach has the
it is

Betham, in his Antiquarian Researches, and in
the original Latin in Petrie's Essay on the

Round

same

signification in
vice,

compound words
viceroy,

as the
vicere-

Towers of Ireland, pp. 329, 330.
This passage shews that O'CaChief of the Clandermot, had seized upon rellan,
*

English
gent, &c.
q

in vicepresident,

O'Carellan.

Regies seems to have been abbreviated from

that part of Moy-Ithe, O'Gormly's country, in

the Latin Eegidaris ecclesia, and means a church belonging to the regular, not the secular
clergy.

which Donaghmore-Moy-Itha was
c

situated.

O'Flaherty says
p. 16.
r

it is

an ecclesiastical word of no
Ogygia,

great antiquity in the Irish language.

Ardstraw, 6pt> ppara, an ancient church in Tyrone, formerly the head of a bishop's see, of which Bishop Eoghan, or Eugenius was patron,
festival was annually celebrated there on the 23rd of August, as was that of Bishop Coibhdhenach on the 26th of November. See

whose
is

Canoin-Phatruig

the old

name

of the

ancient manuscript book of the Gospels, comSee a demonly called the Book of Armagh

the Felire \denguis, and Irish Calendar of the

H

50

[1180.

Coicc cije ap ceo DO lopccab hi ccluain mic noip hi ppojail. Cluain pfpca bpfnainn co na cfmplaib Do lopccaD.
Locpa, apopeapra bpenainn, Caipiol, ceallmf&oin -| balla, miopiohe Do lopccaD

cuaim Da jualann, Dipfpe ceallaij,
uile.

Do ecc. TTlaelpeaclamn ua maoilmiaDaij raoipeac muinnripe heolaip na paichne Do ecc. lorhap ua cacapaigh cijeapna TTIaoileaclainn piabac o peachnapaijj cicceapna leice cenel QoDa DO mapbaD la mac DonnchaiD f carail.

QO18 CR1OSO

1180.
,

Qoip CpiopD mile, ceD, ochDmojarc.
Lopcan ua ruarail
.1.

labpap aipDeppoc

laijfn, i lejairr

na hfpeann Do

maprpaDh
nexed
1266

hi Sajeain.
of Kerry,
Tralee,

O'Clerys' at these days. It was afterwards anto the see of Clogher ; but about the year
it

about four miles to the north of
the
ruins
of several ancient

where

was separated from the see of Clogher,

churches are
y

still

to be seen.

with other churches in the territory of HyFiachrach Arda Sratha, in the gift of the Kinel-

Disert-Kelly, t)ipepc
is

Cealtai j

The name
and
is

now

corruptly anglicised Isertkelly,

Owen, and incorporated with the
donderry.

see of
p.

Lon857
;

See Ussher's Primordia,

in the applied to an ancient church and parish diocese of Kilmacduagh, situated to the south-

O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 76 ; and Ordnance Memoir of the Parish of Templemore.
"

west of the town of Loughrea, in the county of Galway. See Ordnance Map of the county of

Clonfert- Brendan,

Cluain pepca bpenainn.

Galway, sheet 114.
1

The church of

Clonfert, the head of an ancient

Kilmaine, Cill

meabom,

i.

e.

the middle

bishop's see, in the barony of Longford, and county of Galway.

church, a small village in a barony to which it has given name in the south of the county of

w

Lorha, torpa

A

small village in the ba-

Mayo, and not
a

far

from the boundary of the

rony of Lower Ormond, about six miles to the
north of Burrisokeane.

county of Galway.
Batta, or Bed, 6alla, a village containing the

Here are the ruins of two abbeys of considerable extent, but none of
an antiquity prior to the Anglo-Norman invasion, though St. Rodanus, the patron of the
place,

ruins of an ancient church and round tower in

a parish. of the same name, in the barony of Carra, and county of Mayo, and about eight
miles south-east of Castlebar.

in the sixth

had erected a primitive Irish abbey here For an account of Rocentury.
the reader
is

See Life of St.

danus,

referred to his Life,

as

Mochua, published by Colgan, in rum, at 30th of March.
b

Ada

Sancto-

published by the Bollandists, at 25th April.

Muintir-Eolais.

This territory, which after-

*4rdfert-rendan,vovf Ardfert, in the county

wards became the principality of Mac-Rannall,

1180.]

ANNALS
five

OF-

THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

51

One hundred and
datory incursion.

houses were burned in Clonmacnoise, during a prechurches, were burned.

Clonfert-Brendan", with
a
,

its

Lorha", Ardfert-Brendan*, Cashel,
Balla

Tuam, Disert-Kelly

y
,

Kilmaine

2
,

and

were

all

burned.

Melaghlin O'Mulvey, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, died". Ivor O'Casey, Lord of the Saithne died.
,

Melaghlin Eeagh O'Shaughnessy, Lord of half the
killed

territory of Kinelea,

was

by the son of Donough

O'Cahill".

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of Lorcan O'Toole,
land, suffered
i.

1180.
eighty.

Christ, one

thousand one hundred

e.

Lawrence, Archbishop of Leinster and Legate of
6

Ire-

martyrdom

in England.
present
alienuerat, terrain videlic. Ocathesi

comprised the southern

half of the

&

alias

quam

county of Leitrim. It extended from Slieve-inierin and Lough Allen to Slieve Carbry, and
to the west of Ballinamuck, in the county of

plures ad
d

Regiam mensam cum omni

sollicitu-

dine reuocauit."
CPCahitt,

ua carail.

O'Shaughnessy shortly

Longford, and contained the castles of Rinn,

afterwards became lord of

Lough-skur, and Leitrim, and the monasteries of Fiodhnacha Muighe Eein, now Fenagh, Maothail,

all the territory of Kinelea, and the O'Cahills sunk into compara-

now Mohill, and Cluain Conmaicne^ now Cloone. The mountains of Slieve-in-ierin are
placed in this territory by the ancient writers. c Saithne, an ancient territory in EastMeath, the
ancient inheritance of the O'Caseys.

This territory comprised the southern half of the diocese of Kilmacduagh, in
tive insignificance.

the south-west of the county of Galway, and contained the churches of Kilmacduagh, Beagh,

The Saithne,

and Kilbecanty, and the dane, and Ardmulduane.
e

castles

of Gort, Fe-

or O'Caseys, are descended from Glasradh, the second son of Cormac Gaileng, who was of the

Suffered martyrdom

This
stated

is

a mistake of the
this year in

Four

Masters, for it

is

under

Munster

race,

and

settled here

under King CorSee O'Fla-

mac Mac Art,

in the third century.
iii. c.

the Bodleian and Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, as well as in the Annals of Boyle,

herty's Ogygia, part
Irish Pedigrees.

69

;

and Mac Firbis's
states, in

Giraldus Cambrensis
ii.

and in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, that he died [a natural death ?]
in France.

his Hiber. Expugnata, lib.

c.

24, that Philippus

The

fact

is

that St. Laurence O'Toole

Wigorniensis seized

on the lands of O'Cathesie, to the king's use, though Hugh de Lacy had " Inter formerly sold them. ipsa igitur operum

died in the monastery of

Augum, now Eu,

in

suorum

initialia,

terras,

quas

Hugo de Lacy

Normandy, but an attempt had been made by a maniac to murder him at Canterbury in 1175, and this is the martyrdom alluded to by the Four 2

H

[1180.

TTlacpaic ua oaijpe aipcinneach ooijie [oo ecc]. Rajnall ua caiyieallam Do rhayibab la cenel TTloain
cille

i

neneac colaim

pop lap

t>oipe

coknm

pabfin.
zelo siue gentis, utferebatur, impetrata,

Masters.
tice

Ussher has the following curious noof this distinguished prelate in his Veterum

Anglorum

Epislolarum Hibernicarum Sylloge, note to the Brief of Pope Alexander III., Epist. xlviii. Anno
Christi 1179
:

Regi suspectum fuisse, libro 2. Expugnat. Hibern. cap. 23. narrat Giraldus Cambrensis. Eo
tempore, Dubliniensi suss Metropoli prsesens hoc impetratum est ab eo privilegium, ex antiquo
Dubliniensis Archiepiscopi Eegesto, quad Crede mild appellant, a nobis exscriptum. Obiit apud

"Est hie LaurentiusO'Tolus; cujus Vitam ab Augiensis Collegii monacho descriptam tomo 6.
Vit. Sanctor.

Novemb.

14. inseruit

Laurentius

Patrem habuit, ut author ille indicat, Muriartach sive Mauricium O'Tuohail, ad quern
Surius.

Augiense Normannia? castrum (cujus Comes Eichardus Strongbous fuerat, qui Dubliniam & Lageniam, Laurentii sedem metropoliticam &
provinciam, ipso vivente

nan

modtea pars

Hibernice, quce Lagenia dicitur,

&

vidente subjugavit:)

iure Itcereditario pertinebat :
(ita

matrem IngenYbruin
Vita3, quse ego habeo,

quum

patrise ab Anglis vastatse calamitatem de-

enim legunt duo hujus

plorasset, miserabiliter lingua

materna dicens

:

Manuscripta exemplaria) idest,JiliamPrincipis, ex Birnorum, ni fallor, familia. Annos natus
decem, Dermitio regi (qui alius ab
chardi
filio fuit,

illo

Mur-

imipiens ; quid jam facturus Quis sanabit aversiones tuas ? Quis miserebitur tui? 'Atque ita, xvm. Calendas Decemstulte 8f

Heu papule
es ?

a quo Angli in Hiberniam sunt introducti) a patre obses datus, durissime ab eo

bris,

cum

sextce ferice

terminus advenisset, in

habitus est

:

tus, et Ecclesiaa ministerio

post biennium vero patri restituab eo dicatus, sub

confinio Sabbati subsequentis spiritum sancti viri requies (sterna suscepit ; inquit vita eius scriptor.

Annum, quem
feriam
secutus
incidit.

ille tacet,

Annales nostri

assig-

magisterio Glindelacensis Episcopi vixit.

Cum
sive

nant 1180. quo et

14. dies

Novembris

in sextam

annorum

esset xxv. Ecclesise

S.

Comgeni
et

Keivini de Glindelach Abbas, Clero
postulantibus, constitutus est
:

populo id

Csar

Eogerus Hovedenus, & eum Baronius in Annalibus suis ad

ac

demum

Gre-

gorio Dubliniensi Archiepiscopo defuncto,

ad

sequentem annum male referunt. Nam ut ipse Rogerus postea confirmat, anno 1181. Henricus

Dubliniensem cathedram evectus, anno Domini
Gelasio totius Hibernice Primate, in ipsa Dubliniensi Ecclesid, multis Episcopis prcesen-

Rex

Anglice, filius
clerico suo,

Imperatricis,

dedit loanni

1162,

<z

Cumin

in Hibernid, viu.

Archiepiscopatum Divelimce Jdus Septembris apud Eues-

tibus,
est.

gratias agente populo, solemniter consecratus

Anno

1179.

una cum

Catholico

Tuamensi

ham. (ideoque Novembris dies 14. qui electionem hanc antecesserat, ad annum 1180, necessario
retrahendus
est.) et

Archiepiscopo et quinque vel sex Hibernite Episcopis Rornam ad Lateranense concilium profec-

anno 1182.

Lucius Papa
III.

III. ordinavit

loannem Cumin in sacerdotem
:

ubi omnes pro per Angliam transiit licentia transeundi iuraverunt, quod neque Regi,
turus,
:

Idus Martij apud Velletre

deinde consecravit

eum

in Archiepiscopum Divelinice xn. Calend.

neque regno eius rnodum in anni

damnum
illius

qucererent

;

quemadEogerus

Aprilis,

Dominica

in

ramis Palmarum, apud

historia refert

Hovedenus.

Laurentium tamen,

ob privilegia

in Lateranensi Concilia contra Regice dignitatis,

Calendar!) quoque ratio sufFragatur ; anno 1182. Dominicam Paschalem 28. .die quse In sanctorum Martij celebratam ftiisse docet.

Velletre, cui

1180.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
St.

53

Macraith O'Deery, Erenagh of Derry [died]. Randal O'Carellan was killed by the Kinel-Moen, in defence of
kille, in

Columb-

the middle of Derry-Columbkille.
relatus est Laurentius ab

vero

numerum

Hono-

Co

h-Qlriiam an ceoil coclaij,

rio III.

anno 1225. cujus canonizationis Bulla, data Reate, III. Id. Decembr. anno Pontificatus 10. habetur in Laertij Cherubini Bullario ;

dn peoip bappjlom bpaoncopcaij. " Pass across the Barrow, of the cattle abounding border,

tomo

1

.

pag. 49. edit.

Rom. anno 1617." For more

information about this distinguished prelate, the
reader
is

From the land rich in corn and honey, From Dinnree to the pleasant Maisdin (Mullamast),

referred to his Life, as published
in his Florilegium,

by

Messingham
siastical

and to De Burgo's
iv. p.

My journey is

repaid

by

their nobility.

Hibernia Dominicana. Dr. Lanigan in his Eccle-

O'Toole of the festive fortress,
Is over the vigorous

History of Ireland, vol.

174,

and
ii.

Hy-Muireadhaigh,

Mr. Moore, in his History of Ireland,
p.

vol.

308, state that Muirchertach, the father of

As far Of the
The

as

Almhuin of melodious music,
grassy, irriguous surface."

fair,

St. Laurence,

was prince of Imaile

;

but

this is

ancient Irish topographical

work

called

as great a mistake as that of the

author of St.
a son of the

Laurence's Life,

who makes him

Dinnsencfius, places in the territory of Ui Muiredhafgh, the old fort of Roeireann, which was

King

of

all

Leinster, for O'Toole

was

at this

situated on the top of the remarkable hill of

and territory of Hyperiod Lord of the tribe Muireadhaigh, called Omurethi by Giraldus,
comprising about the southern half of the present county of Kildare, to wit, the baronies of

Mullach Roeireann, now Mullagh-Reelion, about
five miles to the south-east of Athy, in the

county

of Kildare.

of this territory is preserved even to the present day in that of the

The name

Kilkea and Moone, Narragh and Rheban, and
a part of the barony of Connell. It was bounded on the north by the celebrated hill of Allen, on

deanery of Omurthie, which, according to the Regal Visitation Book of 1615, comprises the
following parishes, in the county of Kildare,
viz.,

the north-west by Offaly, which it met at the Curragh of Kildare, and on the west byLaoighis or Leix, from which it was divided by the River

Athy, Castlereban, Kilberry, Dollardstown, Nicholastown, Tankardstown, Kilkea, Grange- Rosnolvan, Belin, Castledermott, Grange, Moone,

Barrow. According to O'Heerin's topographical O'Teige was the ancient chief of Imaile (which was a very small district), but 'O'Toole was Lord of Hy-Muireadhaigh, which extended
poem,
along the Barrow northwards as far as the hill of Almhuin, now Allen
:

Timoling, Narraghmore, Kilcullen, Usk. And " this authority adds Adjacent to the deanery of Omurthie is the parish church of Damenoge
:

[now Dunamanoge], and the parish church of
Fontstown."
land, second Edition,

See Ledwich's Antiquities of Irewhere the author p. 294,
I

Cpiall cap 6eapba an Buipb ealaij,

O'n

cip locluiiaip uiprhealai j,
TTIaipoin mip,

ignorantly assumes that Omurethi was 0' Moore Soon after the death of St. Laurence the
O'Tooles, or O'Tuathails, were driven from this
beautiful and fertile district of

O

Dmopi^ co

Oo

6iol m'uipcip o

a n-uaiple.

Omurethi by

O'Cuarail un rhuip meaoaij, Qp Uib meapba ITIuipeaoaij,

the Baron Walter de Riddlesford, or Gualterus

de Ridenesfordia, who, according to Giraldus

54
i

[1180.

Oonncab ua caipeallain Do mapbab la cenel cconaill nofogal a rheabla heneac po papaijj. ap ua ngaipmleabaijj cpe miopbailib na nafrh ipa Ginbilfp ua Dochapcaij bo ecc nboipe colaim cille.
i

Concobop mafnrhaije mac TCuaibpi ui Chonco^aip rcopcaip Concobop ua 1 Concobap ua ceallaij (.1. cijeapna ua maine) bu a mac, a bfpbpacaip biapmaib, i TTlaoilpeachlainn mac ceallai, caoj mac caibj in Concobaip (.1. caoj). biapmaba ui ceallaij, TTluipjhfp ua hebhin cijjfpna ua bpiacpach aibne t>o mapbab la pfpaib

Car na

cconcobop

.7.

i

-|

TTluman.

Cappjamam ua

^lolla ulcccin
i

raoipeac TTluinncipe TTlaoil rpionna Do

rhapbab la hae& TTlac cappjamna

mmp

enoairh pop moploch.

Oomnall mac cai&j

ui

chinneibij cijeapna
torians

upmuman Do

ec.

(Hibernia Expugnata, lib. iL c. xxi.), had his castle at Tristerdermot [Disert Diarmada, now Cas-

and topographical writers, who have each other without consulting any but copied
printed authorities.
f

In tledennot], in the territory of Omurethi. the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen it
is stated,

Violated.

It is
chief,

worthy of remark

here, that

under the year 1178, that the English of Wexford set out on a predatory excursion
into Hy-Muireadhaigh,

whenever a
death

who had

offered insult to a
killed, his

church or sanctuary, happened to be
is

and slewDowlingO'Tuathail of that territory, and lost [O'Toole], king their own leader, Robert Poer. But though the
O'Tuathails were driven from their original territory about this period, they were still regarded

invariably atributed to the miraculous interposition of the patron saint.
g

Hy-Many.

The following

parishes,

or

coarbships, were in Hy-Many, according to a

by the Irish as the second highest family in Leinster, and the Annals of Clomnacnoise, as translated

Book of Lecan, treating of the manners and customs of the O'Kellys, viz. Clonfert,
tract in the
:

by Mageoghegan, record under the year 1214, the death of Lorcan O'Twahall, "young Prince of Leinster, and next in superiority of that province." After their expulsion from the rich
plains of Omurethi, the O'Tuohills, or O'Tooles,

Kilmeen, Kiltullagh, Kilcommon, Gamma (where the Hy-Manians were baptized), Cloontuskert (where the O'Kelly was inaugurated), andCloonkeen Cairill. The following families were located

took shelter in the mountain fastnesses of Wicklow,

Hy-Many, and tributary to O'Kelly, viz., Mac Egan, Chief of the tribe of Clandermot Mac Gillenan, Chief of Clann Flaitheamhla and
in
;

where in course of time they dispossessed the O'Teiges of Imaile, and other minor families. It has been the object of the Editor in this
note to collect together such evidences as will prove that the father of St. Laurence O'Toole,

Muintir kenny
Breasail
;

O'Donnellan, Chief of Clann O'Doogan, Chief of Muintir-Doogan ;
;

O'Gowran, Chief of Dal-Druithne
lain,

;

O'Docomh-

Chief of Rinn-na-hEignidi

;

O'Donoghoe,
;

Chief of Hy-Cormaic, in
territory in

Moinmoy and O'MaoilFor further particulars

though not King of more important
which

all

Leinster,

was chief of a

brighde, Chief of Bredach, which was the best

territory than Imaile, a fact has hitherto escaped our modern his-

Hy-Many.

concerning the families and districts of Hy-

1180.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
killed

55

by the Kinel-Connell, in revenge of his treacherous conduct towards O'Gormly, and by the miracles of the saints whose f guarantee he had violated
.

Donough O'Carellan was

Aindileas O'Doherty died at Derry-Columbkille. battle, called the battle of the Conors, was fought between Connor Moin-

A

moy, the son of Roderic O'Conor, and Connor O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many in which were slain Conor O'Kelly, his son Teige, his brother Dermot, Melaghlin,
,

the son of

Dermot O'Kelly, and Teige, the son of Teige O'Conor". Maurice O'Heyne, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach-Aidhne', was killed by the men

of Munster.

Carroon O'Gilla-Ultain, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, was killed by Mac Carroon", on Inis Endaimh in Mor-loch.
1 ,

Hugh

Donnell, the son of Teige O'Kennedy, Lord of
Many, the reader
is

Ormondm
is

,

died.
called Inchenagh,

referred to Tribes

and Cus-

1

Inis

Endaimh,

now

and

toms of Hy- Many, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in 1843.
h

lies in

It is

Lough Ree, not far from Lanesborough. curious that Lough Eee is here called mop

O'Conor

It is

added in the Annals of

loc, or the great lake.

Kilronan, that this battle was fought at Magh Sruibhegealain, at the head or extremity of

Daire na g-capall.
'

Now the baronies of Ormond, Upmumain and Lower Ormond, in the county of Upper The territory of Uprhumam was Tipperary.
anciently very extensive, but it has been for many centuries limited to the baronies now
its name. O'Kennedy, who descended from Donnchuan, the brother of Brian Borumha,

m

A territory in

Hy-Fiachrach-Aidhne,\\ piachpach Gione. the south-west of the county of

Galway, which, as we learn from the Life of St.

bearing

Colman Mac Duach, published by Colgan, was
originally coextensive with the diocese of Kil-

was originally seated

in

Glenomra, in the east

macduagh.
k
is

Mac Carroon, mac cappjamna.
iii. c.

This name

of the county of Clare, whence they were driven out, at an early period, by the O'Briens and

anglicised

part

Caron by O'Flaherty, in his Ogygia, 85, and Mac Carrhon by Connell Mathe tribe well.

Mac Namaras.
phical

O'Heerin thus notices the

ori-

ginal situation of

O'Kennedy

in his topogra-

geoghegan,
is

who knew now anglicised Mac
them

The name
lo-

poem

:

Carroon.

O'Flaherty

cates

in the territory of Cuircnia,

now

O

the

Cinneioij copcpap ja, ap JJhleann pc"Pr |n 5,

barony of Kilkenny West, in the county of Westmeath. Their ancestor was called ITIael Sionna,
i.

peio Ompa, Sliocc ap nOuinocuam, cpe cpooucc, na

pumn

e.

Chief of the Shannon, from the situation of

puaip jan lapmopacc. "

his territory

on the east

side of that river.

They

are to be distinguished from the O'Caharnys, Sionnachs, or Foxes of whose tribe

O'Kennedy, who purples the javelin, rules over the extensive, smooth Glenomra,
race of our Donnchuan, who, through valour, obtained the lands

Kilcoursey,

Of the

name was Muintir- Tadhgain.

without competition."

56
TTIaolTYiuipe

[1181.

mbochr ppimhpfnoip Gpeann Do ecc. dob ua caicmab, cijeapna loppaip Do mapbab la hua cceallacham

mac

cuinn na

hi

ppiull hi ccill domain.

Qmhlaib ua co^oa raoipeac na bpeoca, Do mapbab la hua njaibcecdm
caoipeac rhaije helfg. TTlupchab ua laccna caoipeac an Da bac DO babaDh illoch con.

QO1S CR1OSO,

1181.

Qoip CpiopD mile, ceD, ochcmojacc, a hafn.

Ounjal ua

caellaiji eppoc Ifichglinne

Do ecc.

maolmuipe ua Dunain abb

cnuic na Sfngan hi

lujmaj Do

ecc.

TTlaolciapain ua piobabpa comapba ciapain Do ecc. Cachpafnfb pia pplaichbfpcac ua maeloopaib ncchfpna cenel cconaill pop macaib pij Connacc Sacapn cincciDipi Du in po mapbab pe meic Decc

DO clannuib cicchfpnab ~[ roipeac Connacc la cenel cconaill co pocaibip oile DO pofpclannaib Ro Dofpclannaib immaille ppiu cennnochdiDpioe. chuippfcc Connaccaij po Daoipe boib ppi pe imcen mppan car pin. Cac
-|

cpice coipppe ainm in caca pin.
11

Mac

Con-na-mbocht,
poor,

i.

e.

the descendant of

Conn of the

was the name of the Erenaghs
This name
is

of Clonmacnoise.

barony of Tirawley, and county of Mayo. The monastery of Errew, on Lough Conn, is in this district, and the family of O'Flynn, a branch of

O'Caithniadh
in Erris,

now

obsolete

whom

were hereditary Erenaghs of

this

monas-

an extensive and remarkably wild barony in the north-west of the county of Mayo, unless it has been changed to O'Cahan, or O'Kane.
p

tery, are still

numerous
till

in the parish of Crosslately in possession of

molina.

They were

the celebrated reliquary called Mias Tighernain,

OfBredagh, na bjiebca.

This

is

the

name of

which

is

now

at

Kappa

Castle.

These O'Flynns

a district in the

barony of Tirawley, comprising the parish of Moygawnagh, and part of that of Kilfian. It is to be distinguished from Bredagh
in Inishowen, in the north-east of the

are mentioned

by

Giolla losa

Mor Mac

Firbis,

the compiler of the Book of Lecan, as the BrughSee Geneaaidhs, or farmers, or Maghheleag
logies,

county of which was the inheritance of O'DuibhDonegal,
dhionna, of the race of Eoghan, son of Niall of
the Nine Hostages.
o

Tribes

and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach,

printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in k 1844, p. 113, note , and p. 239, note '.

Moy-heleag,

maj

helfj

This

is

also called

Da-Bhac, now generally called the Two Backs a territory in the south of the barony
r
;

tna

heleoj

;

it

was the ancient name of the

level part of the parish of Crossmolina, in the

of Tirawley, in the county of Mayo, lying between Lough Conn and the River Moy See

1181.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

57

n Mulmurry Mac Con-na-mbocht chief senior of Ireland, died. c Hugh 0'Caithniadh Lord of Erris, was treacherously slain by O'Callaghan
,

at

Kilcommon.
Auliffe O'Toghda, Chief of Bredagh",
q

was
r

killed

by O'Gaughan, Chief of
in

Moy-heleag

.

Murrough O'Laghtna, Chief of Da Bhac was drowned
,

Lough Conn.

THE AGE OF CHKIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand one

1181.
eighty-one.

hundred

Dungal O'Kaelly, Bishop of Leighlin, died. Mulmurry O'Dunan, Abbot of Cnoc-na-Seangan* (Louth), Mulkieran O'Fiavra, successor of Kieran, died.
5

died.

Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Tirconnell, defeated the sons of the King of Connaught on the Saturday before Whitsuntide. Sixteen of the sons of the
lords and chieftains of

many

others,

Connaught were both of the nobles and the

slain

by the Kinel Connell,

as well as

plebeians".

They held

the Connacians

under subjection for a long time after this battle, which was known by the name of Cath Criche Coirpre* [i. e. the Battle of the Territory of Carbury].
The name O'Toghdha, which would be pronounced O'Toffey in this district, is now obsolete. Under
Tribes of Hy-Fiachrach, pp. 11, 165,228.
this year the
nisfallen,

called in English,

Pismire Hill.

It

contains

the ruins of a church, but no part of the great

Dublin copy of the Annals of Inrecord that John De Courcy fled from

abbey is now traceable on it. This abbey was founded and endowed for Augustinian Canons,

Downpatrick, and went to Ath Glaisne [Ardglass?] where he built a castle which he made
his residence for

by Donough O'Carroll, Prince of Oriel, and Edan O'Kaelly, or O'Caollaidhe, Bishop of
Clogher.

See Trias T/iaum.,

p.

305

;

Ware's

According Annals of Cloninacnoise he returned to and repaired his house there.
1

some time.

to the

Antiquities, cap.
u

26

;

and

also his Bishops of

Down

Louth and Clogher,

at the

name Edan.

in 1181,

>SS., p.

Mulmurry, maelmuipe. Colgan says, Ada 737, that this was the celebrated Ma-

Both of the nobles and the plebeians. In the Annals of Kilronan this phrase is given in Latin " et alii nobiles et cum eis."
:

ignobiles

rianus,

the author of the Irish Martyrology, so often quoted by him and other ecclesiastical
writers.
1

Cath Criche Cuirpre. According to the Annals of Kilronan the persons slain in this battle

v

Cnoc-na-Seangan,
place,

i.

e.

Hill of the ants. This

were the following, viz. Brian Luighnech and Manus O'Couor ; Melaghlin, Murray, and Mur:

which

is

situated about thirty perches to
is

the east of the town of Louth,

now

generally

tough, three sons of Turlough O'Conor ; also Hugh, son of Hugh, son of Eory (O'Flaherty) t

58

[1181.

mfic pioj copcpacup la plaicbfpcac ip in lap napaile liubap iciacc na * * cac pempdice, bpian ~\ TTlajnup Da mac coippbealbaij moip, Oo pocaip beop Qo6 mac concobaip. TTlaolpuanaij, Da mac ele Ctooa
'<

-|

i

concobaip

mac megoipeaccaij ui Ro&uib.Gachmapcac ua muipfoaij, Donnchab mac bpiain luignij ui Concobaip, cucuallacca mac ao6 huf maoilbpenainn, Da mac jpollabuiDe, TTluipcfpcaijuf Concobaip, cpi
ui cellaijj,
-|

giollacpfpc

-|

mac mic aoba mic

I?uai6pi,

"|

Sloicchfo la Domnall

mac

pocaiDe ele DO pafpclannaib. af&a mec lachlainn, -| la cenel neojain celca

If 65 i nulroip. 17o rheabpacr pop ulcoip, pop uib rcuipcpe, ~\ pop pfpaib im RuaiDpi mac Duinnplebe -| im coinmi&e ua plainn. Sluacch la pfpaib maije hirhe im ua ccacain Gacmapcac, -| im cenel

mbinij glinne co pansaDap cap cuaim.
uile

T?o aipccpfo pip

If,

i

ua ccuipcpe
Cuaipr

Ruccpar Uomalcac ua Concobaip Do oiponeab

ilmile

DO buaib.

i

ccomopbup pacpaicc.
~\

cenel eojain Do cabaipc laipp, Do bfpc a pfip uaiDib
King of West Connaught
of Brian O'Fallon,
el alii

po paccaib bfnnaccain.
in the

;

and Donough, son
el ignobiles it

seated in the valley of Glenconkeine,

multi nobiles

cum

eis.

The same

annals also state that

was

Donough, the son of Donnell Midheach O' Conor,
that brought Flaherty O'Muldory to assist him in asserting the chieftainship of the territory of

south of the county of Derry. a This is called peappar Toome, Cuaim Cuama, i. e. the trajectus, or ferry of Tuaim, in
the Tripartite Life of St. Patrick.

The

place

is

now called Toome-Bridge, and is

situated between

Carbury for himself. They also add, that this was called the Battle of Magh Diughbha, and
that the bodies of the chieftains were carried
to Clonmacnoise,

and there interred

in the

tombs

Lough Neagh and Lough Beg, and on the boundary between the counties of Antrim and Derry. " Fearsait Tuama hodie vulgo vocatur Tuaim est vadum vel trajectus ubi Banna fluvius ex
lacuEchach."
b

of their ancestors.

w 0' Connor
ter

According to the Annals of Uls-

Firlee,

F'P M-

Trias Tkaum., p. 183. The Tripartite Life of St.

of

and of Kilronan, three of the sons of Hugh, son Turlough O'Conor, were slain in this battle,

Patrick, as translated by Colgan, in Trias Thaum.,
pp.
127, 146,
calls

this territory

"Leaeorum

namely, Melaghlin, Murray, and Murtough. x In 1585 the O'Murray, O'lDuipeaoaij head of this family was seated at Ballymurry,
in the parish of Kilrnaine,

side of the River Bann. " Venit (Patricias) in Leseorum fines Bannse flumini ad orientalem ejus ripam
fines,"

and

states that it

was on the east

barony of Athlone,

adjacentes."

But though the Firli were unques-

and county of Roscommon.
i

tionably seated on the east side of the River

bpSnamn,
*

O'Mulrenins, pronounced in Irish O'lTlaoil Mul-vrenin.

O

1

Bann, since the twelfth century, it would appear, from the Annotations of Tirechan on the
Life of St. Patrick, that they were on the west side of this river in the time of the Irish apos-

It would apKinel-Binny, Cenel 6mnij pear from several authorities that this tribe was

1181.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

59

According to another book, the sons of kings who were slain by Flaherty in the last mentioned battle were the following, viz. Brian and Manus, two sons of Turlough More and Mulrony and * * * two sons of Hugh O'Connor. In that battle also fell Hugh, the son of Conor O'Kelly, and Gilchreest,
;

;

the son of Mageraghty O'Rodiv Eachmarcach O'Murray* Donough, the son of Brian Luighneach O'Conor Cucuallachta, the son of Murtough O'Conor
; ; ;
;

three of the 0'Mulrenins y

who was
made an

Gillaboys son of Roderic, together with many others of the nobility. Donnell, the son of Hugh Mac Loughlin, and the Kinel-Owen of Tullaghoge,
; ;

the two

Mac

and Hugh, son of Hugh,

incursion into Ulidia, and defeated the Ulidians, the Hy-Tuirtre, and

Rory Mac Donslevy, and Cumee O'Flynn. The men of Moy-Ithe, together with O'Kane (Eachmarcach), and the 2 Kinel-Binny of the Valley, mustered an army, and crossed Toome". They
the Fiiiee, together with
b plundered all the territories of Firlee and Hy-Tuirtre, and carried thousands of cows.

off

many

Tomaltagh O'Conor was consecrated successor of St. Patrick.
his blessing. &

He performed
them

the visitation of the Kinel-Owen, received his dues from them, and left

tie.

The Barm

(i.

e.

the

Lower Bann), accord-

among the

inhabitants of the plain of Eilne,
;

ing to the oldest accounts of that river, flowed

between the plains of Li and Eilne, and we learn from Tirechan that the plain of Eilne was on the east side of the river, and consequently
the plain of Li, or Lee, was on the west side of " Et exiit it [Patricius] in Ardd Eolergg et
:

prepared an entertainment for St. Columba and Colgan, in a note on this passage, conjeetures that the plain of Eilne was west of the

River Bann, and that which was then called " an But that Mkachaire," i. e. the plain.

Magh

Li was west of the Bann

is

put be-

Ailgi, et

Band,

Lee Bendrigi, et perrexit trans flumen et benedixit locum in quo est cellola

yond dispute by the fact that the church of Achadh Dulihthaigh, now Aghadowey, on the
west side of the river Bann,
ancient authorities, as in
Li,
is

Guile Raithin [Coleraine], in Eilniu, in

quo

fuit

described in

Episcopus, et

fecit alias cellas

multas in Eilniu.

Magh
;

Li, or

Campus

Et per Buas flumen" [Bush River] " foramen
et in Dun Sebuirgi" [Dunseverick] "sedit super petram, &c. &c. Et reversus est in canipum Eilni et fecit multas ecclesias quas
pertulit,

on the margin of the Lower Bann See ColActa Sanctorum, p. 223 the Irish Calengan's dar of the O'Clerys, at 9th and 22nd of January ; and Sampson's Memoir of his Chart and Survey of Londonderry, p. 222. But on the
increasing

Condiri [the clergy of Connor diocese] habent."

Adamnan,
c.

in his Life of Columba,

says, lib.

i.

power of the O'Kanes, the

Firli

were
See

50,

that Conallus, Bishop of Cuil Raithin

[Coleraine],

having

collected

many

presents

unquestionably driven across the Bann note under the year 1 1 78.

i2

60

aNNdta Rio^bachra eineawR
QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopo
1182.

[1183.

mile, ceo, ocTicrhogarc, aDo.

dob ua

caellaiji eppoc aipjiall,

-\

cfnD candnach

Gpeann Do
i

ecc.

Oomnall ua huallachain aipoeppoc muman Do ecc. bo Sluaicchfb la oomnall mac afoa ui lachlainn 50 Dun

cac bo jallaib ip in Du pin l?o mapbab ann ona Rajnall ua bpfiflen, giolla maille ppiu, T?uccpar Soipcela mapcain leo Don cup pin. oile ui bpiain Do rhapbaD la Ragnall mac bpian mac coipp&ealbaij;

Oo pao pom
i

nodil piaba. eabaib pop cenel neojain cpiopD 6 cacdin co pocaibip

Commapa

bice rpe meabail.

QoD mac cappsamna raoipeac muinnnpe jiolla ulrdin mac cappgarhna.
ITIupchab
TTlaolpuanaib.
Ctrhlaib

maoilcpionna DO mapbab la
la TTlaoilpeachlainn ua

mac

caichlij uf DubhDa, DO

mapbab

ua pfpjail Dojabailcaipijecca na hangaile

i

Qob Do

innapbab.

QO18 C171OSD,
Qoiy CpiopD
mile, ceD,

1183.
acpi.

ochcmojacc,

lopeph ua haoba Gppcop ua cceinnpelaij [DO ecc]. 6ec ua hfjpa ciccfpna lui^ne Connacc Do mapbab la concobap ua Diapmaca mic Ruaibpi, ap loc mic pfpabaij ina rij pfin cpe meabail.
This is a mistake of the Dunbo,inDalRiada but not of the Four Masters, as it is annalists,
f

found in the older Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan.
it is

dred-Owen, and Kanall O'Bryslan was killed there, and Gilli Christ O'Cahan, arid many more; and the Galls carried Martin's Gospel with
them."

Dunbo was not in Dalriada at any period, for west of the Eiver Bann, in a territory called an Mhachaire, the Plain, in Colgan's time. Dalriadanever extended westwards beyond theBann.

From

a notice in a manuscript in the

Bodleian Library, Laud. 615, p. 81, it would was appear that this copy of the Gospels, which
believed to have belonged to St. Martin of Tours, St. Patrick, and that to Ireland was

This passage is rendered in the old translation of the Ulster Annals in the Bri" An tish as follows Donell
St.

d

Martin

brought

by

it

Museum,

:

army by

was preserved at Derry in the time of the writer. There was a cemetery and holy well
at

O'Loghlin to Dunbo in Dalriada, and the Galla gave battle to them there, and vanquished Kin-

Derry dedicated to this St. Martin. In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, and in the

1183.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

6l

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1182.

thousand one hundred eighty two.

O'Kaelly, Bishop of Oriel, and head of the Canons of Ireland, died. Donnell O'Huallaghan, Archbishop of Munster, died.

Hugh

Hugh O'Loughlin, marched with an army to Dunbo, and there gave battle to the English. The Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Randal O'Breslen, Gilchreest O'Kane, and many others, were
Donnell, the son of
,

in

Dal Riada

killed.

On

this occasion

they carried off with them the Gospel of

St.

Martin".

Brian, the son of

Turlough O'Brien, was treacherously

slain

by Randal

Macnamara Beg.
Ultain

Hugh Mac Carroon, Chief Mac Carroon.
son

of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, was killed

by

Gilla-

Murrough, the
O'Mulrony.
Auliffe O'Farrell

of Taichleach O'Dowda,

was

killed

by Melaghlin
expelled'.

assumed the lordship of Annaly, and

Hugh was

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1183.
eighty-three.

thousand one hundred

Joseph O'Hea, Bishop of Hy-Kinsellagh (died).

Bee O'Hara, Lord of Leyny in Connaught, was treacherously slain by Conor, the grandson of Dermot, who was son of Roderic, in his own house, on Lough

Mac

Farry.
Imokilly, in the county of Cork. The Irish annado notfurnish us with any further particulars;

Annals of Kilronan, the portion of the passage relating to theGospel reads: 7 popcela mapcain oo Bpec DO gallc-io leo.
e

lists

Under

this year the

Annals of Kilronan, of

but Giraldus Cambrensis, in his Hibernia Expug"a nata, lib. ii. c. 1 8, calls Mac Tyrus a betrayer
:

Clonmacnoise, and of Ulster, record the death of Milo de Cogan, the destroyer of all Ireland, both

proditore Machtyro qui eos ea noctehospitdridebuerat,

Church and State

;

also of Reymond

de

la Gross,

cum aliis quinque militibus improuisis a tergo securium ictibus sunt interempti." Sir Richard
Cox, in his Hibernia Anglicana, p. 37, magnifies Tyrus into an awful specimen of

Cenn Cuillinn [Kantitunensis?], and the two sons of Fitz-Stephen. The Annals of Kilronan and of
Clonmacnoise add, that Milo was killed by Mac Tire, Prince of Ui Mac Caille, now the barony of

this act of Mac

Irish treachery,

and adds, that Milo had been
to lodge at his house that

invited

by Mac Tyrus

eiReaww.

[1184.

Do

ua plairhbfjicaij, an jiollu piabac, pala Deabaib eccep ua plaicbfpcaij
ip in

-]

TTlac ui
-|

jaipmleabaij. Ro mapbab mop DO cenel TTloain.

mmaipeacc

pin

Dpong

pfpjal mac drhlaib
puaipc.

ui

puaipc, Do

mapbab

la loclainn

mac

Dorhnaill ui

<5iollaulrdm ba6 la macaib

mac cappjamna raoipeac muinnpe maoilcpionna Do mapui
-]

bpaoin ele a maille ccuicceap

la

macaibh an cpionnaijh

ui

cacapnaigh 50

CtOlS C171OSD, 1184.

Qoip Cpiopo
loya ua maoilm

mile, ceD,

ochcmogacc, a cfchaip.

Gppcop

eipi&e Do ecc.

bpian bpeipnec mac roipp&elbaig ui concobaip Do ecc. THaoiliopu ua cfpbaill Do oiponeD ccomopbup pacpaic lep na paccb'dil Do comalcac ua concobaip.
i

Qpc ua maoileaclamn ncchfpna mpraip mioe DO mapbab meabail la mac coippbelbaij cpia popconjpa jail, TTIaoilDiapmair ua mbpiain
i

.1.

-\

peaclamn beacc Dojabdil a lonaiD, i mai&m Do ppaomeaD laip a ccionn cpf la poppan Diapmaic ceona Du in po mapbaic lie im mac marjamna i bpiain. Caiplen Do curhDac la gallaib call dip. Caiplen oile Do opccain la TTlaoilpeaclainn -] la Concobop mafninaije ua cconcobaip. Po mapbab Dpong mop Do ^allaib ann.
i

Dec

ccicche pichfc Do poijnib cumDaijri apoa

macha Do

opjain la jal-

laib mi6e.
TTlainipcip

ciccfpna cinel cconaill Do Dia
night.

eapa puaiDh Do eDhbaipr la plaichbfpcach Ua TTlaolDopaio Do naoim bfpnapD Do paich a anma.
]

The same

is

History of Ireland, vol.

repeated by Moore, in his ii. p. 31 1, without quot-

Annals Beapcctij). In the old translation of the of Ulster preserved in the British Museum, the

ing any authority, which is very unfair, as it turns out that the prejudiced Giraldus is the

name

of this Tyronian family, cai j, is anglicised O'Lathvertay,

only authority.

This was not O'Flaherty of OTlaherty lar Connaught, but of Tyrone, where the name is

f

enough to the form it times. The above passage
this translation
:

phlaicbepwhich is close has assumed in modern
is

Ua

"A. D.I 183.

thus Englished in skirmish be-

A

now changed

to

Laverty, or Lafferty (O'phlaic-

tween Gilla Revagh O'Lathvertay and O'Garm-

1184.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

63

was fought between OTlaherty f (Gillarevagh) and the son of O'Gormly, in which O'Flaherty and a great number of the Kinel-Moen were
slain.

A battle

Farrell, son of Auliffe

O'Kourke, was slain by Loughlin, son of Donnell

O'Rourke.
Gilla Ultain

Mac

Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, and five others,

were

slain

by

the sons of the Sinnach (the

Fox) 0'Caharny
1184.

s
.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

thousand one hundred

eighty-four.

Gilla Isa O'Moylin, a bishop, died.

Brian Breifneach, son of Turlough O'Conor, died. Maelisa O'Carroll was consecrated successor of St. Patrick, after Tomaltach O'Conor

had resigned

that dignity.

Art O'Melaghlin, Lord of Westmeath, was treacherously
O'Brien
(i.

the son of Turlough), at the instigation Melaghlin Beg assumed his place, and in three days afterwards defeated the same Dermot in a conflict, in which many persons were slam, among whom
e.

by Dermot of the English, and
slain

was the son of Mahon O'Brien. A castle was erected by the English at Killare h Another castle was plundered by Melaghlin and Conor Moinmoy O'Conor, in which many of the English were slain.
.

Thirty of the best houses in Meath.

Armagh were plundered by

the English of

of Assaroe' was granted to God and St. Bernard by Flaherty Lord of Kinel-Connell, for the good of his soul. O'Muldory,
leaye's son
;

The monastery

and O'Lathvertay and some of Kinkilled."
this year the

regione Medise quse

Hugh
;

asuil appellatur

:

in

dred
8

Muan were

qua sunt
Dublin copy of the An-

tres ecclesise

una

parochialis

viro

Under

nals of Innisfallen record the erection of a

mo-

sancto (Aido) dicata; alia qusetemplum Sanctas Brigidas, et tertia qua; aula Sanctaa Brigidee appellatur
:

nastery at Duleek,
h

by

Sir

Hugh De

Lacy.

et tres etiam fontes

quorum

aquis in

parish in the barony of Rathconrath, and county of Meath. Colgan describes it as follows: " Killaria vicus est in
Killare, Cillaip.

A

unum

confluentibus vicinum non sine miraculo

agitur et velociter

mouetur molendinum."note 31.

Acta SS.,

p.

423,

col. 2,

64

Rio^hachca eirceawN.

[1185.

cuama gpene DO ecc. Cfhopaolao ua jpaDa comopba cponam Niall mac an cponoaij ui carapnaig Do ecc. Clmlaib mac pfp&ail ui puaipc ciccfpna bpeipne Do mapbab a ppiull la
TTlaj pajnaill.

Oorhnall ua plannaccdin caoi^eac cloinne carail Do ecc hi cconja
peicfn.

pfpjal ua pajallaij DO rhapbao

hi ppiull la TTlaeileclainn

ua puaipc.

GDIS CR1OSO,

1185.
cuig.

Qoip CpiopD mile ceo ochcmojjab a
TTlaoiliopu

ua muipeaoaij pfp leccinn Doipe colaim
in

cille

Do ecc lap

Sfnoacaij chojaiDe. Pilib Unpeppa co n^allaib uime Do bfir cona noiocib i mf&on copjaip Do fonnpaD.
cpiopD

apDmaca co

cfnn pe laire

mac cacmaoil apo raoipeac
'

cenel peapaDaij

~\

na cclann

There are no ruins of the Castle of Killare now
visible
;

Philip Unserra

He is called Philip Worcester
Annals of Ulster, in
See

but there are considerable remains of

in the old translation of the

the churches mentioned by Colgan. ' The remains of this Assaroe, cap puao.

the British

Museum, and by his cotemporary GiHibernice, dist. 2, c.

raldus Cambrensis, Philippus Wigorniensis

abbey now
shannon ;

stand about one mile west of Ballyone of the side walls and a part of the

Topographia
is

50, where there

western gable of the abbey are yet standing,

a strange story told about his conduct at Armagh. Hanmer repeats the same ; and Sir Richard

The

architecture

is

very good; but there are

Cox,

who was always anxious to hide

the faults of

at present

no windows or architectural features

worthy of notice remaining.
Tomgraney, ^neine. nastery dedicated to St. Cronan, in the barony of Upper Tullagh, in the county of Clare. It is now a small village.
k
j

the English and villify the Irish, has condescended to tell the story in the following strain
:

Cuaim

An ancient mo-

Hibernia Anglicanq, p. 38, ad ann. 1184 "Philip of Worcester, Lord Justice or Governour of Ire:

land,

came over with a smart party of Horse and
;

Foot

Under

this year the

Annals of Kilronan

Man

of

he also brought with him Hugh Tirrel, a ill Report He was not long in the Go:

record the falling of the great church of Tuam, both its roof and stone work ; also the burning

vernment, before he seized on the Lands of O'Catkesie to the King's Use, though Lacy had
formerly sold them : He also went a Circuit, to visit the Garrisons, and in March came to Ar-

by lightning of the fortress of the Clann Mulrony, called the Rock of Lough Key, in which
six or seven score of persons of distinction, with fifteen persons of royal descent, were

destroyed.

magh, where he exacted from the Clergy a great Sum of Mony thence he went to Down, and
;

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Kenfaela O'Grady, successor of Cronan of Tomgraney Niall, son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny, died.
Auliffe, the son of Farrell
slain
j
,

65

died.

O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was treacherously
at

by Mac Rannall.
Conga-Feichin [Cong].

Donnell O'Flanagan, Lord of Clann-Cahill, died
Farrell O'Reilly

was treacherously

slain

by Melaghlin O'Rourke".

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1185.
eighty-five.

thousand one hundred

Maelisa O'Murray, Lector of Derry-Columbkille, died at a venerable old age. Philip Unserra (of Worcester) remained at Armagh with his Englishmen
1

during six days and nights in the middle of Lent. Gilchreest Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry" and of the Clans,
1

viz.

Clann-

so to Dublin, loaden both with Curses
torsions.

and Ex-

m

Kinel-Farry,

cinel

peanaouij,

and the

Brewing- Pan from the poor Priests at Armagh, and carried it to Down, hut the House where he lay was burnt, and so were also the Horses in the Stable, so that he
Tirrel took a

Clans.

The

the paterritory of Kinel-Farry,

trimonial inheritance of the

Mac Cawells

(the

descendants of Fergal, son of Muireadhach, son of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages)
the barony of nearly coextensive with which Clogher, in the county of Tyrone ; in

was

fain to leave the Pan, for want of Carriage; and Philip had a severe fit of the Gripes, like to cost him his life both which Punishments (they say) were miraculously inflicted
;

was

barony
Colla,

all

the clans here mentioned were

lo-

upon

cated, except the

Hy-Kennoda

and the Clann

them

for their sacrilege."

Cox, however, should

who were

seated in Fermanagh.

The

have here stated, on the authority of Giraldus,
that Tyrell restored the pan to the poor priests,
for Giraldus writes.:

Hy-Kennoda gave name to the barony of Tirkennedy, which is situated in the east of Fermanagh, adjoining the barony of Clogher in See it mentioned at the years 1427, Tyrone.
1

"Sed eadem

nocte, igne,

proprio eiusdem hospitio accenso, equi duo qui cacabum extraxerant, cuin aliis rebus non
paucis, statim combusti sunt.

468, and

Pars etiam

villas

a

name

The family of Mac Cathmhaoil, generally anglicised Mac Cawell and lati1

5 1 8.

maxima eadem

Quo

viso,

occasione igne est consumpta. Hugo Tyrellus mane cacabum inue-

niens prorsus illffisum, pecunia ductus, Arthmaciam eum remisit." It looks very strange that the Irish annalists should have passed over this
transaction in silence,
it

who supplied several bishops to the see of Clogher, are still numerous in this their ancient territory, and the name is also
nized Cavellus,

found

in

other counties,

variously anglicised

being just the sort of

subject they generally

comment upon.

Camphill, Cambell, Caulfield, and even Howell ; but the natives, when speaking the Irish language, always pronounce the name IDac Carrhaoil.

66
.1.

[1185.

dance aenjupa, ctann ouibinnpeacc
-\

clann pogapcais,

ui

cfnnpooa,

~\

clann

collu DO peapaib manac cfnn comaiple euaipcipc Gpeann Do mapbao la hua a cfnn DO bpfic leo 50 pppic uara ccionn neccmj i la mumnap caomdin,
i

miopa lapccam.

1

mac mmpceapcaijj ui laclamn DO rhapbab la jallaib. alban apo caoipeac copcapaibe ua odlaij ollarh epeann, TTlaoibopa ccluain ap uaiple Do ecc copcaoam, Saoi oip&epc ap Dan, ap eneac,
TTIaoilpfclainn
-j
i
]

lopaipD oca oilicpe.
TTiac pf
picic long

Sajcan

.1.

Seon mac an oapa ftenpi Do ceacc
T?o

i

nGpinn luce rpf
caipDiall
T?o bpip

DO jabdil a pie.
-\

gab arcbar,

-\

laigin.

Oo pome

oc
11

noppair paccna,
Corcaree,

occ apD pfonain.

T?o aipj
opinion that

murha epDib.

cpa

now
It is

Westmeath.
north-east

a barony in the county of bounded on the north and
anglice

by Loch Dairbhreach,

Lough

it is identical with the barony of Magheradernon, in the county of Westmeath. At this year, 1185, we find that O'Daly had

Derryvara ; on the west by Lough Iron ; and on the south and south-east by an irregular line of hills, which divide it from the barony of
Moyashel.
of the

possession of Corca- Ree, in addition to his
original territory of

own
not

Corca-Adain

;

and

it is

unreasonable to conclude that the two territories

This territory

is

mentioned by our
as the inheritance

genealogists and historians

descendants of Fiacha Eaoidhe, the grandson of the monarch Felimy Reachtmhar, or the Lawgiver. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia,
part
iii.

Here it is necessary to remark, that, according to O'Dugan's topographical poem, CorcaAdain was in Teffia, or Tir-Maine, and that Corcaadjoined.

cap.

69

;

and Duald Mac Firbis's Pedi-

that O'Daly was descended from ; and the original inhabitants of CorcaMaine, Ree were not. It may therefore be lawfully

Ree was not

grees, p. 106.

This was originally the lordship of O'Hionradhain, and not of O'Daly, as we
learn

assumed, that about this period O'Daly got a
grant of Corca-Ree, which adjoined his original territory of Corca-Adain, from the O'Melagh-

from O'Dugan

:

O't)onncha6a na noa^-ap, Ri Cealaij mm mooapam;

O'Mionpa6am, paoipe
"

pin,

some great service which that noble had rendered them by his sword or pen. poet That Corca-Ree was not in Teffia may be clearly
lins,

for

Ri Chopca Raoije poj loin."
O'Donaghoe, of good tillage, King of the smooth Tealach Modharain
O'Hionradhain, nobler he,

inferred from Tirechan's annotations on the Life

of St. Patrick, in the
in
;

Book of Armagh.
:

TBus,

King of

fairest

Corca Eee."

Patrick's travels through describing " And he Meath, that writer says (Patrick) built another church (Lecain) in the country of
St.

Roide, at Caput Art, in
altar,

which he erected a stone
into the

Corca-Adain, sometimes called Corca- Adaim This was the original lordship of the O'Dalys but unfortunately its situation is not to a cer
tainty

and another at Cuil-Corre, and he came

across the River
Teffias."
It

Ethne \Inny)

two

known.

The Editor has been long o

is, therefore, highly probable that the portion of the country lying between the

1185.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

67

Aengus, Clann-Duibhinreacht, Clann-Fogarty, Hy-Kennoda, and Clann-Colla in Fermanagh, and who was the chief adviser of all the north of Ireland, was
slain

ever,

by O'Hegny and Muintir-Keevan, who carried away was recovered from them in a month afterwards.

his head, which,

how-

Melaghlin, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, was slain by the English. Maelisa O'Daly, ollave (chief poet) of Ireland, and Scotland, Lord of Corcaree"

and Corca-Adain
of the

,

a

man

illustrious for his poetry, hospitality,

and

nobility, died while

on a pilgrimage

at Clonard.

The son
dom.

King of England,

that

is,

John, the son of Henry

II.,

came

to Ireland with a fleet of sixty ships, to

assume the government of the king-

took possession of Dublin and Leinster, and erected castles at Tip q but his praid Fachtna and Ardfinan out of which he plundered Munster were defeated with great slaughter by Donnell O'Brien. The son of people
,
;

He

River Brosnagh (which connects Lough Owel and Lough Ennell) and the baronies of Delvin and Farbil, was anciently called Feara asail, or

q

Ardfinnan,
Iffa

Gpo
hill.

pionnam,

i.

e.

St. Fin-

nan's height, or

It is situated in the ba-

rony of
rary.

and

Offa,

in the county of Tippestill

Magh

asail,

and that the

tract lying

between the

The

ruins of this castle are

to be seen

same river and the barony of Eathconrath, was called Corca-Adain. Mr. Owen Daly of Moningtown, in the barony of Corcaree, is supposed to be the present head of the O'Dalys of Westnieath.
p

on a rock overlooking the River Suir.
states (Hib.

Giraldus

Expugnata,

lib.

ii.

c.

34) that John
the

erected three castles, the

first at Tibractia,

second at Archphinan, and the third at Lismore. The Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen
also state, that

Tibraghny, cippair paccna, L

e.

St. Fachna's

well, is a

old castle,

townland containing the ruins of an situated in a parish of the same name,

Henry, King of England, year, accompanied by four

John Earl of Moreton, son of came to Ireland this

on the north side of the River Suir, in the barony of Iverk, in the south-west of the county of See the Feilire Aenguis, at the 13th Kilkenny
of February and 18th of May, and Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys at the same days, from

hundred knights, and built the castles of Lismore, Ardfinan, and Tiobraid [Tiobraid Fachtna]. For the character of the English servants and counsellors who were in Ireland about the King's

be seen that this place was in the west of the ancient Ossory. See also the Ordnance Map of the county of Kilkenny, sheets 38 and 39- Sir Richard Cox, in his Hibernia Anit

which

will

son at this period, the reader is referred to Giraldus Cambrensis' Hibernia Expugnata, lib, ii. c. 35, where he describes the Normans as " Ver-

glicana,

p.

Tipperary ; Moore, have taken Cox's guess as true See history. Leland's History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 146 ; and
Moore's, vol.
ii.

conjectures that this place and Dr. Leland, and even Mr.
40,

is

enormium iuramentorum auAliorum ex superbia contemptores," &c. and also to Hanmer's Chronicle, and Campion's
bosi,

iactatores,

thores,

;

Historie of Irelande, in which the

Normans are

p. 320.

described as "great quaffers, lourdens, proud, belly swaines, fed with extortion and bribery." Dublin Edition of 1809, p. 97-

K2

Rio^hachca eiReawN.

[1186.

oomnall ua bpiain TTlaiDm ap jallaib mic T?ij Sa^an Ro cuip a nap. Oo DeachaiD ona mac pig Sajcan caipip inunn mpccain Do copaoio hugo Delacn ba poplarhaij a hucc pfj Sajcan apa cionn in pe a acaip uaip ape hugo 6 Gpmn, -j nip leicc cfop na bpaigoe cuigepium pijpaiD Gpeann. cconnaccaib eDip na piojDarhnaib Coriicoccbail coccab Do pap ernp
i

.1.

ua concobaip concobap ua concobap maenmaije, mac Ruaibpi, Diapmaoa, Cacal cappac mac concobaip maonmaije, cacal cpoiboeapg mac Oo pome TCuaibpi a mac pi'6 roippbealbaij, po mapbaD pocaiDe froppa.
T?uai6pi
~\ ~\ -]
~[

lap na huaiplib ele lapccam.

lapcap connacc Do lopccab caijib, rfmplaib la Domhnall ua mbpiain,
la ^allaib.

~\

Cacal cappac mac concobaip maonmaije mic T?uai6pi Do lopccaD cille Dalua caijib, cemplaib cap a neipi, cucc a peocca i a maoine leip. UuaD-

muma

beop Do

rhilleaD,

la sallaib.

Na

goill

Dopccam la concobap maonmaije mac RuaiDpi, mac Ruaibpi peiyne Do ceacc leip co popp commain,
~| -| ~\ i

DO cabaipc cpi mile Do buaib Doib ccuapapcal. Qrhlaoib ua muipfbaij eppcop apDamaca, cenel pfpabaigh locpann no poillpiccheaD cuac i ecclap Decc, polupca pojapcac ua ceapballdin Do
~\
-|

oipDnfb

ma

lonaD.

OiapmaiD mag capcaij cijeapna Dfpmurhan Do mapbaD la ^allaib
caije.

cop-

^Domnall mac

jiolla

paccpaicc cijeapna oppaije Do ecc.

QO1S CR1O3D,
Ctoip CpiopD, mile, ceo,

1186.

occmogaD, ape.

TTlaolcallann

mac aDaim mic
uf

cleipcein

eppcop cluana peapca bpenainn
i

DO

ecc.

laclamn Do cop a plairfp, beapcaij DoipDneaD la Dpuing Do cenel eojain cealca
r

Oomnall mac ao6a

RuaiDpi ua plaich-

occ.

The death of

this bishop is

thus noticed in
1185. Qriilaim

the Annals of Ulster:

"A. D.

nt)un cuaic 7 eclaiy, in Chpipco quieuic a cabaipc co h-onopac co t)aipi Cpuenai, 7
i

h-ua TTIuipe&aij, epiycopup Qpomaca 7 cenmil Gpaoaij, locpann polupca no poillpijeo

Coluim Gille, 7 a aonucal po copaib a acap, .1. an coeB in cemeppuic h-ui Cob'caij, .1.
i

1186.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

69

King of England then returned to England, to complain to his father of Hugo de Lacy, who was the King of England's Deputy in Ireland on his (John's) arrival, and who had prevented the Irish kings from sending him
the

(John) either tribute or hostages. general war broke out in Connaught among the Roydamnas [princes], viz. Roderic O'Conor, and Conor Moinmoy, the son of Roderic; Conor O'Diar-

A

mada
and

Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy and Cathal Crovderg, the son of Turlough. In the contests between them many were slain. Roderic
;

;

his son afterwards

made peace with

the other chiefs.

The West
nell

of Connaught was burned, as well churches as houses, by Donand the English. O'Brien Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, who was the son of Roderic,
Killaloe, as well

burned

churches as houses, and carried off

all

the jewels and

riches of the inhabitants.

Thomond was

also destroyed

Moinmoy,
wages.

the son of Roderic,

Roscommon with

the son of Roderic,

and by the English. who gave them three thousand cows

and pillaged by Conor The English came as far as
as

Auliffe O'Murray, Bishop of Armagh and Kinel-Farry, a brilliant lamp that had enlightened clergy and laity, died r and Fogartagh O'Carellan was conse;

crated in his place.

Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, was slain by the English of Cork. Donnell Mac Gillapatrick, Lord of Ossory, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Maelcallann, son of
Christ, one

1186.
eighty-six.

thousand one hundred

Adam Mac

Clerken, Bishop of Clonfert-Brendau, died.

Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, died; and Rory O'Flaherty [O'Laverty] was elected by some of the Kinel-Owen of Tullaghoge.
^
paill bic.

Thus rendered

in the old transla:

Museum " A. D. Auliv O'Mureay, Bishop of Ardmach (Tirone) and Kindred-Feray, a bright taper that
tion preserved in the British
1 1

Cruthny, and [was] brought nonourably to Dyry-Columkilly, and was buried at
quievit in

Dun

85.

his father's feete, the Bishop O'Coffy, in the side

lightneth spiritually and temporally, in

CArista

of the church." It looks very odd that a Bishop O'Murray should be the son of a Bishop O'Coffey!

70

[1186.

caoipeac panac) cainoeal einij, -| jaipcceD cuaipla mac mic laclainn, -| la Dpeim Do cenel eojain, i cipc Gpeann Do mapbab cion Doib ann. imp eojam Dopccain po a bicin jion 50 paibe ua mbpandin Do mapbab paccpaicc mac an jiolla cuipp coipeac

Conn ua

bpfiplein

(.1.

T^iolla

Id Domnall

ua laclainn cpe epail muincipe bpandm po oein. murhain la concobap maonmaije Ruaibpi ua concobaip DO lonnapbab cuccaD e Dia la a mac buoein. Connaccaij Do milleao fcoppa Diblinib,
i
]

rip DO
DO.

pibipi

cpe comaiple

pil

muipeDaij,

-j

DO paDacc cpioca ceo Dpfpann
ceall niomDa cicchpfna jail

llugo Delacn TTlalapcac
TTlibe. bpfipne, i aipjiall.

~\

Dipcaoilceac

Do Dna DO bfipci cfop Connacc. Ctp pe po 176 ba Ian mi'6e uile 6 Shionainn 50 paippgi j;ab fprhop 6ipfnn Do jallaib. DO caiplenaib jail lepp. lap ccaipccpin lapam caiplen Dfprhai je 66 cdimc

Qp

a territory in the north of Tiror the county of Donegal, extending Connell, from Lough Swilly to Mulroy Lough, and from

s

Fanad was

w

Hugo

de Lacy.

The character and

descrip-

tion of the

personal form and appearance of

the sea to Rathmeltan.

In the old translation

de Lacy, is thus given by his contempoGiraldus Cambrensis rary,

Hugo

:

of the Annals of Ulster this passage is rendered as follows: "A. D. 1186. Con O'Brislen, the candle of liberality and courage of the North of Ireland, killed by some of Kindred-Owen, and
all Inis

" Si

viri colorem,

si
:

vultum

qua:ris,

niger,

nigris ocellis

&

defossis

naribus simis, facie a

dextris igne casuali, mento tenus turpiter adusta. Collo contracto, corpore piloso, pariter et neruoso.
Si staturam qusris, exiguus.

Owen spoyled and preyed through that, innocent of it" [L e. of the crime, cm co though paiBe cm ooib ann].

Si factustabilis,

ram, defonnis.

Si mores

:

firmus ac

&

Gallica sobrietate temperatus.
liaribus

Negotiis fami-

Mac Lougklin. There were some monarchs of Ireland of this family, but they w.ere at this time only Lords of the Kinel-Owen.
1

plurimum

intentus.

Commisso quoque

regimini, rebusque gerendis in commune vigilantissimus. Et quanquam militaribus negotiis

u

Cpioca c^o

signifies a cantred, or

barony,

plurimum

instructus, crebris

tamen expeditio:

containing 120 quarters of land. plained by Giraldus Cambrensis

It is thus ex:

num

iacturis,

Ducis

officio

non fortunatus

post

" Dicitur auBritannica

vxoris

mortem

vir vxorius,

& non vnius tantum,
:

tem cantaredus
tanta

tarn Hibernica

quam

sed plurimarum libidini datus

vir auri cupi-

teme

portio quanta 100. villas continere

dus

solet"

Hibernia Expugnata, lib. ii. c. 18 See also O'Flaherty's Ogygia, pp. 24, 25 ; and
O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, at the word Cpioca. It is translated, " Cantaredus seu Centivillaria
regio"
n. 51.

auarus, propriique honoris & excellentia, trans modes tiam ambitiosus." Hibernia Expugnata, lib. iL cap. 20.

&

by Colgan,

in Trias Thaitm., p. 19, col. 2,

This word is used in Profaner, malapcac. the best Irish manuscripts, in the sense of profaner or defiler, and the verb malapcuijim means,
I defile,

*

profane, curse.

The following

1186.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
s
,

71

Con O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad

the

lamp of the

hospitality

and yalour of the

north of Ireland, was slain by the son of Mac Loughlin' and a party of the KinelOwen in consequence of which Inishowen was unjustly ravaged.
;

Gillapatrick

Mac

Gillacorr, Chief of the Hy-Branain,

was

slain at the insti-

gation of the Hy-Branain themselves.

Roderic O'Conor was banished into Munster by his own son, Conor Moinmoy. By the contests between both the Connacians were destroyed. Roderic,
however, by the advice of the Sil-Murray, was again recalled, and a triochached" of land was given to him.

Hugo de
;

Lacy,

the profaner* and destroyer of
;

many churches Lord of the
;

English of Meath, Breifny, and Oriel he to whom the tribute of Connaught was paid he who had conquered the greater part of Ireland for the English, and of whose English castles" all Meath, from the Shannon to the sea, was
full
;

after

2 having finished the castle of Durrow

,

set out,

accompanied by

examples of it in the Leabkar Breac,
will prove its true

fail.

19,

b, b,

the county of Carlow ; one on the Barrow, near

meaning

:

Uuip

ip

menic

Leighlin

;

and one

at Kilkea,

and another at

elmjchep 7 malapcaigchep in pobul uili cpia imapbup aenbmne conio aipe pi ip coip po ceooip a malaipcpium nap ob juapochc DO
;

Narragh, in the present county of Kildare. See also Han-trier's Chronicle, Dublin Edition,
pp. 321, 322.
*

pochaioe he
it is

na caecpac cpia pochamo. "For often that all the people are corrupted and
7
;

Oaipmach, now Durrow,

situated in the

through the crime of one man whereexcommunicate him, that he may not be dangerous to the multitude, and that they may not fall through him." Also at fol.
defiled

north of the King's County, and close to the boundary of the county of Westmeath, where
St.

fore it is proper to

about the year 550.
cal

Columbkille erected a famous monastery See Lanigan's Ecclesiastivol. iL p. 118.

History of Ireland,

At

the

ol pe, a beich malapca, bichu. " And I say, quoth he, epcoicchenb cpia
4, b, b,

Ocup acbepim,

period of the erection of this monastery, Durrow was in the territory of Teffia, and the site

let
y

me

be accursed, excommunicated for ever."

was granted to

For a curious account of the English castles castles erected by Sir Hugh de Lacy, the reader is referred to Hibernia Giraldus Expugnata,

St. Columbkille by Brendan, Chief of Teffia, the ancestor of the Irish chieftain,

by

Hugh

Fox, or O'Caharny, at whose instigation Sir de Lacy was murdered. Adamnan, in

Meath

Cambrensis, cap. 19, 21, and 22. Besides his castles he erected one at New Leighlin,

his Life of

Columba, thus speaks of the founda-

tion of a monastery in this place
kille
:

by

St.

Columb-

in Idrone, called the Black Castle ; one at

Tach;

" Vir beatus in mediterranea Hibernia;

meho now Timahoe,
one at Tristerdermot,
territory of

in the territory of Leix

now

Castledermot, in the

parte Monasterium, quod Scotice dicitur Darmaig, divino fundavit nutu," See his Life of

Hy-Muiredhaigh, O'Toole's original

country

;

one at Tulachfelmeth,

now Tullow,

in

lib.

Columba, published by Colgan in Trias Thaum., i. cap. 31, lib. ii. c. 2, and lib. iii. c. 19.

72

aNNata Rio^hacnca emeawN.

[lisa

an cai^len. Uainic Din jail ina coirhiOeacc DO Dechpain 6 TTliabaij Do pfpaib reachba Dia foijib -] aon occlac jiolla gan lonacap

amac 50 cqiian

Venerable Bede has the following notice of
the erection of this monastery (Histor.
c.

nevertheless, that the
in the

Darmaig of Adamnan

is

lib. iii.

4):

"Fecerat, (Columba) priusquam Britanniam veniret monasterium nobile in Hibernia, quod a

Durrow, county of Kilkenny; but he offers no proof, and is manifestly in error. See his little work entitled the Life and Prophecies
of St. ColumbkiUe.
a

/

hoc copia Koborum Dearmach lingua Scotorum, est, Campus Eoborum, cognominatur." Camden and Mercator thought that by Dearmodi in this passage, Bede meant Armagh, and
the former, in pp. 764, 765, of his Hibernia, states, that a celebrated monastery was founded
at

G'Meyey.
this

There are several families of

name

in the county of

Westmeath, and in

the parish of Magheross, in the county of

Mo-

naghan.

Mr. Moore, in
a

his History oft Ireland, vol.

ii.

p. 321, states that

De Lacy

" met his death from

Armagh by Columba, about the year 610 but Ussher, who knew Irish topography far better
;

hand

so obscure, that not even a

name remains
:

than either of these writers, proves that Dear-

mach was the present Durrow

in the King's

in a note " Several names have been to the perassigned petrator of this act, but all differing so much

associated with the deed."

And adds,

County. " Columba? vero Dearmach eadem ipsa est quam Giraldus Cambrensis (Hibern. Expugnat.
lib.
ii. c.

from each other, as to shew that the real name was unknown. Geoffry Keating, with that love
of dull invention which distinguished him, describes the assassin as a

34) non

Dernach, ut habet liber editus,
vel

sed ut

MSS. Dervach

Dermach

:

(literam

guise."

young gentlemen in disKeating's account of this murder referred
is
:

aspiratam et v consonam eadem pene sono Hiberni efferunt:) ubi Midis ilium debel-

enim

M

to

latorem

Hugonem de Lacy, a
dolo

securiltus

male

se-

thus given in Dr. Lynch's translation of Keating's History of Ireland " Hugo de Lacy Midiae ab Henrico prapositus

by Mr. Moore,

curum,

fuisse narrat.

Hibernensium suorum interemptum In regio comitatu ea est, Burrogf)
:

tan to illico in indigenas seviendi libidine cor-

reptus

est,

ut nobilem imprimis in eo tractu
deleverit,

vulgo appellata

qua? monasterium habuit S.

Colmanorum gentem funditus pene

Columba? nomine insigne; inter cujus Kn^^ia,

aliisque regionis illius proceribus insidias dolose

Euangeliorum Codex vetustissimus asservabatur, quern ipsius Columba? fuisse monachi dictitabant.
ex quo, et non minoris antiquitatis altero, eidem Columba; assignato (quern in urbe 3XclIcs sive
ISenlis

instruxerit, et laqueis quas tetenderat irretitos
vita fortunis spoliaverit.
bilitatis flore

Quidem

aiitem e no-

animosusjuvenis indignissimam hanc

dicta Midenses

sacrum habent)

diligent!

cum

editione vulgata Latina collatione facta, in

suorum ceedem, fortunarumque jacturam iniquissimo ferens animo, audax sane facinus aggressus est. Cum enim Hugo condendo castello Durmagiae in

tiostros

usus variantium lectionum binos libellos

Midia teneretur implicitus, operarios quos-

concinnavimus."

and

Primordia, pp. 690, 691 ; Britannicarum Ecdesimum Antiquitates,

cumque idonea mercede conducens, quibus ita familiariter usus est, ut consortio eorum operisbilis

London, 1687, p. 361. The Rev. Denis Taaffe,

who was

well ac-

que, quandoque se immiscuerit ; juvenis itte nooperarii speciem cultu prae se ferens operam
locavit, confus fore,

quainted with the foregoing passage, asserts,

suam ad hoc opus

ut facul-

1186.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
it.

73

of Teffia, a youth named Gillagan-inathar O'Meyey", approached him, and drawing out an axe, which he had
three Englishmen, to view

One

of the

men

tatem aliquando
tanti

nancisceretur

animam

illam

descendant of the honourable man, for miao

suorum sanguinis profusione cruentatam hauriendi nee sua spe frustratus est quadam enim vice Hugonem graviter in opus incumbentem conspicatus, bipennem alte sublatum in ter; ;

means honour,

respect,

and miaoac, an honourIn the record of the
in the

able or estimable man.

murder of Hugo De Lacy, preserved
nals of Kilronan,
it is

An-

stated that this

O'Meyey
:

gum

ejus adegit, egit, ac extrusit."

animam que

domicilio suo ex-

was the fosterson of the Fox, Chief of Teffia. The
passage " A. D.
cille,
is
1

That

this story

Keating, will the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, which

was not invented by the honest appear from the following entry in

186.

very curious and runs as follows Uga oe 6aci oo tDupmaj Colaim
inoci, 7
ip

oo oenam caiplem
laip
;

pluaij oiaip-

mioe oo jallaib
7 6pepni,
7

uaip
ip

pe

pa

pij Pflibe

was transcribed long before he was born. A. D. 1186. Uja oe 6aci .1. malapcnc oipcailcec neimeo 7 cell Gpenri, a mapbao

Gipjiall, 7

7
i

n-emech coluitn

cille ic

oenum
O'

caipceoil

.1.

po gap Gpmn Ro po Ian Ono Dlioi o Smamn co paipci oo [recte o'a] caiplenaip, 7 oo jallaib. lap craipc-

Cotmacc,

7

bo bo bepca cip uile oo gallaib.

a ntJepmai^; oo mapbao Cecba.
" A. D. 1186.
faner

O

ITIiaOaij oo

pin

Hugo

de Lacy,

i.

e.

the pro-

oo in rpaocuip pin .1. caiplen t)upmaije Oo oenaim, camic atnacli bo pecham an caipCamic Ono lein, 7 rpiap bo jallaib laip.

and destroyer of the sanctuaries and churches of Ireland, was killed in revenge of
Columbkille, while making a castle at he was killed by O'Meyey of Teffia."

en occlac oo pepuip mioe oa inbpaije, 7 a pa na coim .1. jilla jan machup o miabaij, balca an cSmnaio peippm, 7 cue 6n puille bo, jup ben a cenn oe, 7 gup cuic
cuajli
eicip

Durrow

;

This entry
lation of the

is

thus rendered in the old trans-

ceno

7

colamo a clobh an

caiplen."

Annals of Ulster in the British

Mu-

seum

:

" A. D. 1186.

Hugh

de Lacy killed by a
Ireland, killed

workman.

Hugh

and privileges" [neimeb]

de Lacy, spoyler of churches " of

by

one of Brewny, by the Fox O'Catharny, in revenge of Colum Kill, building a castle in Dorow
(his

Durrow to make a castle there, having a countless number of the English with him for he was King of Meath, Breifny, and Oriel, and it was to him the tribute of Connaught was paid, and he it was that won

" A. D. 11 86.

Hugo

de Lacy went to

;

all

Abby, Anno 640 [540 ?j ex quo fundata
It will

est

Shannon
this

Ireland for the English. Meath, from the to the sea, was full of his castles, and

Dariajicclesia)."

be seen that in this pas-

English [followers].

After the completion of

well acquainted with the English accounts of the murder of De "a workman" \ Lacy, renders O'

sage the translator,

who was

work by him, i. e. the erection of the castle of Durrow, he came out to look at the castle,
having three Englishmen along with him. There came then one youth of the men of Meath up to
him, having his battle-axe concealed, namely, Gilla-gan-inathur O'Meyey, the fosterson of the

thus

Hugh de Lacy killed by a workman of Tathva" (DO mapbao O' O miaoaij oo Cecba).
:

"

miabaij, by

But this

is

so manifest a blunder that

it is

unneit
;

cessary to descend to particulars to refute

for

decidedly a family name, not meaning descendant of the labouring man, but
is

O' miaoui^

Fox himself, and he gave him one blow,
he cut
off his head,

so that

and he

fell,

both head and

body, into the ditch of the castle."

74

[1186.

ruaj po a coimm
cuic ercip cfnn
-j

laipy.

Oo
i

colainn

bfn a cfmT Oe gup bfpc builte DO llugo gup colaim cille. Qjup cclaD an caiflen i neneac
-|

Do cuam jiolla jan lonacap Do copa6 a peaca apy, 6 jallaib

o jaoiDealaib

Now

it is

quite clear, from these authorities,
is

while each

man was
some

busie to try his cunning ;
plaistering,

that Mr.Moore

wrong
a

in charging

Keating with

some

lading,

some heaving,

dull invention for having written that the

mur-

some carving; the Generall

also himselfe digg-

derer of
guise.

De Lacy was

young gentleman

in dis-

He should have remembered that Keating

ing with a pykeaxe, a desperate villain of them, he whose toole the Generall used, espying both
his hands occupied

had many documents which he (Mr. Moore) could not understand, and which are probably now lost.

As

to calling

O'Meyey a gentleman, we must

ac-

and his body, with all force inclining to the blow, watched his stoope, and clove his head with an axe, little esteeming the

knowledge that the term could then be properly enough applied to a youth who had been fostered

by an

Irish chief of vast territorial pos-

torments that ensued" [no torments ensued, for the murderer, who was as thin as a greyhound, " This baffled all pursuit Lacy was conED.]

he had been deprived of them by The scheme of O'Meyey could have been known to the Irish only. The English
sessions, till

De

Lacy.

querour of Meth, his body the two Archbishops, John of Divelin and Mathew of Cashell, buryed in
the monastery of Becktye, his head in S. Thomas abbey at Divelin." Historie of Ireland, Dublin
Edition, pp. 99, 100. See also
cle,

might have taken
to

it

for granted that

he was a
seems

labourer at the castle.

But

after all there

Hanmer's Chroni-

be no original English authority which calls the murderer of De Lacy a labouring man, nor

Dublin Edition, pp. 322, 323, where Hanmer observes of the tragical end of De Lacy
:

any authority whatever
shed.

Campion, who

than Holingwrote in 1571, gives the
for it older

" Whose death

(I

was not sorry

of,

read in Holinshed) the king for he was always jealous of

following description of the occurrence, in his Historic of Ireland., which savqurs really of " dull invention the rather for these

his greatnesse."

The only cotemporaneous English account of
this event are the following brief

Lacy whisperings, did erect and
:

words of Gi-

edifie a

number

of

raldus Cambrensis, in the 34th chapter of the

Castles,

well and substantially,
places,

provided in

Derwath, where diverse Irish prayed to be set on worke, for
convenient

one

at

second book of his Hibernia Expugnata, which is headed Brevis gestorum recapitulatio : "De Hugonis de Lacy a securibus male securi dolo Hi-

hire.

Sundry times came Lacy to quicken his labourers, full glad to see them fall in ure
with any such exercise, wherein, might they once be grounded & taste the sweetness of a
true man's
life,

berniensium suorum apud Dernach
the
of

[recte

Der-

uach] decapitatione." Giraldus would cdH both
his fosterson O'Meyey the people Lacy, inasmuch as they were inhabitants of Meath, of which he was the chief lord, and

Fox and

De

he thought

it

no small token of

reformation to be hoped, for which cause he
visited

of which,

them

often,

and merrily would command
in

it would appear from William of Newburg, he intended to style himself king. The

his

Gentlemen to give the labourers example

Abbe Mac Geoghegan,
torn.
ii.

in his Histoire d'Irlande,

taking paines, to take their instruments in hand, and to worke a season, the poore soules looking

on and

resting.

But

this

game ended

Tragically,

De Lacy a young Irish lord disguised as a labouring man, ("un jeune seigneur Irlandois deguise en ouvp. 36,

calls

the murderer of

1186.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
;

75

kept concealed, he, with one blow of it, severed his head from his body and both head and trunk fell into the ditch of the castle. This was in revenge of Columbkille. Gilla-gan-inathar fled, and, by his fleetness of foot, made his
rier"),

in

which he

is

borne out by Keating,
;

Ulster.

It also appears

from the Irish annals,

and not contradicted by the Irish annals but he had no authority for stating that Symmachus

that

De Lacy

had,

by the daughter of King

Eoderic O'Conor, a son called William

Gorm

;

O'Cahargy (for so he ignorantly calls an Sinnach OC'aharny, or the Fox, Chief of Teffia),

from whom, according to Duald Mac Firbis, the celebrated rebel, Pierce Oge Lacy of Bruree

who had an armed force concealed in a neighbouring wood, rushed upon, and put to the sword the followers of De Lacy ; or that the Irish
of his body. The fact would appear to be, that his own people buried De Lacy's body in the cemetery of Durrow,

and Bruff, in the county of Limerick, who
flourished
in

was the eighteenth
also

the reign of Queen Elizabeth, in descent ; and from whom

obtained possession

the Lynches of

Galway have descended.

(See Vita Kirovani, p. 9, and O'Flaherty's Account of lar-Connaught, printed for the Irish
Archaeological
Society,
p.

where

it

remained

till

the year 1195, when, as

36.)

The

race of

we

learn from Grace's Annals and other autho-

rities,

removed

the Archbishops of Cashel and Dublin it from the Irish territory ("ex Hy-

Walter and Hugh, who were evidently the sons of Hugh I., by his first wife, became extinct in the

male

line.

Walter

left

two daugh-

bernica plaga"), and buried the body in the Abbey of Bective in Meath, and the head in St.
It appears, moreover, that a controversy arose between the canons of St. Thomas's and the monks of Bective, concerning the right to his body, which contro-

ters, namely, Margaret, who married the Lord Theobald Verdon, and Matilda, who married

Thomas's church in Dublin.

Geoffry Genevile.

Hugh had

one daughter,
in

Maude, who married Walter De Burgo, who,

her right, became Earl of Ulster. See Hanmer's Chronicle, Dublin Edition, pp. 387, 388,
392.

versy was decided, in the year 1205, in favour of the former, who obtained the body, and interred
it, along with the head, in the tomb of his first wife, Rosa de Munemene See Harris's

For the

different accounts of the death of
is

Hugh
mus
c.

de Lacy the reader

referred to Guliel1.

Neubrigensis, or William of Newburg,

3,

Ware,

vol.

i.

p. 141,

and the Abbe Mac Geo-

9 ; Holingshed's Chronicle ; Camden's Britannia, p. 151 ; Ware's Annals, A. D. 1186;

Lacy's second wife was Roderic 0' Conor, whom King he married in the year 1180, contrary (says

ghegan (ubi supra).
Rose, daughter of

De

Cox's Hibernia Anglicana,

p.

40

;

Leland's His-

Holingshed) to the wishes of King Henry II See Dublin Copy of the Annals of Innisfallen,

tory of Ireland, vol. i. pp. 147, 148; Littleton's Life of Henry II., book 5 ; and Moore's History of Ireland, vol. ii. pp. 321, 322.
It

may not,
that, in

A. D. 1180, and Hanmer's Chronicle, Dublin It is stated in Grace's Annals Edition, p. 318.
of Ireland, that this Sir

mark,

perhaps, be out of place here to reour own time, a somewhat similar

disaster occurred at

Durrow;

for its proprietor,

Hugh left two sons (but by what mother we are not informed), Walter and Hugh, of whom, according to the Dublin
copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, the former became King of Meath, and the latter Earl of

the Earl of Norbury, was assassinated by a hand still unknown, after he had completed a castle

on the

site of that erected by De Lacy, and, as some would think, after having insulted St. Columbkille by preventing the families under

L

[1187.

po coill an cldip.

TCainicc laparh

i

ccfnn an cpionnaij q ui bpaoin, uaip

appiaD po pupdil aip an ciapla Do mapbao. ui ceallai^h cijfpna ua mdine Do mapbaD la TTlupcha6 mac cai&j
concobap maonmaije.
hi ccenel cconaill Do bpfiplem raoipeac pdnac laclamn.

O

mapbaD

ta

mac mic

CIO1S

CR1OSO,

1187.

Qoip CpiopD

mile, ceo,

ochcmojhac, a peachc.
-\

ITluipcfpcac ua maoiluibip eppoc cluana peapca, Decc. TTlaoiliopa ua cfpbaill eppucc aipjiall

cluana mic noip Decc.

RuaiDpi ua plaichbfpcaij cicchfpna cenel co-jam Do mapbaD ap cpec
ccip Conaill la

i

plaicbfpcach. locha ce Do lopccaD Do rene Doaic. T?o baibfo ~] po loipceab Cappacc mjfn ui eibin (.1. Duibeapa) bfn concobaip mic Diapmaca (ci^fpna maije luipcc) 50 peacr cceoaib (no cfcpaca ap ceo), no ni ap uille eiccip pfpaib
1

hua maoloopaij

.1.

mnaib

ppi

pe naon uaipe innre.

^lolla lopa
]

mac

ailella ui bpaoin

pecnap ua maine pfnchame pccpibm^e,

peap Dana

D'ecc.

his

tutelage from burying their dead in the ancient cemetery of Durrow.

This place, which Kilclare, Coill a' cldip was originally covered with wood, retains its name to the present day. It is a townland in
the parish of Kilbride, in the barony of Kil-

b

The district is generally anglicised Moylurg. now locally called the " Plains of Boyle." This territory was bounded on the north by the River
on the east partly by the Shannon and na Sionna ; partly by the territory of Tir Briuin on the south by Magh Naoi, or Machaire ChonBoyle
;

See Ordnance Map coursy and King's County of the King's County, sheet 8. c Maelisa 0' Carroll. He was elected Arch-

nacht,

which

it

by

the River Bridoge, which divided

met near Elphin ; and on the west it from the

district of Airteach.

Moylurg extended from

Armagh, and died on his journey towards Rome See Harris's Ware, vol. i. p.
bishop of
180.

Lough O'Gara toCarrick-on-Shannon; from the Curlieu Mountains to near Elphin; and from

Lough Key paic loca ce,
island in

d

Lough Key
The Rock of Lough Key, capis the name of a castle on an
in the county
It is still
i.

to the northern

boundary of the pa-

rish of

Kilmacumshy.

Mac Dermot was Chief

Lough Key, near Boyle,
kept in
e.

of Moylurg, Airteach, and Tir Tuathail ; and at the time of dividing the county of Roscommon
into baronies, these three territories
into one,

of

Roscommon.
e

good

repair.

were joined
Lat-

Magh Luirg,

the

plain of the track, or road,

and

called the

barony of Boyle.

1187-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
.

77

b He afterwards escape from the English and Irish to the wood of Kilclare went to the Sinnagh (the Fox) and O'Breen, at whose instigation he had

killed the Earl.

Murrough, the son of Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, was Conor Moinmoy [O'Conor].
O'Breslen, Chief of Fanat in Tirconnell, was slain

slain

by

by the son of Mac

Loughlin.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1187.

thousand one hundred eighty-seven.
died.

Murtough O'Maeluire, Bishop of Clonfert and Clonmacnoise,
Maelisa O'Carroll
,

Bishop of Oriel (Clogher), died. Rory O'Flaherty [O'Laverty], Lord of Kinel-Owen, was slain, while on a predatory excursion into Tirconnell, by O'Muldory (Flaherty,).
d Lough Key was burned by lightning. Duvesa, daughter of e O'Heyne, and wife of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg with seven hunf dred (or seven score ) others, or more, both men and women, were drowned

The rock

of

,

or burned in

it

in the course of

one hour.

Gilla-Isa [Gelasius], the son of Oilioll O'Breen,

Sech-Abb

[Prior] of

Hy-

Many,

a historian, scribe,

and

poet, died.
of Taghboyne, or Tibohine."
(

terly, however, by a Grand Jury arrangement, the south-west part of the barony of Boyle has been called the barony of French-Park, from the
little

Seven score

is

interlined in the original

:

town of that name
at the years

See other references

the compilers could not determine which was the true number, and so gave the two readings,
is

to

Moylurg

1446 and 1595.

The

following parishes are placed in the deanery of Moylurg by the Liber Regalis Visitationis of

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, it stated that the number destroyed on this occa-

1615; but
lurg
is

must be understood that by Moythere meant all Mac Dermot's lordship,
it

which comprised Moylurg (now the plains of Boyle), TirTuathail andAirteach; viz. Kilnamanagh; Ardcarne; Killumod; Assylin, now Boyle parish; Taghboin, now Tibohine; Killcoulagh;
Killewekin,
cin

moo," and in the old translation, the number 700 is written in Arabic figures. Thus " A. D. 1187. The Carrick of Lough Ce burnt at noone, where the daughter of O'Heiyn was burnt and drowned. Coner
sion
ni ip
:

was "un. cec, no

Mac Dermot, King of Moyloyrg, and 700 or more, men and women, were burnt and drowned
within an hower."

now Kulluckin,

in Irish Cill GiBi-

Kilrudan, Clonard, and Killicknan, be; longing then (as they now also do) to the parish

The burning of this fortress is recorded Annals of Kilronan, at the years 1 185 and

in the
1

187;

78

[1187-

Do rhupaD pop jallaib la concobap uaca jan mafnmaije -] la maelpechlamn mbecc cona cepna p^eolanja muDhucchaDh. Cuccpac a bpoibb, a naipm, apceic, alluipeacha,
Caiplen
cille

dip

DO lopccaD

~\

mapbaD, a neocha leo, po mapbaicc ofp Do piDepibh leo. Oonnchaoh ua puaipc Do mapbaoh la muincip eolaip
-\ -] -\

hi ppiull.

ui puaipc Do njeapna Opuimcliabh Do opccain Do mac TTlaelpeachlainn Do mac cacail hui puaipc, ua mbpiuin goill miDe aniaille conmaicne,
-] -|

-|

po mapbaD mac maelechlainn ui puaipc pia ccionn coicoipi lap pin hi cconmaicmbh, po DallaD mac carail huf puaipc la hua maoloopaib .1. plaicbfprach in enech
ppiu.

Do

poine Dia,

~\

coluim cille piopr

ampa

innpin, uaip

-]

mapbaD Dna pe pichic Dafp jpdoa mfic Hlaoilpechlamn coluim cille. caipppe Dpoma cliabh cpe miopbail De, ap puD conmaicne, TTlac Diapmacra, TTIuip^fp mac raiDcc, cigfpna muije luipcc Decc ina
colaim
cille.

l?o

-\

-|

cigh

pfm ap claonloch

hi

ccloinn cuain.
ecc.

Rajnall mag cochlain ciccfpna Dealbna Do

QoD mac

maoileachlainn

ui

puaipc

njeapna bpeipne Do mapbaD la
ecc.

macaib cuinn meg paghnaill.

Qipeaccach mac amalgaiD caoipeac calpaije Do
at the former year the

number stated to have been

destroyed is six or seven score, but at the latter the number destroyed is not stated. In the Annals of Boyle the burning of Carraic Locha Ce
recorded under the year 1186, but the ber destroyed is not mentioned.
is 8

132-137 but it must be acknowledged that Columbkille was held in peculiar veneration at this place, and was regarded as its patron
pp.
St.
;

See Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys at 9th of June.
1

num-

Son of Mdagklin.
to the'

Hugh, according
nals of Ulster.
J

His name was Aedh, or Dublin copy of the Ani

Muintir-Eolaii,

i. e.

the

Mac Eannals and

their correlatives,

who were

seated in the south-

ern or level part of the present county of Leitrim. Their country was otherwise called Magh

cille.

In revenge of Columbkille, rieneac colaim This phrase, which occurs so frequently

Rein

;

and they were

as often called

Conmaicne

" in throughout the Irish annals, is rendered revenge of Columkill" in the old translation of
the Annals of Ulster, preserved in the British
in

Maighe Rein,
11

as Muintir-Eolais.

small village in the barony of Carbury, and county of Sligo, remarkable for the remains of an ancient round

Drumdiff,

Dpuim

cliaB

A

Museum,

as follows:

which the above passage is rendered "A. D. 1187- Drumcliew spoyled

by mac Moyleghlin O'Royrck, King of O'Briuin
and Conmacue, and by Cathal O'Royrck's son, and the Galls of Meath with them but God
;

tower.
kille,

O'Donnell, in his Life of St. Columbstates that a
saint.

by that

monastery was founded here This is doubted by Dr. Lanigan,
vol.
ii.

shewed a miracle

in his Ecclesiastical History of Ireland,

Columkill there, for Moylaghlin's son was killed two weeks after, and
for

1187-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
castle of Killare,

79

The

which was

in possession of the English^

was burned
:

and demolished by Conor Moinrnoy [O'Conor] and Mclaghlin Beg and not one of the English escaped, but were all suffocated, or otherwise killed They carried away their accoutrements, arms, shields, coats of mail, and horses,
;

and slew two knights. s Donough O'Kourke was treacherously slain by the Muintir-Eolais DrumclifP was plundered by the son' of Melaghlin O'Rourke, Lord of HyBriuin and Conmaicne, and by the son of Cathal O'Rourke, accompanied by
.

But God and St. Columbkille wrought a remarkable the English of Meath. miracle in this instance; for the son of Melaghlin' O'Rourke was killed in Conmaicne a fortnight afterwards, and the eyes of the son of Cathal O'Roiirke
were put out by O'Muldory (Flaherty) in revenge of Columbkille'. One hundred and twenty of the son of Melaghlin's retainers were also killed throughout Conmaicne and Carbury of Drumcliff, through the miracles of God and St.
Columbkille.

Mac Dermot

(Maurice, son of Teige), Lord of Moylurg, died in his

own

mansion on Claenlough, in Clann-Chuain". Randal Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin, died.

Hugh, the son of Melaghlin O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was
sons of

slain

by the

Con Mag Rannal. Aireaghtagh Mac Awley, Chief of
was blinded, with

Calry, died

1
.

Cathel's son

whom

the

army

came,

O'Moyldory's house, in revenge of Columkill, and a hundred and twenty of the
in

him, and placed himself under the protection of Mac Dermot, Chief of Moylurg See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrack, printed in 1844,
for the

"of the sons of Moylaghlin were killed in Conmacne and Carbry of Drumklew, through the miracles of Columkill."
chief'est" [followers]

Irish

Archaeological Society,
is

pp. 163,

204, 205.
ten ;
it

The name Claonloch

Clann-Chuain, Clonn Chuam, called also Fir Thire and Fir Siuire ; their territory comprised the northern part of the barony of Carra,
in the

k

lake of Castlebar, for

was probably the ancient we learn from the Book

now forgotname of the

of Lecan that the Clann Chuain were seated on
the River Siuir, which flows through the town of Castlebar.

county of Mayo, and was originally a portion of the country of O'Dowda, under whom it was held by O'Quin of Carra; but about
the year 1150, O'Quin, in consequence of the barbarous conduct of Rory Mear O'Dowda, who
violated his daughter while on a visit at his

Chie/of Calry, raoipeac calpaije, that is, of Calry-an-chala, which, according to the tradition in the country, and as can be proved
'

from various written authorities, comprised the
entire of the parish of Ballyloughloe,
in the

(O'Quin's) house, renounced his allegiance to

county of Westmeath.

80
'

Rio^hachca eiraeaNN.

[1188.

QO1S CR1OSO,

1188.

a hochr. doip CpiopD mile, ceD, ochcmojac,
TTlaptain ua bpolaijh aipoeccnaiD jaoi&eal
-|

pfp Ifiginn CtpDa

mocha

Do

ecc.

QeDh ua bechan eppcop
coccai&e.
T?uai6pi

innpi

cacaij Do ecc.
hi

Clmlaoib ua Daijpe Oo cocc co

Dia oilicpe,

-]

a ecc ann
hf6, i

lap naicpighe

ua canannain cijfpna
t>o

Gpeann bfop

mapbaD

pioghDarhna la plaicbfpcac ua maoloopaiD cpe mebail ace

cinel cconaill ppi

na bpeccaD Do lap opomacliabh amach, -\ bparaip Dpoichfc Sliccighe lap ele DO Do mapbaD amaille ppip, -[ Dpfm Dia riiumncip. Tnagnap ua gaipb Do mapbab la muinnroipeac pfp nopoma (po imbip larh ap ua ccanannain)
Dochapcaij nDiojail uf canannam. Oorhnall ua canamidin Do Ifopab a coipi Dia ruaij pfin i nDoipe ace a ecc De cpia eapccaine pamca colaim cille. bfin apcclamje connaiDh,

np eachmapcaij

ui

i

-\

Dpong Do uib eachDach ulaD Do cocc ap cpeich rcip eo^ain 50 ccopachcacap 50 Ifim mic neill, T?o jabpac bu annpin. Do DeachaiD Doriinall ua laclainn cona cfcclac ina nDeaDhaiD, puce oppa
^oill caipceoil
i

riiaije

coba,

~\

m

CPBroly,

O6polaij

This name

still

exists

pp. 2-7- It continued to be the seat of a bishop
till

in Derry, anglicised

passage

is

given in

Brawly and Broly. This the Dublin copy of the An:

about this period (1188), when

it

seems to

have been united to the see of Limerick. Ussher,
however,

nals of Ulster, as follows

A. D. 1188. Hlapcam
uile,
7 apt>

who thought

that

it

owed

its origin

hua bpolaij apoecnaib joeibel
pep

to St. Patrick, informs us that its possessions

And thus renleiftinn aipb maca DO ec. dered in the old English translation in the British Museum "A. D. 1188. Martan O'Brolay,
:

were divided between the
laloe,

sees of Limerick, Kil-

and Ardfert

"
:

Atq; hie notandum, Patri-

cium

archlearned of the Irish

all,

and archlector of

in metropoli Armachana successore relicto ad alias Ecclesias constituendas animum adjecisse
:

Armagh,
n

died."

in quibus sedes ilia Episcopalis fuit in
catti

Inis- Cathy,

Imp Carai
is

Now

called Scat-

Sinei (Sljanan) fluminis alveo, Inis

& eodem

tery Island.

It is situated in the

the town of Kilrush, and

Shannon, near remarkable for the

sensu

in

Provinciali
Is

appellata.

remains of several churches, and a round tower
of great church was founded here antiquity. See 540 by St. Senan, a bishop, about the

Laonensem
Primordia,

&
p.

Cathay Episcopatus inter Limiricensem, Ardfertensem hodie divisus."

Romano

Insula

A

873.

year

Sincere penitence, iap naicpijhe roccaibe,
literally,

Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland,

vol.ii.

after choice penance.

This phrase

is

1188.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

81

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand one

1188.
eighty-eight.

hundred

Martin O'Broly, chief Sage of the

Irish,
n
,

and Lector
died.

at

Armagh,

died.

Hugh

O'Beaghan, Bishop of Inis-Cathy

Auliffe O'Deery- performed a pilgrimage to

Hy

[lona],

where he died

after

sincere penitence

.

Rory O'Canannan, sometime Lord of Tirconnell, and heir presumptive to the crown of Ireland, was treacherously slain by Flaherty O'Muldory on the
bridge of Sligo, the latter having first artfully prevailed on him to come forth from the middle of Drumcliff. The brother and some of the people of O'Canannan were also killed by him. Manus O'Garve, Chief of Fir-Droma (who

had

hands on O'Canannan), was afterwards slain by the people of Eachmarcach O'Doherty, in revenge of O'Canannan's death.
laid violent

Donnell O'Canannan wounded his foot with his

own axe

at Derry, as

he

was cutting a piece of wood, and died of the wound, in consequence of the
curse of the family [clergy] of Columbkille p The English of the castle of Moy-Covaq and a party from Iveagh, in Ulidia, set out upon a predatory exciirsion into Tyrone, and arrived at Leim-mhic. ,

Neill

r
,

where they seized on some cows; Donnell O'Loughlin pursued them
" while cutting," and this
1
is,

very frequently given in Latin in the Annals " in bona of Ulster thus penitentia quievit," or " in bona mortuus est." penitentia
:

in the opinion of

the Editor, the true reading.

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster this passage reads as follows A. D.
Columbkille
:

p

rony of

coba, a plain in the baUpper Iveagh, in the county of Down. Its situation appears from the position of the

Moy-Cova,

maj

1

188.

t)omnall hua canannan oo lecpao a coipi

church of Domhnach Mor Muighe Cobha, now

Dip cuaij
naio, 7

pem

t

n&aipe

i

juic apclainne con;

a ec be cpia mipbail coluim cille and thus translated in the old work already referred to: "A. D. 1188. DonellO'Cananancuthis foote by his oune hatchet
tree for fewell,
kille's miracles."
i

Donaghmore, a parish lying nearly midway beSee Feilire tween Loughbrickland and Newry
Aenguis, at 16th November, T Leim-mhic-Neill, i. e. the leap of the son of Niall. This was the name of a place near Dun-

in

Dyry" [when stealing]
it is

"a

and died thereof through Colum-

Here

to
it

^uir

is left

untranslated;

be remarked that means "
stealing,"

gannon, in Tyrone, called after Donnagan, the son of Niall, who was son of Maelduin, the son

or "while stealing." In the Annals of Kilronan, the reading is aj buam, i. e. "cutting," or

Aedh Oirdnighe, monarch of Ireland, who died in the year 819See Duald Mac Firbis's of the Kinel-Owen, p. 126. Pedigrees
of

M

82
hi

aNNdta Riojjhachca eiReawN.
t>o

[iiss.

ccaban na ccpann apt), jallaib, po cuipfo a nap.
aenap,
-|

copchaip innpin

paccpac lomaipecc Dm poile, po Tncut>h pop Oo paOaD eirh pa&aoh Do jallja pop Dorhnall a hi ppioqjuin cijfpna Qilijn, Dorhnall mac aoDa hui
-\ -|

laclainn, piojbarhna

la pin pfin
laparii.

Gpeann ap cpur, ap ceill, ap cpebaipe. RuccaD an co naipmibin moip 50 hapDmaca. 17o haDnaicfb co nonoip,
ui

6oaom mjfn
iap mbpfirh

cuinn

bainnjepna murhan bai aja hoilicpe
-|

i

nDoipe oecc

buaba

6 Dorhan

o Dfrhan.
hi

Sluaicceab la lohn Do cuipc i la jallaib Gpeann

cconnaccaib amaille

CionoiliD pf connacc .1. concobap maonle concobap ua noiapmacca. maije maice connacc uile. Uainic Dorhnall ua bpiain co nDpuing Do pfpaib TTlurhan pochpairce pijh connacc. Loipcic na 501 II apaill DO ceallaib na
i

cipe pfmpa.

Ni po Ificcic pccaoileaD Doib co pan^accap eapDapa.
ccip conaill on, uaip na po Ificcpiocc connaccaij

ba

Do ceacc
ccfp iaD.

i

map

pia Dia

lap bpiop pccel Do ua maoloopaiD Do plaicbepcac, ceajlomaiD OD cualaDap na joill pin piDe cenel conaill na ccoinne co Dpuim cliabh. po loipccpfo eapDapa co Ifip. SoaiD cap a naipp. CiajaiD ip in coippOo beapcpaD connaccaij pip murhan arnrnup poppa. TDapbaiD pliab.
~\

pochaiDe beacc Don chup
i

rhoip Dib.
pin.

pdccbaiD na

goill

an cip ap eccin,

"|

nf

po rhillpfo a

Cavannaff-crannard,CaKan na ccpann apo,

i.

the hollow of the high trees. This name does not now exist in Tyrone, nor does it occur
e.

Leabhar Breac, fol. 52, Editor has translated
heat of the conflict,"
u

b,

and 104, a; but the
"

the throughout by or "thick of the battle."
it is

in the Ulster Inquisitions,

Survey. There are two townlands called Cavan-O'Neill

or

Down

Spear.

5 a ^' 5 cn
/

rendered a pike in the
:

old translation of the Annals of Ulster, thus

in the county of Tyrone, one in the parish of
Kildress, near Cookstown,

"

A

and another in the
Dr. Stuart,

all,

thrust of a Pike was given the King among and fell there unhappily, viz. Donell mac

parish of Aghaloo, near Caledon.
in his Historical
p. 163,

Hugh

O'Loghlin, King of Ulster [Aileach] and

Memoirs of the City of Armagh,
is

thinks that this

the place

now
is far

called

heire of Ireland for personage, witt, liberality and housekeeping, and was caried the same day
to

Cavanacaw, magh on the
1

situated within

two miles of Arfrom

Armagh and was honerably
'

buried."

Newry

road; but this

OfO'Quin, Ui Cliuinn

This was O'Quin,

being certain.

Chief of Muintir-Iffernan in Thomond,
conflict, hi

now

re-

Heat of the

ppiorsutn.

The word

pniocjuin, which occurs so frequently in these Annals, literally means, the retort, or return of

The situpresented by the Earl of Dunraven. ation of the territory of O'Quin, from whom
Inchiquin derives its name, is thus given in O'Heerin's topographical poem :

the assault, or onset, or the exchange of blows

;

1188.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
5
,

83

with his retainers, and overtook them at Cavan na g-crann ard where an engagement took place between them; and the English were defeated with great But Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, Lord of Aileach, and slaughter.

presumptive heir to the throne of Ireland, on account of his personal symmetry, intelligence, and wisdom, alone received a thrust from an English spear', and fell in the heat of the conflict". His body was carried to Armagh on the

same day, and there interred with great honour and solemnity. v Edwina, daughter of 0'Quin and Queen of Munster, died on her mage at Derry, victorious over the world and the devil.
,

pilgri-

John de Courcy and the English of Ireland made an incursion into Connaught, accompanied by Conor O'Dermot; upon which Conor Moinmoy, King of Connaught, assembled all the chieftains of Connaught, who were joined by Donnell O'Brien, at the head of some of the men of Munster. The English set
fire to

some of the churches of the country

as they passed along,

but made no

( Bally sadare), with the intention of passing into Tirconnell, because the Connacians would not suffer them to tarry any

delay until they reached Eas-dara

longer in their country. As soon as O'Muldory (Flaherty) had received intelligence of assembled the Kinel-Conell, and marched to DrumclifF to oppose them.

this,

he

When

the English heard of this movement, they burned the entire of Ballysadare, and returned back, passing by the Curlieu mountains, where were attacked
the Connacians

who

they by of the English were slain, and those survived retreated with difficulty from the country, without effecting much

and Momonians.

Many

destruction" on this incursion.
t)'

O'Chumn an cpome neamnaip
paippm^ Ipepnam;

ITIuincip

Don cup pin. " And the English left the country without doing much damage on this occasion."
In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster
reads: pacbaic
it

dp

copam an jille jlom pa copa pmne plea&oi^.
extensive Muintir-Ifernan

" To O'Quin of the good heart belongs

na jaill in cip ap eicin cen a becc D0 & leu6 which is rather incorrectly ren'

The The
Is at

dered "
'

And

left

;

the Countl7 b 7 foroe without

fertile district of this splendid

man

the festive Corafin."
destruction, 7 ni

much fi Sht'" tish Museum.
It
is

in the old translation in th e Bri-

po millpeo a beacc. In the Annals of Kilronan the reading is 7
:

w

added in the Annals of Kilronan, that

Much

o na guill in cip cen a bee bo milleo

Murrough, the son of Farrell O'Mulrony, and O'Madden, and many others [alii midti eis], were slain at the Curlieus on this occasion.

mm

M

2

84

cn-wata Rio^hachca eireeaNN.
Cpeach la
-|

[1189-

co pujupcoip oorhnall mac gallaib ulaD pop cenel neojhain al ' aoDa uf lachloinn njeapna cenel neojhain poppu, -] po chuippfc dp pop 5
laib,

arpochaip Domnall

i

ppiocshum an chacha

pin.

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopo,
mile, ceo,

1189.

ocrmojao, anaoi.
-|

Do bachaD eccip dipt) TTlaolcamnij ua pfpcomaip pep leccinn Doipe
imp eojain.

Qpomaca Do GpDmaca DO
1 cpian,
"]

ina pochaip. opccain la hiohn Do cuipc -] la jallaib Gpeann lopccaD o cpoppaib bpijDe co pecclfp bpiccDi eccip pair,

ream pall. TTlupcha ua cfpbaill cijepna

oipjiall

Do ecc

ip in mainipDip

moip

mp

naicpicci rojaibi.

Domnall mac TTluipceapcaij mec loclainn Do mapbaD la jallaib Dal apaibe aca pfm. Gchmilib mac mec cana, ponap pobapcan cipe heoccham uile Do ecc. TTIac nahoibce ua TTlaolpuanaiD cijeapna pfp manac DO cop ap a cijeap-\

nap,

-|

6 DO 6ol Do

cum
-|

ui cfpbaill.

Cainicc pluaj jail Don cip mpccain,
Doib.

~\

DO paD ua cfpbaill
baill,
-]

ua maolpuanaiD racap

TTlaiDiD pop

ua

ccfp-

1
*

mapbcap ua maolpuanaiD. Concobap maonmaije (.1. mac TCuaiDpi) aipD pi connacc eiccip gallaib la Dia oipecr jaoiDealaib Do mapbaD la Dpuinj Dia rhuincip pfm
.1.
-\

Aird

is
;

now
it is

called Ardmagilligan

and Tarn-

laght-ard

a parish, situated in the north-

This passage is rendered as follows year 1 165. in the old translation of the Annals of Ulster
:

west extremity of the county of Londonderry, and is separated from luishowen by the straits
of Loughfoyle.

"A.
after
*

D. 1189.

Murogh

O'Carroll,

Archking of
of Meliibnt

Argiall, died in the greate

Abbey

That part of this parish which on Lough Foyle is low and level but verges the high mountain of 6eann Poibne, now Ben;

good repentance." Egkmily, Gciinilio. This name, which

is

an-

glicised

Eghmily

in the old translation of the

eveny,
i

is

situated in the southern part of it, from

Annals of Ulster, and Acholy, in the Ulster Inquisitions, is

whsBCe

it

has got the

name
i.

The Great Monastery,

e.

of Ard, or height. the Abbey of Melli-

compounded of ech, Lat.
miles,
is

equus, a

horse,

and mrlio, Lat.

a soldier.

The

font, iu the

county of Louth which was erected by Donough O'Carroll, Chief of Oriel, in the

country of

Mac Cann

shewn on an old map

preserved in the State Papers' Office, London,

1189.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
;

85

of Ulidia took a prey from the Kinel-Owen but they were overtaken and slaughtered by Donnell, the son of Hugh O'Loughlin, Lord of

The English
Kinel-Owen

the

;

but Donnell himself fell fighting in the heat of the

battle.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1189.

thousand one hundred eighty-nine.

x Mulkenny O'Fearcomais, Lector of Derry, was drowned between Aird

(Ardmagilligan) and Inishowen.

Armagh was plundered by John De Courcy and the English of Ireland. Armagh was burned from St. Bridget's Crosses to St. Bridget's Church,
including the Rath, the Trian, and the churches. Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, died a sincere penitent in the Great
y

Monastery

.

Donnell, the son of Murtough Mac Loughlin, was slain by the English of Dalaradia while he was [staying'] amongst them.

Eghmily*, the son of
died.

Mac Cann,

the happiness and prosperity of

all

Tyrone,

Mac-na-h-Oidhche [son of the night] O'Mulrony", Lord of Fermanagh, was driven from his lordship, and fled to O'Carroll. Shortly afterwards an English

army arrived

in that country, to

whom

O'Carroll and O'Mulrony gave battle;

but O'Carroll was defeated, and O'Mulrony killed. Conor Moinmoy (the son of Roderic), Bang of all Connaught, both English and Irish, was killed by a party of his own people and tribe b ; i. e. by Manus,
county of Armagh, which borders on Lough Neagh, and through which the River Bann flows on its way
as the north-eastern angle of the
b

His own

tribe

This passage reads as follows
:

in the Annals of Ulster

mac Ruampi,
Gpenn
uile,

into that lake.
*

ConcoBup maenmaiji, Connacc, 7 pioamnu oo tnapbao oa luce jpaoa pein
aipopi
:

O'Mulrony, O'TTIaotpuancnb.

There were

many distinct families of this name in Ireland, The O'Mulrony here mentioned, was of the same race as Maguire, by whom the former, as well as O'Hegny, who was by far more illustrious,

cpia epail a Bparap; and is thus rendered in " Coner the old translation Moynmoy mac

Koary, archking of Connaught, and to be king
of Ireland, was killed
brother's advice.''

by

his minions,

by

his

was soon

after subdued.

86

[1189-

TTlajnup

mac

an cpopac Donn), ploinn ui pinacca (oia njoipci

-\

la haoDh

mac

mic coippDelbaij ui concobaip, -j la TTluipcepcac mac bpiain bpeipnij cacail mic Diapmaca mic caiDg, -] la giolla na naom mac giollacomam, mic
muipfoaij bain
ui

maoil

TTlicil

Dona cuacaib.

TTlaips oipeacc po cogaip

Ifice mojha a a&bap aipo pigh Gpeann DO rhapbaD, uaip cuccpac upmop ua bpiain Dia cij 50 ccfnnup Do pia piu po mapbaD, Ooij cairncc Oomnall cue cpf picic bo jaca cpioca ceD hi Dun leooa, boi pfccmam ina pappaD, ni cconnaccaib Do, puce ua bpiain Dib pin uile, ace copn .p. peoiD 50 nop,
]

-\

-j

-|

bpiain a pfnarap Diapmaca ula6 ina cij, ~\ Do bai Domnall
ui

pfin, i

Do baf RuaiDpi
ci jeapna

mac Dinnnplebe
Dfpmuman
hi

pi
-|

mag
.1.

cdpcaij

ina

1:155

DO paD pom cuapupcal mop DO caib. bai TTlaelpeaclainn bfg
Ifip,

cuicc eich

jaca cpiocaic cec
cigh,
-|

cconnac-

pi

cfmpa ina

puce cuapupcal mop

i bai

ua puaipc

ina cij, i puce

cuapupcal mop

Ifip.

cfnD lap mapbab Concobaip maonmaiji canjup 6 piol muipeaDaij ap a mic, ~| 6 pdnaic T7uai6pi ui Choncobaip pi Gpeann Do cabaipc pije Do mp necc
Croisach Dorm, Cpopac t)onn. The word cpopac means streaked, seamed, or marked with crosses, and was probably applied to O'Finaghty,
c

et decanatu de
it is

Tuatha."

From these

authorities

clear that the territory called the Tuatha, or

from having had the cicatrices, or seams of wounds
intersecting

Three Tuathas, comprised that part of the county of Eoscommon extending from the northern

each other on

his

face.

Shane
flou-

O'Mullan, a celebrated highwayman,

who

rished in the county of Londonderry about one hundred years since, was, according to tradition,
called

Shane Crosach, from having his vered with scars of this description.
d

face co-

Lough Eee to Jamestown, on the Shannon, from Jamestown to near Elphin, and thence bounded on the east again to Lough Kee. It was by the River Shannon on the north by the Shannon and the territory of Moylurg on the west
point of
; ;

The Tuathas
i.

rha,

e.

Generally called Ceopa Cuathe three districts. These were Tir

by Sil-Murray, or the Plain of Connaught and on the south by the modern Hy-Many.
See

;

Map

Briuin na Sinna, Kinel Dofa, and Corachlann.

Hy-Many, published
chasological Society.
nals,

prefixed to the Tribes and Customs of in 1843, by the Irish Ar-

The

tripartite territory called the

Teora Tuatha

According to these an-

formed a deanery in the diocese of Elphin, comprising the ten parishes following, viz.,

Aughrim,

O'Dugan's topographical poem, the O'Monahans were originally the chiefs of Tir-

and

to

Kilmore, Clooncraff, Kiltrustan, Kilglass,
lin,

Bum-

Kilgefin,

Termonbarry, Cloonfinlough, Lissonuffy, and Cloontuskert. See Liber Regalis

Briuin na Sinna (but were subdued by tluO'Beirnes); the Mac Branans and O'Mulvihils
of Corcachlann or Corca Sheachlann ; and the

and Colgan's Trias Thaum., p.524, where, speaking of the church of Kilgefin, he points out its situation thus " Killgeuian
Visitationis of 1615,
:

O'Hanlys of Kinel-Dofa. e To his house. This

is

the Irish annalists to denote

the phrase used by " he submitted, or

ecclesia parochialis Dircccsis Alfinensis in regione

made

his submission."

On

such occasions the

1189.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

87

c the son of Flann O'Finaghty (usually called an Crossach Donn ); Hugh, son of Brian Breifneach, the son of Turlough O'Conor; Murtough, son of Cathal, son

of Dermot, the son of Teige; and Gilla-na-naev, the son of Gilla-Coman, who was the son of Murray Bane [the Fair] O'Mulvihil of the Tuathas d Alas for the party who plotted this conspiracy against the life of the heir
.

presumptive to the throne of Ireland! To him the greater part of Leth-Mho6 f gha had submitted as king. Donnell O'Brien had gone to his house at Dunlo
,

where he was entertained

of every cantred in Connaught,
the property of King of Ulidia,

week; and O'Conor gave him sixty cows out and ten articles ornamented with gold; but O'Brien did not accept of any of these, save one goblet, which had once been
for a

Dermot O'Brien, his own grandfather. Rory Mac Donslevy, had gone to his house. Mac Carthy, King of Desmond, was in his house, and O'Conor gave him a great stipend, namely, five horses out of every cantred in Connaught. Melaghlin Beg, King of Tara, was in his house, and took away a large stipend; and O'Rourke had gone to his house, and also carried with him a great stipend. After Conor Moinmoy had been slain, the Sil-Murray sent messengers to
Roderic O'Conor, son and to give
,

the

former King of Ireland, to

tell

[offer]

him the kingdom

:

and

as

him of the death of his soon as Roderic came to
all

Moy

Naei", he took the hostages of the Sil-Murray,

and of

Connaught

;

for

king to
torn

whom

sented those submitting with gifts.

obeisance was made, always preOf this cus-

of Ballinasloe

we have

a remarkable instance

on record in

lying to the west of the River in the county of Galway. Dunlo-street, Suck, in Ballinasloe, still preserves the name,
e

the Irish
or

work

called Caithreim Toirdhealbhaigh,

His

son.

This passage

is

so

confusedly

of Turlough O'Brien, in which it is stated that at a national assembly held by the Irish at Gaol Uisce, near Ballyshannon, O'Neill sent Teige O'Brien one hundred horses
as

Wars

given in the original that the translator has
it necessary to transpose the order of the language in the translation, but the original is printed exactly as in the autograph,

thought

wages of subsidy, and

as

an earnest of the

h

Moy

Naei,

maj

naoi.

This

is

otherwise

subordination and obedience due to him from

O'Brien but O'Brien, rejecting the subsidy and denying the superiority of O'Neill, sent him two hundred horses, to be received in
;

The inhabitants of the town of Eoscommon and its vicinity, when
called

Machaire Chonnacht.

speaking of the country generally, call the district lying between them and Athlone, the Barony, and

acknowledgment
O'Brien.
f

of

O'Neill's

submission

to

Dunk, Dun leooa

It is

the

name of

a

them and Elphin, the Maghery ; but that you are not in the Maghery till you they say are two miles and a half to the north of the town
that between
of

townland, which contains that part of the town

Roscommon.

The following

are the bounds

Rioshachca eiraecmN.
T?uampi 50

[1190.

naof po jab sialla pil muipfoaig i Connacc, ap ap ann po loc piB an can pin. bacap geill Concobaip maonmuije ninip clocpann pop ua cijeapna cenel cconaill cona coicep cal DO

maj

i

plaicbeapcac

maolDopaiD
-\

bfic illonspopc ip in ccopann,

connaccaij uile einp gall

-\

jaoibeal

ma

naghaiD Don leic

aile.

la cacal cappac mac concobaip Concobap ua Diapmaca DO mapbaD maonmaije a nDiojail a acup. Qn ceo Ripofpti Do pfojab op Sa^aib .6. lultj. la hua TTlaoilDopain (plaicbfpcac) Do jabail ppi connachcaib

SluaijeaD

^up po jab longpopr

ip in

Copann.

Uangacap connaccaij

uile eicip jal-

laib i jaoibealaib ina ajaiD,

ap a aoi

m

po curiiainjpfc

ni

66,

-|

po fcap-

pcappac

ppi apoile

Don chup

pin.

QOIS CR1OSO,

1190.

Ctoip CpiopD, mile, ceD, nochac.

Diapmaic ua pabapcaij abb Dfpmaije Do ecc. TTlaelpeaclainn ua neaccam ^lollabeapaij ua SluajaDaij Do niapban
-\

la coippbealbac

mac PuaiDpi

ui

concobaip.
-]

TTlop injean coippDealbaijui Concobaip,

Duibfppa mjfn Diapmaca mic

caibg DO ecc. Coinne eicip Cacal cpoib'Deapcc -] Cacal cappac hi ccluain peapca bpenamn Do Denarii pioDa fcoppa. Cfccaic piol muipeabaij uile ip in ccoinne

ceDna im comapba pdcpaicc, im Concobap mac Diapmaca, ~] im aipeaccach ua poDuib, -\ nf po peaDab a piooucchaD pe poile Don chup pin.
~|

of the Maghery, according to the general tradition of the people in the of Eoscommon. county
It

extends northwards as far as Lismacooil, in the parish of Kilmacumshy ; eastwards, to Falsk, in the parish of Killuckin; westwards, from
the bridge of Cloonfree, near Strokestown, as fur as the bridge of Castlereagh ; and southwards, to a hill lying two miles and a half north
of the

Drishaghan, in that parish, the navel or centre of the Machaire or plain of Connaught, which conveys a distinct idea of the position of this
plain.
'

Mac

Teige

It is

added in the Annals of

Kilronan, that she was the wife of Cosnamhach

O'Dowda.
Cathal Crovderg, Cccal cpoibbeapj, The Cathal, or Cahill, the Eed-handed.
Cathal,
k
i.

e.

town of Roscommon.

The

natives of the

name

parish of Baslick call a hill in the townland of

which means warlike, and appears to be

1190.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
up
to

89
Inish-

the hostages that had been delivered
cloghran, an island in

Conor Moinmoy were on

Lough Eee, at that time. Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Tirconnell, encamped with
and
all

his forces in Cor-

ran;

the Connaciaus, both English and Irish, were against

him on the

other side.

Conor, grandson of Dermot, was slain by Cathal Carragh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, in revenge of the death of his father.

Richard

was crowned King of England on the 6th of July. O'Muldory (Flaherty) marched with his forces against the Connacians, and
I.

All the Connacians, both English and Irish, came to oppose him; however, they were not able to injure him, and both departed without coming to an engagement on that occasion.
pitched his

camp

in Corran.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand one

1190.

hundred

ninety.

Dermot

O'Rafferty,

Abbot

of Durrow, died.

Melaghlin O'Naghtan and Gilla-Barry O'Slowey were slain by Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor.

More, daughter of Turlough O'Conor, and Duvesa, daughter of Dermot

Mac Teige

1 ,

died.

meeting was held at Clonfert-Brendan, to conclude a peace between Cathal Crovderg" and Cathal Carragh. All the Sil-Murray repaired to this meeting, together with the successor of St. Patrick Conor Mac Dermot, and
1

A

,

Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv; but they could not be reconciled to each other on this
occasion.

synonymous with the Welsh

Cadell, is

nerally anglicised Charles, as the Christian

now gename

Archseological Society in 1845.
'

See also note

of a man, but Cahill as a surname, which is in Irish O'Cathail. Dr. O'Conor, in treating of this

under the year 1224. The successor of St. Patrick, Coriiapba pa-

king

in his suppressed work,

Memoirs of

the

Life and Writings of Charles
ffare, translates his

O'Conor of BelanaO'Flaherty See his ac-

He cpuic, i. e. the Archbishop of Armagh. was Thomas, or Tomaltach, O'Conor, who was related to the rival princes, and "a noble and
worthy man," who was anxious to restore
native province
to his

name "Charles the Red-

handed."
translates

See
it

p.

32 of that work.

tranquillity

See Harris's

"Cathald Red-fist."

Ware,

vol.

i.

p. 62.

count of Hiar Connaught, printed for the Irish

N

90

awNQf-a Rio^hachca eiraecmN.

.

[1191.

Uanaicc ua concobaip i piol muipebaij 50 cluam mic noip in abaij pin, an coblac 50 tnoc apa bapach, cangacap pompa ap puo na ]io eipig T?o eipig anpab anbail Doib ap an loch Sionna 50 pangacap 50 loc pib. po cuaipcc an canpab an cfrap 50 po pccaoilpioc a napqiaige 6 apoile
-j -] -]
i

ba ip in mbof 6 concobaip conap larhab a luariiaipeacc la meo an anpaib, Cacal cpoibDepcc, bai Gipeachcach ua mbof ua Concobaip apcpach
-]
i

.1.

cenmord peipeap ceapna im Charal cpoiboeapg. l?o baibeab Qrhlaib Da Concobap mac carail, Concobap Qipeaccac ua pot>uib, mac Qo&a meg oipechcaij, ua TTlaoilbpenamn, 1 mac ui mannacam co
i

poouib, 1 mboi innre

concobap mac

cacail.

Oo

coiDh an cfcap po uipcce 50 po baibfb

"]

~\

pocaibe ele.

QO1S CR1OSD,
Qoip Cpiopo,
T?uai6pi
mile, ceo,

1191.

nochac a hafn.

ua Concobaip Do paccbail Connacc
ui

-\

a Dol

co- rip

Conaill Do

paighioh plaicbfpraij

maoilDopaiD,

~]

i

rrfp neojain lap pin DiappaiD
~\

m pocpaicce ap cuaipceapr nGpeann Do jabail T?fje Connachr DO piDipi, Do 6 connaccaib, Do COID poirhe Do po pafmpac ullca peaponn Dpajail na mi&e, Do cafo ap pin ip in nf po fipjfccup piDhe leip, paijib gall
~\
-]
]

mumain, coniD eipci pin cuccpac piol muipfbaij pCpann pach, i cenel aoba na heccge.
Ctillfnn

Do,

.1.

cip

piach-

mjfn Riaccam

ui

mailpuanaib, bfn aipeacraij

ui

pobuibh DO

ecc.

m
n

It foundered,

literally,

oo coioh an cfrap po uipce, " the vessel went under water."
i.

i.e.

the race of Aodh, or Hugh, of Slieve Echtghe,
Slieve Aughtee.
.

now

This was the tribe name

Conor, son of Cathal,

e.

Conor, Cathal

Crovderg's

own

son.

The

translator has been

of the O'Shaughnessys and their correlatives, which became also that of their country, for the

obliged to transpose a part of this sentence,

custom of ancient Ireland was, "not to take names
and creations from places and countries, as it is with other nations, but to give the name of the
family to the seigniory by them occupied."

which

is

not properly arranged in the original,
is

but the Irish text
autograph. Tir Fiachrach,

printed exactly as in the
Tir Fiachrach Aidhne

See

i.

e.

The country

of the

O'Heynes in the south-west

O'Flaherty's Ogygia Vindicated, p. 170, and Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, p. 354, note 8. O'Shaughnessy's country of Kinelea comprised the south-

of the county of Galway. P Kinelea ofEdttghe, cenel

aooa na hechcje,

eastern half of the diocese of Kilmacduagh, in

1191.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

91

O'Conor and the Sil-Murray went to Clonmacnoise on that night, and early next morning embarked in their fleet, and sailed up the Shannon until they came to Lough Ree. violent storm arose on the lake, by which their vessels

A

were separated from each other; and the storm so agitated the ves'sel in which O'Conor was, that it could not be piloted. Such was the fury of the storm, it foundered, and all the crew perished, except O'Conor himself and six others. In this vessel with O'Conor (Cathal Crovderg) were Areaghtagh O'Eodiv and
Conor, son of Cathal",
the two sons of

who were both drowned,

as

were

also

Conor and

Auliffe,

Hugh Mageraghty;

O'Mulrenin, and the son of O'Monahan,

and many

others.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1191.

thousand one hundred ninety-one.

Roderic O'Conor set out from Connaught, and went to Flaherty O'Muldory
in Tirconnell,

north of Ireland,

and afterwards passed into Tyrone, to request forces from the to enable him to recover his kingdom of Connaught but the Ultonians not consenting to aid in procuring lands for him from the Connacians, he repaired to the English of Meath, and these having also refused to go
;

with him, he passed into Munster, whither the Sil-Murray sent for him, and gave him lands, viz. Tir Fiachrach qpd Kinelea of Echtge".
Ailleann, daughter of
died.
the county of Galway
Tribes

Regan O'Mulrony, and wife of Aireachtagh O'Rodiv,

See

map

prefixed to
for the
list

on cuipp 50 cele
ouipn
7 cpi

61, 7

ppic plej innce 7 cpi

and Customs ofHy-Many, printed

O'Shaughnessy's country in the year 1543, see Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, printed for the same Society in
1844, pp. 375, 376. Under this year the Annals of Kilronan record the erection of the castle
of Rath Cuanartaighe, but without giving the name of the builder, or the situation of the castie.

Irish Archaeological Society in 1843. of townlands in Sir Dermot

For a

pn,

7

meoip illeireo plenna na pleije lam o'n njjualumn a pat>."

" A. D. 1191.
year,

The River

Galliv dried

up
it,

this

and there was a hatchet found in

mea-

suring a hand from one point to the other, and there was a spear found in it measuring three

hands and three fingers in breadth, and a hand from the shoulder in length."
See O'Flaherty's Account of lar-Connaught, published by the Irish Archaeological Society,
p.

They

also contain the following entry

un-

der this year, respecting the drying up of the River Galway A. D. 1 191. In ^mllim bo epcijhao an ol.aoa.n p, 7 pp.r cuuo innce, 7 lam
:

29,

where we read
bus, ad

and Ware's Antiq. Hibernicce, c. xii., " In Annalibus Roscomanensi:

annum MCXC,

fit

mentio capitis Haste, ad

N2

92

[1192.

QOIS CR1OSO,

1192.

Goip CpiopD, mile, ceD, nochac, aOo.

Oopup ppomncicce an Dmbpecclfpa colaim cille hua ccacam na cpaibe, la hinjhin ui Innfipje.
-\

i

nDoipe Do bfnamh la

Caichleac ua ouboa cicchfpna ua namalgaDa

~\

ua ppiacpac muaibi Do

mapbab

la

Da mac a mec

pen.

Cfeb ua plainn coipeac pil TTlaoilepuain Do ecc. TTlaiDm ace capaiD 6achapa6 ap jallaiB la muinncip maoilcpionna.

Caiplen acha an upcaip

~\

caiplen ciUe bipgi Do bfiiarh ip in
the

mbliabam

pi.

turn desiccate."
q

longitudinem uniuscubiti, repertiinfluvioGaliva: See note under the year 1178.

name

of their territory, which comprised the

Of Creeve, na

cpaoiBe.

The

district near

Coleraine, west of the River Bann.

The

cataract,

and part of the parish of Kilkeevin, in the present county of Roscommon. The present head of this sept
entire of the parish of Kiltullagh,

now

called the Cutt's Fishery,

was anciently

called

Eas Craoibhe

Domestica, cap. 3, of the River Bann, he writes

See O'Flaherty's' Ogygia, where, describing the course
:

of the O'Flynns told the Editor in 1837, that it was the constant tradition in. the family, that

" Banna

inter

scaturiens per

Learn et Elliam prater Clanbresail regionem Neachum lacum traasiens ^Endro-

O'Flynn's country extended southwards as far as the bridge of Glinske, in the county of Galway, but the Editor has not found any authority for
it beyond the limits of the present of Roscomrnon. It comprised the encounty tire of the mountainous district of Sliabh Ui

extending

niensem agrum et Fircriviam (F'P na CpaoiBe) Scriniamque in Londinodorensi agro intersecat,
et tertio e Culrania, et Cataracta Eascribe lapide se in

Fhloinn,
tains

oceanum transfundit, salmonibus
ffficundissimus."

totius

Europe longe
r

O'Flynn's mountain, which contownlands, and lies partly in the twenty parish of Kiltullagh, and partly in that of Kili.

e.

0''Inneirghe,

now

anglicised

Henery

This

keevin.

The

lake called Lough

Ui Fhloinn,

i.

e.

family descends from Brian, grandson of Niall of the Nine Hostages, Monarch of Ireland in 406. There are several of this name in the parish of Ballynascreen, in the

Lough Glynn by Mr. Weld, in his Statistical Account of the county of Roscommon), also lies in this
O'Flynn's
territory, as does

lake (incorrectly anglicised

county of London-

derry, of whom Dr. Henery, of Maghera, in the same county, is at present the most respectable.

called in Irish

the village of Ballinlough, baile locha Ui Phloinn, i. e.

See Duald

Mac
p.

Firbis's Irish Pedigrees,

Lord

the town of O'Flynn's lake. O'Flynn's castle, of which the foundations only are now traceable,

Roden's copy,
s

178, with which the copy in the

Royal Irish Academy corresponds.

village
e.

stood on the top of the hill between the and the lake.

Hy-Awky andHy-Fiaclirach,
Sil-Maelruain

i.

the inhabiis

The present head

tants of the baronies of Tirawley
1

and Tireragh.
it

Edmond

of this sept of the O'Flynns O'Flynn, Esq., of Newborough (the

This was the tribe name of
also

the O'Flynns of Connaught, and

became

son of Kelly, son of Edmond, son of Colla), who possesses but a few townlands of the territory.

1192.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

93

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1192.

thousand one hundred ninety-two.

of the refectory of Duv-regles-Columbkille was made by r of Creeve q and the daughter of 0'Henery O'Kane, Taichleach O'Dowda, Lord of Hy-Awley and Hy-Fiachrach' of the Moy,
, .

The doorway

was

Hugh

grandsons. O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, died'. The English were defeated at jthe weir of Aughera", by Muintir Maoil-t-Sinna. The castle of Ath-an-Urchairw and the castle of Kilbixy* were erected in

slain

by

his

own two

this year.
Dr. O'Brien, in his Irish Dictionary, printed Edmond O'Flin, of
others, both Irish and English, were slain. w Jlth-anUrchair, now called in Irish baile aca upchuip, and in English Horseleap: it lies

many

at Paris in 1768, states that

Ballinlagh, Esq. (the grandfather of the present Edmond), was then the chief of this ancient fa-

"the Eight Hon. Lady mily. Ellen O'Flin, Countess de la Hues of LahnesCastle, in Normandy, was of the same direct branch of the O'Flins, her ladyship being daughalso states that

He

in the barony of Moycashel, in the south of the county of Westmeath. Sir Henry Piers of Tris-

ter to

of

Timothy O'Flin, of Clydagh, in the Co. Roscommon, Esq." The Connaught O'Flynns are of a different race from O'Flynns of Arda,
in

ternagh, who wrote in 1682, says, that Sir Hugh De Lacy was murdered here by a mere villain or common labourer, and a native, as he was stooping down to give some directions to the workmen but this cannot be true, as it ap;

Munster, and from the O'Flynns, now O'Lynns, of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee, the warlike
opponents of Sir John De Courcy. u The weir of Aughera, capaio 6acapao This place is called Acharudh Lobran at the year 1 63. The only place near the country of the
1

pears, from the old Irish annals, that Sir Hugh was murdered in 1186 by O'Meyey, the foster-

son of the Fox, prince of Teffia,
fore this castle

i.

was

erected.

e. six years beSee note under

the year 1186.

from Sir

Piers says that this place was called Horseleap, Hugh de Lacy having leaped on horsecastle

Muintir Maoil-tsionna, or

Aughera,

is

Mac Carroons, called the parish of Augher, in the barony

back over the drawbridge of the

See

of Deece, in the county of East Meath. The Mac Carroons were seated in Cuircne in Teffia,

He Vallancey's Collectanea, vol. i. pp. 84, 85. describes this castle as a stately structure, and
such no doubt
ruins of
it it

was, but there are no distinct

which was the western part of the county of "Westmeath. According to the Annals of Kilronan the Mac Carroons were defeated this
year
at

at present, except the
;

two

piers of the

drawbridge

masses of the walls are seen scathill,

tered over the

but the ground-plan of the

Rath Aodha (Rathhugh, near Kilbeggan), by the English, on which occasion the two sons of Mac Carroon, the two sons of Teige Mac
Ualgairg
[Magoalric], O'Hart, Branan

See building could not now be determined other references to this place at the years 1207

and 1470.
x

Mac Branan, and

Kilbixy, Cill

6^51,

recte

Cill 6i5fi je,

i.

e.

94

[1193.

Cpeach mop Do oenarh

la jallaib laijfn ap Domnall

ua mbpiain, 50
-|

oalua piap 50 majh ua croippnealbaij, puccpangacrap rpe clap cille Oo ponpac ^oill Diobh. parc Dal ccaip oppa 50 po mapbpac pochaiDe Don chup pin. caiplen cnuic TCapponn caiplen cille piacal, maibm mop pia noomnall ua mbpiain pop jallaib opppaije 50 po
-]

cuipeaD a nap.

CIO1S

CR1OSD,

1193.
acpf.

Qoip CpiopD mile, ceo, nochac,

Gochaib ua baoijill Do rhapbaD la huib piachpac apoa ppara. TTlaolpacrpaicc ua cobcaij Do ecc.

Cacal mac gaichene DO

ecc.
Cill Piacla, now Kilfeakle, an old church, of Clangiving name to a parish, in the barony and county of Tipperary, and about william,
z

This place is dethe church of St. Bigseach scribed in the Gloss to the Feilire or Festilogy of Aengus at 4th October, as in the territory of

Ui Mac Uais (Moygoish), in Meath. It afterwards became an English town of some importance, according to Sir

four miles and a half to the east of the town of

Henry

Piers,

who wrote

in 1682

Kilkixy, of old a town of great note, as tradition telleth us, twelve Burgesses having, in their scarlet gowns, a Mayor or Sovereign
:

"

Tipperary. In the Book of Lismore, fol. 47, b, b, this church is described as in the territory of Muscraighe Breogain, which was the ancient

name

of the barony of Clanwilliam.

See also

Annals of
and 1205
;

Innisfallen, at the years 1192, 1196,

with other
&c."

officers suitable to so

great a port,

Life Colgan's edition of the Tripartite
lib. iii. c.

The Editor

visited this place in 1837,
this ancient town.

of St. Patrick,
clesiastical
a

32 ; and Lanigan's Eci.

and found but few traces of

History of Ireland, vol.

p.

290.
hill

They were mere ruin ;

as follows
2.

:

1.

The Leperhouse,
;

a

Knockgraffon,

Cnoc Rappon,

i, e.

the

of

The

site
its

of the castle, but no
walls
3.

Raffon, who, according to Keating
writers,

and the older
It is

remains whatever of

A moat sur-

was the nurse of Fiacha Mulleathan,

rounded by one circular fosse ; 4. Site of the There is a holy well near the church gallows.
still

King

of Munster, in the third century.

bearing the name Cobap je, i. e. the well of St. Bigseach, a virgin, whose memory was venerated here, according to the Irish Ca-

&ip

a townland in a parish of the same name, in the of Middlethird, and county of Tipperary,

barony and about two miles to the north of the town of
Cahir.

O'Brien has the following notice of this

lendars, on the 28th of

June and 4th of Octo-

place in his Irish Dictionary, voce

GRAKANN

:

ber

See other references to Kilbixy at the

"

years 1430 and 1450.
y Magh-Ua-Toirdltealbkaigh, a plain near the .Shannon, hi the parish of Killaloe, in the east of the county of Clare.

GRAPANN, Knockgraffan, of county of Tipperary, one of the regal houses
the kings of Munster in ancient times, where Fiacha Muilleathan, and other Momonian kings,

or Eaffan,

in the

had their courts

;

it

was

to

that seat Fiacha

1193.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

95

The English of Leinster committed great depredations against Donnell O'Brien. They passed over the plain of Killaloe, and directed their course
y westwards, until they had reached Magh-Ua-Toirdhealbhaigh where they were opposed by the Dalcassians, who slew great numbers of them. On this expe2 dition the English erected the castles of Kilfeakle and Knockgraffon".
,

Donnell O'Brien defeated the English of Ossory, and made a great slaughter
of them.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1193.
ninety-three.

thousand one hundred

Eochy O'Boyle was
Cathal

slain

by the Hy-Fiachrach of Ardstraw".

Mulpatrick O'Coffey died.

Mac Gaithen

died.
castle only

brought Cormac Mac Airt, King of Leath-Coinn, prisoner. In after ages it was the estate, together
with
its annexes, of the O'Sullivans. very remarkable moat yet remains there to be seen to

one small tower

now

remains, but the

outlines of

some of the walls are traceable to a
See Cormac's GlosIre-

A

very considerable extent.
sary, voce

Qna

;

and Keating's History of

this day."

Again, under the word RAFFAN, he

land, reign of

Cormac Mac Art.
Innisfallen

" ; KAFPAN, Cnoc-Raffan, a beautiful hill near the River Suire, the centre of the primitive estate of the O'Sullivans, descended from Finin,
writes
elder brother of Failbhe Flann, ancestor of the

The Dublin copy of the Annals of

records the erection of the castles of Kilkenny and Kilfeakle, by the English, in this year.
*

visited Knockgraffon iu the year and found the ancient ruins to consist of 1840, a large moat surrounded by a rath of ample di-

Mac Cartys." The Editor

\ para,
straw.

Hy-Fiachrach ofArdstraie, ut piacpac apoa i. e. the descendants of Fiachra of Ard-

Their territory was situated along the River Derg, in the north-west of the county of Tyrone, and comprised the parish of Ardstraw

mensions.

The moat

is

about

fifty-five feet in

and some
(Primardia,
straw, and

adjoi/iing
p. 857),

parishes.

Ussher states

perpendicular height, and sixty
at top.

feet in

diameter

that the church of

Ard-

At

the foot of the -moat on the west

side is a curious platea measuring seventy paces from north to south, and fifty-seven paces from east to west. This place remained in the possession of the descendants of Fiacha Muillea-

other churches of Opheathrach, were taken from the see of Clogher, and incor-

many

This tribe of porated with the see of Derry. the Hy-Fiachrach are to be distinguished from those of Connaught, being descended from
Fiachra,

than, the O'Sullivans, until the year

1

192,

when

the son of Ere,

who was

the eldest

the English drove them from their rich plains into the mountains of Cork and and

son of Colla Uais, monarch of Ireland in the
fourth century

Kerry, within their Rath of Knockgraffon, a strong castle to secure their conquests. Of this
erected,

See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, P.

iii.

c.76.

[1193.

Ofppopjaill(.i.bfnci gepnain uil?uaipc) ingfn mupcaba uiTTIaoileachlainn Do ecc i mainipDip Dpoicir arha ip in cuiccfo bliaban ochcmojau a haoipi.

Oiapmaio mac Conbpo^oa ui biomupaij; caoipeac cloinne maoilupa, ncchfpna ua pailje ppi pe pooa Do ecc. Cached obap mac mej capraij Do rhapbaoh la Dorhnall mag capcaijjh. THuipcfpcac mac mupcaba TTlec mupca&a cicchfpna ua ccennpelaij Deg.
]

GoDh ua maoilbpenamn caoipeac
laibh
c

cloinne concob'aip Do mapb'ao la jal-

acha

cliach.
territory of Clanmaliere extended to the

DeapBpopjaill. She was, thereborn in the year 1 108, was forty-four years fore, of age when she eloped with Dermot Mac MurDervorgilla,

margin

of the Great Heath of Maryborough, and comprised the barony of Portnahinch in the Queen's

rough, King of Leinster, who was then in the sixty-second year of his age, a remarkable instance of a green old age.

Dermot was expelled
O'Conor

County, on the south side of the River Barrow, and the barony of Upper Philipstown, in the King's County, on the north side of that river.
This Dermot O'Dempsy was the only man of his name that obtained the chieftainship of all
Offaly.

in eight years afterwards, but, as Dr.

observes, not for the seduction of this woman.

See O'Conor's Prolegomena ad Annales, part ii. p. 146. O'Reilly, in his Essay on the Brehon

He

founded, on the site of an ancient
St. Evin,

church dedicated to

about the year

Laws,

attempts to defend the character of this
it

1178, the great Cistercian abbey of Rosglas,

woman; but

cannot be defended, as

we have

now Monasterevin
he richly endowed.

(ITIainipcip Giriifn),

which

the authority of these Annals, and of the older Annals of Clonmacnoise, to prove that she not

See his Charter of Foun-

only consented to go
also carried

home with Dermot, but

dation published in the Monasticon A nylicanum, For the extent of Ui Failghe vol. ii. p. 1031.
before the English invasion, see note under the

with her, her dowry and cattle

See Mageoghegan's Translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, and note under the year 1 172,
p. 4.
d

year 1178.

Monastery of Drogheda, TTlamir-np Opoicic

ofMurrongh Mac Murroitgh. was Murtougli na maor (i. e. of the StewHe ards), son of Murrough na nGaedhal (of the
f

Murtouffk, son

Gra.

of Drogheda,
Mellifont,

Colgan observes that, by the Monastery the Four Masters mean that of

Irish),

who was

the brother of Dermot

na nGall

which

is

near that town.

See Trias

Thaum., p. Sanctorum, p. 655, 776; see also Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History
of Ireland, vol.
'

309, and

Ada

brought the English (of the English), to the Book of Leinster, to Ireland). According a very important fragment of a MS. preserved
first

who

iv. p.

167, note 22.

clann maoilujpa. Clanmalier, This, which was the territory of the O'Dempsys, extended on both sides of the River Barrow, in the
King's and Queen's Counties. It appears from an old map of the countries of Leix and Ophaley, made in the reign of Philip and Mary, that the

Dublin (H. na nGaedhal was the ancestor 2, 18), Murrough of the celebrated family of Mac Davy More, or Mac Damore, said by Sir George Carew to be a
in the Library of Trinity College,

branch of the Barrys, and also of Mac Vaddock, whose country was situated round Gorey, in the
north-east of the county of "Wexford, supposed
also,

but without any proof whatever, except

1193.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM, OF IRELAND.

97

c of Murrough Dervorgilla (i. e. the wife of Tiernan O'Kourke), daughter d O'Melaghlin, died in the monastery of Drogheda [Mellifont], in the eighty-fifth

year of her age. Dermot, son of Cubroghda O'Dempsey, Chief of Clanmalier', and for a long time Lord of Offaly, died.

Cathal Odhar, the son of

Carthy, was slain by Donnell Mac Ca^thy. f 8 Murtough, the son of Murrough Mac Murrough Lord of Hy-Kinsellagh
,

Mac

,

died.

HughO'Mulrenin", Chief of Clann-Conor, was
mere conjecture,
to

slain

by the English

of Dublin.

be

of

English descent.

a lady of the Barrys,

From Donnell Kavanagh, the illegitimate son of Dermot na nGatt Mac Murrough, are descended all the Kavanaghs, including the Mac
Dermots Lav-derg
illegitimate
;

David and Redmond into

and thus brought the names this branch of the

Mac Murrough

family, as the

Kavanaghs have

that of Gerald, Maurice, Walter, &c., from in-

and from Enna, another

son of the same Dermot, are de-

families.

termarriages with other English or Anglo-Irish The pedigrees of the above septs of

scended the
so

numerous

in Leinster.

family of the Kinsellaghs, The country of

now Mac

the

Mac Murroughs

are also given in

Duald
and in

Mac
8

Firbis's Genealogical Book, p. 473,
p. 82.

or Mac Damore, was in the barony of Ballyghkeen, comprising the lands of In the State Papers' Office, Glascarrick, &c.

Davy More,

Peregrine O'Clery's,

The people called Hy-KinHy-Kinsellagh sellagh, were the descendants of Eochy Kinsellagh,

London,

is

preserved a petition, dated 1611, of

King of

Leinster, about the year of Christ

Art Mac Dermott Kavanagh, Chief of the Kinsellaghs,

and Redmond Mac Davimore, Richard Mac Vaddock, and Donnell Kavanagh Spaniagh,

358.4 Their country originally comprised more than the present diocese of Ferns, for we learn

from the oldest

lives of St. Patrick,

that Do-

and other gentlemen and freeholders of the countries of Mac Dermott, Mac Davimore, and

naghmore, near Sletty, in the present county of Carlow, was in it. In an ancient Tripartite Life
of St. Patrick, quoted by Ussher (Primordia, p. 863), it is called the larger and more power" Ordinavit S. Patricias ful part of Leinster.

Mac Vaddock, through
and another

their agent,

Henry Walsh;

petition, dated
gent.,

mond Mac Damore,

May, 1616, of RedChief of Mac Damore's

country, in the county of Wexford, to the English Privy Council, regarding the new Plantation

de gente Laginensium alium episcopum nomine

Fyacha virum reliyiosissimum
lissimi Patricii
vertit et baptizavit ;

:

quijussione bea-

In this petition Mac Damore that he holds his lands by descent and not states
in Wexfordshire.

gentem Ceanselach ad fidem conquce gens major atque poten-

by

tanistry.

This, however,

is

not enough to

tior

prove his descent from the Barrys, in opposition to the Book of Leinster, a vellum manuscript,
at least five, centuries old,

eat." The country of HyFelmeadha, north, which was the ancient name

pars Laginensium

which

traces his pedi-

of the district around Tullow-Ofelimy, in the present county of Carlow, was also in the territory of Hy-Kinsellagh.
h

gree to

Murrough na nGaedhal, the brother of Uermot na nGatt. It is highly probable, nowthat Murrough na nGaedhal, had married ever,

O Mulrenin,
1

Omuoilbpenumn

The exact

limits of the cantred of Clann-Conor, the terri-

98

[1194.

Ua
cup,
-]

la jallaibh, cfpbaill ciccfpna aipjpall DO jabail
la

~\

a Dallab leo

o

a cpochaoh lapccain. Imp clochpann DO 07150111 la macaib oipoealb,

-\

macaib concobaip

TTlaonmaije.

QO1S CR1OSO,

1194.

Goip CpiopD, mile, ceD, nochac, acfrhaip.
Conpcancin ua bpain [ua bpiain?] eppoc Oomnall mac roipp&ealbaij ui bpiain
piooa i coccab T?eDla abanra
~\

cille
T?i

Dalua DO

ecc.

emj
1

~|

muman, lochpann polupoa Ifice mo&a fnjnarha na muimneac,
-\

muipcfpcach a mac Do jabail a lonamh. apchfna Do ecc, a ccop ap eccin DO chiachcain ap imp] ua ppionncain, ^oill CumiDe ua plainn Do mapbaD la gallaib.
-\

Di.

Sloicchfo la jillebepr mac joipoealbaij co heapp puaio, ap pi&en gan nach capba Dia Sloijfo imp.
tory of O'Mulrenin, cannot
as this family

~\

a iompu6

now be determined,
under

sunk

at an early period

is

O'Flanagan and O'Conor Roe ; but its whereabouts may be ascertained from O'Diigan's topographical poem, which makes the Clann-

These churches, to one of which sent occupier. attached a very old square belfry, called in Irish Clojap, are said to have been erected by
St.

were

Conor

a

subsection of the Clanncahill, whose

Dermot in the sixth century but some of them re-edified. The famous Meave of Croghan, Queen of Connaught, was killed on this island by
;

territory comprised the parishes of

Kilmacum-

and Shankill, and parts of the parishes of Creeve and Elphin, in the county of Roscommon. ITIael Bpenamn, the name of the
shy, Kilcorkey,

the champion Forby, her own nephew, and the spot on which she perished is still pointed out,

and

called lonao

mapbra

VTleiDbe, the place of

progenitor of this family, signifies the servant, or devoted of St. Brendan.
Iniahdoghran, Imp Clocpann, i. e. the island of Clothra. This Clothra is said to have
'

the killing of Meave. There is also on the highest point of the island the remains of a fort called

Grianan Meidhbhe

See Ordnance

Map

of the

Island; and Petrie's Inquiry into the Origin and Uses of the Round Towers of Ireland, p. 358.
k

been the

sister of

the famous Meadhbh, or Meave,

Queen

of Connaught.

The
is

island lies in

Lough
called,

loes

The Sons of Osdealv, i. e. the Mac CostelAccording to the Annals of Kilronan, the

Rue, near St. John's, and

now sometimes

island of Inis Clothrann

was plundered

this year

by the people of the counties of Longford and Roscommon, dwelling in its vicinity, the Seven Church Island, from the ruins of seven old
churches
still

by Gilbert Mac Gosdealv, and
viz.,

his English fol-

lowers, and the sons of Gilchreest

Gilla Croichefraich and Auliffe,

Mac Carroon, who had

to be seen

on

it

;

and sometimes

the tribe of Muintir Maeltsinna with them.

Quaker's Island, from Mr. Fail-brother, the pre-

According to the Dublin copy of the Annals of

1194.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
4

99
put out his

O'Carroll,

Lord of
1

Oriel,

was taken by the English, who
k
,

first

him. eyes, and afterwards hanged
sons of Osdealv Inishcloghran' was plundered by the

and the sons of

Conor Moinmoy.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1194.

thousand one hundred ninety -four.

Constantine O'Brain [O'Brien?], Bishop of Killaloe, died. Donnell, son of Turlough O'Brien, King of Munster, a beaming lamp in peace and war, and the brilliant star of the hospitality and valour of the Momonians,

Leth-Mogha, died; and Murtough, his son, assumed his place. The English landed upon [the island of] Inis-Ua-bh-Fionntain but were

and of

all

1

,

forcibly driven

from

it.

Cumee 0'Flynnm was slain by the English. Gilbert Mac Costello marched, with an army,

to Assaroe",

but was com-

pelled to return without being able to gain any advantage

by

his expedition.

Innisfallen,

it

Nangle

;

and

this is correct, for

was plundered by Gilbert de De Nangle was
of the Costelloes.

after

whom

several places in Ireland are named,

but from a family of the name O'Fintan.

the original

name

m Cumee CfFlynn.
re-

This
1

is

the celebrated

Under
maighen,
give the
also,

this year the

Annals of Kilronan

chieftain,

who, in the year
eleven.

178, defeated

De

cord the erection of the Castle of

Domhnach

Courcy
his

in the territory of Firlee,

and cut

off all

now Donaghmoyne,
name
of the builder.

in the barony of

men except

The name

of the person

Farney, and county of Monaghan, but do not

by whom Cumee

was

slain is not given in the

Under

this year,

the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen record the erection, by the English, of the
Castle of Briginis, in Thomond, with the consent of Donnell More O'Brien, who, it was believed, permitted its erection for the

Annals of Ulster, Kilronan, or Innisfallen. Do thapBab bo jjullaiB is the phrase used by them
all,

and the old translator of the Annals of
:

" Cumie Offlin Ulster renders the passage killed by the Galls." The term Galls is at this
period always applied to the English, though in the previous century it means the Danes, or
Scandinavians.
n

purpose of
chronicle

distressing
also enters

Mac

Oarthy.

The same

this year the death of the of Godfred, King of the Isle of Mann, daughter and wife of John de Courcy.
1

under

Assaroe,

the

name

is

eap puab, i. e. the Red Cataract, but more correctly Gap Oobu puaio, i. e.
here in the year of the world

Inis-Ua-bk-Fionntain,

i.

e.

insula O'Fintais

the cataract of Aodh Ruadh, the son of Badharn,

norum.

The

situation of this island
It is

unknown

who was drowned

to the Editor.

not called from St. Fintan,

4518, according to the chronology of these an-

o2

loo

awwaca Rio^hachca eiReawN.
TTlaolpeachlamn mac Dorhnaill
ui

[1195.

jpollapacpaicc ciccfpna oppaije DO
ui

ecc.

Concobap mac TTlajnapa mic Duinnpleibe
nanriluam
i

eochaba Do mapbab la

hUa

meabail.

mac coippbealbaij ui concobaip Do ecc. ui pinoacea raoipeac cloinne mupchaba Do 65. Sicpiucc mac ploinn Oonnchab mac TTluipcfpcaij mic coippbealbai j Do mapbab la TTluipcfpeach mac Dorhnaill ui bpiain. TTlupchab mac Qmlaoib ui cinoeioij DO mapbab la lochlainn mac micpair
QeDh
Dall
ui

chinneircij

i

pionjail.

QO13 CR1O8O,
Qoip Cpiopo,

1195.

mile, ceD, nocharc,

a

cuicc.

Domnall ua Conaing eppcop cille Dalua Do ecc. plopenc mac Rfaccam ui maoilpuanaib eppcop oile pint) Do Domnall ua pino comapba cluana pfpra bpenaino Decc. Gacmapcach ua cacdpi Do ecc pecclep poll.
i
i

ecc.

Concobap mag paccna Do ecc pecclep ooipe. Sirpiucc ua jaipmlebaij DO rhapbab Do mac Dupm Slebe. la mac hujo De laci DO jabdil Sluaijeab la lohn DO cuipci,
-\

nfipc

ap

jallaib laijfn,

~\

murhan.

Sluaiccheb la Cacal ccpoibofpcc ua cconcobaip, la mac joipoelbaij 50 nopeim DO jallaib, -\ Do jaoiohealaib na mibe imaille ppip ip in murhain 50 panjaccap imleach lubaip, -\ caipiol 50 po loipcceab cerpe mopcaiplem leo
1 apaile

Do mioncaiplenaibh.
i

cconnachcaib ap in murhain, -j ba copjpach in gach maijin cpiapa cubchaib 50 painig coloch mfpg, i co hinip Pobba, i po jabaic lonja cachail cpoihoeipg uile laip, pu laip lac co
~\

Cachal mac DiapmaDa DO rochr

nals,

but

in the

herty's corrected Irish Chronology

year 3603, according to O'FlaSee Ogygia,

called the Erne, in the

town of Ballyshannon.

(FFinnaghty
this

There were two families of

part

iii.

c.

36.

This

name

is is

now pronounced

name

in

Connaught, of

whom

one was Chief

Assaroe, but the

cataract

known by
It is

the appellation

more generally of the Salmon Leap.

of Clann-Murrough, and the other was Chief of Clann-Conway, and had his residence at Duna-

on the River Samhaoir,

now more

usually

mon, near the River Suck. These families were

1195.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
who was
the grandson of Gillapatrick,

101

Melaghlin, the son of Donnell,
of Ossory, died. Conor, son of Manus,

Lord

who was

son of Donslevy O'Haughey, was treacher-

ously slain by O'Hanlon. Hugh Dall (the Blind), the son of Turlough O'Conor, died. Chief of Clann-Murrough, died. Sitric, the son of Flann O'Finnaghty
,

Donough, son of Murtough, who was son of Turlough, was slain by Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien.
Murrough, the son of Auliffe O'Kennedy, was
the son of Magrath O'Kennedy.
slain

wfingail' by Loughlin,

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1195.
ninety-Jive.

thousand one hundred

Donnell O'Conaing [Gunning], Bishop of Killaloe, died.
Florence, the son of

Regan O'Mulrony, Bishop of Elphin, Donnell O'Finn, Coarb of Clonfert-Brendan, died. Eachmarcach O'Kane died in St. Paul's church Conor Mag Fachtna died in the abbey church of Derry.
Sitric

died.

O'Gormly was slain by Mac Donslevy. John De Courcy and the son of Hugo De Lacy marched with an army

to

conquer the English of Leinster and Munster. Cathal Crovderg O'Conor and Mac Costelloe, with some of the English and Irish of Meath, marched into Munster, and arrived at Imleach lubhair (Emly) and Cashel. They burned four large castles and some small ones.
Cathal

Mac Dermot marched from Munster

into Connaught,

and passed
Inishrobe",

victoriously through the province.

On arriving
[i.

at

Lough Mask and

he seized upon

all

the vessels

e.

boats] of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, and
eluded patricide, matricide, fratricide, and the

supplanted by that sept of the Burkes called

Mac David, who had
the county of Galway year 1225.
vFingail.

their

chief castle

at

murder of any
1

relation.

Glinsk, on the west side of the River Suck, in

Inis/irobe,

imp pooba,

i.

e.

the island of the

See note under the

River Robe.

A

small island in

Lough Mask,

Thecrimeof pion^ail was counted
Irish.

opposite the mouth of the River Robe, not far from the town of Ballinrobe, in the county of

worse than simple murder by the

It in-

Mayo.

102

aNNdta Rioshactiea eiRecwN.

[1196.

ulca lomba ap ap gach leic De co caiplen na caillije co noeapna cachal cpoiboeapg co nopeim DO jallaib -| Do cloinn maoilpuana, -\ DO ponab mac oiapmaoa gep uo mop na huilc DO pome 50 pin. 66016
pib po

pe

CIO1S
Qoip Cpiopo,
l?ecclep p6il
-[

CR1OSD,

1196.

mile, ceo, nochac, ape.

pecaip

in

GpDmacha cona

cfmplaib,

-\

50 mbloib

rhofp

Don Raic DO lopccab.
TTluipcfpcach mac muipcfpcaij ui laclamn cijeapna cenel eojain TJiojbarhna Gpeann cuip jaipcceb, ~| eanjnama leice cuinn, ofopgaoilcib cacpac,
caiplen gall, cupgbalaib ceall, ~| caoimneirheab, Do mapbab la Oonnchab mac blopgaib ui cacdin cpe comaiple cenel neojain lap ccabaipc na cceopa Rugab a copp laporh 50 ooipe pcpine, 1 cdnoine pacpaig boib im Dilpi 66.
-]

po habnacc hipuibe 50 nonoip, -\ cdcaib. mac ouinnplebe co njallaib, i 50 macaib coipec connacc Do poighib cenel neojain, na naipcep, Uangaccap cna cenel
colaim
cille,
-|

Sloijeao la Rudibpi

)

eojain celca occ,

~\

piopu aipcip co macaipe

dpDamaca
~]

paopac cac boib 50 paoimeab pop mac oumnplebe
r

ina najaib, ~\ Do po lab Dfpgdp a rhuinThis passage
is

Caulen na-Caillighe.
:

Now called

the Hag's

w Honour and
lated

respect.

trans-

Castle in English

it is

situated in

Lough Mask,

by

Colgan as follows, in his
filius

Annals of

and
5

a round enclosure of great extent. The rath, or fort, that surrounded the catheis

Derry, Trias Tkai/m., p. Murchertachus Hua Lachlainn,

504: " A. D. 1196.
Murcher-

extended, according to tradition, as far south as the present market house.

dral of

Armagh

tachi, Hiberniro regis, Princeps de Kinel-eoguin, & expectatione multorum Rex Hibernian futurus,

Churches and fair nemeds. Cupjoalaibe oeall 7 caoitTineirrieab is translated by Colgan " Multarum Basilicarum et Sanctuariorum funI

turris

fortitudinis

&

defensionis

Aquilonaris

Anglicarum Ciuitatum & fortalitiorum expugnator, & multarum BasiliHibernise, victoriosus

dator."
II

Vide Trias Thaum.,

p.

504,

col. 2.
is

carum & Sanctuariorum fundator, de

consilio

Blosky O'Kane.

That

this

Blosky

the anClos-

cestor of the

numerous

clans of the

Mac

quorundam procerum de Kinel-eoguin qui per tria Scrinia, & Canones S. Patricij iuramentum
fidelitatis

keys, in the

county of Londonderry, can scarcely

be doubted.
hi>

The Erenagh Mac Closkey signed name Blosganus in the reign of James I.,
at once affords a clue to the true original of this family.

chadi

ante ipsi prsestiterant ; maim Bloscadii O Cathain dolose filij
:

Duniriter-

which

remptus occubuit eiusque corpus Doriam delatum ibi cum funebri pompa & honore septilturn
cst."

name

And

thus,

very carelessly in the

1196.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
r

103

brought them away to Caislen na-Caillighe [the Hag's Castle], where he proceeded to commit great ravages in all directions, until Cathal Crovderg, accompanied by a party of the English and of the Sil-Maelruana, arrived and made peace with him (Mac Dermot), although he (Cathal) had thitherto committed
great injuries.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1196.
ninety-six.

thousand one hundred
at

The Abbey of SS. Peter and Paul
part of the Rath
s
,

Armagh, with

its

churches, and a great

were burned.

Murtough, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, Lord of Kinel-Owen, presumptive heir to the throne of Ireland, tower of the valour and achievements of
Leth-Chuinn, destroyer of the cities and castles of the English, and founder of churches and fair nemeds' (sanctuaries), was killed by Donough, the son of

Blosky O'Kane",
loyalty to

at the instigation of the

Kinel-Owen,

who had pledged

their

him before the Three Shrines and the Canoin-Phatruig [i.e. the Book of Armagh]. His body was carried to Derry, and there interred with honour
and
respect".

Rory Mac Donslevy, with the English, and the sons of the chieftains of Connaught, marched an army against the Kinel-Owen and Oriors*. The
Kinel-Owen of Tulloghoge and the men of Orior proceeded to the plain of Armagh to oppose them, and there gave them battle. Mac Donslevy was
old translation of the Annals of Ulster
:

" A. D.

Orior, i.e. of
east

1195. Murtagh mac Murtagh O'Loghlin, King of Kindred Owen, and that should be King
of all Ireland, the supporting Post of Leth-

of the county of

Upper and Lower Orior, in the The word Armagh.
Eastern
;

cnpcep

signifies Oriental, or

and the

ci6 7

quinforfeatesof Armes and courage [cuip enjnoma leici cuinn], Banisher

J5

a T"

from their territory and people were so called in the east of Oriel ; and the name of situation
the inhabitants
is

\_recte

accordingly latinized Artheri

destroyer] of Galls and Castles, Eearer of churches and holiness" [neimeo], "killed by Donogh mac

and
'

Orientates, by Probus, Colgan, O'Flaherty, and other writers. Probus calls this territory

Blosgy O'Cathan, in counsel of

all

Kindred
and

Regio Orientalium.
Patrick, published

See the second Life of St.

Owen,
of

after bringing the three schrines

canons of Patrick with

him into the south church

Ussher's Primordia, pp. 857,
Ogygia, part
iii. c.

by Colgan, in Trias Thaum.; 1 047 O'Flaherty's
;

Armagh, and he was carry ed to Dyry Columkille, and he was buried honorably."
x

76;

Mac

Firbis's Genealogical

Book (Marquis of Drogheda's copy),
130
;

pp. 107,

Orion, aipcep,

i.

e.

the

inhabitants of

and Dublin P. Journal,

vol.

i.

p. 103.

104
cipe.

QNHaca Rio^hachca

eiraeaNN.
-\

[1196.

Uopcpacap ann Dna aoo becc DO macaib placa,

6a Diet imaille ppiu. S o pochaibib oile DO bofpcuppluaj mac maoiliopa ui concobaip a connaccaib, via plaicbepcaij,
baip pailge,
-j

coipeac Connacc maicib bpian bume

mac

ui

conco-

mac

ui

paolain na nDeipe.
-|

luimnij

po mapbab cepmainn Dabeocc, a muincipe pia ccinD miopa cpia piopcaib De, i Dabeog. e pen 50 nDfpjap Oomnall mac Diapmaoa mecc capcaij Do bpipeab coca ap jallaib po po cuip a nDeapg ap, 1 po Diocuip a luimneac, 1 murhan,
-| -|

TTlac blopccaib ui cuipin Do apjain

bpip 6d
cip na

mamm pin. maibm oile mac DiapmaDa cijeapna maije luipj Do Dol Concubap
poppa cen mocd an
buille,
-)

hi

nupD
i

i

mainip-

po jjab

romalcach cijeapnup Dia

epi.

QOD ua
TTlaice

DO mapbab peapjail njeapna muincipe hanjaile
ui cuinn.

meabail la

macaib Sicpioja

hi meabail, muinnpe heolaip DO mapbab la mac carail ui Ruaipc an jiolla puaD cnoipeac muincipe heolaip TTluipfbac mdcc Rajnaill
.1.

DO mapbab la mac majnupa ui Concobaip cpe pupdil mic carail lap po mapbab na maire pempaice.

ui

Rudipc

machjamhain mac Concobaip maonmaije piojDamr.a Connacc Do mapi At this period the territory Desies, Oeipe. of Desies extended from Lismore to Credan-

and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 368. The stone chair of St. Daveog, or
Daibheog,

head, in the county of Waterford. The last chief of the Desies, of the family of O'Faelan, was Melaghlin, or Malachy, who was deprived of his
principality shortly after the English invasion,

shewn

in a

the patron of this Termon, is yet townland of Seeavoc, which verges
side.

on Lough Derg on the south
lands of
a

The church
called Ter-

Termon Daveog

are

now

when

it

was granted

to

Eobert Le Poer, whose

mon-Magrath.
Limerick

descendants (now called Powers) for ages after See Cambrensis' Hipossessed the territory

The Dublin copy

of the Annals

of Innisfallen state, under this year, that
nell

Don-

berniaExpugnala,
Ogygia, P.
*

lib.

i.

c.

16; and O'Flaherty's
e.

iii. c.

69-

More na Curra Mac Carthy destroyed the castle of Kilfeakle, and slew many of the English
there,

Termon- Daveog,

Ceapmann oubeoj,

j.

and took two of their

chiefs prisoners;

The church of this the sanctuary of St.Daveog Termoa was situated on an island in Lough
of

that he also plundered the territory of'Imokilly, where he destroyed another castle and slew many
of the English ; that he and his Eugenian forces

Derg, in the county of Donegal, but not a trace it now remains. For some account of this cele-

brated island in

Lough Derg, commonly

called

the island of St. Patrick's Purgatory, see Dean Richardson's work entitled Folly of Pilgrimages,

and joined Cathal Crovderg O'Conor andO'Brien, marched to Cork, then in the possession of the English, to destroy it ; but that he did not suffer the

town

to be burned,

on condition that the

1196.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

105

defeated with dreadful slaughter; and twelve of the sons of the lords and chieftains of Connaught, with many of an inferior grade, were slain. Among the
chieftains slain

were Brian Boy O'Flaherty; the son of Maelisa O'Conor, of Connaught; the son of O'Conor Faly and the son of O'Faelain (Phelan), of
;
.

the Desies y

of Blosky O'Currin plundered Termon-Daveog* but in a month afterwards he himself was slain, and his people were dreadfully slaughtered, through the miracles of God and St. Daveog.
;

The son

Dermot Mac Carthy, defeated the English of Limerick" and drove them from LimeHe also defeated them in two other battles in this year. rick. Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, embraced Orders" in the monastery
Donnell, the son of

and Munster

in a battle, with dreadful slaughter,

of Boyle; and Tomaltagh assumed the lordship in his stead Hugh O'Farrell, Lord of Muintir-Annaly, was treacherously slain sons of Si trie O'Quin.
.

by the

The

chiefs of Muintir-Eolais

were treacherously

slain

by the son of Cathal

O'Rourke.

Murray Mac Rannall, surnamed the Gillaroe", Chief of Muintir-Eolais, was slain by the son of Manus O'Conor, at the instigation of the son of Cathal O'Rourke, who had procured the deaths of the above-mentioned chiefs.
Mahon, the son of Conor Moinmoy, Roydamna' of Connaught, was slain O'More (Donnell) and the men of Leix f who attempted to prevent him by
,

English should quit it. The same chronicle records an excursion made by the English this year
to Fordruim, where they slew O'Kedfy, and the two sons of Buadhach or Victor O'Sullivan, namely,

this chief, state, that

he died i nouici monaij, " in the of a monk." noviceship c In his stead, oia 6pi: literally, " after him."
d

The

Gillaroe,

an ^'O^

puab, i.e. red or
materies of a

Murtough and Gillycuddy (JJiolla ITlocuoa).

red-haired youth.
e

In the margin of this work is the following note, which was probably taken from Dr. O'Brien's " Vide Wacopy of the Annals of Innisfallen
:

Roydamna, pto^oariina,
term applied

i.

e.

king, a
f

to the sons of a king, like

prince, in the

rseum ad hunc annum, ubi actiones hie descriptas in sensum a reipsa alienum et Anglis favorabilem, uti in suis passim annalibus, detorquet."
b

Leix,

modern acceptation of the word, This territory, which was the laoijip.

Embraced

Orders, Do bol hi nupo,

i.

e.

took

patrimonial inheritance of the family of O'More, comprised a considerable part of the Queen's If we take from that county the ba-

County.

the habit of a

monk

The Annals

of Kilronan,

ronies

of Portnahinch

under the year 1197, in recording the death of

belonged to the families of O'Dunn

and Tinahinch, which and O'Demp-

106
-\

[1197-

la laijipp cc copnarii na heDala DO bfpc o ba6 la him m6pt>a Domnall, cac1ial cappac Do mapbab ui mopDa ina Dioghail. jallaibh ppipp, 1 Da en. Ruaipc DO mapbaD la luijnib ap pbab Conjalach mac pfpgail ecc. loDname ua mannachain cijfpna ud mbpiuin na Sionna Do
'

Cachal mac afoha
miDij.

ui

plaichbfpcaig Do

mapbaD

la macaib muipcfpcaij

CIOIS C171OSO, 1197.

a peace. Goip CpiopD, mile, ceD, nocacc,
Do ponulaD co hfppccpaibe, SluaijeaD la lohn Do Cuipc co njallaib 176 pdpaijeaD -| po. polrhaigeD cpioca ceD pacc caiplen cille Sanccdin, cianacca leo. T?o pd^aib Roicpel pirun co pocpaioe moip immaille ppip
-\

and were a portion of the territory of Ui Failghe, and the barony of Upper Ossory, which
sey,

nals of Kilronan state that Mali on

was

slain

by

was a part of the ancient Osraighe, and belonged to the Mac Gillapatricks, or FitzpaSeeUssher's tricks,. the remainder will be Leix.

an archer of Donnell O'More's people, and that Donnell O'More fell on the same day by the hand
of Cathal Carragh, in revenge of his brother. The entry is thus given in the Annals of Kilronan
at the year

Primordia, pp. 818, 943, and Map of Leix and Ophaley, in the British Museum. The territory
of Laoighis, or Leix, was originally divided into seven parts, the boundaries of which met at a
stone, called

1196 rhac^arhain mac concobaip maonmaije DO mapbao le peppenach .1. Con:

5oban,oo rhumcip DomnaillUi mopoa.
nall

Dom-

Leac Eiada, on the plain of

Magh

ceona DO

Kiada,
all

now

Morett, which originally comprised

the Great Heath of Maryborough. These seven districts were under the government of seven

uaip carait cappai^. And thus in the Annals of Boyle, but under the year 1197: "A. D. 1197- IDacjamain mac Concubaip
lairh

ua rnopoa pern oo cuicim

ip in

maenmargi

occisus ab aliquo sagittario

petty chiefs, of one arch chief, called Righ Eiada,
nerally resided at

who were

all

under the jurisdiction

milia t)otnnaill ui

mopba,
cecidit

et

in

de faeadem hora
cacail

who

ge-

<3omnalL ua mopDa
cappaij."
h

de mantt

Dun Mask, now Dunamase
un-

See Duald

Mac

Firbis's Genealogical Book,

Congalach,

der the head LAOIGHIS LAIGHEAN.

For the

obsolete, as the Christian

This name is now Con^alac name of a man, but is

bardic account of the original acquisition of this
territory by Laoighseach Ceannmhor, the ancestor of the O'Mores, the reader is referred to

preserved in the surname of Conolly, in Irish

O'Conjalaij.
'

Slieve-da-en, pliab

oa

6n, L

e.

the mountain

Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, reign of Felym Eeaghtwar ; and to Keating's History of Ireland, reign
g

of the two birds.
this

This mountain, which retains

In revenge of him,

ma

ofCormacMac Art. The AnGiojcul

name to the present day, lies principally in the parish of Kilross, barony of Tirrerill, and county of Sligo, and extends from near Lough

1197.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
v

107

from bearing

which he had taken from the English; but O'More was killed by Cathal Carrach [O'Conor], in revenge of him s [Mahon]. the son of Farrell O'Rourke, was slain the men of Leyny, on Congalach", by
off the spoil

Slieve-da-en'.

lodnaidhe O'Monahan, Lord of Hy-Briuin na-Sinna".
Cathal, the son of

Hugh

O'Flaherty, was slain

by the son of Murtough

Midheach

1

[Miderisis].

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age
of.

1197.

Christ, one

thousand one hundred ninety-seven.

John De Courcy and the English of Ulidia marched, with an army, to Easm Creeva and erected the castle of Kilsanctan", and wasted and desolated the
,

territory of

Kienaghta
It is

.

He

left

Rotsel Pitun, together with a large body of
possession of his castles and lands.

Gill to Colooney.

worthy of remark, that

a lough on the north side of this mountain called Loch da ghedh, i. e. the lake of the
there
is

m

mon

Eas-Creeva, fpp cpaibe, now called the SalLeap, or the Cutt's Fishery, is a cataract on

two geese

See

Map

prefixed to the Tribes

and

the River Bann, to the south of Coleraine, in the

Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, printed in 1844. ^Hy-Briuin na-Sin na, now locally called Tir uaBiuin.
It is a beautiful territory lying

county of Londonderry.
n

Kilsanctan,

Cill
is

Scmccam

In the

AnSan-

between

nals of Kilronan it
cail,

called caiplen cille

Elphin and Jamestown, in the county of Roscommon, and comprising the parishes of Cill mor na

and in the old translation of the Annals of " the Castle of Killsandle." It was siUlster,
tuated on the east side of the River Bann, not
far

now Kilmore, Eachdhruim mac n-Aodha, nowAughrim, and Cluain creamha, now Cloncraff.
Sinna,

from Coleraine.

There

is still

a remarkable

According nahan lived
seat of

to the tradition of the district, at Lissadorn, near Elphin,

O'Mothe
a well

mound

near the Salmon Leap on the Bann, called

now
is

Mountsandall
derry, sheet
7.

See Ordnance

Map

of London-

John

Balf, Esq.,
;

where there
and the

called

Monahan's well

last

of the

Kienaghta,

Cianacca, now the barony of

O'Monahans, who was chief of this territory, was killed here by O'Beirne with a blow of his fist,
unde nomen, Lissadorn,
1

Keenaght, in the north-west of the

county of
i.

Londonderry.

The

tribe called Cianacca,

e.

i.

e.

the fort

of the fist.

was

Murtough Midheach, i. e. the Meathian. He so called from having been fostered in Meath.
this year the

the race or progeny of Cian, were descended from Cian, the son of Oilioll Olum, King of Munster
in the third century.

After the establishment

Under

Dublin copy of the An-

nals of Innisfallen state, that Gilbert de

Nangle was expelled from Meath by the King's Deputy,

of surnames the principal family of the Cianachta of this territory took the surname of O'Conor,

and

Hamon

de Valentiis [De Valoignes]

who took

distinguished in the Irish Annals by the appellation of O'Conor of Glenn Geimhin.
is

P

108

aNNQ^a nio^hachca eiraeaNR
-\

[1197-

ipin ccaipciall hipin,

occ apgain cuac -| ceall ap. po jjabpac 05 mbpab, ~\ cluain f, Uainij laporh Roicpel phicun ap cpeic co pope ooipe, -| po aipg ua maoiloopaib cijeapna conaill eanac,-] t>fp5bpuach,1?u5 bna plaicbeapcac neill an cuaipcipc poppa, l?o pijeb lomaipfg 1 eojain co nuafab t>o clanoaib a nap im mac apbjail eacappa pop cpaig na huacon^bdla, -] po cuipeab mec loclainn cpia rhiopb'ail colaim cille, cainoij, -] bpeacain ipa cealla po

aipccpeacc.
P

The

territories

and

the

churches,

ruar

7

ceall.

By

this phrase the annalists often

mean

197. Camic ono Roicpel picun co co poaipc cluami 7 enach 7 oepcpoprtDaipe,
ster
:

A. D.

1

loip ruar 7 cill means " both laity and clergy." generally q Cluain-I, Enagh, and Dergbruagh, cluam i,

lay and ecclesiastical property,

bpuac.
tish

And

thus rendered in the old transla-

tion of the Ulster Annals, preserved in the Bri-

Museum, MSS.

add. 4795.

" This Rochel

eanac

7

ofpjbpuach.

The Editor has been
attention, to identify

able after

much study and

hie and

Pitun came to Port Dyry, and spoyled Cluain Anagh and Dergbruagh."

these three churches, though Colgan, a native of
this part of Ireland,

had done much

to

confound

them.

Cluam i is the present townland of Clooney, containing the ruins of an old church, in the parish of Clondermot, not far from the
city of

Colgan, who thought that he understood the passage correctly, concluded that only two churches are mentioned, and took for granted
that Cluain
i

Eanagh was the name of one

Londonderry

;

6unuc

is

the old church

church, and this he evidently took to be the one now in ruins between the two lakes Enagh
already mentioned.

of Enagh, situated between the two loughs of the same name, in the north of the parish of

Thus

in the note on his

is

Clondermot; andlDfpgbpuach, i.e. iheredbrink, the townland of Gransha, in the same parish.
Colgan, in Trias Thaum., p. 505, gives an incorrect translation of the following part of the

wrongly made name of Cluain an Eanach, he " Est writes Capella Difficesis Dorensis, juxta
:

Eanach arcem

nobilissirnse familise

O'Cathano-

rum

;

a qua et Cluain Enaich appellatur."
p.

Trias Thaum,,

450, n. 51.

And

again,

in
:

this passage, viz.

:

Camij

lapaiti

Roicpel picun

ap cpeic 50 pope ooipe 7 po aipjj nach 7 ofpsbpuach. " Eotsellus Pitun venit
i,

cluam

ea-

church of Eanach, he writes " Ecclesia vulgo Eanach dicta (juxta quern est arx nobilissimaj familiae O'Cathanorum) tertio
his notice of the
civitate Dorensi."

ad portum Dorensem, Ciuitatem ipsam, Ecclesiis de Cluain an Eanach, & Dearg-bhruach spoliatis,
invasurus."

tan turn milliari versus aquilonem distat ab ipsa Trias Thaum., p. 377, col. 2.

The
i

Editor,

who

took for granted that Col-

Here he reads Cluam
Eanack,'
' 1 1

as if

I, Ganach, were an abbreviation of the

" Cluain an
ar-

gan's knowledge of the topography of this part of Ireland was next to perfect, as he was a native of Inishowen,

ticle in or

an

;

but in

this

he

is

undoubtedly
older
Irish

was very much puzzled by

mistaken, for

we

learn from the

these notes

Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan, that three churches are distinctly mentioned in the passage,
viz.,

but on examining the parish of ; Clondermot in 1 834, he found that Cluain i and
distinct townlands, containing

Eanack were two

and Ganach, and OeapjBpuac. The passage runs as follows in the Annals of Uli,

Cluain

each the ruins of an old church.

O'Donnell, in

his Life of Columbkille, distinctly points out

1197-]
forces, in the

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
castle,

109

out of which they proceeded to plunder and ravage Rotsel Piton afterwards came on a prethe territories and the churches'".

datory excursion to the harbour of Derry, and plundered the churches of q But Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of KinelCluain-I, Enagh, and Dergbruagh
.

Owen and Kinel-Conell, with a small party of the northern Hy-Niall, overtook him and a battle was fought between them on the strand of Faughanvale s in
; ,

r

which the English and the son of Ardgal Mac Loughlin were slaughtered, through the miracles of SS. Columbkille, Canice', and Brecan, whose churches
they had plundered.
the situation of Cluain
i,

which he
words
:

calls

simply

Cluain, in the following

Krivy, and made the castle of Killsandle, and wasted the Trichaced of Kyanaght" [out] " of that
castle.

" In loco

quodam quern Cluain
distanti

vocant, a

Do-

In that castle was Eochel Pitun
to him.

left

with

rensi oppido ad

adversam Feabhalii lacus margi-

a

number

This Rochel Pitun came to

nem non procul
(Columba).

templum

excitavit."

O'Donnell then goes on to state, that Nicholas Boston [Weston], an English Bishop, had, not long before his own time (1520),
pulled down this church and commenced erecting a palace with the materials obtained from its
ruins, at a place called Bunseantuinne, not far

Port Dyry, and spoyled Cluain hie and Anagh and Dergbruagh. Flaithvertagh O'Moildory,

King of Kindred Owen overtooke him with a few of Conels and Owens, and broke of them
uppon the shore of Vochongvail, that most of them were killed through the miracles of
Columkill,

from Derry.

" Faucis retro ab hinc annis, Episcopus Anglicus, Nicholaus Boston dictus, prsefatum templum demolitus, ex ejus ruderibus palatium molitus potuit vindicante
p.
est,

spoyled
dered]."

[i.

Cainegh, and Brekan, whom they e. whose churches they had plun-

sed

consummare non
Trias

There is no reference to Ardgal Mac Loughlin in this translation, but his name is inserted in a more modern hand in the Dublin copy
of the Annals of Ulster.

Deo." &c

Thaum.,

The son

of Ardgal

Mac

399,

col. 1.

by the annathe " Grange of Dirgebroe," in an taken at Derry, in the inquisition year 1609, and is now, beyond dispute, the townland of
lists is called

The

place called Deargbruagh

Loughlin seems to have joined the English on this occasion, as heis stated to have been slain through
the miracles of the patron saints of the district.
*Faucr/ianvale. Colgan writes \iNuachongbail. There are several other places of this name in

but
r

Gransha, or Grange, in the parish of Clondermot, its church has been See totally destroyed.

Ireland

:

in the county of

one near the foot of Croaghpatrick, Mayo a second in the county
;

Ordnance

Map of Londonderry, sheets

13 and 14.
is

A

small party, uacao.

This word

used

throughout these annals to denote " a few, or a small party." See O'Brien's Dictionary, in voce. In the old translation of the Annals of Ulster the passage is rendered thus, under the
1196
[recte

of Westmeath, on the borders of the county of Longford ; a third on the Eiver Boyne, to the

west of Drogheda
of Clare.

;

and a fourth in the county
is

The name

translated

Nova

habitatio

by Colgan.
1

See Acta Sanctorum,

p. 141,

note

8.

year

Canice,

camoech

He

is

the patron saint

1197]:

"An

.

1196.

An army by
to Eas-

John de Coursy with the Galls of Vlster

of the territory of Kienaghta, in which he was born in the year 516 See Colgan, Trias

no

aNNdta Rioshachca
cfirpe cuipn

eiraectNN.

[1197.

TTlac ecij Do cianaccaib Do plac alcopa ceampaill moip Doipe colaim
cille, i

baD peapp po baoi
ui
"]

in

Gpino Do bpeic eipce,
uf

.1.

mac

maoiloopaiD, cammcopainD copn bocapcai j, a loppa Dib. popic [ppir] Do all a nionnrhappa, imoppa an cf po goiD, na peoiD ip in cpfp 16 lap nd ngoio, po cpochab la imoppa plairbeapcac 05 cpoipp na piaj neneac column cille ipa halcoip po papaij.
l?iabac,

mac

polap, copn
-\

T?o bpipicc

-|

-\

~|

i

aipjiall plaicbfpcac ua maoiloopaiD njeapna cenel cconaill, eojain, uile Conall ap laoc&acc epibe, pio^Darhna Gpeann copnamac cfmpa,
-] "]
;

Cuculamn ap jaipcceab,

ua 'pe ap eneac, TTlac lu^ac ap occlacup Decc (an <5
i

Dapa la pebpuapi) lap ccpeablaiD cojaiDe, ninip Saimep ipin cpiocacmab bliabain a plaiciupa, ipin norhaD bliabain ap caogacc a aoipe. Ggup po habnacc nopuim ruama co nonoip amail po baD Dfop. ^abaip eacmapcac ua Docapcai (.1. an giolla pponrhaol) cfnnup cenel
-\ i

lohn Do cuipc co pocpaice rhoip imaille ppip cap ruaim hi ccfp eogain, aippiDe co hapoppaca lappm cimceall 50 Doipe colaim cille. Qipipic coicc haiDce ann. CiajaiD mparh co cnoc napcain Dia momapcap caipip. Ueccaic Dna cenel conaill im ecmapcconaill po ceDoip,
-|
i

ccionn coicciDipi

mpom raimj

cac ua nDocapcaij Dia paigiD, peprap car fcoppa, ropcpacop pocliai&e mop aDiu anall. ^16 iaD cenel conaill ann po Diclnjic ifccpibe uaip cop-\ -]

Thaum.,
vol.

p.

182

;

and

Ada

Sanctorum,

p.

190

z
;

Guaire in

hospitality.

He

is

here compared

also Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History
ii.

of Ireland,

to

pp. 200, 202.
Etigh.
is

Guaire Aidhne, King of Connaught, who was so distinguished for hospitality and bounty that

u

Mac

In the Annals of Ulster and

he became

the

personification

of generosity

Kilronan he

called

Mac

Gilla Edich.
7

w Their

jewels.

Q

nionmapa

a loppa

among the Irish bards. Guaire was King of Connaught for thirteen years, and died in the year
See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in
662.

In the Annals of Ulster the reading is : 7 rail a ninnmapa 7 a lapa bib ; which in the old
translation is rendered,
silver off
*

"broke

their gilt

and
This
i.

1844, p. 391.

them."

Defender of Tara, copnarhac
also

cfmna

might
y

be translated contender for Tara,
..

e.

Mac Liighach in feats of arms He was the best spearsman among the Fiana Eireann, or Irish Militia, in the third century. He was the
a

for the sovereignty of Ireland.

Connell.

Cuchullin.

These were two of the

son of Daire Derg, and grandson of Finn Mac Cumhaill, the Fingal of Mac Pherson's Ossian,

most distinguished of the Red Branch heroes, who flourished in Ulster under Concovar Mac
Nessa in the
first

and was
Lugha.

called

Mac Lughach, from
fol.

his

mother
b,

See Book of Lismore,

204,

where

century.

St. Patrick is

introduced as asking the senior

11970

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

Ill

Mac Mac

Deny, and carried
Solas,

Etigh", one of the Kienaghts, robbed the altar of the great church of off the four best goblets in Ireland, viz. Mac Riabhach,

the goblet of O'Muldory, and the goblet of O'Doherty, called

Cam-Corainn.

These he broke, and took

off their jewels"

and

brilliant

gems.

On the third day after this robbery, these jewels and the thief were discovered. He was hanged by Flaherty [O'Muldory] at Cros-na-riagh (i. e. the Cross of
Executions), in revenge of Columbkille, whose altar he had profaned. Flaherty O'Muldory, Lord of Kinel-Connell, Kinel-Owen, and Oriel, defender of Tara
x
,

heir presumptive to the sovereignty of
2

all

Ireland, a Connell in

heroism, a Cuchullin* in valour, a Guaire in hospitality, and a Mac Lughach in b feats of arms", died on Inis Saimer on the second day of February, after long
,

and patient suffering, in the thirtieth year of his reign, and age, and was interred at Drumhome with due honour.

fifty-ninth of his

Eachmarcach O'Doherty

(i.

e.

Gilla Sron-mael) immediately after

assumed

the chieftainship of Kinel-Connell. fortnight afterwards John De Courcy, with a numerous army, crossed Toome into .Tyrone, thence proceeded to

A

Ardstraw, and afterwards marched round to Derry-Columbkille, where he and his troops remained five nights. They then set out for the hill of CnocNascaind to be conveyed across it but the Kinel-Connell, under the conduct
, ;

of Eachmarcach O'Doherty, came to oppose them, and a battle was fought between them, in which many fell on both sides. The Kinel-Conell were much

_Caoilti

thus
&ic

Mac Ronain, who this Mac Lughach was, Cia oap mac ITIac luj-ach, po piappaijep a peip, a Cailci, ap pacpaic. TTIac DO
:

side of the river, about one mile to the west of

the town of Ballyshannon.
c

Drumhome, opuim cuama, a church and

Oaipe Oepj mac Pmn, ap Cailci. " Whose son was Mac Lughach, I asked of thee last He was the son night, O Cailti,. said Patrick.
of Daire Derg, the son of Finn, replied Cailti." " Inis Saimer, an island in the River Erne, im-

parish in the barony of Tirhugh, and county of Donegal. This church is referred to under

name ofDorsum Tommce by Adamnan in his Vita Cdumbce, lib. iii. c. 23. It is also mentioned in O'Donnell's Life of Columba,
the Latinized
lib. iii. c.

mediatelyundertheCataracto'fEasAodhaRuaidh,
at Ballyshannon.

61

;

in Ussher's Primordia, p.

969; and

For the origin of the name
p.
2.

also in the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys, at

Imp Saimep,
Ogyyia, part

see Keating's History of Ireland,

Haliday's Edition,
iii. c.

164; and O'FIaherty's O'Muldory had a house
of Eas

23rd September, where it is stated that one of St. Adamnan's churches.
<*

it is

Cnoc Nascain, was the ancient name of

a hill

un this

island.
is

The monastery

Aodha

Uuadh

not on this island, but on the north

Lough Swilly, in the barony but the name is now obsolete.

near

of Inishowen,

112

dNNata Rioghachca

eircecmN.

[iigs.

im 6onncha6 ua caipceipc coipeac. cpacap Da ceo Diob im eacmapcac peppm, cloinne Sneojile cong einij, comaiple cenel cconaill eanjnama, ceille, im rhag noubam, im mhag p-fpjail, uile mi jiolla mbpijoe ua nDocapcaijj,
"]

-|

-]

im rhacaib ua mbaoijill, leo epce, 1 DO beapcpacc bopairhe mop Concobap ua cacdin Do ecc.
-\

im paopclanoaib
-]

oite,

-|

po aipccpfo imp eojain.
pin.

lompoiDicc laip

maij6 aof, cuip opDain, Concobap mac caiDg cijeapna maije Imps connacc uile Decc lap naicpije cojaibe maimpcomaipce aipecaip, einij, aca Dalaapg. cip TTlaolpuanaiD ua caiTTIacpair ua laicbepcaij canaipi cfpe heojain
~|
i

-|

"|

pelldin cofpec cloir,ne

Diapmaoa Do rhapbaD. Oomnall mac Rajnaill mec l?ajnaill Do rhapbaD Do macaib mec DuibDapa piull. T?uai6pi ua plaicbfpcaij ci^eapna mpcaip connacc Do jabail la cacal
i

cpoibDeapg la pij connacc.

QO1S C171O3D,
Qoip CpiopD,

1198.

mile, ceD, nocacc,

a hocc.
-]

^lolla macliacc ua bpandin Do accup a comapbaip uaDa, jiollacpipc ua cfpnai^ Do oipDneaD ina iona6 in abbDaine colaim cille Do pfip coja
laoc
~\

cleipeac cuaipcipc Gpeann

i

ccoiccinne.
~\

PuaiDpi ua concobaip Ri'Conracc
e

Gpeann
p.

uile eiccip jallaib

~|

jaoi&e-

Tower,

cuip

-- The
But

word cuip properly
as

295

;

but Rubpai^e

is

found among the Irish
at the earliest peId.,

means

a prop, pillar,

support, or fulcrum, and

as the

proper name

of a

man

cop means a tower.

Colgan has translated cuip throughout his works by the Latin
turris,

riod

of their history.

pp.

26, 59, 293.

but
f

it

the translator has adopted the word tower, should be understood in the sense of sup}

name Ruaiopi Throughout is anglicised Rory, except in the name of this last monarch of Ireland, which is made Roderic
this translation the

port, or prop, throughout.

Ruaiopi ua ConcoBaip. The nameTJuaiopi, which is to be distinguished from Rubpai^e, seems to be of Danish origin in
Roderic
'Conor,

During ten years unfortunate prince reigned over Connaught only, for the eighteen following he was acknowledged by the greater part of the
of his
life this

for the sake of distinction.

Ireland.

It first occurs in the Irish

Annals

at

Irish chieftains as
finally,

the year 780.
first

See O'Conor's edition of the

monarch of all Ireland upon the unnatural revolt of his

;

but
sons,

part of the Annals of the

Four Masters,

he

retired, according to the

Annals ofKilronan,

\

1198.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
two hundred of them were
slain,

113

slaughtered, for

besides Eachmarcach himself

and Donough O'Tairchirt, Chief of Clann-Snedhgile [Clann-Snelly], the prop of the hospitality, valour, wisdom, and counsel of all the Kinel-Conell; and also the sons of O'Boyle, and Gilla-Brighde O'Doherty, Mag-Duane, Mag-Fergail,

many

other nobles.

The English then plundered Inishowen, and

carried off

a great

gransplendour, hospitality, and protection of all Connaught, died after exemplary penance in the monastery of Ath-da-laarg (Boyle).
deur,

number of cows from thence, and then returned. Conor O'Kane died. e Conor, the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg and Moynai, tower of the

Magrath

Laverty, Tanist of Tyrone, and Mulrony O'Carellan, Chief of

Clann-Dermot, were slain. Donnell, son of Randal

Mac

Ranall,

was treacherously

slain

by the sons of

Mac

Duvdara.

Rory O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, was taken prisoner by Cathal
Crovderg, King of Connaught.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1198.

thousand one hundred ninety-eight.

Gillamacliag O'Branan resigned his abbacy; and Gilchreest O'Kearney was elected coarb of St. Columbkille by the universal suffrages of the clergy and laity of the north of Ireland.

Roderic 0'Conor f King of Connaught and of
,

all

Ireland, both the Irish

and

in 1183,

into the abbey of Cong, which had been founded and endowed by himself, where he

spent the last thirteen years of his life. late Dr. O'Conor, in his suppressed work,

The Me-

without any alloy from temerity, revenge, But Mr. Moore, who has 28. p. his character without any bias from faweighed
lustre,

and despair,"

moirs of the Life and Writings of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, has endeavoured to invest the
life

mily pride, has come to the conclusion, that "the only feeling his name awakens is that of

and character of

this

weak monarch with

which at such a pity for the doomed country crisis of its fortunes, when honour, safety, independence, national existence, were all at stake, was cursed, for the crowning of its evil destiny,

heroic dignity and interest, asserting that " in his adversity his fortitude was not of that ig-

noble species, which flows from resentment ;" but that " his constancy shone forth in all its

with a ruler and leader so utterly unworthy of
his

high calling."

History of Ireland, vol.

ii.

114
laib Decc hi ccanancaib
i

[1198.

6 Dorhan, i o Dearhan,

-|

lap mbpfir buaba ccunja lap naicpije rojjaibe, a copp co cluain mic noip, -\ po habnaiceab puccab
-]

Don caob cuaib balcoip cfmpaill moip cluana mic noip. TTlac bpiain bpeipnij mic coippbealbaij; uf concob'aip bo mapbab la cacal

cappac mac concob'aip maonmaije. Caralan ua maolpabaill cijeapna caippge bpacaije Do mapbab bua ua Depain peipin Do mapbab ina Diojail po ceboip. oepdin,
~]

Sludicceab la lohn De cuipc hi ccfp eojain ap puD na cceall, ~\ po haipcceab, "| po milleab Gpbppaca, ~\ pacboc laip, Rainic mporh Doipe colaim cille, -| baoi ainnpiDe Di omce pop peaccmam agmilleao inpi heogam
ineallifia muna coippeao aoD 6 nell * * * i luce coicc lonj co cill larapnaib, i po loipc nf Don baile, "| po rhapb occ ppip Decc Do jallaib, l?o cionoilpfc joill maiji line, "| Dail apai&e cpi

1

an cipe apcfna, i

ni

pajaD app inp

ceo Do pocrain aoba,
p.

~\

ni

po pachaij ao6 nac

nf

co po Doipcpfc ina
but the name
is

cfiin

05

340.

The only remark which the Editor

in existence

;

anglicised

Mul-

deems necessary to add here on the history of this unfortunate monarch is, that it is stated in
the Historia Families

faal, and sometimes, incorrectly, Mac Paul. h John De Courcy. This passage is also given

De

Burgo, preserved in

in the Annals of Ulster

the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, that Rickard More, the son of William Fitz Adelm

word
ters,

for

word

as in the text of the

and of Kilronan, nearly Four Mas-

De Burgo,

in the

battle

of Leithridh,

near

except that they add that some of the English of Moylinny and Dalaradia were dressed
in iron mail.
It is

Dublin, deprived him of his arm and kingdom with one stroke of his sword ! a fact which, if
true, has been concealed
Irish history.

rendered as follows in the

old translation of the Annals of Ulster.
Irish phrases in brackets are

The

by

all

other writers on

from the Dublin
1

The descendants of Roderic have
line
;

copy of the Ulster Annals.

" A. D.

198

[recte

been long extinct in Ireland, in the male
but, if

we

believe the author of Vita Kirovani,

1199]. army, by John de Courcy, into Tirowen among the churches [ap puc na ceall],
viz.,

An

and O'Flaherty, the Lynches of Galway descend from him in the female line. See Account of

untill

Ardsraha and Rathboth spoyled by him, he came to Dyry, and was there nine

West Connaught, printed
logical Society,
p.

for the Irish Archaeo-

nights, spoyling of Inis

Owen and

the country

36:

According

to

Duald

Mac

Lacys of the county of Limerick have sprung from William, the son of Sir

Firbis, the

about, and [would not have] went [gone] from thence for a long tyme [7 ni pajab ap ppi pe poca], untill [unless] with five ships HughO'Neale went [had gone] to Killaharna and burnt part of the town, and killed forty wanting two. There were the Galls of Moyline and Dalnaray, three hundred before them in iron plate and without
iron,

Hugh De
O'Conor.
g

Lacy, by the daughter of Roderic

Carrick-Braghy, cappaic bpacaioe, a terri-

tory comprising the, north- western part of Inishowen, where the family of O'Maelfabhaill is still

and wist nothing

untill they

rushed upon

1198-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

115

the English, died among the canons at Cong, after exemplary penance, victorious over the world and the devil. His body was conveyed to Clonmacnoise, and interred at the north side of the altar of the great church. of Brian Breifneagh, who was the son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain by Cathal the son of Conor Moinmoy. Carragh, Cathalan O'Mulfavil, Lord of Carrick-Braghy s was slain O'Dearan, who
,

The son

by

was himself

slain

immediately afterwards in revenge of him.
led
;

by John De Courcy" into Tyrone, among the churches and Ardstraw and Raphoe were plundered and destroyed by him. He afterwards went to Derry, where he remained a week and two days, destroying army was
Inishowen and the country generally. And he would not have withdrawn all * * * his forces from thence had not Hugh O'Neill sailed with five ships to Kill'
1

An

in Latharna,

burned a part of the town, and killed eighteen of the English. The English of Moylinny" and Dalaradia mustered three hundred men, and marched against Hugh, who had no intimation of their approach until they
them, burning the town.

Then they fought

in

Kilroot

but anciently Kilroegh and Kilreugh
this district

the midest of the towne [ap lap in baile] untill the Galls were put to flight, and gave them five

which was certainly in

See the Ca-

overthrows after untill they went to their ships, and killed but five of O'Neal's men. Then went

This lendar of the O'Clerys, at 16th October. church, whose patron saint was a Bishop Colman,
son of Cathbhadh,
is

described as situated on

John away [from Dyry] hearing of this." Kill in Lame, cill * * lacapna
'

i

In
cill,

the brink of Loch Laoigh in Dalaradia, in Ulster. See also the Feilire, or Festilogy of Aengus, at the same day, where this church
i

the Annals of Ulster this

name

is

written

is

described, as

the latter part of the name, exactly as in the text of the Four Masters ; but in the Annals of Kilronan it is' written cill a
left for

with a blank

" pop bpu locha laij n-UllcaiB, on the brink of Loch Laigh in Uladh." For the descent of
the tribe originally seated in the regiuncula of Latharna, the reader is referred to Duald Mac
Firbis's Genealogical

a church in the territory of Laand in the old translation of the Annals tharna;

larapna,

i.

e.

work, Marquis of DroghThis name
is still

of Ulster

it

is

made

Killaharna.
is

Latharna

is

now

called Larne,

and

the

name
;

of a village

eda's copy, p. 248. * Moylinny,.Tf\cr$ line.

pre-

in the east of the corfnty of Antrim

but

it

was

originally a tuath, cinament, or regiuncula, near Trias Lough Laoigh in Ulster See

served as that of a townland in the parish of Antrim, in the county of Antrim. But Moylinny,
before the present arrangement of the baronies in the county of Antrim, was a territory which

Colgan's

little
is

Thaum., p. doubt that the
here
left

188, and 5th Index.
cill,

There can be

or church, whose

name
is

imperfect by

the annalists,

the

extended from Lough Neagh to Carrickfergus See note *, p. 23, on Dal Bmnne. For its boundaries in 1609, see note

celebrated church of Cill

Ruao, now

anglicised

under the year 1503.

Q

116

aNNom

Rio^hachca eiReaww.

[1199.

lopccab an baile. 17o pfpab lomaipeacc eacoppa laporii, -] po muib pop jjallaib, i cuccab coicc ma&manna poppa 6 cd pin co nDeacpac ma longaib, q po mapbab to mumcip aoba ace coijeap namd. lap cclop na pccel pin DO lohn po pagaib an baile paibe .1. Doipe colaim cille. cenel conaill Do coimcfnjal la Coccab eicip cenel conaill i eojain,
ni
i

-]

hua neccnij in acchaib cenel eojain, po boi coinne fcoppa Do naibm a hi ccepmann Dabeocc. Uainic cpd ao6 ua neill 50 ccenel eojain ccapaopab imme DO coipmeapcc na coinne, po lonnpaij ua heiccmj, ~\ po iheabam paip co bpapccaib bpaiccDe la hua neill.
-| ~\

Oo Deachaib ao6 50 ccenel eojain ip in 16 cfona, co nDepnpac cpeic pop cenel conaill hi macaipe TTlaije hfoca, -j rucpac bopairiie Dipime mp mapbab leo uf buibDiopma pop pceirhleab mapcpluai j.
Sluaijeab la haob ua nell -] la cenel neojain Dopibipi 50 macaipe TTlaije hfora Do cabaipr caca Do cenel cconaill, i po pdjaibpfc cenel cconaill a longpopc leo, -\ Do ponab blobab pire -| caDac fcoppa Don cup pin.

Carol cpoibDeapg ua concobaip DO
concobaip maonmaije,
-\

Denarii pioba ppi
cip,
]

a cabaipr Don

cacal cappac peapann DO cabaipc DO.

mac

CIO1S

CR1OSO,

1199.

Qoip CpiopD,
TTlaolfopa

mile, ceo, nochacc, anaoi.

coriiapba

abbap pacpaic Sanccup TTlaupiciup ua baoccdin Decc in hi colaimm cille. Do ponpac goill ulab cpf ploij mopa hi cfp neojam, -| an cpep ploijj DO ponpac, po jabpac lonjpopc 05 Dorhnac mop maije lomclaip, Do cuippfc
nialldin,
-\

mac

giolla epdin, aipcmoeac cille moipe Decc.

ua

-\

1

O'Hegny.lle was

at this period the Chief

Fermanagh, the Maguires not having as yet acquired any power over that territory
See
"

of all

observed, was the level part of the barony of Eaphoe, now called the Lagan,

Kilmare-OneiUand, cill

mop ua medium.

O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part

iii.

c.

76.

Now

A

skirmish, pceirhleab tnapcpluai^, a skir-

mish of In the old translation of the cavalry. Annals of Ulster, it is rendered " Nell O'Duivdirma was
"

the parish of Kilmore, in the barony of Oneilland, and county of Armagh, about three

miles east of the city of
p

Armagh.

killed

uppon

a skirmish."

Donaghmore-Moy-Imclare, t>omnac mop muije imclaip. Now Donaghmore, a church
and parish in the barony of Dungannon, and

The plain of

Moy

Itha

This,

as

already

1199.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

11?

poured round him, while he was burning the town. were defeated. fought between them, in which the English

A

battle

was then

The English were
;

routed five successive times before they retreated to their ships and there were only five of Hugh's people slain. As soon as John [De Courcy] had

heard of

this,

he

left

the place where he was

[determined upon making con-

quests], that

is,

Derry-Columbkille.
1

war broke out between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Oweri. The Kinel-Connell joined O'Hegny against the Kinel-Owen; and they had a meeting at

A

Termon Daveog,
O'Neill,

for the purpose of forming a league of amity with him.

Hugh

however, repaired thither to prevent the meeting, and attacked

and defeated O'Hegny, who delivered him hostages. On the same day Hugh and the Kinel-Owen went to the plain of Magh
Ithe,

andjalundered the Kinel-Connell.

From

this place
1

they drove off a vast

number
of

of cows, after killing O'Duvdirma in a skirmish " between the cavalry. Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen made a second incursion into the plain
Itha
n
,

Moy

to give battle to the Kinel-Connell

;

but the Kinel-Connell

left

their

camp

to them,
parties.

upon which terms of peace and friendship were agreed on

between the

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor

made peace with Cathal Carragh,
into his territory,

the son of

Conor Moinmoy, brought him

and gave him
1199.

lands.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
Tlie

Age

of Christ, one thousand one hundred ninety-nine.

Maelisa, son of Gilla-Ernain,

Erenagh of Kilmore-Oneilland

,

and intended

successor of

St.

Patrick, died.

Sanctus Mauritius O'Baedain died in Hy-Columbkille. The English of Ulidia made three great incursions into Tyrone, and on the
third incursion they pitched their

camp

at

p

Donaghmore-Moy-Imclare
we

,

and sent

three miles west of the town of Dungannon. This

before St. Patrick's time, as

learn from the
:

church was founded by St. Patrick, who placed there a St. Columba, called in Irish Colum Ruis
Glarida.

Festilogy of Aengus, at the 6th September .1. j;lcin T?opy jlanoa aintn in baile ppiup

The

place

where

this

church stands

was

called

Ros Glanda, from a well named Glan,

cnnm na cibpao pil ann, 7 oomnach mop amm moiu " Ross Glanda leas the name of the place
;

118
-|

[1199-

Do cpeachaD an cipe. Camic Dna aob Dpong mop Dia muincip DO riiilleao Do na gallaib, no la a 6 neill mD oipfp an cploij coma comnamic 66, uaba po elaibpfc pan aibce jan nac caipfpeam co noeaan Do
-| -]

nap, i

fpna cuaim. carap rap SluaicceaD la Puaibpi ua nDumnplebe co nf Do jallaib miDe, -[ po aipccinnce ace aon bo. pec mainipnp phoil, ~\ peaccaip co nap pdccaibpfr

Oomnall ua Docapcaij njeapna cenel nenDa apDa miooaip Decc. OonnchaD uaicneac mac RuaiDpi ui Concobaip Do rhapbao la Sajcaib
-|

luimnij.

l?ooub
in

mac

poeDig coipec cenel aongupa Do

mapbaD

la gallaib ap cpec

ua neapca cein. Cacal cpoibDeapj ua concobaip DO ionnapba6 a cappac Do jabail a lonaiD.
Sluaicceao la haoD ua neill
hfoca, i
i

pijje

Connacr,

~\

caral

poipicm carail cpoibDeip^sobpfpaibmaije co naipjiallaib ju pangaccap rfj baoian aipcij. Soipfr lapom 50
i.

(baile) first,

e.

well which

is

there

from Glan, the name of the and Domnach mor is its
;

name

See also the Irish Calendar at this day." of the O'Clerys at the same day, where it is added that Domhnach mor Moighe lomchlair is
in Tir Eoghain,

rapair ap oiapmioe poppo, 7 po elaoup pan aioce co noecaoap cap Uuaim. It is rendered " A. D. 1 as follows in the old translation 199"
:

\_recte

1200].

"The

Galls ofVlster this yeare

prayed" [preyed]
third

" thrice in Tyrowen, and the
at

was the ancient

now Tyrone. Magh Imchlair name of the plain in which the
It is explained
ali-

tyme they camped

church of Donaghmore stands.

sent forth a great army. to prevent them, and fought with the Galls and

Donnaghmore, and Neale came Hugh

by Colgan

as follows
,i.

"
:

Imchlair, qua? et

quando Maghdair,

campus planus,

sive pla-

nities legitur vocata

;

est ager regionis Tironise,
et in ecclesia

broke of them, and slaughtered a great number of them, and they stole away by night, untill they went beyond Toame."
r

non procul a Dungenainn,
regionis

eiusdem

O'Donslevy,
rectly

ua oumnpleibe

;

more cor-

Domnach mor
6.

dicta colitur S.

Columba
p.

Prsabyter
c.

Septemb."

Trias T/iaum.,

184,

1.

This passage is given as follows in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster A. D.
Toome.
:

q

tDuinnplebe, in the Dublin copy of It is thus rendered in the Annals of Ulster. " A. D. 1199. An the old translation army by " some of the Eory Mac Dunleve to" [with] Galls of Meath, and spoyled the Abbey of Paul
:

mac

1200.

t)o ponpac jaill ulab cpi cpecha
7 in

i

cip

neoj^am,

lonjpopr ic DO cuippec cpech

rpfp cpech oo ponpac oo jabpac oomnacli mop muiji imclaiji,
irnach.

and Peter, so as they left but one cowe." s Kinel-Enda Kinel-Enda and Ard-Mire

was the ancient name of the

district situated

mop Cainij aeo ua neill in aipcip na cpeice co po compac DO 7 na jaill 7 co po maio ap jallaib, 7 co

between the Rivers Foyle and Swilly, in the ArdSee p. 19, note d county of Donegal
.

mire, or

Ard

Miodhair, was the name of a

ter-

1199-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
body of
their troops to destroy

119

and plunder the country. Hugh O'Neill set out to oppose this host; and they came to an engagement, in which the English were slaughtered, and such as escaped from him fled secretly by q night, tarrying nowhere until they had passed Toome
forth a large
.

Eory O'Donslevy and some of the English of Meath, mustered a body of troops, and plundered the Monastery of SS. Peter and Paul (at Armagh), and
,

r

left

only one

cow

there.
,

s Donnell O'Doherty, Lord of Kinel-Enda and Ard-Mire died. Donough Uaithneach, the son of Roderick O'Conor, was slain by the Eng-

lish of

Limerick.
slain

Roduv Mac Roedig, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa, was
a predatory incursion, in Hy-Earca-Cein'.

by the English, on

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor was banished from the kingdom of Connaught and Cathal Carrach assumed his place.

;

Hugh

O'Neill, with the

men

of Moy-Itha and the

men

of Oriel, marched to

Tibohine-Artagh", to relieve Cathal Crovderg O'Conor.
ritory lying westwards of Kinel-Enda, in the direction of Lough Finn. It is to be distin-

They returned

again,

See his Genealogical Book (Lord Roden's copy), Da mac ITIaoilcoba .1. blarmac, a p. 568
:

guished from Ceann Maghair, near Fanaid. The O'Dohertys were afterwards settled in the ter-

quo piojpaio ula6,
u

7

aongup, a quo cmel
i.

n-aonjupa: ap bib piojpaio leice carail.
Tibohine-Artagh,

now the barony of Inishowen, which had been previously possessed by families of the
ritory,

Ceac 6aoirm

aipcij,

e.

the house, or church of St. Baoithin, of the territory of Airteach. It is now the name of a parish church in the diocese of Elphin. See the
Feilire

Kinel-Owen
to

race,

who were

all
;

tributary either
after the set-

Loughlin, or O'Neill tlement of the

Mac

but

O'Dohertys, who were of the Kinel-ConneU race, the inhabitants of Inishtribute to O'Donnell.
'

Aenguis at 19th of February, where church is described as lying to the west of this
Croghan, in Connaught "ppi cpuacham Connachc aniap ;" and the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys at the same day, where the saint is
:

owen generally paid
Hy-Earca-Cein

This was the ancient name

of a tribe situated in a valley in the present barony and county of Antrim. See Colgan's Trias Thaum., p. 183, col. 2, note 221.

called "

of Airteach."
p.

The Kinel-Aengusa were a tribe of the Clanna Kury, in the same neighbourhood. They descend, according to Duald Mac Firbis, from
Aengus, the second son of Maelcobha, and the Chiefs of Leath Cathail, now the barony of Lecale, in the county of Down, were of them

Bishop Baoithin, the son of Cuanach, See also Colgan's Trias Thaum., col. 1, notes 17, 18, 19 ; and^eta Sanc370,

torum, pp. 369, 370 ; also Erck's Ecclesiastical Eegister ; Beaufort's Ecclesiastical Map of Ire-

land

The

and Archdall's Monasticon (at Tibohin). parish called after this church is still some;

times locally called Airteach

;

but the territory

120

[1199-

panjaoap eapDapa,

uilbam puce oppa cacal cappac co maicib connacc, maille ppip. peacap lomaipeacc earoppa, po bupc 50 njallaib luimnij
-| -] -\

ppaomeab pop cuaipcepc Gpeann, cenmocd porn. oipjiall, i pochai&e
hi

-j

po pdjbab ann ua heccnij
la

ci<c;eapna

Sluaigheab la lohn Do Cuipc co ngallaib ula6,

~\

mac hujo De Ian

co

poipicin -cacail cpoiboeipg 50 pangaoap cill mic Duac. ngallaib mi6e Cainicc laporh cacal cappac co cconnaccaib imaille ppip, ~] po cacaijpfc Spaoinceap pop jallaib ulab ~\ mibe aipm hi pabaccap cuicc ppi apoile.

caca,

po leanaD iaD alldcaip an caca 50 pinn Duin pop loc pib, i po gabab lomcurhang pop lohn ainnpibe, ~\ po mapbab Dpong mop Do jallaib, ~\ po bdibiD apaill Diob ap nf puapaccap conaip
ni

cepna acr Oa cac

&fb,

~\

ceichib acr a noeacaib

i

nearpaib cap loc poip uara.

Ruapc ua
TTlupchab

TTlaoilbpenainn coipech cloinne concobaip Do ecc. Ri Sa^an lohn Do pioghaoh op Sa^ain .6. Qppil.

mac cochldm cigeapna Dealbna fchpa

t>o ecc.

was more extensive than the present of Tibohine See note under the year parish 1197. There is another parish church called
of Airteach

note
x

the Irish Archseological Society in 1842, b and map to the same work.
,

p. 71,

Teagh Baoithin, in the barony of Raphoe, but
anglicised Taughboyne, though pronounced Tiboyne by the Scotch setalways tlers, and Tibwceheen by those who speak the
Irish language.

the

name is now

Rindown, T?mn oum, i. e. the point or peninsula of the dim, or earthen fort. This peninsula extends into Lough Eee, in the parish of St.
John's, barony of Athlone, and county of Ros-

This

is

called after St. Baoithin,

common, and is about eight miles to the north See Ordnance Map of of the town of Athlone.
the county of Roscommon, sheet 46.

orBaithenus, son of Brendan, son of Fergus, the

This pe-

and companion of St. Colunibkille, and his immediate successor in the abbacy of lona. w Kilmacduagh, Cill mic t)uac, i. e. the church of Mac Duach, an ancient cathedral
relative

ninsula contains the ruins of a castle of great

and strength, and of a military wall, with gates and towers, of considerable extent and
size

church in the barony of Kiltartan, and county of Galway. This church was erected by Guaire
about the year 610, for his kinsman, Colman Mac Duach, who
Aidhne, King of Connaught,
is

magnificence, measuring five hundred and sixtyfour yards in length, and dividing the Sinn,

or point,

from the main land by extending
It
is

from water to water.

stated in the Irish

the patron saint of the Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne,

Annals that the Danish tyrant, Turgesius, built a fortress on Lough Ree, and it has been conjectured that by
fort,

a tribe

who

possessed the entire of the present

him was

erected the dun,

or

diocese of

Kilmacduagh before the English invasion See Colgan, Ada Sanctorum, p. 245 and Tribes and Customs ofHy-Many, printed for
;

from which

this point of land

was denomi-

nated Uinn oum.

See a very curious description of this place, by Mr. Petrie, in the Irish

1199-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

121

however, and on coming to Easdara (Ballysadare), were overtaken by Catlial Carragh, with the chiefs of Connaught, and William Burke, with the English of Limerick: a battle was fought between them, in which the forces of the
north of Ireland were defeated; and O'Hegny, Lord of Oriel, and beside him, were slain.

many

others

John de Courcy, with the English of Ulidia, ami the son of Hugo De Lacy, with the English of Meath, marched to Kilmacduagh" to assist Cathal Crovderg O'Conor. Cathal Carragh, accompanied by the Connacians, came, and gave
and the English of Ulidia and Meath were defeated with such and these were purslaughter that, of their five battalions, only two survived sued from the field of battle to Rindown* on Lough Ree, in which place John was completely hemmed in. Many of his English were killed, and others were
battle
: ;

them

drowned

;

for they

found no passage by which to escape, except by crossing
died.

the lake in boats.

Rourke O'Mulrenin, Chief of Clann-Conory John was crowned King of England on the

,

sixth of April.
z
.

Murrough Mac Coghlan, Lord of
Penny Journal, No.
1

Delviri Eathra, died

10, pp. 73, 74, 75.

Clann- Conor.

See note under year the

his Irish

were mett by Cahall Carragh O'Connor, with all and English forces, and were overthrown
to

1193.
*

and pursued

Royndown (now

called

Teagh

The Annals of Kilronan and of Clonmacnoise

enter these transactions under the year 1200 ; and the former contain a much fuller and more
detailed account of the battles
rivals of the

neer Loghrie). John Coursey was driven to take boate when he came to that place, and his people knew not where to

Eoyn, or John's house,

between the two

house of O'Conor in this and the

betake themselves for their safety, but only by sailing into the islands of Loghrie, where an infinite

two succeeding years. The Annals of Clonmacnoise add, that soon after this slaughter of the English at Lough Ree, Cathal Carragh was

number

of

them were

slain

and drowned.

Soone after Cahall Carragh was taken deceiptfully

De

treacherously taken prisoner by Hugh Lacy, who confined him in the Castle of

by the English of Meath, and by Hugh Delacy the younger, and was conveighed to the Castle of
the Obber, there to be safely kept, untill he had

Nobber (an Obaip), there to be kept until he should give them their The whole paspay.
sage
is

thus translated by Connell Mageoghegan

:

given them their pay, which he was content to give in part, and for the rest to give security, by which means he was sett at Liberty, and im-

D. 1200. Cahall Crovedearg O'Connor, accompanied with the forces of John De Coursey and

"A.

Hugh Delacie,

passed through Connought, untill

mediately went to Munster to Macarthie and William Burke. And for John Coursey, after slaying of his people, [he] returned to Ulster

they came to Tyrefiaghragh Aynie, where they

again."

R

122

[1200.

aois CRIOSO,

1200.

Goip CpiopD, mile, Da ceo.

ppuicib ceann cele nDe cluana Decc an
TTlaoleoin

CaDhla ua Dubcaij aipDeppcop ruama Decc lap pfnDaeam. mic uaipeipge uf neaccain uapal ppuic Do Uaipeipje mac maoilmop&a Da gac poalcm apcfna, cluana mic noip, pfp Ian Do bepepc,
-] -)

DeacmaD la DO rhapca. ua capmacdin comapba commain Decc.
-|

QOD ua neill DO aicpijaD la cenel neojain, Do ponaD cpeac laip hi ccip pijab ma iona6,
~\

concobap ua loclainn Do

nenDa, fto

mapb

Daoine,

-]

puce buap lomDha. Do beachaib cpa Gccneacan ua Domnaill cijfpna cenel conaill co loingfp cenel conaill ap muip laip, -] cona ploj ap rip, -] po jabpac longpopc ag

c an caippjfn, cangaccap clann Diapmaoa Don leic oile 50 pope Roip Do
Under
state that
this

year

the Annals

of Kilronan

land, together

Gormgal O'Quin, Dux, or Captain of Muintir Gillagan, was taken prisoner by the English, who plundered his people, and reduced

with Laurence O'Toole, ArchbiBrenshop of Dublin, andConcors, Abbot of St. Roderic O'Conor, to negotiate dan's, by King with King Henry II. and they waited on the
;

them
ment.

to great distress for

want of food and
erection

rai-

They

also record the

of the

Windsor, where a grand council was held, and a convention ratified, by which Henry

King

at

Castle of Granard under

this year,

but without

giving the copy of the Annals of Innisfallen state that

name

of the builder.

The Dublin
it

as long as granted to his liegeman Roderic, that serve him faithfully he should he continued to

was built by Richard Tuite, as a stronghold against O'Reilly in south Breiihy and this ap;

be a king under him ready to do him service as his vassal, and that he should hold his heredias he tary territories as firmly and peaceably before the coming of Henry into had held them

pears to be correct

:

for

Granard

is

very close to

the ancient dunchladh, boundary wall, or ditch,

Ireland.
his

Roderic was likewise to have under

between Breifny and Annally, extending from

Lough Gawna to Lough Kinclare. Under this year also the Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan record the death of Rowland Mac
Uchtry, King of the Gall-Gaels in Scotland. a Kyley O'Dvff//, caohla ua oubrui j. This
the prelate called Catholicus Tuomenensis by Giraldus Cambrensis, in his Hibernia Expugnata,
is

dominion and jurisdiction all the rest of the island, and the inhabitants, kings and princes
included, and was

bound to oblige them to pay tribute through his hands to the King of England, &c.
vol.
i.
;

and

See this treaty in Rymer's Fcedera, also as given in the original Latin in

Cox's Hibernia Anylicana, p. 29 ; and an abstract of it in Leland's History of Ireland, vol. i.
p.
p.

lib.

i.

c.

34.

He

succeeded
1 1

Edan O'Hoisin

in the

104; and in Moore's History of Ireland,
287.

vol.

ii.

year 1161. In the year

75 he was sent to Eng-

1200.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

1-23

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1200.

thousand two hundred.
at

a Kyley [Catholicus] 0'Duffy Archbishop of Tuam, died
,

an advanced age.

Uaireirghe, son of Mulmora, the son of Uaireirghe O'Naghtan, one of the noble sages of Clonmacnoise, a man full of the love of God, and of every virtue, and head of the Culdees of Clonmacnoise, died on the tenth of

March.

Malone O'Carmacan, Successor of St. Coman died. Hugh O'Neill was deposed by the Kinel-Owen, and Conor O'Loughlin was elected in his stead. The latter plundered Tir-Enda, killed many persons, and
,

b

drove

off

many

cows.
sailed with the fleet of Tirconhis

Egneghan O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, nell [thirteen vessels] by sea, and despatched

army by land, and pitched
repaired to Port-Rois
d

his

camp
In

at Gaeth-an-Chairrgin

e
.

The Clandermot

on the

the year 1179, Cadhla, or Catholicus O'Duffy, attended the second Council of Lateran, together with Laurence O'Toole, Archbishop of Dublin Constantine, Bishop of Kil;

(Gweedore),
coast.
d

"fiaor:

6eapa (Gweebarra),
all

tuacpoip (Loughros Bay),
Port-Hois,
is

on the western

laloe

; Brictius, Bishop of Limerick ; Augustin, Bishop of Waterford; and Felix, Bishop of

This

i. e. the port or harbour of Eoss. not the Portrush in the parish of Bal-

ly willin, in the

county of Antrim, but Eosses

but on their passage through England, they were obliged to take an oath that
:

Lismore

Bay, a short distance to the north of Derry. This story is very confused in the original. It

they would not say or do anything at the council prejudicial to King Henry or his kingdom

See note under the year 1180,

p. 51.

Accord-

ing to the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, he died in the Abbey of Cong, in the year 1201.
"

Egneghan O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, despatched the ships of Tirconnell, thirteen in number, by sea, ordering their commanders to meet him at Gaeth-an:

should be told thus

"

Chairrgin.
his forces

He
by

then marched the remainder of

Successor of St. Coman,

i.

e.

abbot of Eos-

common.
Gaeth-an-Chairrgin, i. e. the inlet of CarriCarrigin is a village three miles to the

and pitched his camp at Gaeth-an-Chairrgin. As soon as the Clann-Dermot, his opponents, had heard of this division of
land,
his forces,

they marched to Port-Eois (Rosses

gin

south of the city of Londonderry, on the west side of the River Foyle. The word jaer, or ftaoc, enters into the names of three other
places in the

prevent crews of the thirteen ships attacked and defeated them. This shews how unequal they were to

of the ships, and Bay), to intercept the passage them from joining the land forces ; but the

county of Donegal, as

5^ Oop
B

compete with the combined forces of O'Donnell.

124

ctNNata Rio^hachca eiReawN.

[1200.

Oo conncaoap poipne na rcpi lonj nDecc baoi an jabail ppip an loinjfp. coblac inopin, T?o leccpfc pochaib iacc jop paoirheaD pop cloinn noiapmaDa. Uicc mace lacloinn (.1. concobap becc mac muipcfpcaij), ina bpoipirin, -| po a eac pomh DI, copcaip lapom la cenel cconaill
po cpapccpab poo, 5ona6 a pcpim po DirhisneaD pecc piarh. Qp in eneac colaim cille, a corhapba, ua cpicdin cijeapna ua ppiaccpiapan DimiaD ceona po mapbaoh TTlupcaD Leanaic muinnp eccneacam an niamm mpccain gup po cuippeac ap
-]

-\

pach.

ap cloinn noiapmaoa. ap eojanchaib SluaicceaD la ITlelfp -| la gallaib laijfn 50 cluain mic noip i ccoinne T?o bacap of oiDce cacail ccluain, -] aipcccfp leo an baile eicip
~\

cappaij.

i

cpo6

Do coi&peao po a cfmplaib. Cacal cpoiboeapj DO Dol ip in muriiam Do paijib mic mec capcaij
1 biat>, 1

-]

uilliam bupc.

J5eppmaiDe ua baoiselldm DO rhapbab la hua nDorhnaill
neacdn.

.1.

la hecc-

lomaipeacc eiDip ua nDomnaill
jlaippene ua Ruaipc.
")

-|

ua puaipc, ualjapcc,
-\

-\

concobap na

po cuipeaD DOpgdp a niuinocc mapbaDh, po bonchea& concobap pepin Don cup pin, cipe eiDip b66a6, leic ui rhaoiloopaiD Do ponnpaoh po pighfoh an lomapjoil pin.

Ro

rhaib pop uib bpiuin,
-\

e

Murrottgh O'Creaghan, TTIupcao na cpiocain. This name would be now anglicised Morgan
f

Cambrensis
nigris,

:

"

&

toruis,

Meylerivs vero vir fuscus, oculis vnl tuque acerrimo. Stature

Creighan, or Cregan.
Ily-Fiachrach, Hy-Fiachrach of Ardstraw. See note under the year 1193.
i.

paulo mediocri plus pusillo.
e.

pro quantitatis captu perualido.
drato,

Corpore tamen Pectore quaceterisq
;

ventreq

;

substricto, brachiis
.

TkeClann-Dermot,Clar\nt>\upmaoa. These were a tribe of the Kinel-Owen, who inhabited

s

membris

quam
Nihil

plus neruositatis habentibus, Miles animosus & eemulus. carnositatis.
ossosis,

and gave name

to the present parish of Clonder-

vnquam

abhorrens, quod aggredi quis vel

mot

(anciently Clandermot), on the east side of

the River Foyle, in the barony of Tirkeerin, and county of Londonderry.
h

Primus in prrelium vltimus conserto proelio redire consuetus in omni conflictu omnis strenuitatis opera s*eu
solus debeat vel comitatus.
ire
: :

Meyler,
of

i.

e.

King Henry

I.,

Meyler Fitz-Hcnry, natural son by Nesta, the mother ofMau-

perire paratus, seu prseire adeo impatiens & prseceps: vt vel vota statim, vel fata complere
:

rice Fitzgerald.

He was made Lord

Justice of

Ireland in the year 1199
vol.
ii.

p.

See Harris's Ware, 102; and Cox's Hibernia Anglicana,

dignum ducat. Inter mortis & Martis triumphos, nil medium ponens: adeo laudis cupidus & glorise,

quod

si

viuendo forte non valeat: vincere

p. 46.

His personal form and character are described as follows by his cotemporary, Giraldus

velit vel

moriendo.

Vir itaq;
si

fuisset

cumulata

laude dignus vterque,

ambitione posthabita,

1200.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
fleet:

125

other side, to attack the

when
1

the crews of the thirteen vessels perceived

their intentions, they attacked

and defeated the Clann-Dermot. Mac Loughlin

(Conor Beg, son of Murtough) came to their assistance; but his horse was wounded under him, and he himself was dismounted. He was afterwards slain

by the Kinel-Connell, in revenge of Columbkille, his coarb and shrine, that he had violated some time before. And it was for the same violation that Murrough O'Creaghan

Lord of Hy-Fiachrach f was killed. Egneghan's troops followed up the route, and slaughtered the Kinel-Owen and the Clann-Dermots Meyler", and the English of Leinster, marched to Clonmacnoise against
,

6

,

.

Cathal Carragh (O'Conor), where they remained two nights: they plundered the town of its cattle and provisions, and attacked its churches. Cathal Crovderg O'Conor went into Munster, to the son of

Mac Carthy and

William Burke

[to solicit their aid].

A battle
and

Gerrmaide O'Boylan' was slain by O'Donnell (Egneghan). was fought between O'Donnell [on the one side], and O'Rourke

(Ualgarg) and Conor na-Glaisfene O'Rourke [on the other]. The Hy-Briuin (O'Rourkes) were defeated, and their men dreadfully cut off, both by drowning
killing.

Conor himself was drowned on

this occasion.

This battle was

fought

at

Leckymuldory*.
The O'Boylans O'Boylan, ua baoi^eallam chiefs of the territory of Dartry-Coininsi, of Dartry, in the county of Monow the
'

Christ! Ecclesiam debita deuotione venerantes,

antiqua

&

autentica eiusdem iura non tan turn

were

illibata conseruassent:

Quinimo

tarn noua?, tarn-

barony

que

cruentse

conquisitionis

(plurima
;

quippe

naghan.

O'Dugan

calls

them the blue-eyed,

sanguinis effusione, Christianseq

gentis inter-

fcedatas) partem placabilem Deoq ; placentem, laudabili largitione contulissent. Ve-

emptione

white-handed, red-lipped host, the griffins of splendid horses, and the bold kings of Dartry.
k

Leckymuldory, lecrc ui riiaoiloopaio,
flag-stone,

i.e.

rumtamen quod mage stupendum est, amplioriq dolore dolendum: postremum hoc vitium toti
;

O'Muldory's

or

flat

surfaced rock,

The

Editor, after a minute examination of the

fere militise nostrse a

primo adventu, vsque in
fuisse."

hodiernum constat commune

Hibernia

topographical names in O'Muldory's country, has come to the conclusion that this is the re-

Expugnata, lib. ii. c. x. This Meyler was the founder of the abbey of Great Connell, in the

markable

flat

surfaced rock called the lecic,
at Bellice,

under the cataract

now

Belleek, on

county of Kildare, in which he was buried in the yea.r 1220. See Archdall's Monasticon, at
Great Connell, county of Kildare, where there are some curious notices of this " Tameless

the River Erne, about two miles to the east of

See it described in the notes Ballyshannon. under the years 1409, 1522. Hy-Briuin, or

tamer of the Irish

all."

Hy-Briuin Brcifne, was the tribe name of the O'Rourkes and their correlatives.

eirceciNN.

[1201.

Oonnchab uairneach mac Ruaibpi
luimmj.
TTlachjariiain

uf

Concobaip DO rhapbab la

mac

Do jiollapacpaicc uf chiappDa

mapbab

la jallaib

cluana lopaipD. Cluain lopaipD Do lopccab Dua ciap&a Do pojail pop na jallaib barap

mnce.
conaing, Cpeach la cacal cpoiboeapj TTlumain gup po loipg caiplen rue uilcfn cona mnaoi illaim laip lap caiplen uilcin, 1 mapgab luimnij, DI piDepe becc, lolap Daoine cenmochac. mapba& piacpa ua plamn raoipeac pil ITlhaoilpuain Do ecc. Carhal cappac Do jabciil Rige connacc, caral cpoibDeap^ Do lonriapi

ui

-\

-\

-j

-\

ba6 DO i nulcaib 50 pamig co ceaj ui Gignij cijeapna peapmanac, DO paijiD lohn Do cuipc gup po naiDm a cupa ppip.

-\

aipme

QO13 CR108O,
Qoip CpiopD,
mile,

1201.

Da cheD, a haon.
~\

Uomalcach ua concobaip comopba parcpaicc,
Decc.

ppfomaiD na hGpeann

Conn ua meallaij eppcop eanaij Dum, jfm jloiniDe ecclapracba Decc. lohannep De monce celion capDinal comopba peacaip Do code 6 T?oim co hepmo. SfnaD mop Do ceaglamaD ina bail co har cliac eiDip eppcopaib,
the English, opo jail pop na jalnot for the sake of destroying the laib, i.e., monastery, but to take revenge of the English ;
1

To injure

of the aiFairs of Munster, of which the Four Masters have collected no account :" A. 1). 1 200.

A

great

army was mustered by William De
all

or rather, he ran the risk of committing sacrilege to

Burgo, and

the English of Munster, joined

on the English. ra Besides them, cenmocar. This phrase is used throughout these Annals, very generally
his vengeance

wreak

by Murtough Finn, Conor Roe, and Donough Cairbreach, the three sons of Donnell More
to Cork.

though be left untranslated throughout. n Banished into Ulster. This
for it
is

it

has

little

or no meaning, and might

O'Brien; and they inarched through Munster They encamped for a week at KinCairbre Aodha, and

neigh,
is

a repetition,

where Aulifie More O'Donovan, King of Mac Costello were slain.

mentioned under the
this year the

last year.

Under
iials

Dublin copy of the An-

of Inuisfallen contain the following notice

Then came Mahon O'Heney, the Pope's Legate, and the bishops of Munster, and made peace between the O'Briens [on the one side] and the

1201.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

127

Donough Uaithneach,
of Limerick.

the son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by the English

Mahon, {he son of Gilla Patrick-O'Keary, was
Clonard.

slain

by the English of
1

Clonard was burned by O'Keary, to injure the English who were in it. Cathal Crovderg O'Conor made a predatory incursion into Munster, and plundered Castleconning [Castleconnel] the market of Limerick, and Castle,

Wilkin and led Wilkin and
;

his wife

away

captives, after having killed thirteen
.

m knights, and many other persons besides them Fiachra O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Mailruana, died.

Cathal Carragh assumed the government of Connaught, and Cathal Crovderg was banished by him into Ulster". He arrived at the house of O'Hegny, Lord of Fermanagh, and went from thence to John de Courcy, with whom he

formed a league of amity

.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1201.
one.

thousand two hundred
St. Patrick,

Tomaltagh O'Conor, successor of

and Primate of Ireland,

died.

Conn

O'Melly, Bishop of

Annaghdown,

a transparently bright

gem

of the

Church, died. Johannes de Monte Celion, the Pope's Legate, came to Ireland, and convoked a great syrtod of the bishops, abbots, and every other order in the Church,
Mac Carthys, O'Donohoes, and the rest of the Eugenians" [on the other].
[Mortogh Fionn O'Brien] marched at the head of the Dal-Cassians, his brothers, Connor Euadh and Donough Cairbreach, serving as officers under him, against the Eugenians, whom he greatly harassed, and slew Auliff O'Donovan, chief of
that family, with
nobility.

m

In a marginal note is the following observation Latin: "O'Donovan, Rex Carbriae
relagatus erat

nam ab anno 1178

Aodha; O'Donovan ex

ditioue sua de Cairbre

Aodhbha in regione Limiricensi in occidentalem partem regionis Cor-

many

others of the Eugenian

Vid. supra ad istum annum." The substance of this passage is thus given by Dr.
cagiensis.

After which a peace was concluded between him and Donall Mor Mac Carthy, sur-

O'Brien, in his History of the House of O'Brien, published by Vullancey, in the first volume of
his Collectanea de
title

named na Curadh, King of Desmond, by the mediation of Mahon O'Heney, Archbishop of
Cashel,

who was

of

Law

Rebus Hibernicis, under the " A. of Tanistry. D. 1200. He

that time."

the Pope's Legate in Ireland at See note under the year 1254.

128

[1201.

-]

abbabaib,

ppiu.

jac 5pa6 eccailpi.i pochame DO paopclarroaib Gpeann imaille 17o opOaigpfo laporh a ccainjne uile lap na ccoip eircip ecclaip
-\ -|

cuair.

Sena6 conDacc (imnnon caipoinal ceDna) laochaib, cleipchib occ ar luain hi cint) coiccibipi lapom, po cinDpfc a ccaingne peb poba cecca.
~\

Niall ua ploinn DO rhapbab la jallaib ula6 meabail. THajnup mac Diapmaoa ui laclainn Do rhapbab la muipceapcac ua nell,
i

1

muipceapcac Do mapba6 ina cionaio. Concobap mac mmpjfpa ui eDin Decc. UaDg ua bpaoin njeapna luigne mioe Decc.
mic an cpionnaij ui carapnaij Decc. ITlupchao ua T71aDaDdin lee coipec pil nanmcaba Do juin
TTlui|iea6ac
neill

mac

ma

cfnn Do

poijic i a ecc cperiiic. SluaijeaD la cacal cpoiboeapj, -] la huilliam bupc cona pocpame gall -| jaoibeal hi cconnaccaib o ra lummeac 50 ruaim Da ualann, aippibe 50
p

Lune, lu) jne

This was a territory of con-

siderable extent in ancient
is still

Meath and
;

its

name

preserved as that of a barony, anglicised

by Teige mac Connor Moenmoye there ; Carragh O'Connor, King of Connaught, came in view of the said forces to a place
slain

also Cahall

Lune, and now corruptly pronounced in Irish luibne ; but the ancient territory of Ltiighne was

Gurthin Cowle Lwachra, and from thence he went to the skirmish between his forces and
called

much more extensive than the modern barony, for we learn, from the Tripartite Life of St. Patrick, that Doinhnach mor Muighe Echnach, now
Donaghmore, near Navan, was situated in it. q Forces. The account of the death of Ca thai
Carragh, and of the actions of William FitzAdelm De Burgo, is given as follows in the Annals
of Clonmacnoise, as translated by Macgeoghegan "A. D. 1201. Cahall Crovedearg and William
:

them,

who

finding his people discomfited, and

put to

flight,

was

killed himself,

by the miracles

of St. Quseran, together with Kollye

mac Der-

mott O'Moylerwayne, and many " Cathal Crovdearge and William Burk, after committing these great slaughters, went with
others.

their forces to

Moynoye and Moylorge, over

Donleoy into Moynemoye, from thence to West Connought, until they came to Cowynge of St.
Ffehine, where

Burk, with

all

their forces of English

and

Irish-

men, came to Connaught, pass'd from Lirnbrick to Twayme, from thence to Owran, from thence to Alfyn, from thence to the Carrick of Loghke,

that time William Burke,

they kept their Easter. At and the sonne of

O'Flathvertye, privily consulted and conspired together to kill Cahall Crovederge O'Connor,

from

thence to

the

Abbey

of Athdalaragh,

which God prevented, for they were by great
oaths sworn to each other before, which whoso-

where the chambers* and roomes of that abbey were the lodgings of the annie. Cahall mac

ever wou'd breake was to be excommunicated

Connor O'Dermott went

to prey the lands of

Mac Dermott"

" and was \recte Hy-Diarmada],

with booke, bell, and candle. " William Burk sent his forces

to distrain for

1201.]
at Dublin, at

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
which
also

129

many

of the nobles of Ireland were present.

By

this

synod many were enacted.

proper ordinances, for the regulation of the

Church and

the State,

A fortnight afterwards the
laity of

Conuaught were established.
Niall

at

same Legate called a meeting of the clergy and Athlone, at which meeting many excellent ordinances

OTlynn [O'Lynn] was treacherously slain by the English of Ulidia. Manus, the son of Dermot O'Loughlin, was slain by Murtough O'Neill; and
Murtough was
killed in revenge of him.

Conor, the son of Maurice O'Heyne, died.
p Teige O'Breen, Lord of Lune in Meath, died. Murray, son of Niall, who was son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny, died. Murrough O'Madden, Chief of half Sil-Anmchadh, was wounded in the
,

head by an arrow, and died of the wound. Cathal Crovderg and William Burke, at the head of
forces'
1
,

their English

and

Irish

marched from Limerick, through Connaught,

to

Tuam, and proceeded

his pays

and wages throughout Connought, who were soone cut off, for six or seven hundred of

the extent of tha profanation that the archers of the army had women in the hospital of the

them were soone

after

slain.

William Burk

monks, in the houses of the

cloister,

and in

afterwards repaired to Limbrick, and Cahall Crovederge tooke upon him the name of King
of

every apartment throughout the whole monastery; and they left nothing in the monastery

Connought again."

The Annals

of Kilronan, which

may

be con-

sidered the chronicle of the district, contain a

without breaking or burning, except the roofs of the houses only, tmd even of these they broke and burned many. They left no part of
the monastery to the monks excepting only On the dormitory and the house of the novices.
this

much
two

fuller

account of the battles between these

rivals of the

house of O'Conor. The account

of the profanation of the abbey of Boyle, and of the death of Cathal Carragh, is given as follows, under the year 1202 " great army was led into Connaught by Cathal Crovderg, joined by Wil:

occasion William

Burke commenced the

erection of a cashel [or circular wall] around

A

the great house of the guests, on which he bestowed two days' work. On the third day after

liam Burke, the sons of Donnell O'Brien,

viz.,

Murtough and Conor Roe, and by Fineen Mac Carthy. They marched to the monastery of
Ath-dalarac, on the River Boyle, and took up their quarters in it ; and they remained there for
three days, during which time they profaned

the commencement of this wall, Cathal Carragh, King of Connaught, was killed by the English,
as

were

also

Dermot, who was

Dermot, son of Gilchreest, son of son of Teige O'Mulrony, and

Tomaltagh, son of Taichleach O'Dowda, and many others. They then departed from the monastery, after which William

and defiled the whole monastery; and such was

Burk dismissed

130

aNNCK.a Rioghachca eiReaww.
-j

[1201.

apiaD huapan 50 hoilpinn 50 cappaic loca ce, 50 mainipcip aca Da loops, na mainipcpe pobcap boca lonjpuipr Doib'. Oo coiD Din cacal mac cije DiapmaDa pop cpec in uib Diapmaoa. T?ucc caDj mac concoBaip maonmaije paip. T?o pijeaD eapgal earoppa,
1 copcaip cacal.

Dala

cacail cappaij pi

connachc cionolaiD piDe a pocpaiDe,

-]

cainic

piacc guipcin cuil luacpa hi ccompocpaib Don mainipcip. bacap parhlaiD ucc pe hucc co cfnn peccrhame, q DeabaiD jac Hi popcfnn na pee hipin Do Deachaib cacal cappac Do Deccpin laoi fcoppa. na Deabca. Spainceap ppucrhaiDm Dia rhuincip ma cfnn, ~| caipceap epfm

Do poijpD an cploij 50

po mapbaD e, ba cpia piopcaib De ciapdin inDpn. an collaio mac DiapmaDa uf maoilpuanaiD Don DeabaiD mapbaD beop maille pe pochai&ib ele. CuiD cacal cpoibDeapg uilliam bupc cona pin plojaib ap a haicle muij luipcc, muij naoi, aippiDe co hiapcap connacc.
)

ma ccpecommapcc,
l?o
i

]

-|

i

i

Rangaccap conga

peicin,

~\

ap mnce DO ponpac an
-|

caipcc.

Ci6 cpa, ace po

la clomn Puaiopi uf plaicbfpcaij peall Do cogpab la huilliam bupc, Denam pop cacal cpoibDeapj, po paop Dia 6 Don cup pin cpia pldnaD na
-]

the sons of O'Brien and
forces.

Mac Carthy and

their

dred, vel amplius.

When

William Burke had

The

resolution to which Cathal Crov-

derg and William Burke then came, was to
despatch their archers throughout
to distrain for their wages,

heard of the killing of his people he sent for O'Conor. forewarning of his intention reach-

A

Connaught and William Burke

ing O'Conor, he shunned the place where William was. William then set out for Munster, having
lost the greater part of his people."
r

and his attendants, and Cathal Crovderg, reThen a miraculous report was paired to Cong.
bruited abroad, and
it is

Oran, uapdn,

now

Oran.

A

well-known

not

known whether

it

place, containing the ruins of a

church and round

proceeded from a man, or from the spirit of God in the shape of a man, namely, that William

tower, in the barony of Ballymoe, and county of Eoscommon See Trias Thaum., p. 136, where

Burke was
in

There was not a way or road Connaught through which this report had not passed. On hearing this news a resolution was adopted by the tribes of Connaught, as unakilled!

the

name

is

thus explained

:

"Huaran enim

sive

fuaran idem Hibernis sonat quod fons vivus,
sive viva vel frigida

aqua e terra scaturiens."

nimcusly as if they had all met in council for the purpose, and this was, that each person should kill his guest e. the soldier billeted on [i. him].
This was done: each tribe killed the number
billeted

See also the year 1556, at which mention is made ofGillacolumb O'Clabby, Coarb of St. Patrick, at
this place.

The place is still called Uupan Ui Chlabai j, and " Patrons" are yet held there

among them, and their

loss,

according

annually on St. Patrick's day (17th March), and on the last Sunday in July, called Garland

to the report of their

own

people,

was nine hun-

Sunday.

Not many years ago the

senior of the

1201.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

131

from thence successively to Oran r to Elphin, to the Rock of Lough Key, and to and the houses of the monastery the monastery of Ath-da-Loarg (Boyle)
;

served them as military quarters. At this time Cathal Mac Dermot went on a predatory excursion into HyDiarmada5 Teige, the son of Conor Moinmoy, overtook him, and a battle was
:

fought between them, in which Cathal [Mac Dermot] was slain. As to Cathal Carragh, King of Connaught, he assembled his forces, and

marched against

this

of the monastery. which daily skirmishes took place between them. At the end of this time Cathal Carragh went forth to view a contest but a body of his people being violently driven towards him, he became involved in the crowd, and was killed.
;

army, and arrived at Guirtin Cuil luachra in the vicinity They remained confronting each other for a week, during
,

1

This happened through the miracles of God and St. Kieran. Ancolly, the son of Dermot O'Mulrony, and many others, were also killed in this battle.
After this Cathal Crovderg and William Burke passed with their forces through Moylurg and Moy-Nai, and thence through West Connaught, and
arrived at Cong, where they spent the Easter. William Burke and the sons of Rory OTlaherty, however, conspired to deal treacherously by Cathal Crovderg, but

protected him on this occasion from their designs, through the guarantee of the ecclesiastical witnesses to their league of mutual fidelity.

God

O'Clabbys used to appear at the Patrons, and point out to the people the extent of the Termon lands possessed by his ancestors, on which occasion the people were accustomed to make a collection for his support.

which the pilgrims kneel.

Traces of the foun-

dations of other buildings are also observable in the field adjoining the church, which shew the

The O'Clabbys, now

ancient importance of the place. This was the tribe Hy-Diarmada
in

name of

Clabbys, axe numerous in the county, but have retained no property in this Termon.

the family of O'Concannon, Galway. The chief of the name had his seat, in
1585, at Kiltullagh, in the county of Galway. See Tribes and Customs o/Hy-Many, printed for

the county of

Colgan

calls this

church nobilissima ecdesia
of
its

de Huaran, but

little

magnificence, how-

ever, remains at present, there being at the place

but a mere fragment of the ruins of the church, and the base of its dogas, or round tower, measuring about fifteen feet in height. The uaran, or spring, from which the place derives its

the Irish Archaeological Society in 1843, p. 19. The Hy-Diarmada are to be distinguished from the Clann-Diarmada,

who were

at

Dun

Doighre,

now Duniry,
<

in the barony of Leitrim, in the

name, accounted a holy well, and frequented by pilgrims. It has a small stone cross over it before
is still

county of Galway.
Guirtin Cuil luachra,
i.

e.

the

little field

of

the rushy corner or angle.

This name is

now ob-

S2

132

aNNata Rio^hachca

eircecmN.

[1202.

im bflpi ppi apoile. Tieaccailpe baoi eacoppa

Can^aDap mumcip
-[

uilliam

a ccuapapoail pop connaccaib, linjic connacraij bupc mpDcain Do cobac Dib. jabair Soaip uilliam co luimneac lap pin poppapom, i mapbaic 700. cacal cpoiboeaps pije 661516 connacc. ccenel cconaill, ap pochla hualjapcc ua Ruaipc Do 6ul
i

-| Sloijheab bu -\ jabala. Rug ua Domnaill eccreaclian cain Doib ipm ccpfch Ru^pac poppa occ leic ui maoilDopam. peachap pcainoeap fcoppa 50 paeimer> laab a noeapjap eicip rhapbab -\ babab. pop uib bpnnn cona pocpaite, -| po

na jjlaippene. cup pin po baibeab concobap ccenel conuill ipm 16 cfcr,a. Cenel neojain Do rochc pop cpeich naile t)o pala fcappa -] ua Domnaill jup po ppaoineab pop cenel neo^ham po chenel neo^hain mapbab geappmami ua baoijeallain co pochaibib aile Do

ba Don

i

-|

i

maille ppip.
la mag piacCijfpnan mac Domnaill mic carail ui Ruaipc Do mapbab an pac i la cloinn chachail, -\ an reojanac mag piacpac DO mapbab ap

laraip

pin.

QO1S CR1OSO,

1202.

Qoip CpiopD, mile, Da ceD, ao6.

capmacam eppcop cluana pfpru bpenainn Do ecc. ua bponain aipcinbeac copaije Decc. TTlaolcolaimm Oorhnall ua bpolcdin ppioip i uapal peanoip, Saof oeappcaijce ap ceill, ap cpuc, ap belb, ap mine, ap mopbacc, ap cpabab, 1 ap eagna 065 lap noeijbfchaib an peaccmab la picfc Qppil.
TTluipcfpcac ua
solete, for

the oldest
it.

men

in the parish of Boyle

of,

or devoted

to, St.

Columba.

This name

is

never heard of
u

made Malcolm

in Scotland.

CPCarmacan,

O Capmacam, now anglicised
seated
in the north-

x

Of

Tory, Copaije,
i.

and sometimes

called
It is

Gormican.

The family of this name were
Abbey- Gormican,

Coip-imp,

e.

the island of the tower.

an

in the parish of

west of the barony of Longford, in the county of Galway, which parish derived its name from
a monastery founded by a chief of this tribe. The name is written O'Gormagan in the Galway
Inquisitions.

island off the north coast of the county of Donegal, where St. Columbkille is said to have erected

a monastery and doifftheach, or round tower See O'Donnell's belfry, in the sixth century
Life of Columba,
lib.
i.

c.

73,

lib.

ii.

c.

20,

and

w

Maekolum, TTlaolcolaimm,

i.

e.

the servant

Calendar of the O'Clerys, at 9th June. For the early history of this island the reader is referred

x202.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
of William Burke afterwards went to
;

133

demand their wages from rushed upon them, and killed seven hunthe Connacians but the Connacians dred of them. William then returned to Limerick, and Cathal Crovderg assway of Connaught. Ualgarg O'Rourke mustered an army, and marched into Tirconnell. On their arrival in the country, they seized upon a number of cows and other proregal

The people

sumed the

O'Donnell (Egneghan) overtook them at Leck-I-Muldory, where a battle was fought between them, in which the Hy-Briuin (O'Rourkes) and their army were defeated and cut off with terrible havoc, both by killing and drownperty.
ing.
It

was on

this occasion that

Conor

na-Glais-fene (O'Rourke)

was drowned.

On

the same day the

Kinel-Owen made another predatory incursion into

Tirconnell; and a conflict took place between them and O'Donnell, in which the Kinel-Owen were defeated, and Gearrmaidi O'Boylan and many others of
the

Kinel-Owen were

slain

along with him.

Tiernan, the son of Donnell,
slain

who was

the son of Cathal O'Rourke, was
;

by Mag-Fiachrach and the Clann-Cahill but Mag-Fiachrach, surnamed Eoganach [i. e. the Tyronian] was killed on the same spot.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1202.

thousand two hundred two.

Murtough O'Carmacan", Bishop of Clonfert-Brendan, died. Maelcolum" O'Bronan, Erenagh of Tory* (island), died.
Donnell O'Brollaghan, a prior, a noble senior, a sage illustrious for his
telligence, personal form,
in-

and comeliness, and

for his mildness, magnanimity,

piety,

and wisdom,

after

having spent a good

life',

died on the twenty-seventh

of April.
to Keating's History of Ireland, Haliday's Edition, pp. 122, 180,

the most distinguished saint of this island next
after St. Columbkille.
1

182; and O'Flaherty's Ogygia,

part

iii.

c.

7.

See also Battle of
x

Magh

Rath,

A

good

life.

printed for the Irish
1

Archasological Society in

the Annals of Ulster:
Prior, $c. #c., post

Thus expressed in " Domnall h Ua

Latin, in

Brolchain,
et

St. Ernan, son of Col842, p. 1 06, note . man, son of Maen, son of Muireadhach, who was son of Eoghan, ancestor of the Kinel-Owen, was

A

magnam

tribulationem

optimum
uitam

penitenciam in quinta Kalendas

Maij

finiuit."

134

awMaca Rio^hachca eiReawH.
ITIaolpinnem
065.

[1203.

mac colmain peanoip cojaioe
(.1.

-]

conn cpaibDec ua planna-

Oorhnall cappac ua Docapcaijj

pio

raoipeac apDa miobaip) Do rhap-

baD la muincip baoijpll lap nap^ain ceall -| cuac niom&a. Concobap puab mac Domnaill uf bpiain Do rhapbab la a Deapbpacaip pfm
muipcfpcac mac Dorhnaill mic coippbealbaij uf bpiain. Uoippbealbac mac TJuaibpi uf concobaip Do elub a jeimeal, i caral cpoiboeapg 60 benam pio&a ppif "| pepann Do cabaipr Do. Uoipp6ealbac
1 la
,

laporh Do lonnapbab la cacal
njall.

~\

p(6 Do Denorh pip po ceDoip rpia impibe na

mac muipcfpcaij uf maoileachlainn Do ecc. Diapmaicc mac aipc uf maoileachloinn DO mapbaD la mac lochlamn
Oorhnall
concobaip.

uf

CIO1S

CR1OSD,
Da

1203.
ceD, arpf.

Ctoip Cpiopo, mile,

reppcop mac jiolla ceallaij puaiDin eppcop cille mic Duach DO ecc. Ooipe colaim cille Do lopccab o ra pelecc TTlapcain co noppaic a&ami

Qn

nam.

Do Denam la ceallac ap lap cpoi la j;an nach Dlijeb cap papuccab muincipi la po&ein, po mill an baile co mop. Cleipij an cuaipcipc DO cionol co haofn iona6 Do bul 50 hi plopenc ua cfpballan eppcop npe heojain, TTlaoliopa ua Dopij eppcop cfpe conaill, abb pecclepa poil
TTIainiprip
"|
.1.

-|

1 peaDaip apDmaca, amaljaib ua pepjail abb pecclepa Doipe, ainmipe ua cobcaij, Do muincip Doipe, Do cleipcib an Dpong mop pochaibe
in
~\ -] -]

cuaipcipc jenmofaicpf&e.
'

CiagaiD laporh co

hf,

-]

pcaoilceap leo anrhaimp-

O'Boyles, muincip BaoijiU According to O'Dugan's topographical poem, the O'Boyles were chiefs of Cloch Chinnfhaolaidh, now Clo-

1284 and 1343.
a

At

once,

po cdooip

.1.

po ceo uaip __ This

ghineely, in the north-west of the barony of Kilmacrennan, and of Tir Ainniire, now the ba-

adverbial expression, which occurs so frequently throughout these Annals, signifies at once, without delay, sine mora.

rony of Boylagh, and Tir Boghaine, now Bannagh barony, in the west of Tirconnell, now the

county of Donegal

See notes under the years

This name, which has Awley, ariial^aio. been anglicised Awley throughout this translation, existed among the Irish from a remote pe-

b

1203.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Mac Column,
a venerable senior, and

135
(the

Maelfinen

Conn Craibhdheach

Pious) O'Flanagan, died.

Donnell Carragh O'Doherty, Royal Chieftain of Ardmire, was slain by the z and territories. O'Boyles after he had plundered many churches
,

Conor Roe, the son of Donnell O'Brien, was slain by his own brother, Murtough, son of Donnell, who was son of Turlough O'Brien.
;

i.

e.

and Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, escaped from confinement He afterwards Cathal Crovderg made peace with him, and gave him land. a the English, made peace with him at once expelled him, but, at the intercession of Donnell, the son of Murtough O'Melaghlin, died. Dermot, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, was slain by the son of Loughlin
.

O'Conor.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1203.
three.

thousand two hundred

The son
well of
St.

Derry-Columbkille

of Gillakelly O'Ruaidhin, Bishop of Kilmacduagh, died. was burned, from the cemetery of St. Martin to the

A

Adamnan. monastery was erected by Kellagh without any legal

right,

and in despite

of the family of lona, in the middle of lona, and did considerable damage to the town. The clergy of the north of Ireland assembled together to pass over into lona, namely, Florence O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone [i. e. of Derry]
;

Maelisa O'Deery, Bishop of Tirconnell [Raphoe], and Abbot of the church of SS. Peter and Paul at Armagh; Awley" O'Fergahail, Abbot of the regies of Derry;

Ainmire O'Coffey; with many of the family [clergy] of Derry, besides numbers
of the clergy of the north of Ireland. They passed over into lona; and, in accordance with the law of the Church, they pulled down the aforesaid monasriod of their history.
It is to

be distinguished

written

O

pipj^il.

It

was the name of the

from Griilaoib, which they derived from their connexion with the Danes, and which has been
anglicised Aulifie in this translation.
ter is identical

hereditary Erenaghs of Kilmacrenan, by whom It is now the O'Donnells were inaugurated.

This

lat-

pronounced

as if written O'ppi^il,

by a meta-

with the Danish Arnlaff, Anlaff, and Ole. The surname O'Ferghail was, and Olaf,
very

thesis or transposition of letters, not unusual in many words in the modern Irish, and always

is still,

common

in Tirconnell,

but usually

anglicised Freel, without the prefix O'.

136
cip

[1203.

pemepepcmap Do
in

peip blijeb na heccailpi,
]

-j

po hoiponeb an carhalgaib

pempaice

abbaine la rpia coja gall jaoibeal. mac muipcepcaij uf loclamn co nDpuing Do jallaib Do bul Oiapmaicc pugpac opeam po aipgpfc Scpin colaim cille, ap cpec hi ccfp neojain, cenel eojain oppa, ~| ppaoinrep leo pop biapmaicc co na jallaib, -j po mapDO
-\ ~\

na Scpine. Sloijeab la mac hu^o DC laci co nDpuing Do jallaib mibe nulraib co po Dfocuipfb lohn Do cuipc a hulcoib iap ccop caca fcuppa nDun Da Ifcglap,

ba6 Diapmaio

pfipin cpia miopbailib

i

i

in

po mapbhaoh pochaibe.

TTluipcepcac rerbac Do mapbab la Diapmaio

mac concobaip maonrhaije mic TJuaibpi uf concobaip mac Ruaibpi la haob mac Ruaibpi Da Deapbpd")
.1.
-]

caip a acap pen ap pairhce cille mic Duach. TTlaibm pia nDomnall mac meg capraij

pia nofprhumain pop jallaib

Du

ap uille. paolan mac paolain njfpna ua ppaolam Do ecc maimpcip Congalaij.
i

hi

ccopcpacop peapccacr ap ceo no

ni

c

Galls,

i.

e.

the northmen or inhabitants of

clearly

Scotland
d

who were not of the Gaelic or Sco tic race.

shews in Trias Thaum., p. 494, col. 2 : " Hie locus est Dioecesis Dorensis jacens in valle
alio

lows:

This passage is translated by Colgari as fol"A. D.I 203. Kellachus extruxit Monas-

de Gleann Conncadhain, unde diversus ab

cognomine loco ejusdem Diocesis."

The

valley

terium in Insula Hiensi, contra ius
renitentibus loci senioribus.

&

Quo

aaquitatem facto audito

of Gleann Concadhain here mentioned

by Col-

gan

still

retains its name,

which

is

correctly an-

Clerus Aquilonaris Hiberniso indicit publicum conuentum ; ad quern Florentius O'Kervallan-

Episcopus Tironise, Moelia O'Dorigh Episcopus Tirconallise, & Abbas Monastery SS. Petri & Pauli

glicised Glenconkeyne and other Anglo-Irish official documents. It is a wide and beautiful valley in the west of the

in the Ulster Inquisitions,

Amalgadius Hua Fergail, Abbas Dorensis, Anmirius O Cobhthaich, & multi alij de Clero convenerunt. Et postea omnes profecti sunt ad Insulam Hiensem, & Monasterium jam Ardmacha?
;

barony of Loughinsholin, and county of Londonderry, bounded on the south by the remarkable

mountain of Sliabh
lion,

Callain, Anglice Slieve Galand on the north by the Dungiven and

memoratum
erunt:

a Kellacho ibi extructum, destrux-

tion of the country,

Banagher mountains. According to the tradiwhich is corroborated by

&

suffragiis electum, Hiensi

prsedictum Amalgadium, communibus Monasterio prsefici-

written documents, this district, which was the
patrimonial inheritance of O'Henery, comprised the parishes of Ballynascreen, Kilcronsghan, and Desertmartin.

unt."
e

Trias Thaum., p. 501. Screen- Columbkille, Scpin
is

Colaim

cille

This

not the shrine of Columbkille in

Ardma-

assumed by Archdall and Sampson, but the present old church of Ballynascreen, in
gilligan, as

There is a remarkable esker, or long hill, to the south of the old church of Ballynascreen, in
the west of this district, called Eisgir Mhic Lochlainn, which tradition points out as the site of a

the

barony of Loughinsholin.

This Colgan

1203.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

137

and the aforesaid Awley was elected Abbot of lona by the suffrages of c the Galls and Gaels".
tery
;

into Tyrone,

Dermot, the son of Murtough O'Loughlin, went on a predatory excursion He was encountered, and plundered the Screen-Columbkille e
.

however, by a party of the Kinel-Owen, who defeated Dermot and his English; and Dermot himself was killed through the miracles of the Shrine.

An army was led by the son of Hugo de Lacy and a party of the English Meath into Ulidia and they banished John de Courcy from thence, after they had defeated him in a battle fought at Dundaleathglas (Downpatrick), in
of
;

which many had been

slain.

Murtough the Teffian, son of Conor Moinmoy, who was the son of Roderic O'Conor, was slain by Dermot, the son of Roderic, and Hugh, the son of Roderic, namely, by his own two paternal uncles, on the green of Kilmacduagh.

A victory was gained by Donnell, the
Desmond, over the English more, were slain.
Faelan
;

Carthy, and the people of in the conflict one hundred and sixty persons, or

son of

Mac

Mac

Faelan

f
,

h Lord of Hy-Faelaing died in the monastery of Connell
,

.

great battle fought between the two rival chiefs. O'Neill and Mac Loughlin, in which the latter

naire,

now Cloncurry and
;

Fiodhchuillinn,

now

was defeated and
if

slain,

and there can be

little,

any, doubt that this tradition alludes to this

Feighcullen. Shortly after the English invasion, however, the Hy-Faelain, or O'Byrnes, were driven from their original level territory, and
forced to take refuge in

Dermot O'Loughlin
f

See note at 1526.
is

the mountain fast-

Mac Faelan
to
vol.
ii.

He

called

Mackelan

in the

nesses

work attributed
Ware,
6

Maurice Regan

See Harris's

where they dispossessed other minor families, and became very powerof Wicklow,

pp. 192, 193.

ful

Hy-Faelain.1\i.\s, was the name of the tribe and territory of the O'Byrnes. Before the Engtheir country comprised the present baronies of Clane and Salt, and the greater and portion, if not the entire, of those of
lish invasion,

See the Feilire or Festilogy of Aengus, and Calendar of the O'Clerys, at 18th May, 8th June, 8th August, 2nd and 16th September,

and 27th

October.

See

also

note

on Hy-

Ikeathy Oughteranny, in the present county of Kildare, as appears from the Irish calendars, and other

Muireadhaigh, under the year 1180. It is quite clear, from the authorities here referred to,
that,

previous to

the English invasion,

the

documents, which place in this territory the town of Naas, and the churches of Claenadh,

O'Tooleand O'Byrne, with their correlatives and followers, were in possession of the entire of the present county of Kildare, with the
families of

now

Clane;

Laithreach Briuin,
;

brine, near

Maynooth

now LaraghDomhnach Mor Moighe
parish
;

exception, perhaps, of a very small portion adjoining the present county of Carlo w.
h

Luadhat,

now Donaghmore

Cluain Co-

Connell,

Conjalaij.

Now

the abbey

of

138

[1204.

CfnanOup Qch cpuim an Dpoichfcr nua DO lopccab. TTlame Do ecc. Sicpicc ceabchac ua ceallaij
-]

QO18 CR1OSO,

1204.

Goip CpiopD, mile, Da cheD, a ceacaip.
cfnn ua TTluprele ua Spuichen aipchinDeac na congbala, coipeac clomne 8ne6jile aji rorachc Decc lap noeij pfnoainn, i a abnacal Sicpiucc
.1.
-]

ip in

cfmpall Do ponaD leip pein. lohn De Cuipc inopfoac ceall,

~\

cuac Do lonnapbab la mac

liujo

De

laci

Great Connell, in the county of Kildare.
cording to

Ac-

abbey was founded, under the invocation of the B. V. Mary and St. David,
this

Ware

macnoise, but entered under the year 1202, and it is added, that it was broken down the

by Myler Fitz-Henry, Lord Justice of Ireland, in the year 1202 See Harris, Ware, vol. ii.
It looks strange that the chief of Hyp. 262. Faelain should die in this monastery the year

same year by the King of Connaught. k Sitric CfSruithen. His death is entered in
the Annals of Ulster as follows, under the year
1205. " A. D. 1205.

after its erection.

It

is

probable that, after

na congBala

.1.

Sicpmc huappuiren oipcinnec cenn hua muptele, 7 coipec
est

being subdued, he consented to become a monk in the great abbey erected in his territory by
the English conqueror. See Archdall's MonasThe ruins of this abbey, which was one ticon. of great extent and magnificence, are now almost

clainne r-neiojile ap cocucc, post optimam penitentiam feliciter finiuil vitam, et sepultus
in

templo quodfactum
1

est

apud ipsum."
This
i.

Conwal, Conjbail.

is

Conjbail

^

lnne Suili e,

e.

generally called Conwall of the

and nothing remains to attract the notice of the antiquary, but the figure
totally destroyed,

vale of the River Swilly ; it is an ancient parish church, now in ruins, near the River Suileach
(Swilly),
in the

of a bishop and an old Latin inscription in the Gothic character, which has been often published.

barony of Kilmacrenan, and

Under this year the Annals of Kilronan contain the following curious passage, which is
'

See the Feilire Aengiis, and county of Donegal the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys, at 8th of

February, and Colgan's Acta Sanct.,
ruins

p.

406

;

altogether omitted by the Four Masters: "A. D. 1203. William Burke marched with

also Erck's Ecclesiastical Register, p. 44.

The

of this church are to be seen on the

the English of Munster and

Meath

into

Con-

naught, and erected a castle at Meelick in Sil-

Anmchadha, and where he erected it was around the great church of the town, which was filled
all

you go from Letterkenny to about two miles from the former. Dunglow, m Clann-Snedhgile, Clnnn Snebjile, were a
right of the road as
tribe of the Kinel-Connell, seated in Glenswilly,

round with stones and clay to the tops of the gables ; and they destroyed West Connaught, both churches and territories." The erection
of this castle
is

to the west of Letterkenny.

They descend from

Snedhgil, son of Airnealach, son of Maelduin, son of Kinfaela, son of Garbh, son of Ronan, son
of Lughaidh, son of Sedna, son of Fergus Kin-

also given in the

Annals of Clon-

1204.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Trim, and Droichead

139

Kells,

Nua (Newbridge) were
Hy-Maine, died
1

burned.

Sitric (the Teffian) O'Kelly, of

.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Sitric O'Sruithen", Christ, one

1204.

thousand two hundred four.
1 ,

Erenagh of Conwal
m

i.

e.

head of the Hy-Murtele, and

the Clann-Snedhgile for his worth, died, after exemplary penance, and was interred in the church which he had himself founded.
chief
all

man

of

John de
fada,

Cour.cy", the plunderer of churches
ter,

and

territories,

was driven by

who was
John de

son of Conall Gulban, ancestor of

the Kinel-ConnelL
n

Hugh
This
is

overthrown at Downdalethglass [Down] by de Lacy, and himself banished into Eng-

Courcy.

the last noIt is en-

tice of

De Courcy

in these Annals.

land ; but under the next year the same Annals would seem to contradict this entry, or, if not,
to give us to understand that

tered in the Annals of Ulster under the year 1205. At the year 1204 the Annals of Kilro-

De Courcy

re:

nan

was fought between de Lacy, with the English of Meath, and Hugo John de Courcy, with the English of Ulidia, in
state

that a battle

turned from England. The passage is as follows "A. D. 1204. John de Courcy and the Englishmen of Meath fell to great contentions, strife, and debate among themselves, to the utter ruin

which John de Courcy was taken prisoner, but afterwards set at liberty, lap na cpoppao 06 mil co lapupulem, having been prohibited from
ing to Jerusalem.

and destruction of Ulster.

John was gone

to

the country of Tyreowne, and

Hugh

Delacie

go-

went

Under the year 1 205 the same Annals record, that John de Courcy brought a fleet from the Innsi Gall, or the Hebrides, to contest Ulidia with the sons of Hugh de Lacy and the English of Meath, but that he effected
nothing by this expedition except the plundering of the country ; that he was compelled to go

England." The Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen,

to

in noticing the doings of King John in Ireland, state that he summoned the sons of Hugh de
to appear before him to answer for the death of the valiant knight John de Courcy, who was treacherously killed by them. Mr.

Lacy

away without making any conquest, and that
after this

Moore thinks (History of Ireland, vol. iii. p. 3) that this was the great Sir John de Courcy,
conqueror of Ulster; but this is not the fact, for the Sir John de Courcy killed by the De Lacys

entered into a league of amity with O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen. In the interpolated

he

Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen it is stated, that John de Courcy gained a great victory at Carrickfergus in 1207; but this must be a mistake. In the Annals of Clonmacnoise,
as
stated,

was Lord of Eathenny and Kilbarrock, in the See Grace's Annals of Irecounty of Dublin
land at the year 1210, and Campion's Historic of Ireland, Edition of 1 809, p. 109. Ware supposes that this Lord of Kilbarrock and Eathenny was the natural son of the great Sir John de

by Connell Mageoghegan, it is under the year 1203, that Sir John de encounCourcy and his forcea were, in a
long

translated

Courcy, but this does not appear probable, for

T

140
hi cip

[1204.

eojain ap comaipce cenel neojain 50 painicc 50 cappaicc pfpjupa, t>ia rhuincip. po mapbpac joill ulaD pochaioe
(Strongbow) had to Vivian de Cursun and his granted Kathenny heirs, as fully as Gilcolm before held them and
find that the Earl Eichard
:

-]

we

next proclaimed De Courcy as a rebel, and offered a large reward to any who should seize

him and

deliver

him

it is

most likely that the Sir John de Courcy, Lord of Eathenny, was the son of this Vivian. The great Sir John de Courcy had a brother,

proved ineffectual, and followers of De Courcy, and held out great rewards to them for betraying him. To this
the following they agreed, and gave De Lacy that De Courcy was a man of such information
:

into his hands. This having he next bribed the servants

Jordanus de Courcy, who was killed by his own people in the year 1197, as appears from the

Dublin copy of the Annals of Iimisfallen, and who was possibly the ancestor of the Mac Patricks of Kingsale

so well armed in gigantic strength, and always that no one man durst lay public and private,

and Eingrone.
to

The truth seems

be that the conqueror of

hands upon him. However, that upon Good but remains Friday yearly he wears no arms,
of Down alone, doing penance, in the church-yard
;

The archives Ulster went to England in 1205. of the Tower of London furnish us with the
mandate of King John to the Ulster knights, who had become sureties for their chief, directing them to cause
his service

that

if

De Lacy would have
Down,

readiness near

a troop of horse in he could, by their (the

him
to

by

a

term
;

Justice of Ireland
safe

to appear and perform be assigned by his Lord together with the King's

their master. betrayers') directions, apprehend De Courcy followed. These directions were

Courcy, and the names of the delivered on his part See Eotuli Lihostages terarum Patentium in Turri Londiiwnsi asser-

conduct to

De

was attacked unarmed seeing no other weapon at hand he ran to a wooden cross that stood in the churchyard, and, tearing its shaft from the
:

he dealt such powerful blows of it upon his enemies, that he killed thirteen of them upon
socket,

vati, an.

1201 ad. 1216, vol.

i.,

part

i.,

London,

the spot.
fettered,

He

was, however, finally overpowered,

1835.

Here we lose sight of Sir John de Courcy, conqueror of Ulster, as he is called, for we have no trustworthy records to prove what was his
ultimate
served

and delivered a prisoner into the hands of De Lacy, who conveyed him to London, where he was confined in the tower and condemned to

The Book of Howth, now prethe manuscripts in the Lambeth Library, P. 628, contains a detailed account, professing to be authentic, of his subsequent hisfate.

For this service King perpetual imprisonment. the Earldom of Ulster upon De John conferred
the betrayers Lacy, who, instead of rewarding caused them to be hanged. of De Courcy, In this condition would De Courcy have

among

tory, of

which the Editor

is

tempted to give

here a brief outline.

had it not been passed the remainder of his life, for some difference that arose between John,

Immediately after his defeat at Down,
offered the

De

Courcy Hugh de Lacy, which this cowardly lord refused, alleging that as he was the representative of the king in Ireto
land, it

combat

King of England, and Philip, King of France, about the right to some fort in Normandy, who,
to avoid the shedding of Christian blood, agreed

would be beneath

his dignity to enter

to put it to single combat. King Philip had in readiness a French knight of so great prowess

the

lists

with a rebellious subject.

De Lacy

and renown, that King John found no subject

1204.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Hugo de Lacy

141

the son of

into Tyrone, to seek the protection of the Kinel-

Owen. He arrived at Carrickfergus, and the English of Ulidia slew great numbers of his people.
At of his realm willing to encounter him. he was informed by one of his officers, length
was a mighty champion confined in the Tower of London, who would prove more than a match for the French knight. King John,
that there

The two

kings, disappointed in their antici-

pated pleasure of seeing a combat between mighty

De Courcy to give them some proof of his bodily strength. Complying with their request, he ordered a strong stake to
champions, intreated

right glad to hear this, sent to De Courcy, calling upon him to support the honour of England;

be driven firmly into the ground, on which were He then placed a coat of mail and a helmet.

and who,
vailed
for his

after repeated denials, is at last pre-

upon

to accept the challenge. to Ireland,

He

sends

own sword

which was a

drew his sword, and looking with a frowning and threatening aspect upon the kings, he cleft the helmet and coat of mail, and sent the weaso deeply into the wood, that no one but himself could draw it out. Then the kings

ponderous weapon, of exceeding good temper, and which he had often imbrued in the blood
of the

pon

men

of Ulster.

The rigours of

his im-

prisonment were softened, and his strength restored by proper nourishment and exercise.
appointed, the list provided, the scaffolds set up, the princes with
the place
is

asked him what he meant by looking so sternly at them, and he answered in a sullen tone, that

had he missed

his blow,

he would have cut

off

The day came,
their nobility

both their heads. His words were taken in good part, on account of the services he had performed.
as great gifts,

on each

side,

with thousands in

expectation. Forth comes the French champion, De gave a turn and rests him in his tent.

King John gave him his and restored him

liberty, as well

to his posses-

sions in Ulster.

He then
sea,

Courcy

is

sent for,

who

all this

while was truss-

coming

to Westchester,

England, and committed himself to
sailed to

ing of himself with strong points, and answered the messengers, that if any of them were invited to such a banquet they would make no great
haste.

the mercy of the
at his

by contrary winds, which
embarkation.

but was put back again rose upon a sudden
This he did for fifteen

Forth, at length, he comes, gave a turn,

and went into

his tent. When the trumpets sounded to battle the combatants came forth and viewed each other. De Courcy looked his

days successively, and upon every repulse he was admonished at night in a vision, that all his
for that
set foot

attempts to cross the sea to Ireland were vain, it was preordained that he should never

antagonist in the face with a wonderful stern

upon

Irish ground, because he

had grie-

countenance, and passed by. not liking his grim look,

The Frenchman,
sym-

gigantic size, and

metric proportions, stalked still along, and when the trumpets sounded the last De

drew out

charge, his ponderous sword, and the

Courcy French

by pulling and setting up the servant. collected that he had formerly translated tincathedral church of Down, which had been
ter

vously offended there

down the masDe Courcy re-

knight, being seized with a sudden panic, ran away, and fled into Spain ; whereupon the English

black

dedicated to the Holy Trinity, into an abbey of monks brought thither from Chester, and
that he had consecrated the same in honour of
St. Patrick. On being driven back the fifteenth time his visions had so powerfully wrought upon

sounded victory, clapped their hands, and

cast

up

their caps.

142

[1204.

Uilliam bupc Do inDpab connacc eicip chill

-|

cuaic

-]

|io

Diojhail Dia

na naoirh inDpn paip uaip po 65 Do galup longndr Do baD abnap Daipneir. TTluipcfpcach ua plaichbfpcaij cijeapna mpchaip connacc Do ecc.
his imagination, that he submitted to the decrees of heaven, passed sentence upon himself, returned to France, and there died about the year

truth by their additions, but were not entirely
inventors."

There can be
story about Sir

little

doubt, however, that this

1210.

John de Courcy was not invented
It is

b.

Dr. Leland observes (History of Ireland, v. i. L c. 6, p. 180), that those who reject the su-

by any
any

Irish bard, for it has not been found in

Irish manuscript in prose or verse.

perstitious addition, have yet adopted the ro-

mantic part of the narrative without scruple, though both evidently stand upon the same original authority. It
it
is

evidently a story got up in the fifteenth or sixteenth century, on the slender basis of an AngloIrish tradition,
ting,

and was

first

committed to wri-

quite certain, however, that

with other stories of a similar character, in
le-

stands upon no original authority, but is a mere story invented in the fifteenth or sixteenth
flatter the vanity of the Howth family, whose ancestor, Sir Armoric Tristeram, or St. Laurence, married De Courcy's sister,

that repertory of Anglo-Irish traditions and gends, the Book of Howth.

century to

A similar
districts of

story

is

told in the

mountainous

Kerry and Beare, and Bantry, about

and followed

his fortunes into Ireland.

Leland

much

Donnell O'Sullivan Beare, who fought with as valour and desperation in the reign of
Elizabeth, as Sir

adds, that this romantic part of the history of Sir John De Courcy was invented by Irish

John de Courcy did

in the

bards and romancers, and writes as follows " But it would not be worth while to detain the
:

reign of Henry II., and who was, perhaps, as But great a hero as Ireland ever produced. stories of this description are poetical inventions
of later ages, when tradition, through the want of written records, had fallen into that degree

reader by this romantic tale, merely for the sake of refuting it, if we did not conceive it to be a

specimen not unworthy of regard of the narrative of Irish bards and romancers, and the liberthey assumed of enlarging and embellishing the real incidents of their times. They who
ties

of obscurity which

left

romantic writers at full

liberty to raise as bright a fabric of fable as they pleased, on the slender basis of true history.

They

often,

no doubt, owe their origin

to vivid

lived in earlier, times are not so easily detected. But we see with what caution we are to receive

traditional reminiscences of the valour of noble

warriors, whose real characters, if described

by

their narratives,

when, in times

less

obscure,

writers

who could keep within
up

the bounds of

and when confronted by other evidence, this order of men have hazarded such bold fictions,
and with such ease and such success have obtruded the marvellous and the affecting upon
their unrefined hearers for real But as history. we find in these instances that the tales of the
Irish bards

nature and of truth, would afford abundance of
shining virtues to be held of posterity.
for the admiration

We
mate

sis states

have already seen that Giraldus Cambrenthat Sir John de Courcy had no legiti-

son.

According
Innisfallen,

to the

were founded upon

facts,

we may

Annals of

Dublin copy of the he was married in the

reasonably conclude that their predecessors took the same course : that they sophisticated the

year 1180 to [Affrica] the daughter of Godfred, King of the Isle of Man ; and she died in the year

1204.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
;

143

William Burke plundered Connaught, as well churches as territories but God and the saints took vengeance on him for that for he died of a singular
;

disease, too shameful to

be described.
died.

Murtough O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught,
1

193, having borne
1 1

no children up

to the

middle

of the year

86,

when

Giraldus's historical no-

Campion, who compiled his Historie of Ireland in 1571, asserts, that " Courcye dying without heires of his body, the Earldome of Vlster was entirely bestowed
tices of the Irish invaders end.

have alleged, in regaining his place in the royal favour, may be taken for granted from the fact that, though he left a son to inherit his possessions,

both the

title

and property of the earldom

of Ulster were, on his decease'' [qr. before his decease ?] " transferred to his rival, Hugh de

upon Hugh de Lacye, for his good service." See Dublin edition of 1809, p-100. But Dr. Smith, in his Natural and Civil History of Cork, states that,
notwithstanding what Giraldus Cambrensis asserts, in the second book of his History,
that

Lacy."

The

History of Ireland, vol. iii. p. 4. Patent Roll referred to by Dr. Smith men-

tions a Milo de Curcy, juvenis, son of

John de

"

Curcy, Junior, but contains not a word to shew who this John de Curcy, Jun., was, or about the

John de Courcey, Earl of
(Rot.
Pat. 6

Ulster,

had no
of

combat with the French champion.

On

the

issue, there is a record extant in the

Tower

London

Johan. M. Dors.), that

strength of the traditional story, however, the heads of the Mac Patricks, or De Courcy s of Cork,

Milo de Courcey, son of John de Courcey, was an hostage for his father upon his enlargement from the Tower to fight the French champion."
Vol.
is
ii.

have claimed and exercised the privilege of appearing covered in the royal presence. It may not be impertinent to remark, however, that no mention
is

pp. 228, 229, of the third edition.

It

made of

this privilege in the

works of
states

also stated in a Pedigree of the

Mac

Carthys,
in

Hanmer
that

or Campion.

The former merely

of

Loch Luigheach, now Corraun Lough,

Kerry,

now
Irish

Royal

preserved in the Library of the Academy, that this branch of the

King John gave De Coury, Earl of Ulster, " great gifts, and restored him to his former possessions in Ireland."
p.

Dublin edition of 1809,

Mac Carthys

descend from a daughter of Sir
fully into the question of the

368.

And

the latter writes in 1571,

"Lord

John de Courcy. Lodge enters
pp. 30-32,

legitimacy of the issue of

De Courcy

in vol. iv.

Coureye, a poore man, not very Irish, the ancient descent of the Courcyes planted in Ireland with the Conquest." Historie of Ireland, Dublin edition, 1809, p. 10.

edition of 1754,

and thinks that

wearing the hat in the royal presence is conclusive as to lawful issue but the antiquity of
;

Mr. Burke states, in his Peerage, but upon what
authority the Editor knows not, that Almericus, the twenty- third Lord Kingsale, in observance
of the ancient privilege of his house, appeared
in the presence of

the privilege has not been proved by documentary evidence sufficient to establish it to the satisfaction

of the historian.

Mr. Moore seems
legitimate son,

King William

III.

covered,

satisfied that

De Courcy had one

and explained to that monarch, when his Majesty expressed surprise at the circumstance, the

Milo, but agrees with Leland in doubting the story of Hanmer, and his legendary authority, the Book of Howth. He writes, " that he" [Sir John De Courcy] " did not succeed, as some

reason thus:

"Sire, my name is Courcy; I am Lord of Kingsale, in your Majesty's kingdom of Ireland and the reason of my appearing covered
;

144

[1205.

aois crcioso,
Cloip CpiopD, mile,

1205.

Da

ceD,
i

a

cuicc.

Ctn caipoeappoc

ua

leienni [ileinni]

Do 6ol

maincini,

-|

a ecc po ceDoip.

Oonair ua bfcDa eppcop ua namalgaba Do
in

ecc.

your Majesty's presence

is,

to assert the an-

of Ireland, but are said to have lost their prece-

cient privilege of

my

family, granted to Sir

John

de Courcy, Earl ofUlster, and his heirs, by JOHN, " The King King of England." Burke adds the privilege, and giving the Baron acknowledged
:

James lord Kinsale, having dency anno 1489. missed being at a solemn procession at Greenwich, King Henry VII. gave the title of Premier
to the lords of Athenry, who but this have ever since enjoyed the same It may be here remarked, fact is disputed."

Baron of Ireland

his

hand

to kiss, his Lordship paid his obeisance,

;

and continued covered."

The

oldest authority

the Editor has been able to find for this privilege is Smith's Natural and Civil History of Cork,
first

that as the

Barony of Athenry

is

now
late

extinct,

the
the

title

of Premier Baron of Ireland reverts to

by Smith

published in 1750, in which it is added, himself, but without citing any autho-

De

Courcys,

and that the

John de

Courcy, twenty-sixth Baron of Kinsale, exercised the ancient privilege of his ancestors on

rity whatever, to

Hanmer's account of Sir John

de Courcy's enlargement from prison to fight the He also adds " The priviFrench champion. of being covered in the royal presence is enlege
:

George the Fourth's William Burke
noise, as translated

visit to Ireland in

1821.

The Annals

of Clonmac-

by Connell, the son of Niall
the year 1627,
record the

joyed to this
John.

day by

his lordship, being granted

Mageoghegan,

in

to his great ancestor, the Earl of Ulster,

by King

death of William Burke at an. 1204, in the

On

the 13th of June, 1720, the late
his

Lord Gerald de Courcy was by

Grace the

Duke

of Grafton,
I.,

King George
kiss his hand,
lege.

His Majesty presented when he had the honour to
to
privi-

" William Burke took the following words of all the churches of Connaught, viz. spoyles of Clonvicknose, Clonfert, Milick, Killbyan, the
:
:

and to assert his ancient

churches of O'Fiaghragh, Twayme, Kill-Beneoine, Killmeoyne. Mayo of the English, Cownga
of St. Fechin,the abbey of Athedalaragh, Ailfynu, Uaran, Roscommon, with many other churches.

22nd of June, 1727, he was presented by the Lord Carteret to His Majesty George II., by whom he was graciously received, had the honour of kissing his hand,
and of being also covered in his presence." He " In then adds May, 1627, Sir Dominick
:

And

that on the

God and

the Patrons of these churches shewed

their miracles

upon him, that

his entrails

and

fundament

Sarsfield

was created Lord Viscount Kinsale, to the great prejudice of this ancient and noble
set

from his privie place, and it trailed after him even to the very earth, whereof he died impenitently without Shrive or Extream
fell

family, and

up

his

arms

in the town.

But,

Unction, or good buryall in any church in the kingdom, but in a waste town." Mageoghegan then adds the following remarks by
notation,

upon a

hearing before the Earl Marshal of he was obliged to renounce the title England,
fair

way

of an-

though he incorporates them with tho

of Kinsale, and take that of Kilmallock.
lords of Kinsale

The
barons

were formerly the

first

text: " These and

many

other reproachable words

1205.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

145

THE AGE OF CHKIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand

1205.

two hundred jive.

The Archbishop 0'Heney p
after.

retired into a monastery,

where he died soon

Donat O'Beacdha, Bishop of Tyrawley,

died.

my
I

was loath to

author layeth down in the old book, which translate, because they were ut-

debellator, rebellium blanditor

:

Indomitis dosuauissimus,

mitus,

domitis indomitus,
:

hosti
illi

worthy and noble a man as William Burke was, and left out other his reproachfull words, which he (as I
ter'd
for the disgrace of so

by him

subdito grauissimus
isti fidelis.

nee

formidabilis, nee

Vir dolosus, blandus, meticulosus,
curialiter ambitiosus

vir vino Veneriq; datus.

conceive) rather declear'd of an Evill will he did

cupidus,

&

Et quanquam auri non minus
:

bear towards the said William then" " any other just cause."

[i.

e.

than]

tamen curiam
Expugnata,

diligens quam curam."
ii.

Hibernia

lib.

cap. xvi.

This

is

the famous William Fitz
is

Adelm de

Duald Mac

Firbis, in his account of the

Eng-

Burgo, who

generally called the Conqueror of

Connaught.
effect

opposition to all the Irish authorities, is to
;

Mageoghegan's defence of him, in no
to reject

the pediof the Earl of Clanrickard, to defend the gree character of Fitz Adelm, by stating that Giraldus

lish families of Ireland, attempts, in

and should any one be inclined

the testimony of the Irish writers altogether, the following character given of him by his own

was prejudiced against him ; and it must be admitted, on comparing the character which
Giraldus gives of William Fitz Adelm with that
of Fitz Stephen, the uncle of Cambrensis, that there was more or less of prejudice in the way
:

countryman and contemporary, Giraldus Cambrensis, must have some weight in corroborating
their

veracity corpulentus, tarn staturse

:

" Erat autem Aldelmi

filius vir

but

still,

when
as

it is

considered that

De Burgo's

quam

facturse, inter

character,

drawn by Cambrensis, does not
it is

parum mediocribus maiores
dapsilis

satis

idonese

:

vir

much
nals

differ

from that given of him in the Anclearly unfair to

&

curialis.

Sed quicquid honoris cui-

quam
dolo,

impendit, semper in insidiis, semper in semper propinans sub melle venenum,

of Clonmacnoise, conclude that both are

false,

though

it

may be

allowed that both are overdrawn, as Giraldus

semper latens anguis in herba.
liberalis

Vir in

facie

&

lenis,

intus vero plus aloes

quam

was undoubtedly prejudiced, and as the Irish ecclesiastic, who compiled the Annals of Clonmacnoise, could not be expected to give an impartial account of an invader and conqueror,

mellis habens.

Semper

" Pelliculam veterem retinens, vir fronte politus,

Astutam vapido portans sub pectore vulpem. Semper

who had plundered
and
p

the church of Clonmacnoise

all

the most sacred churches, of Connaught.

Impia sub
'_'

dulci melle venena ferens.

The Archbishop O'Heney.

In the Annals of

Innisfallen,

at the year 1192,
to

he

is

called the

Molliti sermones eius super

sunt iacula.

sed ipsi Cuius hodie venerator, eras eius:

oleum

dem

spoliator existens, vel delator.

Imbcllium

of According he died in the Abbey Mary's Abbey, Dublin, of Ilolycross, in the county of Tipperary See

Pope's Legate.

the Annals

146

dNNata Rioghachca

einectNN.
-\

[1205.

Saoipbpecac ua DoipeD oipcinneac Domnaij moip,
oecc.

parpaicc ua mojpom,

pep na cpaoibe, cuip jaipa ecc lapom. cce6, 1 beobacca an cuaipapc Do juin Do poijic, -j TTlac ^uillbealaij uf cepbaill cijepna ele Do mapbaD la jallaib. Concobap ua bpaoin bpeajmame Do ecc ma ailicpe ccluain mic noip.
TTlajnup ua caccnn

mac cijepna

cianacca,

-|

i

Rajnall mac Diapmaca ciccfpna ctomne Diapmaca Do ecc. Oomnall mac concoiccpice caoipec muincipe Sepcacain Do Oomnall ua paolain njeapna na nDfipi murhan Do ecc.

ecc.

Ca&cc mac cacail cpoiboepcc Do ecc DO jalap en
noip.

oioce

i

ccluain mic

TTlaelip

mac

TTlaelip

Do Dul ap eccin ap luimneach,
pp. 469, a church
latter settled in

-|

cojab mop

Dfipji

Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops,

Magh

Elne, where they cer-

470.
q

tainly

were seated in the time of Sir John de
;

Donaghmore, t)othnac mop,

is

Courcy

for
1

it

near Castlefin,

in the county of Donegal,

of

the year

177, that

appears from these Annals, at Cumee O'Flynn was then in

which the O'Deerys were Erenaghs, according
to the Ulster Inquisitions.

possession of the ecclesiastical town of Annoy, called Airther Maighe, i. e. the eastern part of

Kianaghta, Cianacca, is the present barony of Keenaght, in the north-west of the county of

r

the plain, because
Eilne, into

it

was in the

east of

Magh

which the Firlee had been driven by

Londonderry.
tribe

It derives

its

name from the

the O'Kanes.
c

name of the family

of the O'Conors of

Toieer, cuip

The word cuip properly means
This passage
is

Glengevin, who descend from Cian (son of Olioll Olum, King of Munster), and who were chiefs
of
it,
s

prop or support.

rendered as

follows in the old translation of the Annals of

previous to the O'Kanes.

pip na cpaoiGe, i. e. the men of the bush or branch latinized Fircrivia by
Firnacreeva,
;

Ulster: "A. D. 1205. Manus O'Cahan, son to the King of Kienaght and men of Krive, the upholder of martiall feats, and stoutnes of the

This was the name of a tribe of O'Flaherty. the O'Kanes seated on the west side of the Bann. " fluvius inter Learn

North of Ireland, was slayne with the shot of
an arrow."

Bann,

et

Elliam"

[recte

Elniam] "prseter Clanbreasail regiouem scaturiens per
et

of O'Carroll, given

Neachum lacum Oendromensem agrum FIRCRIVIAM Scriniamque in comitatu DerriCulrania et cataracta

The son of Guill-bkealach In the pedigree by Duald Mac Firbis, he is called Finn mac Goill an bhealaigh, and is

u

made the twenty-fourth

in

descent from Eile

ensi, intersecat, et tertio a

Eascrive [eap cpaoiBe] lapide in oceanum transfundit."

This tribe of Ogygia, part iii. c. 3. the O'Kanes had some time previously driven the Firlee eastwards across the Bann ; and the

Eigdhearg, from whom O'CarrolPs country, in the now King's County, was called Eile, or See note under the year 1174, p. 15. Ely
*

now

'Brawney, bpeajvhame, an ancient territory, a barony in the county of Westmeath, ad-

1205.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

147

Saerbrehagh [Justin] O'Deery, Erenagh of Donaghmore", and Patrick O'Muron, died. Manus O'Kane, son of the Lord of Kianaghtar and Firnacreeva tower' of the valour and vigour of the North, was wounded by an arrow, and died of
5
,

the wound.

The

Conor O'Breen, of Brawney", died on his pilgrimage Randal Mac Dermot, Lord of Clandermot, died.
Donnell

son of Guill-bhealach" O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, was slain by the English. to Clonmacnoise.

Mac

Concogry, Chief of Muintir Searcachan, died.

Donnell O'Faelain (Phelan), Lord of the Desies of Munster*, died. Teige, the son of Cathal Crovderg, died of one night's sickness at Clonmacnoise.
y Meyler, the son of Meyler took possession of Limerick by force
, ;

on

ac-

joining Athlone and the Shannon.
*

Deisi

See Ussher's Primordia, pp. 782, 866,
O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part
iii.

Desies of Munster,
is still

Oeip

TTIutiian.

This

867

;

c.

69

;

and

name

preserved in the two baronies of

Desies, in the present county of Waterford,

but

Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 282. -The Deisi were originally seated near
Tara, in Meath, and their country there
called t)eir-e
is still

the ancient territory was much more extensive than the present baronies. Keating informs us

Geampac,

Anglice Deece barony.

(Reign of Cormac Mac Art) that the country of the southern Deisi extended from Lismore to

In O'Heerin's topographical poem it is stated that O'Bric and O'Faelain were the ancient
kings or head chiefs of the Desies, and that their
sub-chiefs were
as

Ceann Criadain, now Credan head, at the eastern extremity of the county of Waterford, and from the River Suir southwards to the sea ; and
that of the northern Deisi from the Suir to the

follows
;

:

O'Meara of Hy-

Fatha (now Offa barony) O'Neill of Hy-Owen Finn, O'Flanagan of Uachter Tire, Anglice Upperthird ; O'Breslen of Hy-Athele, as far as the sea to the south-east ; O'Keane of Hy-Foley,

southern boundary of Corca Eathrach, or the Plain of Cashel, comprising the present baronies
of Middlethird and Iffa and Offa East, in the south of the county of Tippcrary. The country of the northern Deisi was otherwise called Magh
Feinihin, which comprised, according to Keating, the baronies of Clonmel-third and Middle- third.

along the River Moghan O'Bric of Hy-Feathach, from Leac Logha (doc labpair ?) to Liathdruim, now Leitrim, on the boundary of the counties of Cork and Waterford.
;
1

y

Meyler

This passage

is

formed the see of St. Declan of Ardmore, which became united to that of Lismore, and is now comprised under its name.
districts

The two

Mageoghegan's

translation

given as follows in of the Annals of

These united

dioceses

extend northwards to

Clonmacnoise: "A. D.I 205. Meyler the younger, son of Meyler Bremyngham, besieged Limbrick, and at the last tooke the same per force, for

about midway between Cashel and Clonmel, and there also ended the country of the northern

which there arose great dissention between the English of Meath. In which dissention Cowley

u 2

JL*iO

dNNaca Rioxnacnuu eiuedrW.
*-*

[1206.
uf

eicip jallaib

na

TTliDe

-|

joill TTlaoilip cpiD pin,
pil

-]

cuulab rhac conmfoha

laeghacham caoipeach
piachach mic
neill.

Ronain Do rhapbaD ap an ccoccaD pn

la cenel

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip CpiopD,
Ooriinall
Trifle,

1206.
cTiecc,

Da

a

pe.

ua rnuipfohaij aipDpfpleijinn Doipe Do ecc. TTlaolpfccaip ua calmain corhapba cainDij cuip cpdbaiD

-|

eccna cuaip-

cipc

Gpeann Do

ecc.

Duine sfirhin, -] jiollapacpaicc ua plaicbfpcac ua plaicbfpcaij ppioip Do ecc. palaccaij aipchinDeac Duin cpuicne Do Denarii cpeac -| mapbca ccfp eo^am. Giccnfchdn ua oomnaill ccfnD Righ Sa^an Do cumjiD pochaip ceall, pacpaicc Do 6ol
i

Comapba

i

1 Do copaoiD

ap jallaibh Gpeann.
killed

Mac Convey O'Leygaghan was
of Kynaleaghe ; many other hurts done
themselves."
*
'

by those

he was Chief of Sileronan, with

Clonmacnoise, at the year 1207. But in later ages the name Kinel Fhiacha, or Kiueleaghe,

among the Englishmen

0' Laeghaghan.

This family was other-

was applied to Mageoghegan's country only, which comprised the present barony of MoyIt should be here remarked that the cashel.
country of Kinel-Fhiacha was never accounted a portion of Teffia, as asserted by some of our

wise called

Mac Conmeadha, now Mac Namee.
makes
O'Eonain
Chief of Cairbre
;

O'Dugan

Gabhra, which was in North Teffia

but whe-

modern

writers.

The men

of Teffia were the de-

ther O'Eonain and O'Laeghachain of Sil Eonain were the same, or of the same tribe, the Editor

scendants of Maine, the fourth son of King Niall
of the Nine Hostages, and their country was sometimes called Tir Maine. The families of Teffia

has not been able to determine, for the tribe

name of one family may agree with the surname
of another, and yet be very different. Nothing will determine those points but positive evidence of their localities, and of their exact pedigrees.
a

were the Foxes, orO'Caharny,who were originally
lords of all Teffia, but

were in latter ages seated in the barony of Kilcoursy (in the north-west of the present King's County), which bore their
tribe

name

of Muintir-Tagan

;

the Magawleys

Race ofFiacka, cmel piaca mic

neill,

i.

e.

This Fiagha the race of Fiagha, son of Niall. was the third son of Niall of the Nine Hostages,

of Calry an chala, comprising the parish of Balof lyloughloe in Westmeath ; the O'Breens

monarch of Ireland
century.

in the beginning of the fifth

Brawney the Mac Carghamhnas (anglicised Caron by O'Flaherty, and Mac Carrhon by
;

His descendants were the Mageogheand O'Molloys, whose country extended gaus from Birr to Killare, as we learn from an entry in Mageoghegaa's translation of the Annals of

Connell Mageoghegan,

but now always Mac
Maoiltsinna,

placed by O'Flaherty near the Shannon, in the territory of Cuircnia, now the barony of Kilkenny "West ;

Carroon)

of Muintir

1206.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

149

count of which a great war broke out between the English of Meath and the z English of Meyler, during which Cooley, the son of Cumee 0'Laeghaghan w-as
,

slain

by

the race of Fiacha", the son of Niall

[i.

e.

the Mageoghegans, &c.]

THE AGE OF CHRIST,

1206.
six.

The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred

Donnell O'Murray, Chief Lector at Deny, died". c Mulpeter O'Calman, Coarb of St. Canice and tower of the piety and wisdom of the north of Ireland* died.
, 1
,

Flaherty O'Flaherty, Prior of Dungiven', and Gillapatrick O'Falaghty, Eref nagh of Dun-crun died.
,

Egneghan O'Donnell took a

The

successor of
,

St.

churches of Irelandg

prey, and killed some persons in Tyrone. Patrick went to the King of England on behalf of the and to complain of the English of Ireland.
e

the O'Dalys of Corca Adam ; the O'Quins of Muintir Gilligan, in the present county of Longford
;

Dungiven, t)un

jjeirhin,

a village

in

the

and a few

others,

who

all

sunk into

insig-

barony of Keenaght, in the county of Londont)un geimin signifies the fortress of derry.
Geimhin. a man's name, but no historical account of his tribe or period has been discovered

nificance

and obscurity shortly after the English invasion See note under the year 1207.
b This passage is thus translated by Colgan " Domnaldus O'Muireduich Archiscolasticus seu
:

by the Editor.
f Dun-crun, Oun cpuirne, translated arx Cruthcenorum by Colgan in Trias Thaum., p. 181,

supremus
c

professor S. Theologies Dorensis

Ec-

Trias Thattm., p. 504. the patron saint of the barony of Keenaght, in the county of Londonderry, in
clesise obiit."

col. 2.

The name
is

St.

Canice

is

Duncroon, and

is now sometimes anglicised a townland in the parish of

which the chief church seems
Drumachose.
d

to

be that of

Ardmagilligan, in the county of Londonderry. There was a church erected here by St. Patrick,

and a shrine finished

for St.

Columbkille by the

North of Ireland. The coarb of St. Canice, in the north of Ireland, was the abbot of Tennon-

celebrated brazier, Conla
St. Patrick, lib.
ii. c.

See Tripartite Life of
;

125
i.

and O'Donnell's Life
99.

kenny,

in the territory of Kienaghta,

now

the

of St. Columbkille,
son's

lib.

c.

See also Samp-

barony of Keenaght, in the county of Londonderry, of which territory St. Canice was a native

Map of Londonderry, p. 487, and the note given above under the year 1203.
8 On behalf of the churches of Ireland, pocup cenll n-6pean The Primate went to England

Memoir

of a

and the principal patron. The Annals of Ulster give a quotation from an ancient poem on the
high character of this
uian.
ecclesiastic,

and the old

to request that the

King would compel the Engrestore their lands and
It

translator anglicises his

name Mael-Peter O'Cal-

lish chiefs in Ireland to

other liberties to the Irish churches.

appears

150

[1206.

Comalcac, mac concobaip, mic biapmara roic caibj njeapna rhaije cloinne maolpuanaib Do ecc. luipcc i aipcigh, 1 na haicibecra en bpanan Cpeac la heccnecdn ua nbomnaill in uib papannain, hi cclomn oiap-|

mara.

Ro abhpac bu
uf popanndin
-\ -\

lomDa,
uf

-]

po mapbhpacc

Daoine.

Ruccpac

uf Diap-

macca,
cap.

pocaibe fcoppa,
TJuaibpi ua

gaipmlfohaij oppa. Ro mapbab, -] po bdibfb puccpac cenel cconaill an ccpeich po bfoib lap moppaoecc.
-\

ga&pa ciccepna Slebe tuja Do
uf ceatlaij

QoDh mac mupchaba

ciccfpna ua maine,

cairnmb ua cairla peapaib

nia6 cijeapna loppaip Do ecc. Cto6 ua joipmjiallaij ciccfpna papcpaije cfpa Do
cfpa.

mapbab

ua cojDa caoipeac na bpeocha la hua narhaljaib Do ecc. lorhap mac mupchaib cdc Dfob Do mapbab ^illibepc ua plannaccdin,
T?uai6pi
-]

apoile ip pop comdin.
from charters in the Book of Kells, now in the
Library of Trinity College, Dublin, that the

name

of

Mac Dermot's Rock, which

it

retains to

this day.

See Memoirs of the Life and Writings
'Conor of Belanagare, p. 305.
4"c

word pocup means advantage,

benefit,

or freedom.

of Charles
'

It is in this sense the opposite of oocap.

Moylurg, Airtech,

Mac Dermot,

or,

as

In Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops (under Eugene Mac Gillivider, p. 64), he gives the fol-

the family were more anciently called, O'Mulrony, was Chief of Moylurg, Airteach, and Tirtuathail, all included in the old
k

lowing translation of this passage from what he calls anonymous Annals " The comarb of
:

Patrick (Eghdon Mac Gilluys), went to the King of England's house, for the good of the

barony of Boyle. Clann-Dermot, clann tDiapmaOa, i. e. the O'Carellans. These, as well as the O'Forannans

churches of Ireland, and to complain of the GALLS (i. e. the English) of Ireland." Harris
took this extract from the old English translation of the Annals of Ulster, preserved in the
British
tation,

and O'Gormlys, were of the Kinel-Owen race, and were at this period seated on both sides of
the Eiver Mourne, and of the arm, or narrow The O'Donnells afterpart, of Lough Foyle.

Museum, which contains the above quoword for word See note under the year
In the Annals of

wards drove them out of the plain of Magh Ithe, and established families of the Kinel-Connell in
their place.
1

1216.

Slialh Lugha.

The name

of this territory

caippjje, i. e. of the Charles O'Conor of Belanagare states in one of his manuscripts, that he built the castle
rock.

Tumaltagh, comalcac Kilronan he is styled na

h

is still

its

well known in the county of Mayo, and limits pointed out. It comprises the parishes

of Kilkelly, Kilmovee, Killeagh, Kilcolman, and Castlemore-Costello, in the south-east of the

and chief
of

seat of the family

on one of the islands

county of Mayo, that

Lough Key, and that this seat obtained the

is, that part of the barony of Costello included in the diocese of Achonry.

1206.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

151

Tomaltagh", the son of Conor, son of Dennot, who was the son of Teige, Lord of Moylurg, Airtech, and Aicidheacht' and chief hero of the Clann1

,

Mulrony, died.

Egneghan O'Donnell plundered Hy-Farannan and Clann-Dermot he took many cows, and killed persons. He was overtaken by the Hy-Dermot, the
;

k

O'Farannans, and the O'Gormleys; and a struggle ensued, in which many were killed and drowned on both sides but the Kinel-Connell ultimately bore off
;

the prey, after

much

labour.
1 ,

Rory O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha died. Hugh, the son of Murrough O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, and Caithniadh m O'Caithniadh, Lord of Erris died. Hugh O'Goirmghialla, Lord of Partry" in Carra, was slain by the men of
,

Carra.

Rory O'Toghda, Chief of Bredagh in Hy-Awley [Tirawley], died Gilbert O'Flanagan and Ivor Mac Murrough slew each other at Roscom-

According to Downing, in his brief, but curious and valuable account of the county of Mayo, the
country of the Galengi,
i.

in which there

is

a range of mountains

still

called Slieve Partry;

but

it

would appear, from

e.

the O'Haras and

O'Garas, comprised the entire of the diocese of Achonry. The O'Garas were afterwards driven

the writings of the Mac Firbises of Lecan, that the territory of Partraighe extended originally See into the present parish of Ballintober
Tribes, Genealogies,

out of Sliabh Lugha by the family of Costello, and in later ages were possessed of the territory
of Coolavin only, in which they had their chief castle at Moy-O'Gara, near the margin of Lough

and Customs ofthe Hy-Fiachp. 189,
is

rach, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society note'. The in note k and

1844, p. 152,

,

family name, O'Goirmghialla,
Irish

now

called in

In an inquisition taken at Castlemore, on the 14th of July, 1607, this name is anglicised
Gara.

O'^opmpuil, which is anglicised Gormilly, Gormly, and even Gorman, which latter is an
unpardonable corruption. See Tribes,
b
.

Slewlowe.
Erris, loppup, an extensive and remarkably wild barony in the north-west of the county of

Sfc.

of

m

Hy-Fiachrach, pp. 47, 187, 202, note

Of Bredagh, na bpeocha.
which contained

^This territory

Mayo.
extinct,
n

The family of O'Caithniadh are now or the name changed, in this barony.

fifteen ballys, or sixty quarters

This name is still well Partry, papcpcuje known in the county of Mayo, as a territory forming the western portion of the barony of
Ceara, and

of land, of the large old Irish measure, comprised the parish of Moygawnagh, in the west of the a part of the adjoining parish of Kilfian.
Genealogies,
Tribes,

barony of Tirawley, in the county of Mayo, and See

now

believed to be coextensive with

and Customs of Hy-Fiach-

the parish

which

is

of Ballyovey, or Odhbha Ceara, locally called the parish of Partry, and

rach, pp. 10, 11, 165, 228.
P

^
Comani,

TJop chomctm,

i.

e.

Bosciis Sancti

152

aNNCtta Rioghachca

eiraectNN.

[1207.

TTluipcfpcac mac cappjamna eaoipec muincipe maoilcpionna SloiccheaD la mac huso t>e laci co ngallaib mi6e -\ laijean
nocc.

Do
i

ecc.

rcelac
fiDipfba

l?o loipcceD cealla,
uf neill

-]

apb'anna laip,

-\

ni

puce geill

ndm

aoohae

Don chup pin. Sloiccheao lap an luce cceDna
uile,
~]

i

cciannacraib.

T?o loipccpfcr cealla

ciannacca

puccpac buap oipfmhe.

QO1S CR1OSD,
Ctoip CpiopD, mile,

1207.

Da ceD, a peachc.

bu.

Cpeach la heiccnfchan ua noomnaill a bpfpaibh manach 50 po jabhpac Ruccpac pip manach poiplion poppa, i po mapbpac Ua t>omnaill cij]

eapna ripe Conaill, cuip fnsnarha, eimj an CUICCID ina pfirhfp, copcpaccap Iciac na huaiple Do pocpacrap mailli ppippoponj DO paopclannaib ele
~\
i

ann, an jiolla piabac mac ceallaij

uf baoijill,

DonnchaD conallac mac
-\

TTlacjamain mac Domnaill miDij ui concobaip laochpaio lomoa cenmocar. Dorhnall mac pfpjail uf puaipc ciccfpna upmoip bpeipne Do ecc. Qrhlaib ua pepjail raoipec TTluipfDhac mac Ruaiopi uf Concobaip,
concobaip maonmaiji,
"]
-]

muincipe hQnjaile Do ecc.

Oiapmair ua maoajdm cijeapna pfl nanmclia&a Do ecc. Uaippi Ruai&pi ui concobaip Rf Connacc Do cabaipc a calmain,
ccup
now
hi

-|

a

pccpfn cloice.
noise record the death of the abbot Cahal
lone, a

the

to the county.

town of Roscorumon, which gives name St. Coman's well, called OaBac
is still

O'Ma-

man

of great riches

and learning.

They

Cliomam,

in existence, in

and

lies in

a field

also contain the following passage relative to the

to the east of the town,

the townland of

Ballypheasant.
q

town of Ballyloughloe, near Athlone, in the county of Westnieath, of which town the Four
" A. I). Masters have collected no early notice. 1206. The sons of Art O'Melaghlyu preyed the

translation of the

These two passages are rendered, in the old Annals of Ulster, as follows
:

"A. D.

1206.

An army

by Hugh de Lacy

to

town of

Balleloghloe,

and burnt part thereof?

Tule Og, and burned Churches and Corne, but caried neither pledg nor hostage with them for

were overtaken by Melaghlyn Begg O'Melaghlyn, Sile Crowherf'rey Mac Carrhon, and certain

An army by de Lacy in Kyanaght, burnt many churches, and tooke many cowes." r Under this year the Annals of Clonmacthat tyme.

English forces, where in pursuite that rowte of Meathmen were discomfitted and putt
killed Mortagh, or

to flight,

Morrogh, son of

1207-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

153

Murtough Mac Carroon, Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-Sionna, died. An army was led by the son of Hugo de Lacy, and the English of Meath and Leinster, into Tullaghoge (in Tyrone), and burned churches and corn, but
obtained neither hostages nor pledges of submission from
occasion.

Hugh

O'Neill on this

The same people

led another

army

q

into Kienaghta,

and burned

all
r
.

the

churches of that territory, besides driving off a countless number of cows

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one thousand

1207.

two hundred seven.

Egneghan O'Donnell set out upon a predatory excursion into Fermanagh, and seized upon cows but a considerable muster of the men of Fermanagh pursued him, and slew O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, tower of the warlike
;

prowess and hospitality of the province in his time and some others of his The following were the nobles who fell nobility were slain along with him.
;

on

this occasion:

the son of

Gillareagh, the son of Kellagh O'Boyle; Donough Conallagh, Conor Moinmoy ; and Mahon, the son of Donnell Midheach (i. e.

the Meathian) O'Conor.

Many

other heroes

fell

besides these

8
.

Donnell, the son of Farrell O'Rourke,
died.

Lord of the

greater part of Breifny,

Murray, the son of Roderic O'Conor, and Auliffe O'Farrell, Chief of Annaly,
died.

Dermot O'Madden, Lord of Sfl-Anmchadha, died. The remains of Roderic O'Conor, King of Connaught, were
deposited in a stone shrine.
Melaghlyn Begg, Mortagli mac Donnagh Koyle, and also Morrogh mac Morrogh O'Kelly was
taken."

disinterred,

and

O'Donnell in Fermanagh ; but the men of Fermanagh overtook him with a more numerous
host than he had, and slew O'Donnell, King of Tirconnell, till then the tower of valour, hospitality,

They

also record the death of Eobert, son of

Hugh
s

Delacie,

under the same

year.

and bravery of the north of Ireland.
fell, viz.,

This passage is better given in the Annals of Kilronan. The literal translation
is

Besides these

Some

of his chieftains also

Gillareagh,

as follows

:

son of Kellagh O'Boyle ; Mahon, son of Donnell, the Meathian O'Conor; Donough Conallagh, the
son of Conor

"A.

D. 1207-

A prey was taken by Egneghan

Moinmoy O'Conor,

et alii

multi

154

[1207.

Carol cpoibbfpcc 6 Concobaip Rf Connacc Do lonnapbab Qo&a uf plaica cpioch Do cabaipc Dia mac pfm oCXob mac cacail. beapcaijj Coccab mop eicop gallaib laijjean pfin eicnp TTlaoilip Sepppaij;
~\

.1.

-\

mapep,

-\

Uilliam mapupccal gup milleab laigm,
~\

]

pip

muman

froppa.

Coccab mop popeicnp hugo De Ian
TTlhaoilip.

maoilip, 50 po milleab uile muineip

Cpfch mo]i la cacal cappac mac biapmaca mic raiDj, ap copbmac mac comalcaij mic biapmara, ap ua pploinn Gappa, co puccpac Dpem Do Con-|

naccaibh paip

.1.

Diapmaic mac TTlajnupa mic TTluipcfpcaij
o hfjpa

uf concobaip,
-|

~|

copbmac mac comalcaij, Concobap 500
ua Duboa cijeapna ua namalja&a, ai& 50 po muioh pop cacal cappac,
po mapbab muipjfp a mac,
ele.
-|
~\

njTpna

luighne,

Donnchab

-j

ua ppiachpac 50 po 50 po jabaD e pfin,
uf

cliuippioc cliach~\

TTlac

Chonjpanna

50 po Dallab, ~\ plannaccam co pocaiDib

Cpeach mop
nobiles, et ignobiles,

la TTIaoilip occ,

-\

la TTluipcfpcac

ua mbpiain,

-\

la coipp-

of

Mac
c

Malion, the

cum eis occisi sunt. The son men of Fermanagh, and the
and William Maresckal
called Geffry de Marisco,

strife between Meyler and Hugh Delacie, that between the said partys the land of Foharties

Oriels victores fuerunt."
Geoffrey, Mares,

was wasted, preyed, and destroyed." v Cathal. This passage is given more
as follows:

fully in
1

The former is generally
or

the Annals of Kilronan, but under the year

208,

De

Mariscis,

by English

writers.

See Han-

"A.

D. 1208. Cathal, son of Der-

mer's Chronicle, Dublin Edit, of 1809, pp. 382He was made Gustos or Governor of Ire385.

mot, son of Teige O'Mulrony, King of Moylurg, was taken prisoner by Cathal Crovderg in violation of the guarantee of the bishops
securities

land in 1216, and Lord Justice in 1226.
Harris's Ware, vol.
ii.

See

who were

p. 103.

William Mares-

chal, or Marshal, was Earl of Pembroke, and

between them, namely, Ardgal O'ConHe nor, Murray O'Duffy, Clement O'Sneyey.
was, however, set at liberty, through the guarantee of those bishops, without giving a hostage or After this he went out of the country pledge.

Prince of Leinster in Ireland, in right of his wife, the granddaughter of Dermot Mac Mur-

rough
u

See Hanmer's Chronicle, Dublin Edit,
et

of 1809, p. 343,

sequen.

These passages are thus given in the Annals

and took a great prey, which he drove on as week afterwards he as Lough Macnean.

far

A

set

of Clonmacnoise, as translated

by Mageoghegan

:

"A. D.

1207. There arose great warrs in Lynster between the Englishmen there, viz', between

out on a predatory excursion into Tir-Oiliolla into the Cur[Tirerrill], and drove off a prey
lieus,

Meyler and GefFry March, and also William Mareschall, which soone brought all Lynster and

great force overtook

and over the Curlieus into Moylurg. A him here, namely, Dermot,

Munster to utter destruction.
" There arose also the like contention and

son of Manus, son of Turlough O'Conor; Manus, son of Murtough, son of Turlough O'Conor ;

Cormac, son of Tomaltagh of the Rock

;

Murray,

1207..]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Hugh

155
O'Flaherty,

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, expelled and gave his territory to his own son, Hugh O'Conor.

A great war broke out among the English of Leinster;
Geoffrey, Mares, and William Mareschal verely from them.
1
.

i. e. between Meyler, Leinster and Munster suffered se-

Another great war broke out between Hugo de Lacy and Meyler result was, that nearly all Meyler' s people were ruined".

;

and the

CathaF Carragh, son of Dermot, who was son of Teige [O'Mulrony], took a great prey from Cormac, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, and O'Flynn of the Cataract", but was overtaken by some of the Connacians, namely, Dermot, son

who was son of Murtough* O'Conor; Cormac, son of Tomaltagh; Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny; and Donough O'Dowda, Lord of Tirawley and Tireragh and a battle ensued, in which Cathal Carragh was defeated.
of Manus,
;

He was

taken prisoner, and blinded

;

and

his son, Maurice,

with the son of

Cugranna O'Flanagan, and many others, were killed (in the battle). Meyler Oge, Murtough O'Brien, and Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor,
son of Tomaltagh of the Eock ; Donslevy, son of O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha; Flaherty Eory O'Flanagan, Chief of Clann Cahill ; and Gilla.This was the name of a small cataract, now nearly removed by the wearing down of the

sylyn

na-nech
Sinna.

O'Monahan, King of Hy-Briuin na When his Breifnian archers perceived

rock, on the Eiver Boyle, about one mile to the west of the town of Boyle. There was an ancient

church on the north side of the
this cataract, originally called
i.e. St.
i.e.

river, opposite

that they were overtaken by this great force, fled as soon as had crossed Lee Dathey they

Dachonna's cataract,

Gap tDachonna, and Gap mic n-eipc,
;

mhaighe, and Mac Dermot, being

left

accompanied

the cataract of the son of Ere, that being the

by his own followers only, he was rushed upon, and his son Maurice, and many others of his
slain, and he was himself at length taken prisoner, and his people routed. When this great force had dispersed, the counsel which the sons of Tomaltagh of the Eock adopted was, to put out Mac Dermot's eyes, and this was ac-

saint's

patronymic name, from his father Ere
later ages,

but in

Gap Ui phlomn,

O'Flynn's

people,

were

cataract, from the family of O'Flynn, who were the hereditary Erenaghs, or wardens, of the church, and the comharbas of St. Dachonna

See note under the year 1209-

cordingly done."

Dermot, son of Manus, who was son of MurThis Murtough O'Conor was the celetough
brated Muircheartach Muimhneach, or the Mo-

*

Under

this year the

Annals of Ulster and

of Kilronan record a battle between the son of

monian, the eleventh son of Turlough More
O'Conor, monarch of Ireland, and the ancestor
of that

Eandal Mac Sorley and the men of Skye [Sciadh], in which a countless multitude were slaughtered. w Of the Cataract, i. e. of Gap ui plainn, or As-

warlike clan of the O'Conors, called

Clann-Mu ircheartaigh.

x2

156

[1208.
uf

Dealbac mac Ruampi
cuicc baile Decc.

Concobaip

i

cci'p

piacpac aiDne co po aipccpioc
uf

Cacal mac
ecc.

T?uai6pi

mac an cpormaij

carapnaij njeapra rfcba Do

SluaiccheaD la macaib Tlugo De taci, 1 ta gallaib mibe 50 caiplen ara an upcaip 50 pabarcup peccmain pop mip ace popbaip paip 50 po paccbab

an caiplen

leo,

-\

cpioca ceo pfpcceall,

-]

50 hionnapbab Hlaoilip ap
1208.

in rfp.

QO18 CttlOSO,
Cloip CpiopO, mite,

Da ceo a hochc.

OauiO bpfcnac eppcop puipc Laip^e Do mapbaoh la hUa bpaolam Dona
Deipibh.
Fifteen baMys, cuicc baile o^cc. bally this period, the thirtieth part of a triocha ced, or barony.
y

A

was at
z

whose descendants

of Meath, and among quently, called Tir-Maine it was afterwards subdivided

into petty territories, the lords of

which were

Teffia,

ceacba

This was anciently a large

territory, comprising, according to several ancient

tributary to the archchief, as the representative of

who was

looked upon Maine, though not

and Anglo-Irish authorities, about the western half of the present county of Westmeath. It appears from various ancient authoIrish
rities that it
1.

always of the senior branch of his descendants.

North

Teffia

the River Eithne,

was divided from South Teffia by now the Inny, and was granted

comprised the following baronies
;

:

in the fourth century to Carbry, the brother of

The barony of Rathconrath

2.

That part of

the barony of Magheradernon, lying to the west of the River Brosnagh, and of the lakes of Lough

This territory is frequently called Cairbre Gabhra in the old Irish authorities, but for
Maine.

many
North
rells,

Oul and Lough Ennell ;

3.

now Kilkenny West
5.

;

4.

The barony of Cuircne, The barony of Brawney

centuries before the English invasion, Teffia was the principality of the O'Farit

;

who gave
Teffia

their tribe

name

of Anghaile,

Clonlonan (into which the O'Melaghlins were afterwards driven), with that part of it which

or South Conmaicne.

South

was subdivided into the follow:

was added to the King's County, by the procurement of the celebrated Terence Coghlan and 6.
;

1. Breaghing lordships or chieftainries, viz. mhaine, now Brawney, the lordship of O'Breen ;

The barony of Kilcoursey

in the King's County. See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 85, where it is stated that the lands assigned to the Tuites, and Daltons were in Teffia. Petits,

Machaire Chuircne, which was originally the lordship of O'Tolairg, but was in the possession of the Dillons from the period of the Anglo-Nor2.

man

invasion

till

the seventeenth century;

3.

In the fourth century the southern half of this territory of Teffia was granted by the Mo-

Calry-an-chala, and sometimes Calry-Teaffa, the lordship of Magawly, now the parish of Bally-

narch Niall of the Nine Hostages, to his son Maine, from whom it is sometimes, but not fre-

loughloe; Muintir Tadhgain, the lordship of the Fox, or O'Caharny, now the barony of Kil-

1208.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
a predatory incursion into Tir-Fachrach Aidhne,
y

157
fifteen

made
ballys

and plundered

(townlands). Cathal, son of Kory,
Teffia
z
,

who was

son of the Sinnagh (the Fox) O'Caharny,
the English of

Lord of

died.

The

sons of

Hugo de Lacy and

Meath inarched

to the castle

of Athnurcher [now Ardnurcher], and continued to besiege it for five weeks, when it was surrendered to them, as was also the territory of Fircal"; and Meyler
5 was banished from the country
.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1208.

.

thousand two hundred

eight.

David Breathnach (Walsh), Bishop of Waterford
the Desies.

,

was

slain

by O'Faelan of

coursey, in the King's County; 5. Corca Adaim, or Corca Adam, now in all probability the barony of Magheradernon.
Fircal, peapa Ceall, was, as already shewn, a territory in the south of ancient Meath, comprising the present baronies of Ballycowen, Bala

O'Connor of Connought" [who] "slewe many of the inhabitants, and after taking away all the cowes, sheep, harnesses, and other things therein,
they burnt the town. " The Castle of Kinnetty, the Castle of Byrre, and the Castle of Lothra, were broken downe

lyboy, and Fircall, or

Eglish, in

the

King's

and

quite

destroyed

by the

said

Mortagh

County.
b

O'Bryen."
this year the

Under

Annals of Clonmacnoise

Under

this year, also, the

Dublin copy of the
the churches of

have the following entries, altogether omitted by the Pour Masters:

Annals of Innisfallen

state, that

"A.

D. 1207.

The English

of

Meath and

[Tedavnet], Kilmurrigan, and Clones" [in Ulster], " were burned by Hugo de
Lacy.

Tigh Damhnad

Lynster, with their forces, went to Killaloe to

build a castle, near the

Borowe [6eal 6opuma],

and were frustrated of their purpose, did neither castle nor other thing worthy of memory, but lost some men and horses in their journey, and
so returned to their houses back again.

Port Lairge is Waterford, Pope Icnrije. the present Irish name of the city of Waterford. * See note under the year 1174, p. 18. Neither

c

Ware nor

as a bishop

Harris has any notice of this David See Harris's edition of Ware's

"Moriertagh mac Bryen an Tleyve besieged
the castle of Byrre, and at last burnt the whole

town.
"

of Bedford, Bishops, under O'Heda, and Robert His name does not occur in any 551, 552. pp. of the Irish annals known to the Editor, except

The

castle of

Athroynny,

in Lease [Bally-

Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, in which his death
lows: "
is

County], was spoyled altogether by the said Mortagh and the sons of
roane,

in the Queen's

noticed as fol-

A.D. 1207. David Breathnagh, Bushopp

158

ctNNata rcioshactiea emeaNN.
/

[1208.

Rucc ua bomnaill Cpeachploiccheab la hdobh Ua neill ninip Gojain. bomnall mop cona pocpairce paip, Ro cuipfb cainojijail fcoppa in po mac mapbab ap bfpimhe ap jach lee. Uopcaip ip in maibm pin bomnall mupchaba, ap abbal bo cenel Gojain imaille ppipp. Uopcpacrap pppiocan rhabma Cacbapp o bomnaill, pfpjal ua baoijill.Copbmac Ua bomi

.1.

i

-]

juin

naill,

bauib ua bocapcaij, i bpfm bo rhaicib cenel cconaill cenmocdce. T?o ppaomeab po bfoib cpe nfpc lommbualca pop cenel neojhain. Sluaiccheab la hUa nborhnaill (Ooriinall mop) pop cenel neojain, pop
-]

Qob ua
eicnp
i

neill

Ua

bpaijbib an cipe gup pnabmab p'bh 50 puce pop cpfcaib Ua neill, po naibmpoc a ccapacrpabli ppiapoile nborhnaill
-]
)

"]

nacchaib gall

-\

gaoibeal no cuippeab ina naghaib.

Duibmnpi mag afnjupa ciccfpna clomnehQoba ua neachbac bo mapb'ab la mac buinnp^eibe ui Gochaba. pmjin mac biapmaca mic copbmaic rhej cdpcaij bo mapbab la a
bpaicpib pfipin.

Ualjapcc ua puaipc bo cop a ngfpnap pfp mbpeipne, naill mic pepjail bo jabail a lonaib a hucc gall.
lohannep epipcopup nopbup bo cop bo Rij Sa^an
-\
i

-\

Qpc mac

borh-

nGpinn bia bfic ina lupcip innre, Sa^oin bfpcoiccionnucchab la comapba pfccaip pobaij an eppcoip bo cop cum coccab i nepinn, 50 mbdcrap Sa^ain jan aipppionn jan baiprrfb jan ongab, jan abnacal inacecca ppi pe cpf mbliabhan.
of Waterford, was killed
Desies."

by O'Foylan of the
is

gennis of only a portion of

it

called

Claim

Ereathnach, as a family name,

now

Aedha.
E

always anglicised Walsh. Waterford was made an episcopal see in 1096, and united to the see of

common

This name, which is very Fineen, pm^in in the family of Mac Carthy, signifies

Lismore in 1363.

533
d

See Harris's Ware, vol. i. p. and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, voL iv. pp. 15, 16, 45.
;

the fair offspring. It is Latinized Florentius by O'Sullevan Beare, throughout his History of the Irish Catholics, and now always anglicised Florence.

David CPDoherty

He
now

is

the ancestor of the

The name Finnen

is

translated Albinus
p.

family of
c

Mac

Devitt,

so

numerous

in the

by Colgan.
note
3.
h

See his Acta Sanctorum,

353,

barony of Inishowen.
Duvinnsi, ouibmnp.

This name

signifies

the black, or black-haired man, of the island.
r

This name, which was Ualgarg, ualjapcc common among the family of O'Kourke, very
is

Iveagk,

Ui Gacoach

The name

of

two

baronies in the county of Down. At this time O'Haughey was Chief of all Iveagh, and Ma-

now obsolete, name of a man

as the Christian or baptismal
;

but

is

preserved in the

fa-

mily of Magoalric, a collateral branch of the

1208.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

159

prey was taken by Hugh O'Neill in Inishowen. O'Donnell (Donnell More) overtook him with his forces and a battle was fought between them, in which countless numbers were slaughtered on both sides. In this battle
;

A

fell

number of the Kinel-Owen with him. In the heat of this conflict fell also Caffar O'Donnell, Farrell O'Boyle, Cormac The O'Donnell, David O'Doherty", and other chiefs of the Kinel-Connell.
Donnell
a great

Mac Murrough, and

Kinel-Connell were at length routed by dint of fighting.

An

army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More)

against

Hugh

O'Neill and

the Kinel-Owen; and he seized

A peace,
who

upon the spoils and hostages of the country. was afterwards concluded between O'Neill and O'Donnell, however,

entered into an alliance to assist each other against such of the English or Irish as should oppose them.

Duvinnsi Magennis, Lord of Clann-Aodha, in Iveagh f was
,

6

slain

by the son by
his

of Donslevy O'Haughy. Fineen s son of Dermot, son of
,

Cormac Mac Carthy, was

slain

own

brothers.

Ualgarg" O'Rourke was deprived of the lordship of Breifny and Art, son of Donnell, who was son of Farrell, assumed his place through the influence of
;

the English.

John, Bishop of Norwich', was sent by the King of England into Ireland as Lord Justice; and the English were excommunicated by the successor of
Peter for sending the Bishop to carry on war in Ireland; so that the English were without mass, baptism, extreme unction, or lawful interment, for a period of three years.
St.

O'Rourkes,
of Leitrim.

now very numerous
It
is

in the

county

wrote him a sharp

letter,

derived from ucnll, pride, and

his unjust proceedings,

upbraiding him with which caused His Holiin-

5 a r5>
1

fierce.

ness to lay the whole
terdict.

kingdom under an
stated
as

John, Bishop of Norwich, Johannes Episcopus Norbus. His name was John de Gray. He was

This event

is

follows

in

Mageoghegan's

translation

of the Annals
:

of

chosen by King John's recommendation to the archbishopric of Canterbury in 1205; but Pope
refused to confirm his election, and procured the election of Cardinal Stephen
III.

Clonmacnoise, under the year 1207 lish Bushop was sent over into this

"An Eng-

Innocent

Langton, an Englishman then at Rome, in his place, and consecrated him with his own hands,

land, by the King of England, to govern the land as Deputie thereof: he was Bushop of Norway [Norwich], and was Excommunicated by the Pope, together

The King, enraged

at this conduct of the Pope,

with all Englishmen in England, which Excommunication hung over them for the space of two

160
TTluipcfpcac

[1209.

mac oomnaill

ui

bpiain riccfpna

cuaDrhuman Do jabdil la

Donnchaib caipbpijj jallaib luimmgh cop papuccao cpi neppcop c|ie popdil

a Dfpbparap

pfin.

Do ecc. Oiapmaicc ua caomctm caoipec o cuaim Da bobap 50 jleoip Qmlaib ua Pocldin caoipec calpaije cuile cfpnacan Do mapbat) la hua
Tftopdin.

aois cr?ioso,
Qoip CpiopD,
mfle,

1209.
ceD, a naoi.

Da

Cele ua Dubcaigh eppcop TTlaije eo na Safari, jiollacpipc ua ceapnaij plaicbfpcach ua plainn corhapba Daconna eapa mic comopba conDepe,
-|

neipc DO

ecc.
p.

or three years, in so much that their churches did not use the Sacraments dureing the said space."

242, note

,

and map prefixed

to the

same

Hanmer

says that this
;

excommunication ex-

work. According to a tradition in the county of Sligo, Gleoir was the ancient name of the river

tended to Ireland also

but he should have

said,

now

called the Culleen or
its rise to

Leafony

river,

which

to the English in Ireland,
k

See his Chronicle,

Dublin Edition of 1809, pp. 373, 377.
This passage
is

the south of Tawnalaghta townin the parish of Kilglass, and barony of land,

takes

rendered as follows in Ma-

geoghegan's translation of the

Annals of Clon-

itself into

macnoise

:

"A. D.

1207. Mortagh

mac Donnell

and running northwards, empties the sea at Pollacheeny, in Cabrakeel townland. From the position of this river, and
Tireragh,

O'Bryen, prince of Thomond, was taken by the Englishmen of Lymbrick against the wills of
three Bushopps,

the old church of Toomore, or Toomour,
quite clear that the
least

it is

O'Caomhains possessed, or

at

by own brother Donnagh Carbreagh mac Donnell
O'Bryen."
1

the procurement of his

were the head

chiefs of all the territory of

CPKeevan,

ua caoriiam, now sometimes

Coolcarney, and the western portion of the barony of Tireragh, verging on the River Moy, near its mouth, and that their territory comprised the parishes of Toomore, Attymass, and Kilgarvan, in the county of Mayo, and the parish of Kilglass,
in the

anglicised Kavanagh, but totally different from the Kavanaghs of Leinster. The Connaught

Kavanaghs are yet numerous in the district here mentioned, but they have all dwindled
into peasants, or small farmers

county of

Sligo.

See

Map

prefixed to Tribes, Genealogies,

and Cus-

See Tribes,

Sfc.

ofHy-Fiachrach, pp. 109, 167, 248, 350.

m From Toomore
dhar
is

toms of Hy-Fiachrach, printed for the Irish Archreological.Society in 1844.
D O'RotUain, now pronounced by the Irish in the county of Sligo as if written O'Roithleain,

to

Gleoir.

Tuaim-da-bhoIt
is

now

anglicised Toomore.

the

name

of an old church and parish near the River Moy, in the barony of Gallen and county of Mayo See Tribes, $c. of Hy-Fiachrach,

and incorrectly anglicised Rowley.

more

analogically anglicised Rollin,
better.

It might be which would

sound

For the extent of the territory

printed for the Archaeological Society in 1844,

of this tribe of the Calry, see note under Cool-

1209.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

161

Murtough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, was taken

pri-

soner by the English of Limerick, in violation of the guarantee of three bishops, and by order of his own brother, Donough Can-breach".

Dermot O'Keevan Lord of
1 ,

that tract of country

extending from Toomore

to Gleoir

m
,

died.

Auliffe O'Kothlain", Chief of Calry of Coolcarney,

was

slain

by O'Moran

.

THE AGE OF CHEIST,
The Age of
,

1209.
nine.

Christ, one

thousand two hundred

Kele 0'Duffy p Bishop of Mayo q of the Saxons; Gilchreest O'Kearney, Coarb 5 (Bishop) of Connor"; and Flaherty O'Flynn, Coarb of Dachonna of Eas-mic
n-Eirc [Assylyn], died.
carney, at the year 1225

See also Tribes, $c.,

of Mayo was annexed to

Tuam

in 1559,
last

and that

of Hy-Fiaehrach, printed for the Irish Archseological Society in 1844, pp. 167, 423.

Eugenius Mac Brehoan was the
Mayo.

Bishop of
c. 1 ;

See also O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part i.
;

O'Moran

He had

his seat at Ardnarea,

on

Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops, p. 602

and

the east side of the Eiver Moy, at Ballina-Tirawley, and his territory extended thence to

Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, voL
iii.

p. 79-

Toomore
P

See Tribes, Genealogies, and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, pp. 167, 245.
Kele

O'DuJfy.He

is

called Celestin,

or

Connor, conneipe, now a small town in the barony and county of Antrim. Until the year 1442 it was the head of a bishop's see, founded

r

Cele O'Dubhai, in Harris's edition of Ware's
Bishops, p. 602.
q

by Mac

Mayo, maj eo, translated by Colgan, campus quercuum, the plain of the oaks, though it more probably means plain of the yews. This which contained a monastery and a cathedral, was founded by St. Colman, an Irishplace,

See Nise, who died in the year 507 Colgan's Acta Sanctorum, p. 190 ; and Harris's Ware, vol. i. p. 218. It was united to the see

of

Down in the year 1442. In the old Irish Annals, and other documents, the Bishop of
Down
is

often called the Bishop of Uladh, or Dal

man, who had been bishop of Lindisfarne, in the north of England, and who, returning to his native country in the year 664, purchased from a chieftain part of an estate on which he erected the monastery of Maigeo, in which he placed about thirty English monks, whom he had taken with him from Lindisfarne, and

Araidhe, while the Bishop of Connor, is always called after his cathedral church. Immediately
before the English invasion, the territory of Dal Araidhe, comprising the diocese of Down, was

possessed
Firlee,

by Mac Donslevy, and Hy-Tuirtre and comprising the diocese of Connor, by O'Lynn See note , under the year 1174,
s

p. 13.

whom

he had

first

established on Inis

Bo Finne.

Dachonna.

In the Irish Calendar of the

Ussher states (Primordia,

p. 964) that the see

O'Clurys,

at the

8th of March, he

is

styled

162

[1209.

mic pfp&ail ui Puaipc njjeapna bpeipne Do mapBab la copbmac mac aipe uf maoilfcnlamn, -| la copbmac mac aipc uf puaipc, ual^apcc ua Ruaipc bo gab'ail ciccfpnaip ina biaibh. Oonnchab ua pfpjail ciccfpna na hanjaile Do ecc. T?i Sa^an Do cecc nepinn peace cceb long. Ip ann po abpac in ach-

Qpc mac

tioriinaill

-]

j

cliac.

baoi aehaib amnpein ace lejjab pccipi na

mapa be

lap

ccoppachcam
is

Mochonna Mao Eire, Abbot of Eas-mic nEirc, in the county of Eescommon ; and in the Feilire
Aenguis, at the same day, the place is distinctly called cap mic nGipc, i. e. the cataract of the
n6ipc, now Gap ui phlom, an old church about one mile to the west of the town of Boyle. Colgan,
sou of Eire,
i.

of the Annals of Ulster, the entry
as follows,

given briefly

ships

:

without mentioning the number of " A. D. 1209. The King of England came

to Ireland with a great navy." In the

Annals of

e.

of Dachonna.

6ap mic

Clonmacnoise,

as translated

the account of the acts
is

by Mageoghegan, of King John in Ireland

him Lanigan, confounds this with the great Abbey of Boyle. The Editor has adduced various evidences to shew that Eas mic n-Eirc
and
after

entered as follows under the year 1209"A. D. 1209. The King of England, with a

great

Company

of

men and

ships,

came into

Ireland,

and landed at Dublin, came from thence
Ardbreackan, in Meath,

not the great Abbey of Boyle, in a letter, describing the localities in the neighbourhood of Lough Key, written at Boyle, July 23, 1837,
is

to Tibreydultan, called

and now preserved at the Ordnance Survey In this he has proved Office, Phoenix Park. that 6ap tnic n6ipc was the ancient name of
the present Assylyn, and Qc DO laupj that of the great Abbey of Boyle, and that Gap mic

where Cahall Crovederg O'Connor came to the King's house, banished Walter Delacie out of Meath into England, whereupon the King and
to Carrickfergus,

O'Connor, with his Fleett, departed, and went and banished Hugh Delacie

nBipc was also often called Gup Dachonna, from St. Dachonna, otherwise Dlochonna mac
nGipc, the patron saint of the place. under the year 1463.
c

from out of Ulster into England. " O'Neal came then to the King of England's house and departed from him again, without

See note

O'Connor return'd to hostages or securitie his own house from thence [and] the King of
:

England lay
long.
pelled the

siege to Carrickffergus,
to leave the same,

and comand did

Seven hundred

ships,

peace

ccb

Warde

The Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster has " A. D. 1210. Ri the same number Sovran bo raioecc n-Gpmn co lonjaip oiapmioe .1. occ.
:
i

and put a strong ward of his own came to Rathwry, or from thence the King Rathgwayrie, [where] O'Connor came again
in the same,

long. The King of England came to Ireland with a great fleet, i. e. seven hundred ships." The exact number of ships brought by King John to Ireland is not stated in any other of

to the King's house and yealded
tages,

him four hos-

viz 1 . in

Lawyne

Connor God O'Hara, prince of Connought, Dermott mac Connor

O'Moyleronie, Ffyn O'Carmackan, chieftaine of

the Irish Annals.
his fleet
is

In the Annals of Kilronan

" a styled lomjjepp aobctl, prodifleet," at the year 1209 ; and coblac mop, gious

Klyn Kelly, and Torvean mac Gollgoyle. The King of England went soon after for England,
and conveighed his [these] hostages with him." It is given in the Annals of Kilronan as fol-

"a great

fleet," at

1210.

In the old translation

1209.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
who was

163

son of Farrell O'Rourke, Lord of Breifny, was slain by Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, and Corraac, the son of Art O'Rourke; and Ualgarg O'Rourke assumed the lordship as his successor.
Art, son of Donnell,

Donough OTarrell, Lord of Annaly, died. The King of England came to Ireland with seven hundred ships', and landed
at Dublin,

where he remained

until

he had recruited himself

after the fatigues

lows, under the year 1210, which seems the true Connaught account of the event.

servant of trust to O'Conor

;

and Torbert, son
of England

of the King of the Gall-Gaels, one of O'Conor's

" A. D. 1210. Johannes, the son of FitzErapress,

lawgivers (peaccaipib).

The King

King of England, came to Ireland
fleet this

then returned, and brought these chieftains with

with a great

year.

levied a great

army

of the

On men

his arrival

he

of Ireland, to

march them
or banish
fergus.

to Ulster, to take

Hugh De

Lacy,

him into England. He left the chief government of Ireland to the English bishop, and told him to build three castles in Connaught. The
English bishop soon after raised an army in

him from

Hugh

Ireland, and to take Carrickdeparted from Ireland, and those

Meath and

Leinster,

and marched

to Athlone,

who were guarding
of his

Carrickfergus

left it

and

came to the King, and the King

left a garrison afterwards dispatched a fleet of his people to the Isle of Mann, who plundered the island, and killed many of its in-

and there erected a bridge across the ford, and a castle on the site of O'Conor's castle."
In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innisfallen, a somewhat different account of King John's actions in Ireland is entered under the
year 1211, which the Editor is tempted to insert here ; for, although he has some suspicions of its authenticity, he thinks that the compiler had
original
least,

own

there.

He

habitants.

Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of
his

Connaught, and
this expedition.

Connacian

forces,

were on

On

their arrival in the north,

King of England had naught to return to him
the
fortnight,

told the

King of Con-

documents which are now

lost,

or, at

at the expiration of a

not preserved in Ireland.
\recte

do

so,

and the latter promised that he would and bring his son Hugh O'Conor with
be delivered up as a hostage.
This,

"A. D. 1211"
army,
ford.

1210].
fleet

"John, King
at

of England, with a large
set sail for Ireland,

and a numerous

him

to

and landed

Water-

however, the King did not require ; but he ' said, Bring him, that he may receive a charter
for the third part of Connaught.'

Thither Donough Cairbreach, the son of Donnell More O'Brien, repaired, to make his
submission to him, and received a charter for
Carrigogonnell, and the lordship thereunto be-

But when

O'Conor returned home, the advice which he and his wife and people adopted was, the worst
that could be,

King.

not to bring his son to the However, O'Conor repaired to the King

of England, and as he did not bring his own son, the king obtained the following persons in his stead, viz., Dermot, son of Conor Mac

was to pay a yearly rent of sixty marks. " Cathal Crovderg, the son of Turlough More O'Conor, King of Connaught, repaired with a
longing, for which he

great body of troops to

make

his obeisance

unto

Dermot, King of Moylurg
of

;

Leyny

in

Connaught

;

Conor O'Hara, King Finn O'Carmacan, a

him. "

King John proceeded from Waterford to Dublin, with the intention of banishing from

164
DO, i canaic o arhcliac 50
i

[1209.

cpoibDfpcc 6 Concobaip

ma

miohe. Do comh Cacal cioppaice ullrain cfch. T?o hionnapbab ualcpa De Ian ap in
~\

50 cappaic De laci a hullcaib hi Sapram. Qooh 6 neill Do pfpupa co po biocuip hugo a ceacc pop cculaib $an giallaDh. Qn Rij Do bol po cojaipm an T?ij bfic bpopbaipi pop an ccappaicc co po paccbaoh Do i, ~\ cucc a muincip Dia nj bub Dfin. pfm innce. Canaicc 6 concobaip mporh Do comh lapom Ri Sa^an 50 paich nguaipe, canaicc ua concobaip an T?i "ace iappai6 a rheic ap ua cconcobaip Dopmipi Oia poi^hm, 1 po bai Ni ccipo ua concobaip a rhac uaba, ace Do paD corhall Do. DO

mibe

hi

Sajcam.

Do com

laparh an TCi

na maire bai

ma pappab

-|

i

-|

jiall ppi

cfcpap Dia rhuincip Dia cionn,

.1.

Concobap 500 6 hfjpa cijeapna

luijne,

-)

Diapmair mac

concobaip uf TTlaoilpuanaiD

njeapna

rhuiji luipcc,

pionn ua

capmacdm,
DO com an

-\

coipbeanD mac
50 Sa^ain,
-\

T?i

pij sallgaoiDel Do afp jpaba puce na bpaijDe pin lai]-.

uf concobaip, i

Ireland Walter de Lacy
into France). into Meath,

(who afterwards passed The King marched from Dublin
fleet

him, he marched from Drogheda to Carlingford, where he made a bridge of his ships, across the
harbour,

and dispatched a large
the sons of

north-

by which he landed some
side,

wards

to a fortress of the English called Carling-

on the other
rickfergus,

of his troops thence to Carand proceeded

ford, to
viz.,

de Lacy, Walter, Lord of Meath, and Hugh, Earl of

command

Hugh

partly by sea and partly by land, laid siege to the castle, which he took." and

Ulster, and then

Lord Deputy of

Ireland,

to

According to the Itinerary of King John, by
the accurate and trustworthy T. D. Hardy, Esq., the King was at Crook, near Waterford, on the

appear before him to answer for the death of the valiant knight, John de Courcy" [Lord of Ra-

thenny and Kilbarrock
treacherously slain

"
Grace],

who was

by them, and to answer to such questions as should be asked of them, for their apparent ill conduct. When Hugh de
Lacy had discovered that the King was going to the north, he burned his own castles in Machaire Conaille,

20th of June, 1210, and was on his return, at Fishguard, on the 26th of August, the same For an account of his movements in Ireyear.
land at this period, the reader is referred to the Rev. Mr. Butler's curious work on the History
of the Castle of Trim.

King's eyes,
erected
Oriel,

and in Cuailgne, before the and also the castles which had been

by

the Earl of Ulster and the

men

of

Hanmer, Cox, and Leland, assert that O'Neill submitted to King John on this occasion but, if we believe the Irish accounts, he refused to
;

fled to Carrickfergus, leavthe chiefs of his people burning, levelling, ing and destroying the castles of the country, and, dreading the fury of the King, he himself went

and he himself

give
u

him

hostages.
i.

Tiopraid Villain,

e.

St. Ulltan's

wellin

There was a place

so called in

Westmeath

over the

sea.

See his Acta Sanctorum, p. 242, Colgan's time note 25 ; and Lanigan's Ecclesiastical History of
Ireland, vol.
iii.

"When

the King saw this disrespect offered

p. 52.

There

is

a holy well

1209.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
u

165

of his voyage, and then set out for Tioprait Ulltain in Meath, where Cathal Crovderg O'Conor came into his house [i. e. made his submission to him']. He

banished Walter de Lacy to England, and then proceeded, with his nobles, to Hugh Carrickfergus, whence he also banished Hugo de Lacy to England.
O'Neill repaired hither at the King's summons, but returned

home without

giving

him

hostages.

The King besieged Carrick
it.

until

it

surrendered, and. he

placed his

Eathguaire, whither O'Conor repaired again to meet him; and the King requested O'Conor to deliver him up his son, O'Conor did not give him his son, but delivered up to be kept as a hostage.
to

own The King of England then went
people in

O'Conor then returned home.

four of his people instead, namely, Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny; Dennot, son of Conor O'Mulrony, Lord of Moylurg Finn O'Carmacan and Torvenn,
;

;

son of the King of the Gall-Gaels*, one of O'Conor's servants of trust. King then returned to England, bringing these hostages with him.
called

The

Tobar Dlltain

in the

naskea, near the old church

townland of Ballyof Rathcore in
;

first

place of note that presents itself to our

view, and that at a distance, if you

come from

Meath
and there

See Ordnance
is

Map

of Meath, sheet 48

also a

townland called Tobar Ulltain

the east, situate in the barony of Farbill, on a high rising ground, built as of design not
to overlook,

in the parish of Killinkere, in the barony of

but to awe the whole country
of the
this
first

;

Castlerahen, and county of Cavan, and not far from the boundary of the county of Meath.

founded

(as tradition goes)

by Sir Hugh deLacy,

who was one
and fixed in
reign of

This townland contains a holy well dedicated to
St. Ulltan,

English conquerors, country in or very near the
It seems,

grims

;

but

which was formerly visited by pilit is more than probable that Maright in

Henry the Second.

by what

to this day remains of the ruins, to have been a

geoghegan
visited

making the Tobar Ulltain, John on this occasion, another by King
is

strong, well-built fort, for the

manner of build-

ing at that time capacious

and of good receipt ;

name
w

for Ardbraccan.,

See

p. 162, supra.

now

Rathguaire is so called by those who speak Irish at the present day, but anglicised Rathwire.
It lies in the parish of Killucan, in the

and heaps of rubbish."
Hibernicis, p. 61.
at the year 1450,
this

only remain some portions of the outwalls Collectanea de Rebus

See also a notice of this place where it is mentioned that

east of the

county of Westmeath, and about

three miles north north-west of Kinnegad.

town was plundered and burned by Mageoghegan. There is scarcely a vestige of it now
remaining.

See Circuit of Ireland by Muircheartach
Neill,

Mac

published by the Irish Archffiological SoThe castle of ciety in 1841, p. 49, note 151. Kathwire is thus described by Sir Henry Piers
in 1682, in his

Of this people O'Flaherty GaU-Gaeh writes as follows : " Gallgaidelios vero existimo Gaidelios insulas Britanniae adjacentes turn incolentes,

*

Chorographical Description of " the County of Westmeath Rathwire is the
:

Nam Donaldum
Christi
1

filium Thada?i

O Brian,

quern

Anno

075 Manniee, ac Insularum

166

aNNata rcioshachna
QO1S C171OSO,
Goip CpiopD,
mile,

eiraectNN.

[1210.

1210.
Deich.

Da ceo, a
6 neill,

Do ceacc co caoluipcce. cionol cuca 50 po mapbaic leo na
nionnrhupa,
-]

Qo6
goill

-|

Domnall ua Dorhnaill Do

im henpi mbecc.

Ro
i

poinnpioc

a

a neDala pop na plojaibh.

Uoippoelbach mac l?uaiopi ui concobaip Do Denarii cpece muij luipcc, LuiD Qo6 mac 1 puce Ifip if in Sejaip f Do paijhiD Diapmaca a bpacap. carail ma oeaohaiD co nDeachaiD coippDelbac ip in cuaipceapc ap ceicheo
poimhe.

bpaijhoe Connachc Do coiDecc
luishne, i
1

i

nepinn,
ui

concobap JOD o hfjpa cijeapna

Diapmaic mac concobaip

maoilpuanaiD, pionD ua capmacain,

aipeaccach mac Donnchai6.

o

muimhnech mac roippDealbaij moip Do ecc. T?i bpfcan, ceacca Do cocr Coccab mop Do eipje eicip Rij Sa^an maire jail nepeann imon nsaillRigh Sa^an ap cfno an jailleappuicc,
ffluipcfpcach
-| ~\
i

eppcop DO
jupcip

po cojaipm T?igh Sapcan, "| T?iocapD DiuiD Do paccbail ma nepinn, ~\ an lupcip Do code co hdc luain ap Dai^h 50 ccuippeao a
'ool
place, called

proceres regni sui f>rotectorem acceperunt, Inse
Gall,

&

reperio.

Gallgaedelu regem Hibernice dictum Hebrides vero sunt, quas nostri InseOgygia,
i.

Henry the younger." In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Innishave been built by

fallen this castle is said to

gall dixerunt."
y

c.

75, p. 360.

Cael-uisge,

e. is

narrow water,

now

called

Henry, the King of England's son, upon an island [recte caol?] of Lough Erne, and that he
passage is copied incarecorrectly by the Four Masters, from mere lessness : indeed they have left many entries imperfect throughout their compilation.
It stands

that part of Lough Erne near Castle Caldwell, where the lake becomes

Caol-na-h-Eirne,

-was slain a

by O'Neill and Mac Mahon.

Mac Donough__ This

narrow.
visible ;

No

remains of the castle are
it

now

nor does

appear that

it

was left stand-

ing for any considerable period.

given as follows in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise

1

Henry Beg.
:

This passage

is

more

correctly in the Annals of Kilronan, as
:

follows

"A. D.
i

1211. 6pai^oe
.1.

Connacr oo coi^eacc

"A. D. 1210. The Castle of Keyleuskie was made by Gilbert Mac Cosdealvie" [now Costello], " O'Neale came with his forces to the place, caused them to desist from building thereof,
killed the builders

Oiapmaio mac Concutiaip mic Diapmuoa pij mui^e luipc, j Concuoap O heajpa pi luijni 7 pino O Capmacan, 7 coipQipeacrac mac beapo mac 5 a ^5 oet)1 ^n

Gpmn

with the constable of the

t)uinncaraig occifup epc.

1210.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

16"

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one
y
.

1210.
ten.

thousand two hundred

The English came
assembling their forces,
z

to Cael-uisge

Hugh

O'Neill

and Donnell O'Donnell,

Henry Beg

,

thither, and slew the English, together with and distributed their goods and property among their troops.

marched

Turlough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, took a prey in Moylurg, and carried it with him to Seghais [the Curlieus], to his brother Dermot. Hugh, the son of Cathal, pursued him but Turlough 'fled before him to the North.
;

The hostages of Connaught arrived in Ireland, viz. Conor God O'Hara, Lord of Leyny Dermot, son of Conor O'Mulrony Finn O'Cormacan and
;
; ;

Aireachtach

Mac Donough".

Murtough Muimhneach", son of Turlough More [O'Conor], died. A great war broke out between the King of England and the King of Wales and ambassadors came from the King of England into Ireland for the English bishop and the chiefs of the English of Ireland repaired, with the English bishop, to attend the summons of the King of England and Richard
: ;
:

Tuite was

c

left in

Ireland as

Lord Chief
ar-

Justice.

" A. D. 1211.
rived in Ireland,

The hostages of Connaught
viz.,

death

is

entered as follows:

"A. D.

1210. Mor-

Dermot, son of Conor Mac Dermot, King of Moylurg; Conor O'Hara, King of Leyny; Finn O'Carmacan, and Torbert, son
of the Gall-Gael.
occisu-s est."

tagh Moyneagh mac Terlagh, Tanist, or next successor of the kingdom of Connought, died."

This Murtough Muimhneach had four sons,
namely, Manus, Conor Roe, Donough Reagh, and Conor Gearr, who raised great disturbances in

Aireaghtagh Mae Doncahy Here it is to be observed that the

death of Aireaghtagh is a distinct entry, and has nothing to do with the account of the re-

Connaught
Lecan,
fol.

in
72,

their time.
et

See the Book of

sequen.,

and Duald Mac Firp.

turning of the hostages.
given correctly under the last year.
tages
b
is

The

list

of these hos-

bis's Genealogical

Book, Lord Roden's copy,
This
is

by
i.

the Four Masters

219c

Richard Tuite.
for

a mistake of the

so called because he

Murtough Muimhneach, was fostered in Munster.
e.

the Momonian,

Four Masters,
in the list

Richard Tuite was not Lord His name does not appear

Justice of Ireland.

He was
like

the son

of Turlough

More O'Conor,

published in Harris's edition of Ware's
ii.,

Monarch of Ireland and the ancestor of the warand restless clan of the O'Conors called

works,
nals.

vol.

This entry

or in any of the older Irish anis given as follows in Ma-

Clann Muircheartaigh. In the Annals of Clonnmcnoise, as trauslated by Mageoghegan, his

geoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, which is more correct than the ac-

168
-|

[1210.

co loc japman i co mbiaoh pfin in bpatchpe co luimnech, 50 pojic laipje, in Qc luain. Oo pala Do gup po cuicpfc cloca caiplen aca tuain Qchcliar, ma cfnn gup bo mapb jan anmam Riocapo DIUID cona pacapc, co nopfim
-\ -|

t>ia

rhumcip immaille ppipp cpia rhiopbailib De, naoimh pfoaip,

-]

naoimh

ciapain.

Clann RuaiDpi

uf concobaip,
ip
i

cap SionainD anaip

caDj mac concobaip TTlaonrhuije Go cocc na cuaraib, Dpfm Do mumcip anjaile imaille ppm
-|
~]

1 puccpac cpeich leo

noicpeibh cfineoil Dobca.
annals
:

Oo

cafo

GOD mac

carail,

count of the transaction manufactured by the Four Masters: "A. D. 1210. The English

" Previous to his being called to England, this Lord Justice (John de Gray) went to

Bushopp that was Deputie and Richard Tuite founded a stone castle in Athlone, wherein there
was a Tower of stone
fell

Athlone to erect a castle

there, that

he might send

his brothers [or relations] to Limerick,
ford,

Water-

built,

which soon

after

and killed the said Richard Tuite, with eight

and Wexford, and that he himself might make Dublin and Athlone his principal quarters. For this purpose he raised forces in Leinster and Meath (where Richard Tuite had been the most powerful Englishman since the flight of the De Lacys to France), and marched to Athlone, where he erected a bridge across the Shannon, and a castle on the site of the one which had
been built

Englishmen more.
befell

by
was

My author sayeth that this the miracles of St. Quaeran, of St.
upon whose Land the
it is

Peter, and St. Paule, Castle
built."

said

After this

stated that

the English bishop went to England. The Annals of Kilronan also state that the bridge of Athlone was erected by the English bishop this
year,

by Turlough More O'Conor,

in

and

also its castle,

on the

site of

O'Conor's

castle,

namely, on the site of one erected in 1 1 29 by Turlough More O'Conor, then King of Con-

the year 1129. But it happened, through the effects of the anathema pronounced against this warlike bishop by the Coarb of St. Peter,

naught.

The

fact

is,

that the

Four Masters have

dis-

and the miraculous interposition of St. Peter and St. Kieran, into whose sanctuaries he was
extending the outworks of the castle, that he lost, on this occasion, Richard Tuite, the most distin-

arranged this passage, as appears by the original
Irish of

given in the margin of Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise. It
it

is

Caiplen cloice t>o benarii ajj ac luain la gallaiB .1. lap an njailleppoj, 7 la
as follows:

guished of his barons, as also Tuite's chaplain, and seven other Englishmen, for one of the towers
of the castle
ruins."
fell,

and overwhelmed them in the

Riocupb t)eUioe.
caiplen,

Cop cloice

do oeanarii ipan

yucuicim copomapBRiocapb 7occap
Fpip-i. cpia

This Richard Tuite received large grants of
land in TefEa in Westmeath,

jallmuille

peupcaib ciapain, poll 7 peabaip pa peapann ap a noeapna6 an caiplen pin. In the Annals of Kilronan, and in Grace's
Annals, it is stated that Richard Tuite was killed by the fall of a stone at Athlone, in the year 1211. The Four Masters should have arranged
the passage as follows, as
is

and was made

baron of Moyashell.

His pedigree is traced by Mac Firbis to Charlemagne, but upon what authority the Editor has not been able to discover. Thus, the pedigree of Andrew Boy Tuite, of the
castle of

evident from the older

lows : "

Money lea, near Mullingar, runs as folAndrew Boy, son of Walter, son of An-

1210.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Justice

169

with the intention of sending his brothers to Limerick, Waterford, and Wexford, that he himself might reside in Dublin
to Athlone,

The

went

and Athlone (alternately) but it happened, through the miracles of God, St. Peter, and St. Kieran, that some of the stones of the castle of Athlone fell
;

upon

his head,

and killed on the spot Richard Tuite, with

his priest

and some

of his people, along with him. The sons of Eoderic O'Conor and Teige, the son of Conor Moinmoy, accompanied by some of the people of Annaly, came across the Shannon, from
the east side, into the Tuathas d and carried a prey with them into the wilderness e of Kinel-Dofa Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, pursued them; and a battle
, .

drew, son of Edmond, son of Andrew, son of
Geoffry,

commonly

called

an

Gitta

Gorm, son of

Thomas, son of James, son of Thomas, son of
John, son of Richard, son of Rickard, surnamed, of the Castles, son of Thomas, son of Maurice, son
of Rickard More, son of

and Turlough, the son of Cathal Crovderg, and the sons of other distinguished men of Connaught, were given into the hands of the English bishop."
d Into the

Tuathas,

ip

were three
side of the

territories of this

na cuaraib. There name on the west

John

Tuite, son of the

Shannon. The sentence would be more

King of Denmark, son

of Drobard, son of Richard,

correct thus,

"oo rocc cap Sionamo aniap
i.

ip

son of Luibincus, or Laniard, son of Arcobal, son of Rolandus, son of Oliver, son of Carolus

na cuaraiB,"

e.

came across the Shannon westFor the situation and

wards into the Tuathas.

Magnus, King of France. In the Annals of Kilronan
curious

is

account of the

affairs

at this period:

"A. D.
forces,

1210.

the following of Connaught Donough Cair-

exact extent of the territory called the Tuathas, in the county of Roscommon, the reader is referred to Tribes

and Customs ofHy-Many, printed

for the Irish Archaeological Society in 1843, p.

breach O'Brien with his

forces,

and Geoffry

90, note

Mares with his
of Munster, and

composed of the English

Hugh, son ofRoderic O'Conor, the son of joined by O'Flaherty, marched into Connaught as far as Tuam, and proceeding thence
Loch na n- Airneadh in Ciarraighe, they seized upon great preys, and remained a fortnight, or
to

and the map prefixed to the same. , celebrated mountain anciently called SliuB bapna na o-Cuar, now Slieve Baune, extends

b

The

through the Tuathas from north to south, nearly The word cuaca is parallel with the Shannon.
the plural of cuar, a territory or district, and the districts or Tuathas here referred to were
three in number, namely, Tir Briuin na Sinna, Corca Eachlann, and Kinel-Dofa. See the next
note.
'

nearly twenty nights, in Ciarraighe, the Connacians opposing them. After this O'Conor

and his people came on terms of peace with Donough Cairbreach and .Geoffry Mares, and
the conditions were these, that they should be permitted to pass to Athlone to the English
bishop, and that O'Brien and

Kinel-Dofa,

cenel ooBra

This was in
its chief,

latter ages called

Doohy-Hanly, from

Geoffry

Mares

It O'Hanly, the senior of the Kinel-Dofa. was the ancient name of a territory in the

should

make peace between O'Conor and the
This was accordingly done,

English bishop.

present county of Roscommon, extending along the Shannon from Caradh na-dtuath (now

170

aNNCtta Rioshachca eircecwN.

[1211.

Do beaprpac DeabaiD Oia poile -] po rheabaiD ap cpoibDfipcc ina nOiaiD, -\ rhacaibh RuaiDpi gup po cuipeaD Dap Sionamn paip DopiDipi iarn lap ppaccbail t>aoine
-[

each.

QO1S CR1OSO,

1211.

Goip CpiopD, mile, Da cheD, a haon noecc.
Sicpiocc

ua

laijjendin coriiapba corhgaill

DO

ecc.
-|

an ngailleppoc, Caiplen cluana heoaip Do Denarh la jallaib ~\ lay QoD 6 neill Do bpeic oppa, cpfchpluaiccheab Do Denarh leo ccfp eojain.
i -|

-\

po cuip a nap im TTlaoilip mac RobfpD. po ppaoineab perhe pop jallaib, Uomap mac uccpaijh 50 macaib TCajnaill mic Somaiplich Do cecc co Do an baile Do opgain ooipe coluim cille poipfnn pe long peaccmojac, ~\
-|

milleaD leo.

LoDap appiDe co himp eojam, i po millpfc
Drumdaff, in the
rish of

in inpi uile.
the

called Caranadoe Bridge) to

Bumlin, now called North Yard
as aforesaid).

;

southern extremity of the parish of Kilgefin. It was divided from Carcachlann, or Corca Sheaclilann, the country of

east half of the parish of Lissonuffy (as divided

by the ridge of Slieve Baune,

The

the ridge of the mountain called Slieve Baune, the western face of which belonged to

Mac Brannan, by

desert or wilderness of Kinel-Dofa (in which St. Berach, or Barry, founded his church of Cluain

Mac Brannan,

and the eastern to O'Hanly; and tradition says that there were standing stones and crosses on
the ridge of the mountain which marked the According to the boundary between them.

Coirpthe), is thus described by the Kev. John Keogh, of Strokestown, author of the Irish

Herbal, who wrote in 1682: " The woods, the chiefest in the county of Eoscommon, are lodged about the saide mountaine (Slieve Bawn), situate most upon the northeast side of it, and beyond the north part thereof,

most intelligent of the natives, the following are the townlands of this mountain, which were in
Corcachlann,
(in
viz. Aghadangan, Corrowhawnagh Bumlin parish) Cloonycarron, Carry ward,
:

Montaugh (moinceac),

is

an aggregate of many

;

and great bogs several miles long, and in some
parts thereof two miles in breadth, intercepted betwixt the said mountain and the River Shan-

Ballymore, Ballybeg (in Lissonuffy parish) ; Leckan, Aghalahard, Eeagh, Killultagh,
(in Cloonfinlough parish).

Aghaclogher

All the other town-

lands of the mountain lying east of these belonged to Kinel-Dofa. Treanacreeva at Scra-

non, interspersed here and there with some little islands of profitable land, interrupted one from

moge Bridge was
both
territories.

also

on the boundary between

another by interpositions of the said bogs." O'Dugan speaks of O'Hanly's country as
lows:

fol-

Kinel-Dofa, or O'Hanly's country, comprised the following parishes, viz., the entire of the parishes of Kilglass and Termonbarry, Cloontuskert and Kilgefin
;

tDuraio oo'n pecroam aipmjep, Cenel ooBca nolur airhpeb;
6! coiriipeapc um cptoe dp oipeacc 6 n-ainlije.

one townland of the pa-

1211.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
in

171
defeated,

was fought between them,

which the sons of Roderic were

and

again driven eastwards across the Shannon, leaving some of their horses behind.

men and

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Sitric
f
,

1211.
eleven.

Christ, one

thousand two hundred

O'Laighenain Coarb of St. Comgall [of Bangor], died. The castle of Clones was erected by the English and the English bishop, and they made a predatory incursion into Tyrone; but Hugh O'Neill overtook
them, and routed and slaughtered them, and slew, among others, Meyler, the son of Robert.

Thomas Mac Uchtry and
with a
fleet

the sons of Randal

Mac

g

Sorley

came

to

Deny

of seventy-six ships, and plundered and destroyed the town. They passed thence into Inishowen, and ravaged the entire island [recte peninsula].
" The
Is

country of the tribe of sharp weapons Kinel-Dofa fast and uneven;
affection in

Morough, or Murchadh.
Teige, or Tadhg.

There dwells

my heart

For the people of O'Hanly."

Donnell.
Teige.

The following pedigree, as given by Duald Mac Firbis, will shew how O'Hanly descends
from Dofa:
Loughlin, son of

Murtough, or Muircheartach.
Anly, or Ainlighe, a quo O'Hanly.

Hurly, or Urthuile.

Hugh, or Aedh, who was the son of
Conor, or Conchobhar.
Donnell, or Domhnall.
Ivor, or Imhar.
I

Muldoon, or Maelduin.
Cluthechar.
Funis.
Dofa, or Dobhtha, the progenitor of the KinelDofa, and from whom St. Berach, or Barry,

Donnell.

Amlaff, or Amhlaoibh.
i

the patron saint of the district, was the
in descent.

fifth

Ivor mor.

Aengus.

Murtough, or Muircheartach, who found the white steed which Teige O'Conor had, and from which he was styled an eic jil, or of
the

Ere the Bed.
I

Brian.

White

Steed.

Eochy Muighmheodhain, Monarch of Ireland
in the fourth century.
f

Raghnall, who fought at the battle of Clontarf in 1014.
i

0' Laighenain,

'

8

Mac

Sorley,

now anglicised Lynam. mac Sariiaiple, anglicised Mac

z2

172

aNNCK-a Rioghachca eineawN.

[1212.

Sloicceab la connaccaib rpia rojaijim an jailleappuic -| jillibeipr mic baift co hfpppuaib, i Do ponpac caiplen occ caol uipcce.
Ruaibpi,

mac puaibpi, mic

coippoealbaij;

ui

concobaip, Do

mapbab

la luij-

mb Connacc.
Copbmac mac Qipr uf maoileacloinn Do buain Delbna Do na gallaib, TTlaoileachlainn mac aipc Do rabaipc mabma ap na jjallaib Do bai ag coirh-\

ecc oealbna,

-]

a cconprabla RobeapD buncomaip DO mapbab.
ecc.
ui

Cujaela ua heiDhin Do
T?ajnailr
)

Caillec De Df injin T?uai6pi

Concobaip DO

ecc.

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip CpiopD,
mile,

1212.

Da

ceb,

a DoDecc.

Dpuimcaoin cona cfmpall bo loy>ccab la cenel neojain gan cfo Dua
neill.

pfpjal ua cacain cijeapna ciannacca
jallaib.

-]

pfp na cpaoibe Do

mapbab
-|

la

^illibepc

mac

joipDelbaij Do

mapbab

i

ccaiplen caoiluipcce,

an

caiplen pfippin Do lopccab la hua neiccnigh. Caiplen cluana heoaip DO lopccab la hGob ua
epenn.

neill,

)

la cuaipceapr

Donnchab ua hfi&m DO ballab la hQob mac cacail cpoibDeipj gan cfo Dua concobaip.
TTlaibm caille na ccpann DO rabaipc la
Sawairle in the old translation of the Annals of
Ulster.

copbmac mac Qipc
:

ui

maoilfc-

Clonmacnoise

name

Samhairle, anglicised Sorley, was a very common among the Mac Donnells of

"A. D.

1211.

Cormack mac Art O'Melaghlin

Scotland.

Thomas Mac Uchtry was Earl

of

expelled the Englishmen out of Delvyn, and gave a great overthrow to a company of Eng-

Athol in Scotland, and the son of Alan de Gallaway.
ti

lishmen that were
in

left to

defend that contrey,

Cael-uisge,
is

now

called Caol

caol uip^e, i. e. narrow water, na h-Eirne, and is that narrow

which discomfiture Robertt Dongomer, their constable and chief head, was slain, together
with Gillernew
vyn's son."
k A woman's name, corresponding Baghnailt. with the man's name Raghnall, or Randall.
'

Mac

Coghlan, the Prince of Del-

part of

Lough Erne near Castle Caldwell.

No

remains of the castle are
1

now

visible.
is

Duncomar

This passage

given as follows

in

Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of

Caittech

De,

i.

e.

the

Nun

of God.

It

would

1212.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
army was led by the Connacians,
Costello, to Assaroe
;

173

An

at the

summons

of the English bishop

and Gilbert Mac

and they erected a castle at Cael-uisge". Roderic, the son of Roderic, who was son of Turlough O'Conor, was slain

by the inhabitants of Leyny, in Connaught. Cormac, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, wrested Delvin from the English; and Melaghlin, the son of Art, defeated the English, who were maintaining possession of that territory,

and killed
l

their constable,

Robert of Duncomar

1
.

Cugaela O'Heyne died. k Raghnailt and Caillech

De two
,

daughters of Roderic O'Conor, died.
1212.

.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
Christ, one
its

The Age of

thousand two hundred twelve.

Drumquin, with
consent" of O'Neill.
Farrell O'Kane,
lish.

churches, was burned by the Kinel-Owen, without the
slain

Lord of Kienaghta and Firnacreeva, was
was

by the Engcastle

Gilbert
itself

Mac

Costello

slain in the castle of Cael-uisge

;

and the

was burned by O'Hegny. The castle of Clones was burned by Hugh O'Neill and the [men of the]

north of Ireland.

Donough O'Heyne was deprived of sight by the son of Cathal Crovderg, without the consent of the O'Conor.

The

p victory of Caill-na-gcrann

was gained by Cormac, the son of Art
dered in the old translation of the Annals of
Ulster:

is

appear to be the feminine form of Cele De, which Latinized Deicola by Giraldus Cambrensis,

"A. D.

1212.

Drumkyn with its churche
li-

and Anglicised Culdee.

m

burnt by Kindred Owen, without O'Neil's
This
is

Drumquin, opuim caoin

the

name

cence."
in the county round tower and large stone A of Monaghan. cross, with antique ornaments, and now or
Clones.
lately used as the

of a townland and village in the barony of Omagh, in the county of Tyrone, and about six miles to the west of the

A

well-known town

town of Omagh

See Ordnance

Map
n

of Tyrone, sheet 33.

market

cross, point

out the

consent, jan c6ao oua neill, " O'Nello invito." 5an ceab Co is an idiomatic

Without

the

antiquity of this town.
'
'

" in expression, generally denoting despite of," or " in defiance of." This passage is thus ren-

no ccpann,

coill CaiU-na-gcran, ccnll na ccpann, written in the Annals of Kilronan, i. e. the
trees

wood of the [great]

This place

is

now

called

174
lainn
-\

awwaca Kio^hachca eiReaww.
la

1212.

hdob mac Concobaip maonmaije ap
-]

jallaib Du in po lab a nap

im piapup TTlapan

im macaib Sleirhne.

Oonnchab mac cana roipec cenel Qonjupa t>o ecc. Oomnall 6 Dairhfn Do riiapbab la macaib meg laclainn
a Doipe.

i

nDopup peclep

Cpfch lap

in

ngiolla piaclach

ua mbaoijill co nDpuinj Do cenel cconaill

a maille ppip pop apaill Do cenel eogain baoi pop comaipce ui raipcfipr, .1. cloinne pinjin. TCucc imoppoo an jiolla piabach roipeac cloinne Snfibjile mapbcap 6 bub ofipin ag coppfpaib Deabaib ppiu caipcfipc poppa, namh a einigh.
-]
-] -]

Ceach Do gabdil

la Diapmaic

mac

17uaibpi ui Concobaip pop
hi

Gob mac

TTlajnupa uf Concobaip hi ccill colmain pinn cuicc pip becc ap picir ann.
TTlaiDm Do cabaipc DO bomnall

ccopann gup po loipccic
i

mac Domnaill bpfjaij maoilfchlainn pop copbmac Ua maoileachlamn Du in po mapbab jiolla cpiopD mac coljan
co pocaibe ele amaille ppip. Oomnall mac Domnaill ui maoileaclainn Do
TTlaoilip.

mapbab ap

cpfic la muincip

Sluaicceab la gallaib TTluman 50 Ropcpe 50 nDeapnpac caiplen ann.
Kilmore, or Great Wood, and
is

situated in the

parish of Killoughy, barony of Bally boy, and See Ordnance Map of that counKing's County.
ty, sheet 24.

translated, in the year 1627, by Connell Mageoghegan of Lismoyny, who knew this place well:

and were thus

long obsolete,
to prove its

The name Coill na g-orann has been but we have the clearest evidence situation and modern name. Thus,

"A. D.

1211.

The English Bushop came over
and was Deputie
thereof,

into this land again,

and went, with

all

the English forces, of Ireland

the writer of the old Irish story called the Battie of Moylena (Cath Maighe Lena), in describing
the rout

to Cloneis, in the north,

where he built a

castle,

oftheMunster

forces
is

battle field of Moylena,
to

which

coming to the about two miles
they

the north of Tullamore,

states that

The English Bushop sent certain of the army to Magmahon's Land to take the preys of the Land; they were overtaken and mett by Magmahon, [who] slew divers of them about Myler mac
Eobert, and Myler himself, and divers of the Englishmen of Lynster, took and caused them
to leave the prey

marched by Coill na g-crann, which was then, he says, called Coill Mhor (or Great Wood).
But,
if

we had no

other evidence, the following

and horses, and gave them

passage in the Annals of Clonmacnoise
sufficient to

would be

many

shew the situation and modern name
In these annals the above passages fully than by the Four Masters,

of this place.

are given

more

by night as by day from thence forward. " The said Deputie came from thence to Lynster, and sent for the forces of Munster, who
fierce onsetts as well

1212.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

175

O'Melaghlin, and Hugh, the son of Conor Moinmoy, over the English, in which the latter, together with Pierce Mason and the sons of Sleviny, were slaughtered. q Donough Mac Canii, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa died.
,

Donnell O'Devine was
the abbey-church of Derry.

slain

by the sons of Mac Loughlin

in the

doorway of

O'Boyle, accompanied by a party of the Kinel-Connell, from some of the Kinel-Owen, who were under the protection
of O'Taircheirt (Gillareagh), Chief of Clann-Sneidhghile and Clann-Fineen. O'Taircheirt overtook them (the plunderers), and gave them battle, but was
killed while defending his guarantee'.

A prey was taken by Gillafiaclagh

the son of Manus O'Conor, at Kilcolman-Finn s in Corran. Thirty-five burned in the house on this occasion.
,

Dermot, the son of Koderic O'Conor, forcibly took the house of Hugh, men were

Donnell, the son of Donnell Breaghagh [the Bregian] O'Melaghlin, defeated Cormac O'Melaghlin in a battle, in which Gilchreest Mac Colgan and many
others were slain.

Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Melaghlin, was excursion, by the people of Meyler.

slain,

while on a predatory

An

army was led by the English of Munster
honic

to Roscrea,

where they erected
very frequently This passage is

came accordingly, with Donnogh Carbreagh O'Bryen, and marched with all their forces to
Killnegrann in Ffercall,

legal

phrase,

occurs

throughout the Irish annals.

now

called

Kilmore,

where they were met by Cormac mac Art O'M,elaghlyn, who discomfitted them, where
t.hey left all their

rendered as follows in the old translation of the Annals of Ulster: " A. D. 1212. An

army by

Gillafiaglagh O'Boyle,
nell,

and some of Kindred Con-

cowes, horses, gold, silver,

and pther things
11

to the said

Cormack."

This is anglicised Kindred Kind-Aengusa Eneas in the old translation of the Annals of Ulster. It was the tribe name of the Mac Canns

vppon Tirowen, being in protection with the Conells and especially of O'Tirchirt" [7 par ap emec ceneoil conaill uile 7 hui raipcepe co j-onpaoacj. " O'Tirchert came uppon them,
fought with them, where Gillariavagh O'Tirchert was slayne, King of Snedgaile and Clanfynin, in saving his credit."

and their

correlatives,

who were

seated in the

present county of Armagh, where the Upper Bann enters Lough Neagh. There were several other tribes of this name in the province of Ulster, as well as in other parts of Ireland.

Kikdman-Finn,
is

cill

Colmdm

F'nn

This

While defending his guarantee, a co nam S r a emij, while defending those whom he had
guaranteed to protect
This,

certainly the present Kilcolman, an old church near Ballaghaderreen, in the barony of Costello,

which

is

a Bre-

and county of Mayo ; but it is at least nine miles from the nearest boundary of the present barony of Corran, in the county of Sligo. The festival

176

[1213.

cona ploij 50 dppaiDe 50 cill achaiD 50 puce TTluipcfpcac mac bpiain oppa ccapo oeabaiO ooib. 17o loireaoh TTlaoileachlainn mac carail cappaijj gup
bo mapb tna jonaib.

QO1S CR1OSD,
Goip Cpiopb,
fillet

1213.

mile,

Da cecc, a cpi Decc.

na nafrh ua RuaDan eppcop luijjne, -| TTluipiccen ua muipeccein eppcop cluana mic noip DO ecc. Ginmipe ua cobraigh abb Peclepa t>oipe coluim cilte uapail clepec
cojaiDe ap cpabao, ap cfnnpa, ap bfipc, ap eccna,
[DO ecc].
~\

ap gac maic apcfna

Comap mac
coluim
cilli
-|

mac Rajnaill DO opccain ooipe DO bpeich peoD rhumcipe Doipe, ruaipcipc 6peann apcfna a
uchrpaigh
-j

Puaiopi

-\

lap cfmpaill an T?ecclepa,
of St. Colman Finn,
or

-|

a mbpfic leo 50
Fair, is

cuil paicin.

Column the

found them entered in different forms and under
different years in the compilations of more ancient

marked
c

in the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys at

the 4th of April.
Killeigh,

writers.

The present entry

is

given somewhat

cill acaio,

anciently called cill

differently in Mageoghegan's translation of the

acaio

opoma
It
is

F ODa i and referred to in the
at

Feilire Aenguis,

25th of June, as in Ui

Failghe.

a fair-town in the barony of Geshil,

in the King's County, about four miles to the

south of Tullamore.

Here are

still

some remains

Annals of Clonmacnoise, as follows " A. D. 1212. The Englishmen of Ireland made a voyadge" [an expedition] " to Roscre, where they built a castle. " The Englishmen of Meath with their great:

of a great abbey, and also a holy well dedicated to the two St. Sinchells. This place is to be from Killoughy in the barony of distinguished

est forces took their

journey to Killnegrann in

Ffercall, where they were mett by Cormack mac Art O'Melaghlyn, and were quite over-

Ballyboy,

in

the same neighbourhood.

The

Murtough, son of Brian, who opposed the English here, was son of Brian Breifneach O'Connor,

chiefest

thrown by Cormack, with a slaughter of the and principallest Englishmen in Meath, as Ferrus Mersey, the two sons of Leyvnie
Wanie, and William Howard, and many others of them; that they left all their cattle, both
horses and cowes, gold and silver, and shirts of mail ; and pursued them to the abbey of Kil-

who

died in

1 1

84.

be suspected that this entry refers to the same event as that already given under the
It is to

year 1211, namely, the victory of Coill na gcrann, for we find the different compilers of the annals
of Ireland, whose works have been amalgamated (frequently without much skill) by the Four Masters, often repeat the same events, as having

beggan, and the place called Bealagh-monie-neSirrhyde. Melaghlyn mac Cahall Carragh O'Con-

nor was killed by Geffray March of that journey." According to the Annals of Kilronan the per-

1213.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
From

177

thence they proceeded to Killeigh', where they were overtaken who gave them by Murtough, the son of Brian [O'Conor], and his army, battle in which Melaghlin, the son of Cathal Carragh [O'Conor] received
a castle.
;

wounds of which he

died".

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
Gilla-na-naev O'Rowan, Bishop of Leyny,

1213.
thirteen.

The Age of Christ, one thousand two hundred

and Muirigen O'Muirigen, Bishop

of Clomnacnoise, died.

Ainmire O'Coffey, Abbot of the Church of Derry-Columbkille, a noble ecclesiastic, distinguished for his piety, meekness, charity, wisdom, and every
other good quality [died]".

Thomas Mac Uchtry and Rory Mac Randal plundered Derry-Columbkille, and carried off, from the middle of the church of Deny, all the precious articles
of the people of Derry, and of the north of Ireland, which they brought to
Coleraine*.
sons slain were Ferris Messat and Walter Dunel.
rensis, vir sapientia, religione,

mansuetudine,

et

Under this year the Annals of Clonmacnoise record the death of William Petitt, and contain
the two entries following, which the Four Masters have very much shortened
:

u

eleemosynis selectissimus, obiit."
p.

TriasT/iaum.,

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, the character of this Ainmire O'Coffey " noble ecclesiastic, distinis thus given
505.
:

A

" A. D. 1212. Mortagh O'Bryen, Donnell mac Donnell O'Melaghlyn, Cowlen O'Dempsie, and
Donnell Clannagh Mac Gillepatrick, gave an overthrow to Cormack mac Art O'Melaughlyn,

guished for his piety, descent, meekness, majesty,
mildness, charity,
post
*

and every other goodness,
est

optimum penitentiam ingressus
Coluim
Coleraine, cuil jiuirin,

mam

uni-

verse carnis in Dubrecles

Cille."

where were

killed Gillechrist

mac Murrough

now

locally

but cor-

Macoghlan, and Donslevey mac Connor O'Melaghlyn, with many others. " Donnell mac Donnell Bregagh O'Melaghlyn, next in succession of Meath and Irish of Ireland,
ler,

ruptly called in Irish ctip-parain,
rectly anglicised Coleraine.

but more coris

This name

trans-

lated " Secessus jilicis," in the Tripartite Life of
St. Patrick, lib.
ii. c.

1

36, published
its

by Colgan in
is

made a journey to take was overtaken by Meyler

a prey from
himself,

Mey-

his Trias

Thaum., where

situation

distinctly

and great

forces of both English

the said Donnell with

and Irishmen, who killed many others with him, at

" in aquilonari Banncei fluminis pointed out as i. e. on the north (eastern) side of the margined

the River of Rahan in Ffercall."

w Died.
Colgan
:

This passage is thus translated by " Anmirus O'Cobhthaich, Abbas Do-

River Bann. Colgan, who was well acquainted with the situation of places in the north of Ireland, shews that Cuilraithin is the place now " civitas Dcdriedm seu called Coleraine:
Reuta,

2

A

178

aNNatct Rio^hachca emecmN.

[1213.

DO reacr 50 Doipe Do gabail cighe ap caram, pip na qiaoibe macaibh meg lachlainn. l?o mapbab celloip mop Recclepa Doipe fcoppa

Ua

-|

occa nfcrapjoipe. Oo pome Dia -] coluim cille miopbail innpin uaip po mapbab an pfp cionoil coichfprail bai leo, .1. TTIacgamaiTi mag aicne
i

-]

neneach columi

noopup in Duibpecclepa. la gallaib mac ucrpaij Caiplen cuite Rarain Do benarii la romap uile Do cum an caiplein ulab, 1 po pccaoileab pelcce, cuphoaijjce an baile cenmoca an cfmpall. pin Qo6 ua neill Do cabaipr ma&ma ap jallaib po la a nofpccap, po
cille
i -|

~\

-\

-\

loipcceab beop laip an capplongpopc ipm
inDibbh.

16

ceccna eicnp Daoimbh,
i

-\

pdnarc Do mapbab Da Thuinnp pfin meabail. pionD ua bpolcdin maop bomnaill (.1. Domnall mop) Do bol cconnaccaib DO cuinjib cfopa f bomnaill. Ctppeab Do coib cecnup co caipppe

Donn

6 bpfiplem caoipeac
i

i

Dpoma

cliab.

Po

cabaill pibe cona caoirhreccoibh Do
"\

n^h an

pilib TTluipf-

ohaij Ifpa an Doill ua [ui] Dalaij, po jab pop miocopcab mop ppipp an bpilib ap ba haifeach porn a liucc cpfoin (gion gup bo he a ciccfpna po corhaipleicc DO). T?o lonnaijeab an pfp Dana ppip, ~\ pon gab biail mbicgeip ma
lairh

co ccapacr bfim nDo 50 ppapccaib mapb gan anmain. Uficc pfipin uf bomnaill hi ccloinn na piop pin oLla lappin ap lomjabail lap 17iocaipo.
Dorhnaill DO

ponab leipcionol ploij laip
Trias Thaum., p. 183,

ma

Deaohaib,

~|

nf

po aipip co painicc

col. 2,
i

Culraine vulgo dicta." note 127.

nor vicar."
This passage is thus rendered in Castle the old translation of the Ulster Annals " A. D. 1213. The castle of Cailrathan, built
:

a

O'Karw

In the old translation of the An-

nals of Ulster this passage is rendered thus:

" O'Kathan and the
to take house

men of Kriv came to Dyry

vppon the Maglaghlans, and killed between them the great Caller of the Church of
Dyry.
miracle,

by Thomas Mac Ugh try and Galls of Vlster, and" [they] "broke down all the stones, pavements, and fences, of all the town for that work, the
church only excepted." The Irish text is thus given in the Dublin copy of the same annals:

God and Columkille shewed a great viz., the gatherer and bringer, Mahon

Magaithne, [was] killed at Columkill his prayer justly in the church doore."
1

Caipcel cula pacain DO oenutn le

Comaf

Prior, celloip in the original.

It is

thus

mac

uccpai

-j

le jallaib

Ulao

7

po pcaileo

" explained in O'Brien's Dictionary. Cealloir, the of a cell or ex., ni cealloip superior

monastery;
;

peilce 7 clacana 7 cumoaici in baile uile cenmora in cempall amain cuice pem.
''

na rub-ceulloip cu

you are neither superior

Carlongphart,

now

Carlingford,

a decayed

1213.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

179

O'Kane" and the [sept of] Firnacreeva, came to Derry to take the house The great prior 2 of the abbey church of Derry, of the son of Mac Loughlin. who interposed to make peace between them, was killed. God and St.
Columbkille wrought a miracle on this occasion for Mahon Magaithne, the the army, was killed in the doorway person who had gathered and mustered of the church of Duvregles, in revenge of Columbkille.
;

of Coleraine was erected by Thomas Mac Uchtry, and the English of Ulidia; and all the cemeteries and buildings of the town were thrown down excepting only the church to supply materials for erecting this castle.

The

castle

1

Hugh

O'Neill defeated and dreadfully slaughtered the English, and, on the

same day, burned Carlongphorf (Carlingford) both people and cattle. Donn O'Breslen, Chief of Fanad, Avas treacherously killed by his own people. Finn O'Brollaghan, steward of O'Donnell (Donnell More) went to Connaught to collect O'Donnell's tribute. He first went to Carbury of Drumcliff, where, with his attendants, he visited the house of the poet Murray O'Daly of
and, being a plebeian representative of a hero, he began to wrangle with the poet very much (although his lord had given him no instructions to
Lissadill
;

c

do

so).

The

poet, being

enraged

at his conduct, seized a

dealt

him a blow which

killed

him on the

spot,

very sharp axe, and and then, to avoid O'Donnell,

he

O'Donnell received intelligence of this, he d collected a large body of his forces, and pursued him to Derrydonnell in
fled into Clanrickard.
in the barony of Lower Dundalk, and county of Louth. This passage is rendered as follows in the old translation of the Annals of

When

town

the Annals of Ulster, or in the Annals of Kilronan.
c

Lissadill,

liap
;

a
it

ooill,
is

i.

e.

the Lit, or fort

Ulster

:

of the blindman

situated in the south-

" A. D. 1213.

Hugh O'Neile broke of the Galls,

and had a great slaughter of them, and burnt the Cairlongfort the same day, both men and cattle."
gives the following entry immediately after the foregoing: " John, King of England, gave England and

west of the barony of Carbury, near the Bay of Sligo. On an old map of the coast of the counties
of Mayo, Sligo, and Donegal, made in the reign of Elizabeth or James I., preserved in the State

The same work

Papers' Office, London, Lissadill
castle.
d

is

marked

as a

Ireland into the Pope's hands, and the

rendered them to himself againe,
to him,
land,

Pope surand 1000 marks

Derrydonnell, Doipe ui borhnaill,

i.

e.

Robo-

return Odonnelli.

and

after every yeare

700 out of EngDublin copy of

and 300 out of Ireland."
this passage is not in the

ruins 9? a castle about three miles to the east of Oranmore, in

townland containing the in the parish of Athenry, and

A

But

the county of Galway.

The

territory of Clan-

2

A

2

183

awwata raioshachca eiRecmw.
i

[1213.

cona6 ua6 po jab ammniuccab, ap a b'eic aDhaib longpoipc ann. l?o jab pop cpeaclopccab an cfpe gup bo piapac co po biocuip Tlluipfbhac Dia comaipje TTlac uilliam Do po bfoib,
Doipe
Dorhnaill
i

ccloinn Riocaipo,

i

-|

rcuabrhurham.

Oo raeo ua

Dorhnaill

ma

biuib,

-\

geibib pop inopab,

]

op-

ccam na cpiche ipin copop accuip oonnchab caipbpec ua bpiain TTluipfohac ua6a nucc mumcipe Immnij. Ro Ifn ua Dorhnaill e co Dopup luimni j, baf ppopbaippi i hi bpoplonjpopc ag mom ui borhnaill conab ua6 ainnimjhi

-j

i

biocuippioc lucr luimnij TTluipfDhac ua&aib pop popcongpa ui norhnaill co nach ppuaip a im6it>fn ace a caipbipc 6 laim Do laith 50 piacr
cfp.

Ro

ach cliach

Duiblinne.

Soaip 6 Dorhnaill Don chup pin lap pipfoh, q lap ccop cuapra connachr uile 50 hiomlan. Do ponao Sloicceab ele laip Dopibipe ^an lompuipeac gan popuccab ip in mbbabain ceccna bfop co hdchcliac jup ba hficcfn DO luce

Gcha

cliac TTluipfDhac Do cop uabaib 50 halbain,

-\

bai annpaibe co nofpna

cfopa Dpecra abmolca DO cumjioh piooha, -j maichme nanacail qp Ua ba he an cpeap Dan Dibh pmhe, bomhnaill Deablarh po noorhnaill,
-\

Q

pich, naill
laip.

[c. gabaib O Dorhpich Dopomh ap a abmolcaibh, ma rhuincfpap e mporh, i DO paD popba, i pfpann DO peib po ba oaca
=

Do paoaoh

-|

Cpeach

la

Copbmac ua maoileachlamn pop

caiplen chinn claip 50 po

rickard comprised six baronies in the county of

Galway, namely, Leitrim, Loughreagh, DunkelSee Tribes lin, Killartan, Clare, andAthenry

ploring his protection. It begins, cpeao ajaib 001615 a ^cem? i. e. "What brings a guest In this poem (of which to you from afar?"
there
is

and Customs of Hy-Many, printed

for the Irish

a good copy on paper in the Library of

Archaeological Society in 1843, pp. 17, 18; and Map to the same, on which boipe ui oorhnaill is

the Royal Irish Academy), the poet calls himself O'Daly of Meath (see note n , under the year
1185, pp. 66, 67), and states that he was wont
to frequent the courts of the English,

shewn due

east of the

town of Galway, and on

the boundary between the territories of Clann
Fergaile and Hy-Many ; see also Ordnance Survey of the county of Galway, sheet 95.
e

and to

drink wine from the hands of kings and knights, of bishops and abbots; that, not wishing to re-

Mac

William.

This was Richard de Burgo,

main

to

be trampled under the feet of the Race

the son of William Fitz-Adelm, and the great Lord to whom King Henry III. granted the
province of Connaught in the year 1225. this occasion O'Daly addressed a poem to

of Conn, he fled to one who, with his mail-clad
warriors,

was able

to protect

him

against the

On
De
irn-

King of Derry and Assaroe, who had threatened him with his vengeance, though
fury of the

Burgo, stating the cause of his flight, and

indeed the cause of his enmity was but

trifling,

1213.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
a place

181

Clanrickard,
for a night
;

which was named from him, because he encamped there and he proceeded to plunder and burn the country, until at last
6

submitted to him, having previously sent Murray to seek for O'Donnell pursued him, and proceeded to plunder and refuge in Thomond. ravage that country also, until Donough Cairbreach O'Brien sent Murray

Mac William

away

to the people of Limerick.
at

rick, and, pitching his

siege to that town-,

camp upon which the people

O'Donnell followed him to the gate of LimeMonydonnell (which is named from him), laid
of Limerick, at O'Donnell's com-

mand, expelled Murray, who found no asylum anywhere, but was sent from hand to hand, until he arrived in Dublin.
O'Donnell returned home on
this

occasion,

completed the visitation of all Connaught.

He
;

having first traversed and mustered another army without

much

delay in the same year, and, marching to Dublin, compelled the people, of Dublin to banish Murray into Scotland and here he remained until he

composed

three

poems

ness from him.

The

third of these

in praise of O'Donnell, imploring peace "

poems

is

the one beginning,

and forgiveOh! Donnell,

kind hand for [granting] peace," &c. He obtained peace for his panegyrics, and O'Donnell afterwards received him into his friendship, and gave him lands and possessions, as was pleasing to him.

Cormac O'Melaghlin plundered
for that the fugitive

the castle of Kinclare
his

f
,

burned the bawn,
calls

his people

who had

had only killed a plebeian of the audacity to affront him !

house and

its

inmates,

him the

chief

Bpala pip an Bpeap, baclac oo b'eir oom cameao, jni DO rhuptiab an riioa6; a 6e an doBap anpolao ?
becij ap
1

of the English, the lord of Leinster, the King of Connaught, the proprietor of the forts of Croghan, of Tara, of Mac Coisi's wall of stone,

Ui Chonaing,
then

and of Mur mic an Duinn, then called Caislen and hints that he might yet invite

" Small

A
O

our difference with the man, shepherd was abusing me,
is

He the poets of the five provinces to his house. ._. , , i , ., c i tells Rickard that whatever deeds of valour

,,,,..

,

And

I killed

that clown

:

(rod!

is this

a cause for enmity?

any one may have achieved, he cannot be truly reT nowned without protecting the venerable or the f feeble; and that he now has an opportunity ot
,

He calls upon the puissant knight Rickard, the son of AVilliam, to respect the order of the poets, who are never treated with harshness by
chieftains,

making himself illustrious by protecting O'Daly of Meath, a poet, whose verses demand attention,
and who throws himself on his generosity.

He

strong.

and to protect the weak against the He next bestows some verses of panedescribes the splendour of

concludes by reminding him of his duties as King of the famous province of Connaught.
f

gyric

upon him,

OfKindare, chmn clcnp.

This

name is now

182

[1213.

an babbDun, lomba uacha.
loipcc

-|

50 paoirhib po]i na sallaib co rcuccab eic

-]

eirce

TDoppluaijeab la gallaib Gpeann bionnpaicchib Copbmaic mic Qipr gup po riieabaib compaicpior ace bpoichfc cine, peachap lomaipfcc fcoppa, Do pocaip l?uaibpi ua ciapba ip in beabaib pin, -\ po pop rhac aipr,
-] ~\

ofocuipeab mac Qipn a oealbna,
50111.50

-|

po haipccfoh a rhuinnp.

Do

coibpioc na

hoc

luain,

-\

to ponab caiplen leo ann.
-\

Do

ponpar bfop caiplen

caiplen bnpmaije. la copbmac mac Ctipc i nbealbna co po aipcc TTlaoilpeachlainn Cpeach bfcc -\ 50 po lonnapb ap an cfp. l?o mapb once uilliam TTluilinn, q po jab
cinneicij, caiplen bioppae,

pfm cigfpnap bealbhna.
obsolete,

but the situation of the place

is dis-

forces that

owed
all

service to the

King

of England

tinctly pointed out in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, in which it is

throughout

the provinces and parts of Ire-

land, assembled,

was originally called Claire Athand situated to the west of Lismoyny moynie, (which was the name of Mageoghegan's own
stated that it

and mett together at the bridge of Tynnie to assault the said Cormack mac Art
O'Melaghlyn, whom they did also meet at a place then called Clare Athmoynie, now called Killclare
['c], adjoining to Lissmoyne and weast, fought

house), and

is still

that of a townland in the pa-

rish of Ardnurcher, orHorseleap, in the

barony

of Moycashel, county of Westmeath See Ordnance Map of that county, sheet 37. The transactions of the O'Melaghlins in this year are

couragiously withall, where four principall men of the said Cormack's army were slain, as Eowrie

O'Kiergy, and others.

The English army came

given in the Annals of Clonmacnoise as follows: "A. D. 1213. Cormack mac Art

from thence to Delvyn Mac Coghlan, and so to Clonvicknose, where they built a Castle; also
they finished and aided the Castles of Dorrowe,
Byrre, and Kynnety of that voyage [expedition]."

O'Melaghlyn

took a great prey from the town of Ardinurcher, and the next morrow after took the of
spoyles the Castle of Ardinurcher, and markett of the same; he tooke many other small preys and
booties.

" Cormack

mac Art O'Melaghlyn wentto Ath" and there devised a strata-

boye" [Ballyboy]
to

" The said Cormack mac Art tooke a prey from the Castle of Kyimclare, together with
the spoiles of the

make the Ward come out of the Castle, gem and killed ten of them immediately, and took all
theirs
after

and spoyles of the towne with him. Soone

Bawne and Markett

of the

he departed the contrey, and came after a

,

said town, and also killed many of the Englishmen, that they left him twenty-eight horses, with eight other harnished horses, and shirts of

long space into the contrey again, tooke all the spoyles of Melaughlyn Begg O'Melaghlyn, and
killed

some of

his people,

and among the

rest,

Mail, and burnt

returned to his

many men in the said town, [and] own house without loss. All the
Lynall

killed the knight called

William Moylyn, and

forces of the English of Ulster, Munster,
ster,

and Meath, together with

the Irish

took the possession of the country again against them. " Cormack mac Art tooke the spoyles of the

1213.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

183

and defeated the English, and carried away from them many horses and
accoutrements.
of Ireland led a great army against Cormac, the son of Art him at the bridge of Tine s where a battle was fought [O'Melaghlin]. They met between them, in which the son of Art was defeated, and Rory O'Keary was

The English

,

The son of Art was then banished from Delvin, and his people were The English then went to Athlone, where they erected a castle. plundered.
killed.

They also Durrow k
.

erected the castle of Kinnity

h
,

the castle of Birr

1

,

and the

castle of

Cormac, the son of Art, went on a predatory excursion into Delvin, and plundered Melaghlin Beg, whom he banished from that country he also
:

slew William of the Mill, and assumed the lordship of Delvin himself

1
.

Castle of Smerhie, together with

all

the cowes,

'

Birr,

bioppa.

Now

generally called Par-

horses, and other cattle in the towne, was overtaken and fought withall by the English of the towne, where the English forces were over-

sonstown, from the family name of the present noble and distinguished proprietor, Lord Ross. as " a This name is

thrown, three of their knights slain, with their Constable and Cheif man, and Cormack broght himself, men, and prey home salfe and sound."

explained by O'Clery watery plain," thus: 6ioppae .1. maj uipje: lonann pop pae 7 oip ap lonann bip 7 uir^e ma. " Biorra, i. e. a plain of water for bir
: :

This name Bridge of Tine, opoichec Cine. would be anglicised Drehidtinny. It must have been the name of some old wooden bridge on the
g

means water

;

and

me

means a

plain."

A mo-

nastery was founded here, according

to the Irish

Brosna or on the Silver Kiver

;

but there

is

no

Calendar of the O'Clerys, by St. Brendan, the son of Neman, who died on the 29th of November,
k

bridge or place at present bearing the name in the King's County, or in the county of West-

A. D. 572.
Durroie,

oupmcn j.

A
Sir

castle

had been

meath. The name Tinnycross, a townland in the parish of Kilbride, barony of Ballycowan, and
King's County, would seem to retain a portion
viz., Tinny ; but as Tinnycross is but an anglicised form of cij net cpoipe, i. e. house of the cross, it cannot be considered as

finished at this place

of this name,

Hugh de Lacy, the by In the Annals so early as the year 1186. elder, of Clonmacnoise, as translated by Connell Mageoghegan, it is stated, more correctly, that the " finished and aided the English on this occasion
Castles of Dorrowe, Byrre, and Kynnety." 1 Under this year the Annals of Clonmacnoise
state,

bearing any
h

analogy to

opoichec Cine.
i.

Kinnity, cenn eicij,
called,

e.

the head of Etech,
the Feilire

that Finn O'Dempsey, and his brother

so

according

to

a note in

Aenguis, at the Yth

of April, from Etech, an

Donough, were most deceitfully taken by Geffrey March [De Marisco], who conveyed Finn
to Dublin,

ancient Irish heroine, whose head was interred

where he was bound
all

to a horse's tail,

here

of a townland and parish in thu of Bally brit, in the King's County. barony
It is the

name

and so dragged through wards hanged.

the streets, and after-

184

QNNaca Rio^hachca
aois crcioso,

eircectNN.

[1215.

1214.

Goip Cpiopo, mile, Da ceo, a ceachaip Decc.
ceppcop 6 ceatlaij .1. eappcop 6 ppiacpach Do ecc. Qpojap ua concobaip eppcop pfl TTluipfDaij Do ecc.
6fnmi6e injfn eccnigh bfn ao&a
nDfijbfchaib.
uf neill

Qn

bamcijeapna

oilij;

Decc lap

Cpeach to Denamh la hGoD mac TTlaoilpeachlainn ui laclamn pop comopba column cille, i Qo6 buDfipm DO rhapbaD la gallaib pia canr>
bliaDhna rpia piopcaibh De
-\

coluim

cille.

Cacal mac Diapmacca mic caiDj
Connachc DO
DO ecc.
ecc.
f

ciccfpna TTluije luipcc, cuip

opDam

bpian mac T?uai6pi

plairbfpraig

mac

ciccfpna lapraip Connachc

Cpeach cpiche caipppe Do Denam la hualgapcc ua puaipc ap
joipoelbaij co puce bu lomba laip.

pi lip

mac

Q018 CR10SO,
Qoip CpiopD,
mile,

1215.

Da

ceD,

a cuicc Decc.

Diompiup ua longapjdin aipoeppoc caipil Decc hi Roirh. Concobap ua henne eppcop cille Dalua Do ecc ap plijioh occ cionncub
Do lappan ccfcparhab comaiple jenepailce bai
Bishop of Hy-Fiachrack, eaypoj ua ppiacHe was Bishop of the Hy-Fiachrach pach in

ecclaip lacepanenpip.

m

" 6rnmioe injen hi Gicnic .1. bfn Oeoa hi neill, .1. pi Oilij, in bona penitentia quieuit."

Aidhne, whose country was co-extensive with
the diocese of KilmacduagTi. He could not have been bishop of the northern Hy-Fiachrach,
or Killala, as Corrnac O'Tarpaidh

This was one of the four Elagh, oileach of Ireland, and its ruins are royal palaces
situated on a hill about
six

miles north of
it

was bishop of

Derry.

Colgan thus
p. 181, col.
1,

that see from 1207 to 1226
tion of
n

See Harris's Edi-

Thaum.,

speaks of note 169

in

Trias
priscis

"
:

A

Ware's Bishops, pp. 649, 650.
ejnij.

scriptoribus Ailech Neid,
appellatur.
sedes, et post

0/TO] Hegny,

The Four Masters

Fuit perantiqua

hodie vulgo Ailech Begum Hibernia;

have omitted the ui by mere oversight. In the Annals of Ulster the reading is, bfnmioe injen
hui
Gijnij,
Sec.,

tempora fidei per easdem derelicta, Temoria denuo repetita et restaurata. Jacetin
Peninsula Borealis Ultoniffi Inis Eoghuin dicta

aud in those of Kilronan

:

1-215.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

185

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1214.

thousand two hundred fourteen.
,

m died. O'Kelly, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach Ardgar O'Conor, Bishop of Sil- Murray [Elphin], died.

Behmee, daughter of
Aileach
,

[0']

Hegny", and wife of
life.

Hugh

O'Neill;

Queen of

died, after

having spent a virtuous

the son of Melaghlin O'Loughlin, on the coarb of Columbkille but Hugh himself was killed before the expiration of a year afterwards, through the miracles of God and Columbkille.
;

A depredation was committed by Hugh,
Cathal
p

Mac Dermot,

the son of Teige,

Lord of Moylurg, and tower of the

glory

of Connaught, died. Brian, the son of RoryO' Flaherty, the son of the

Lord of West Connaught,

died.

The

territory of

Carbury [Co.

Sligo], the possession of Philip

Mac Costello,
.

was preyed by Ualgarg O'Rourke,

who

carried off a

number of cows q

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
C/irist,

1215.

one thousand two hundred fifteen.

Dionysius O'Lonargan, Archbishop of Cashel, died at Rome. Conar (Cornelius) O'Heney, Bishop of Killaloe, died on his return from
the fourth General Council of Lateran.
tertio lapide a civitate Dorensi."
P

nobleness, or dignity, in a paper
oc-

Glory,

opban

The word opban, which
is

College, Dublin, H.
lates cuip

1,

MS. in Trinity 946. Colgan trans15, p.

curs so frequently in these Annals,

explained jjldip, no uipechap, glory, nobility, in the Gloss to Fiach's Hymn, in the Liber Hymnorum ; uap ul
noble grade or dignity, in a MS. in Tfin. Col. Dublin, H. 3, 18, p. 550; it is glossed apb
e.
i.

opoain 7 oipeachaip lapcaip Domain, supremum caput ordinum & procerum occidenTrias Thaum.,
p.

tis." q

298.

jpu6,i.

Under

this year (1214) the

Annals of Kil-

uinm,

e.

high name or fame, in the

Amhra
fol.

ronan record the erection, by the English, of the castles of Clonmacnoise and Durrow; and they

Shenain, preserved in the Leabkar Breac,
121, a;

add

that,

5pu6 no uaiple, dignity or

nobility,

castle of Clonmacnoise,

shortly after the completion of the Cormac, the son of Art

by Michael O'Clery, in his Glossary of ancient Irish words; and apo uuiple, no uipeacap, high

O'Melaghlin,

who had been

expelled from Del-

vin, returned into that territory,

and plundered

2 B

186

[1215.

Qnnub ua muipfohaij eppcop Conmaicne,
Do ecc. ppioip buine jfirhin

-\

TTlaolpoil

ua muipfohaij

cenel pfpjupa cona bpaicpib, q co nDpuing maoilpabaill coipec la TTluipeabac mac mopmaip Ifmna. moip ele immaille ppiu Do mapbaD OonnchaD ua Duibbiopma coipeac na mbpeoca DO ecc, nDuibpecclep

CpaD ua

i

Doipe.

Qongup ua
pib pen.

cloinne caipelldin coipeac

Diapmaca Do mapbab la a bpair-

Do ecc. coipec ceneoil pfpaDhai j Do mapbab la a bpaicpibh. TTlag cana coipec cenel afnjupa
TTlupchab

mac cacmaoil

DO ecc. Ruaibpi ua ploinn ciccfpna Dfplaip Decc. cuicpijh mac cappjamna caoipec mumcipe maoilcpionna caoimgin ua ceallaij bpfj Do jabdil la jallaib maimpcip pfci

caip ace achluam,
;

]

a cpochab leo

in

achcpuim.

mac

eicigein caoipeac cloinne
its cattle,

Diapmaca Do

ecc.

the castle of Clonmacnoise of
feated the

and deit.

English who were

defending

Under

this year, also, the

Annals of Ulster
Breiffe, or the was styled the

and of Kilronan

mention the appearance of

The diocese of Ardagh, however, was extended beyond the country of these tribes at the synod of Kath Breasail, about the year 1118, was defined thus " the discese of Arversed.

when

it

:

a certain character, called
false,

Aedh

or pretended, Hugh, who Cobhartach, the Aider, Liberator, or Deliverer.

and from dagh, from Ardcana to Slieve-an-ierin, Ceis Coran to Urchoilten."
5

O'Mulfavitt,
is

Ua maolpabaiU
is still

This name,

He was
make
it

evidently some person who wished to appear that he came to fulfil some Irish
failed to

which

Anglicised Moylfavill in the old transla-

tion of the Annals of Ulster,

common'in

prophecy, but
pression.
1

make

the intended im-

Inishowen, but Anglicised Mulfaal, and someThe same name is Anglicised times Mac Paul.
Lavelle in Connaught, though pronounced in The territory of the KinelIrish O'Mullaville.

Bishop of Conmaicne.

That

is,

bishop of the

Ardagh, which comprises the country of the eastern Conmaicne ; that is, Annaly, the tersee of

ritory of O'Farrell, in the county of Longford ; and Muintir Eolais, that of Mac Eannall, in the

Fergus, of whom O'Mulfaal was chief, was called Carraic Bhrachaidhe, and comprised the north-

county of Leitrim.

These two families descend

from Cormac, the illegitimate son of Fergus, the dethroned King of Ulster, by Meave, Queen of
Connaught, in the
herty's Oyygia, part
first
iii.

west part of Inishowen. c The Great Steward of Lennox, mopmaop leariina See O'Flaherty's Ogygia, part iii. c. 8 1
Cearhain,

.

now

the Leven,

is

a river flowing out

century.

See O'Fla-

c.

46, where,

by

a

mere

of Loch Lomond, and uniting with the Clyde at the town of Dumbarton. It gave name to a district coextensive

oversight in the construction of a Latin sentence, the situation of these territories is re-

with the present Dumbarton-

shire in Scotland. O'Flaherty thinks that the great

1215.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
r

187

Annudh O'Murray, Bishop of Conmaicne [Ardagh], and MaelpoilO'Murray,
Prior of Dungiven, died. 8 Trad O'Mulfavill Chief of Kinel-Fergusa, with his brothers, and a great number of people who were with them, were slain by Murray, the son of the
,

Great Steward of Lennox'.

Donough O'Duvdirma", Chief of Bredagh, died in the Duvregles of Derry. Aengus O'Carellan, Chief of the Clann-Dermot", was slain by his own
kinsmen.

Murrough Mac Cawell, Chief of Kinel-Farry, died. Mac Cann, Chief of Kinel-Aengusa, was slain by his kinsmen. x Eory OTlynn [O'Lynn], Lord of Derlas died. Gillacutry Mac Carroon,
,

Chief of Muintir Maoil-t-sionna, died.
Gillakevin O'Kelly of Bregia, was taken prisoner in the monastery of St. Peter at Athlone, by the English, and afterwards hanged by them at Trim.

Teige

Mac

y Etigen, Chief of Clann-Dermot, died

.

Stewarts of Leamhain, or Lennox, were descended from Maine Leamhna, the son of Core, King
of Munster,

the seat of O'Lyn, Chief of Hy-Tuirtre.

This

name, which

by Mongfinna, the daughter of Fe-

many

signifies a strong fort, was applied to other places in Ireland, and is sometimes

radhach, King of the Picts.

In the year 1014 Muireadhach (a name which the Scotch write Murdoch), the mormaer of Leamhain, assisted

Anglicised Thurles. The Editor has met several forts of this name in Ireland, but none in Hy-

Brian Borumha in the battle of Clontarf against the Danes, which the Irish writers urge as an
evidence of his Munster descent ; and some have

Tuirtre in the county of Antrim. The most remarkable fort of the name remaining in Ireland
is

situated in the parish of Kilruane, in the

thought that they discovered a strong resemblance between the pronunciation of the dialect
of the Gaelic which
is

barony of Lower Ormond, in the county of Tipperary it consists of three great circular embankments and two deep trenches:
:

spoken in this territory,
is

y

Under

this year the

Dublin copy of the An-

and that spoken in Munster. u CPDuvdirma This name
Inishowen,

nals of Innisfallen record, that a great

war broke

yet common in but sometimes corrupted to Mac

out between Dermot of Dundronan, the son of

Dermot.
Inishowen.

Bredach was the north-east part of

w

Donnell More na Curra Mac Carthy, and his brother Cormac Finn; that the English were assisting on both sides ; and that during this

tribe

Clann-Dermot, clann oiapmaoa, was the name of the Mac Egans, situated in the

war the English acquired great possessions, and made great conquests of lands, on which they
and strong forts for themselves, to defend them against the Irish. The following were the castles erected on this occasion
built castles
:

lying round Duniry, in the south of the present county of Galway.
district

Derlas, oeplap, called ouplapin the Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan. It was the name of

x

The

castle of

Muintir Bhaire,

in Kilcrohane

2 B 2

188

[1216.

QO1S CR1OSO,
Ctoip CpiopD, mile,

1216.

Da cecr, a pe oecc.

cloinne oorhnaill DO ecc. TTlacjamain ua laicbfpcais cijeapna ollarh Gpenn mbpeicfrhnup Do ecc. ^lolla apndin ua mapcain Uomalcac mac aoDa mic aipeaccaij ui jioDuib Do mapbaD la Domhnall mac afoha mic Diapmacra. each6onn mac gilliuiohip comapba pacpaicc, -| ppiomaiD na hGpeann Do
i

ecc

hi

Roimh

lap nofiglibfchaio.

TTlaoilpeaclainn
TWiaoilip.

mac Diapmaca Do rhapbaD Dpeapaib

ceall,

~\

Do mumcip

TTlupchaD
parish, erected

mac

ecc. T?uaibpi uf Concobaip DO
See Ordnance
land, in the parish of Creagh, in the east divi-

by Mac Cuddihy

Map

of the County of Cork, sheet 129. The castles of Dun na mbarc [Dunnamarc]

sion of the barony of West Carbery ; and the ruins of the castle of Baltimore, which was an-

and Ard Tuilighthe, by Carew.

See Ordnance

Map

The

of the county of Cork, sheet 118. castles of Dun Ciarain [Dunkerron] and

na peoo, are ciently called Dun at Baltimore village. same sheet,

shewn on the
harbour

The

castle of Traigh-bhaile, near the

Ceapa na Coise [Cappanacusha], near the Kenmare River, in Kerry, by Carew. See Ordnance

Map of Kerry,
The

sheet 92.

ofCuanDor [Glandore], was erected by Barrett. This castle was afterwards called Cloghatradand belonged to Donell na Carton O'Dobally,

Dunloe, in Kerry, by Maurice, son of Thomas Fitzgerald. See Ordnance Map
of Kerry, sheet 65. The castle of Killforgla [Killorglin], and the castle of the Mang [Castlemaine], in Kerry,

castle of

novan, Chief of Clann-Loughlin,
the 10th of
grandson.

who

died on

May, 1580, and to his son and It was situated in the townland of
of

by

KilfaughnaAghatubridmore, in the parish called Glandore Castle. beg, and is now generally
See Ordnance

the same Maurice.
sheets 47, 56.

See Ordnance

Map of Kerry,

Map

of Cork, sheet 142.

The
of Gala na feirse

castles of Timoleague and

Dundeady were

The

castles of Moylahiff,

[Callanafersy], of Cluain Maolain [Cloonmealane], and of Curreens [now Currans], by the

For their erected by Nicholas Boy de Barry. Ordnance Map of the County of situation see
Cork, sheets 123, 144.
1

son of Maurice Fitzgerald See Ordnance of Kerry, sheets 46, 47, 48, 56.

Map

Clann-Donnell,

clcmn oorhnaill.

These

of Dunnagall and Dun na sead The ruins of the for[Baltimore], by Sleviny. mer are marked on the Ordnance Map of the
castles

The The

castle of Arlioch,

by Roche.

were a distinguished sept of the Kinel-Moen, of Raoriginally seated in the present barony but afterwards driven across the Foyle phoe,

by the O'Donnells. See the year 1178, where it is stated that Rory O'Laverty was elected
chief of
all

County of Cork, sheet 150, on Ringarogy

Is-

Kinel-Moen, in place of Donnell

1216.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

.18!)

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1216.
sixteen.

thousand two hundred

Mahon
Giolla

O'Laverty, Chief of the Clann-Donnel?, died.

O'Martan, Chief Ollave (professor) of law in Ireland, died. Tomaltagh, the son of Hugh, who was the son of Oireaghtagh O'Rodiv, was slain by Donnell, the son of Hugh Mac Dermot.

Amain

Eachdonn Mac
at

Gilluire

a
,

Coarb of

St.

Patrick and Primate of Ireland, died

Rome,

after a well-spent

life.

Melaghlin, the son of

Dermotb was
,

slain

by the men of

Fircall

c

and the

people of Meyler. Murrough, the son of Roderic O'Conor, died.
O'Gormly, who was deposed. This is sufficient evidence to shew that O'Laverty was of the
race of the Kinel-Moen.
a

gain,

or Fox's country, and Kinel-Fiacha, or

Mageoghegan's country, both which it joined near Kilbeggan on the west by Delvin Eathra,
;

Eghdonn Mac

Gilla- Uidhir.

He

is

called

Eugene Mac

Gillivider in Harris's edition of

Ware's Bishops, p. 62. His death is entered in "A. D. 1216. the Annals of Ulster, as follows
:

Coghlan's country on the east by OfO'Conor Faly's country on the south-east faly, by Hy-Regan, or Duthaidh Riagain, O'Dunne's
or
; ;

Mac

Gchoonrv

mac 5'^ e

uibip,

comapba

parpaic,

country and on the south by Ely O'Carroll, from which it was separated by the Abhainn
;

7 ppimaic Gpenn pope jenepale conyiliutn iacepanenpe Rome pelicicep oboopmmic." Thus rendered in the old translation " A. D.
:

Chara, which

falls

into the Little Brosna, near

the town of Birr

See Feilire Aenguis, preserved in the Leabhar Breac of the Mac Egans,
fol. 9,

1216.

Eghdon Mac

Gilluir,

Coarb of Patrick
See

and Primate of Ireland, post generate Consilium
Lateranense Romce feliciter obdormiuit." note under the year 1206.
b

Melagftlinn, the son

ofDermot.

His surname

in which Kinnity (church) is placed on " the frontiers of Ely and Feara Ceall pman cam Cino ecij ccoicpich hell 7 pep cell." " Finan Cam of Kinnity, on the frontiers of Ely and Feara Ceall." The following places are men: i

was O'Dempsey, according to Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise.
c

tioned
viz.
:

by the old Irish writers
;

as in this territory,
;

Eathain(now Rahen) Durrow Magh-leana,

Fircatt,

The

territory of Feara-Ceall, as

now

already observed, comprised the baronies of Bal-

the parish of Moylena, alias Kilbride, containing the town of Tullamore ; Lann Elo (now

lycowan, Ballyboy, and Fircal, alias Eglish, in the King's County. It was the most southern
territory of ancient Meath, and the hereditary principality of the O'Molloys, descended from

Lynally)

Coill-na-gcrann (now called Kilmore and Greatwood, and situated in the parish of
;

Killoughy); Pallis ; Ath-buidhe (now Bally boy); O'Dugan Eglish; Baile-an-duna ; Drumcullen.

Fiacha, the son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. It was bounded on the north by Muintir-Thadh-

honours the peapa ceall with the following
quatrain
:

190

[1217.
cille

Caiplen

Dalua DO Denam la Seappaij mapep,
19.

-\

an jailleappoc

pop DO benamh cighe innre ap eiccin. On cpfp ilenpg Do pioghaDh op Sa^ain

Occobep.

aois crcioso,

1217.

Qoip CpiopD, mile, Da ceD, a pechc Decc.
5iolla cijeapnaijh mac jiolla Ronam eppcop Qipjiall, Gpeann Do ecc lap bpCnnainn, -\ lap nairhpicche.
-\

cfnn cananac

Oiapmair mac concobaip mic Diapmaca njeapna muiji luipcc Do bomnaill bfn carail cpoibbfipcc Do ecc. TTlop mjfn uf bpiain, Oomnall ua ga&pa Do ecc.
.1.

ecc.

Niall

mac mic

lochlainn

ui

Concobaip Do ecc.

Donnchab ua maoilbpenainn caoipeac cloinne concobaip Do ecc. ua pfpjail Do mapbaD la TTlupchaD cappac ua ppfpjail.
c

mac aca&ain caoipeac
pean

cloinne pfpmaije Do ecc.

T3i

bpeap ceall na

j-clotoearii

Ware's Works,
e

vol.

i.

pp. 521-593.

O'TTlaoilriiuaiD,

paop an plomoeao,
;

Under the year 1216 the Annals of Kilroentries,

l?o

paomao 506 lann leipean
na aonap aijepean.

nan contain the following

which the

T?arf

Four Masters have omitted:

"

King of Feara
Is O'Molloy,

"A. D.
Ceall of ancient swords

1216.

A

world at
noble the surname,
centius,
;

Rome

at Lateran, after this

synod of the clergy of the with the Pope Innosynod (council), Pope

Every sword was vanquished by him

and soon

He
d

has a division to himself alone."

T/te castle ofKittaloe

This passage

is

given

Innocentius quieuit in Christo. "John, King of England, was deposed by the English this year, and died of a fit. (In the

in the

Annals of Clonmacnoise,

as translated

by

Annals of Clonmacnoise,
geoghegan,
it is

as translated

by Ma-

Connell Mageoghegan, as follows: " A. D. 1216. " founded a Geffrey Marche" [De Marisco] Castle at Killaloe, and forced the inhabitants
to receive
this bishop

stated that he died in the

Ab-

" bey of Swynshead, being poyson'd by drinking of a cup of ale wherein there was a toad pricked

an English Bushop." was Eobert Travers.

The name of

He was

after-

wards deprived (in 1221), and the see continued to be filled almost exclusively by Irishmen till
the Eeformation,
there having been but one Englishman, namely, Eobert de Mulfield, who

with a broach.") "The son of the King of France assumed the government of England, and obtained her hostages."
" Gilla Croichefraich

Mac Carroon and

the

priest O'Celli died, both having been crossed

and

succeeded in

1409

See

Harris's

edition

of

ordered to go to the Eiver [Jordan]. " The abbot O'Lotan, a learned and pious

1217-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
castle of Killaloe
d

191

The

was erected by Geoffrey Mares. The English Bishop
force.

also built a

house there by

Henry

III.

was crowned

in

6 England on the 19th of October

.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1217.
seventeen.

thousand two hundred

Gillatierny Mac Gillaronan, Bishop of Oriel (Clogher), and head of the canons of Ireland, died, after penance and repentance*. Dermot, the son of Conor Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, died.

More, daughter of O'Brien (Donnell), and wife of Cathal Crovderg
[O'Conor], died.

Donnell O'Gara died.
Niall, the

grandson of Loughlin O'Conor, died. Donough O'Mulrenin, Chief of the Clann-Conor, died.
Teige O'Farrell was
Gillapatrick
slain

by Murrough Carragh

O'Farrell.
,

Mac Acadhain, Chief of Clann-Fearmaighe 8
Gregory, son of Gilla-nain the county of Leitrim

died.

man, in pace

quieuit.

naingel, abbot of the
quieuit, in the East,

monks of Ireland,

in pace

being expelled by the of Drogheda, through envy and jealousy.

monks

; Muintir-Kenny lying between Lough Allen and the bounprincipally dary of the county of Eoscommon, and Clann-

" The Archbishop O'Eooney was cruelly and violently taken prisoner by Maelisa O'Conor,

Fermaigh, comprising

all

the valley of Glanfarne.

and the Connacians, who cast him in chains, a thing of which we never heard a parallel, i. e.
the fettering of an archbishop. " Patriciua, Bishop of Knockmoy, quieuit."

The following chiefs are placed in the district of West Breifny, and tributary to O'Eourke, in O'Dugan's topographical poem, viz. Mac Tier:

nan of Tealach Dunchadha, now the barony of Tullyhunco, in the county of Cavan Magauran,
;

Chief of Tealach Eachdhach,

Repentance, iap bpfnamo 7 naichpicche In the Annals of Ulster at 1218, andofKilro-

f

Tullyhaw, in the

now the barony of same county Mac Consnamha,
;

nan in 1217,

this phrase is given in Latin thus:

"5'U-a

cisfpncuj- tnac

aipgiall 7 cfnn
tentia quieuit."

fylla Ronain er-puc cananac Sperm in bona peni-

(and sometimes ridiculously anglicised Fordc), Chief of Muintir-Kenny, and Mac Cagadhain, Chief of Clann-Fermaighe, both
in the present

now Mac Kinnaw

barony of Dromahaire, in the

*Clann-Fearmaighe. The natives still remember the name of this territory, and that of the
adjoining one of Muintir Kenny, both which are contained in the present barony of Dromahaire,

county of Leitrim ; Mac Darcey, Chief of KinelLuachain, a territory which comprised the present parish of Oughteragh, at the foot of Slievean-ierin
;

in Dartry

and Mac Clancy, and his correlatives and Calry, territories nearly all in-

192

Riohachra
Domnall mac TTlupchab
rheg cocldin cigeajina uprhoip
tiiacaib TTlaoileaclamn

[1218.

oealbna Do rhap-

bab DO

meag

coclin

i

meabail

i

liarDpuim.

Cacal

pionn 6 lacrna caoipeac an
i

Da bac Do mapbaD la hua pploinn

maighe Vieleocc

ppiull

iria

njh

pfin.

Copbmac mac Uomalcaij ooipDneDh.

QOIS CR1OSO,
Qoip CpiopD,
mile,

1218.

Da checc, a hochc Decc.

Cletnenp eppcop luijhne Do ecc. na naom ua sopmjaile Saccapc pctca liipaij Do ecc ina oilichpe.
eluded in the present barony of Kossclogher, in the north of the county of Leitrim. h Liathdruim. There is no place in the territory of Delvin Mac Coghlan, now called Liathdruim, unless we may suppose Leitra, in the parish of Clonmacnoise, to be a corruption of it. See

son of Tomaltagh of the Eock, the son of Conor. Under this year the Annals of Kilronan contain the

altogether omitted

following entries, which have been by the Four Masters ;

" A. D. 1217. Oisin, Abbot of Abbeyderg [in
the county of Longford], died. " The fishermen of all Ireland, from Waterford and

Ordnance

Map

o'f

the King's County, sheet 13.

There is a place called Liathdruim, Anglice Leitrim, in the parish of Monasteroris, in the same See Ordnance Map, sheet 1 1 county.
. '

Wexford

in

the south, to DerryIsle of

Columbkille in the north, went to the

Mann

to fish,

where they committed aggressions,

Moy-h

JSleoff,

tnaj heleog.

A level district
in the

but were

all killed in

Mann

in retaliation for

in the parish of Crossmolina,

Tirawley, in the county of Mayo. under the year 1 1 80. The territory of the Two Backs lies principally bet\veen Lough Conn and
the Kiver
k

barony of See note

their violence.

" The Abbots of

all

Ireland went to England,

to the general chapter held there this year ;

but

Moy.

their attendants were dispersed, and the most of them were slain in England; and the Abbot of

This entry should be made a part of the second paragraph under this year, relating to
it is

Drogheda was deprived of
chapter."

his

abbacy

at this

Dermot mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg, for so given in the more ancient and more correct
Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan.
thus in the Annals of Ulster
:

"

Every

fruit tree

produced abundance of fruit

this year."

It stands

" The English of Ulidia mustered a plundering army, with which they proceeded to Armagh, and plundered it. O'Fotuelan was the
totally

A. D. 1218. tDiapmaio

mac ConchuBaip

mic Oiapma&a pi ITluije luipj mopcuup epc. Copmac DO jabcnl pii oa ip.
In the Annals of Kilronan, which
nicle of the district, this
is

person who guided them, for he had promised the people of Armagh that the English would
not plunder them so long as he should be with them (the English). In a week after, O'Neill

the Chrocalled the

Cormac

is

1218.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Mac Mac

193

Donnell, the son of Murrough
Delvin, was treacherously
slain

Coghlan, Lord of the greater part of
Coghlan, at

by the sons of Melaghlin

Liathdruim".

Cathal Finn O'Laghtna, Chief of the Two Bacs, was treacherously slain in his own house by O'Flynn of Moy-h-Eleog'.

Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh [Mac Derniot], was inaugurated

11 .

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1218.

thousand two hundred eighteen.

Clemens, Bishop of Leyny [Achonry], died.
Gilla-na-naev O'Gormally, priest of Rathloury
1 ,

died on his pilgrimage.

Roe and Mac Mahon came and took a great prey from the English, namely, one thousand two The English and O'Fotuelan hundred cows.
pursued them, but the Kinel-Owen turned upon them, and killed fourteen men who were clad in
coats of mail, besides the Constable of

p.

See Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops, 286, under Flathberty G'Brokain, where it is stated that "the episcopal see was translated
Harris.
to

from Ardsrath
to St. Luroch,

whose

Maghere, which was dedicated festival is celebrated on the

Dundalk

;

and O'Fotuelan was killed in revenge of
Patrick."
1

St.

17th of February." In a Latin epitaph on a tombstone in the cemetery of the Roman Catholic chapel
of Maghera, the late Dr. Makeever, P. P. of
is

Rathloury,
fort.

lupaij, i. e. St. Lurach's This church, about the situation of which

Rac

ghera,
saint

called ParochusRatUurensis.
locally called St.

is

now

Loury.

MaThe patron The cathe-

our topographical writers 'have committed so

dral church of the

many
is

strange blunders, is still well known; it the head of a deanery in the county of Londonis

Ardstraw, in

Kinel-Owen was originally at the north-west of Tyrone, whence it

town of Maghera, called Machaire Eatha Luraigh, where anciently the church, grave, and holy well of St. Lurach
derry, and
situated in the

to Rath Luraigh, in the present town of Maghera, in the county of Londonderry. In course of time the ancient bishopric of Ardstraw became a part of the see of

was afterwards translated

are

still

to be seen,

and where his

festival

was

See Cacelebrated on the 17th of February The situalendar of the O'Clerys at this day.
tion of this church,
to be the

Clogher; but on the elevation of Derry into a bishop's see in the year 1 158, the bishopric of

same

as

which some have supposed Ardstraw, was well known to

Rath Luraigh was made a part of its diocese and finally, by the power of German O'Cer;

vallan,

and

his tribe of the Kinel

Owen, the

See his Primordia, pp. 856, 857, where he says that the bishopric of Ardstraw, together with that of llathlurig, then a deanery called

Ussher

bishopric of Ardstraw was separated from the diocese of Clogher, and annexed to that of Derry,

about the year 1266
1179.

See note under the year

Its Rathloury, was annexed to the see of Derry. situation was also well known to Ware and even to

2 c

194
TTlaoiliopa

[1218.

ua Oai^pe ai]iclnnneach Doipe column cille Do ecc an roccrhaD lap nDenam la Do becembep lap mbfic cfcpacar bbaDain ma aipchinDeac, ccuaic. Do gniorh hi call jaca maicfpa pop caorhnaccaip Ufmpall mainipcpe na buille Do coippeaccaD. ua ccuipcpe Do mapbab la gallaib, TTluipcfpnac ua ploinn ciccfpna fil ccacapaicch uile, cuip Conjalach ua cuinn raoipeac TTlaije lujaD, DO mapbab la gallaib beop einijjh, oipoeapcaiy cuai^cipc Gpeann
-]
i

-|

-]

-]

jaipcceb, ceDna. ip in 16

~\

Da Ruaibpi, i TTIaoilpeaclainn
bfccain.

riiac

meg

coclain Do ecc

i

maimpcip

cille

Cochlamn ua Concobaip Do ecc
m Maelisa
lated

-|

mainipcip cnuic tnuai&e.
but
its site is pointed out about one hundred perches to the south of the town. Its burial ground still remains, but the site of the monas-

O^Deery
:

by Colgan chidnechus Dorensis in hospitalitatiis, aliisque

This passage is thus trans" Moelisa Hua Doighre Ar-

bonis operibus prsedicabilis, postquam munus Archidnechi quadraginta annis exercuerat ; obiit

tery
p

is

now

a green field.
:

Louffftlin

'Conor.

He was the
6, col. 4.
i.

tenth son of

Doria 8 Decembris."
not the archdeacon, as
quaries have supposed.
n

The aipcinneach was

Turlough More O' Conor, Monarch of Ireland
See Book of Lecan, foL 72,

many

respectable anti-

iRmockmoy, Cnoc mucuoe,

e.

Collis

Muadice.

Hoy-Lughad, mag lujao. This is called Magh Lughach in the Annals of Kilronan.
There were several
trict in

Now the Abbey

of

Knockmoy,

in the

barony

districts

in Ireland of this
is

of Tiaquin, in the county of Galway, and about This is six miles to the south-east of Tuam.

name, but the one here mentioned

a level dis-

the

Hy-Tuirtre, in the present county of Antrim, which is mentioned in these Annals at

Four Masters.

A. M. 2859, and in Keating's History of Ireland (Haliday's edition, p. 178), as cleared of wood in the time of Neimhidh, the leader of the second
This passage is rendered colony into Ireland. in the old translation of the Annals of Ulster as
follows:

this monastery by the According to Grace's Annals of Ireland, the Abbey of Knockmoy, which was otherwise called de Cotte Victoria;, was founded
first

mention made of

by Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught, in the year 1 1 89 but the Dublin copy of the Amials
;

of Innisfallen,

and Ware's Antiquities at Galits

way, and also his annals, place
the year 1190.
It
is

foundation in

"A. D.

of Turtry,

1218. Murtagh O'Flyn, King was killed by the Galls, Congalach

the general opinion of Irish historians that Cathal Crovderg founded
this

O'Cuin, the Candle of feats and courage of the North of Ireland, Prince [nij coipech] of Moye " Luga and Kindred Cathasay, all" [both] killed
the same day."
Kilbeggan,
cill beccain.

abbey

for Cistercian

monks,

in

commemo-

ration of a victory, which he had gained at the hill of Knockmoy, and hence called it de
Colle Victoria;.

Now

a town in

century,

now

at the

In a compilation of the sixteenth Convent of Esker, near

the south of the county of Westmeath. There is not a vestige of the monastery now remaining,

Athenry, it is stated that the Abbey of crioc buao, i. e. monasterium de Colle Victories, was

1218.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

195

Erenagh of Deny, died on the 18th of December having been Erenagh of Deny for forty years, and having done all the good in his power, both in Church and State.
.

Maelisa 0'Deery m

;

of the monastery of Boyle was consecrated. Murtough O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre, was slain by the English and Congalagh O'Quin, Chief of Magh Lugad", and of all Sil-Cathasaigh, and tower
;

The church

of the valour, hospitality, and renown of the north of Ireland, was also slain by the English on the same day.

Rory and Melaghlin, two sons of Mac Coghlan, died
Kilbeggan
.

in the monastery of

q p Loughlin O'Conor died in the monastery of Knockmoy

.

founded by Carolus O'Conor about the year 1220; but this is totally wrong in the name

tory without being corroborated by some cotemporaneous English or Irish authority. Dr. Led-

name

and date of the foundation, for the original Irish is not cnoc buaio, the hill of the victory, but

wich says, that the battle in commemoration of which the Abbey of Knockmoy was built, was
" In the fought in Ulster! height of the battle," writes the doctor, " O'Conor vowed to build an

ofMuaidh, a woman's name, denoting good, or noble (maic no uapal) and this name is unquestionably older than the
hill
;

cuoc imiaioe, the

time of Cathal Crovderg, for the plain adjoining the hill of Knockmoy was called Magh Muaidhe
at a

abbey in his own country, if he was crowned with success, and he erected Knockmoy, in Irish, Cnocmugha, the
ters styled
hill
'

of slaughter, and in monkish wri-

very early period. covered no contemporaneous or trustworthy account of the battle said to have been fought and

The Editor has

dis-

Monasterium de Colle Victoria,' to perpetuate the remembrance of O'Conor's victory."
p.

Antiquities of Ireland,

second edition,

won by

Cathal Crovderg at this place, and is inclined to think that Cottis Victories is but a fanciful translation of the ancient Irish
hill, as if it

520.

Dr. Leland, however, with that display of
philosophic
inference from
his

were cnoc rnbtiaib.

name Of such

of the
fanci-

which renders
rity, treats as

work worthless

legendary events, as an autho-

ful

translations

we have

several instances

in

true history the account of this

other parts of Ireland, as de Rosea Vatte, for Rop ^lap; de Viridi ligno, for Newry, or luBap

supposed battle contained in the Book of Howth, which he quotes (but without knowing that it

Cinn cpajja; de

Voile salutis, for tnamirrip

an
it

was the Book of Howth),

as a

MS.

in the

Lam-

BeuUnj, &c. Hanmer, in

The Book

of

Howth, and from

his Chronicle

(Dublin edition of

beth Library, P. No. 628, and draws the following conclusion, which shews that a man may

1809, pp. 338-341), give an account, but without mentioning the place, of a "bloody battaile"

be a sound logician, though a bad judge of the After authenticity of historical monuments.
describing the fictitious battle,
lie

between O'Conor and Sir Armoric
in

St.

Lawrence,

writes: "

An

which Sir Armoric and

all

his small

band of

were annihilated; but it is a mere romance, and should not be received as hissteel-clad warriors

advantage gained with such difficulty and so little honour, was yet sufficient for the levity

and vanity of Cathal.

He founded

an abbey

2 c 2

196

[1219.

Cpeac DO

Denarii la gallaib
-\

ap uib bpium na Sionna, Dpeam Do connachcaibh t>o bpeic poppa 50 paimiD popp na jallaib 50 ccopba&ab Oiob. Do pochaip mac uf cpacap cuilleaD ap ceo eiccip mapbaD, a maille ppip. Concobaip pppiofguin na pjainnpe 50 nopuing Dia muincip
-| "|
i

la muipcfprac cappac ua ppfpjail mme, mac coippbealbaij mic maoileaclamn, Diapmaic
-|

aois CRIOSO,
Qoip CpiopD,
mile,

1219.

Da ceD, a naoi Decc.

maoileoin eppcop cluana mic noip to bacao. ponachcan ua bpondin comopba coluim cille DO ecc,

Goo ua

-|

plann ua bpol-

chain oo oiponeaD

ma

iona6 ip

in

corhopbup.
t>o

TTlaelfpclamn

mac Concobaip maonmaije

mapbab la TTlajnup mac
i

coipp&ealbaij i Concobaip lap ngabail cije paip i ccluain cuaipcipc. SluaiccheaD la hUa noomnaill .1. oomnall mop ngaipbcpian connacr Da
lordship of O'Beirne.

upon the field of action called de Colle Victories; and by this weak and inconsiderate mark of
triumph, raised a trophy to the romantic valour
of his enemies."

To

this

circumstance
:

O'Dugan

refers in the following lines

TTIuincip Beipn,

cpo&a an carpal,

Mr. Moore

Qp
in opposition to all writers,

riiacaiB O'lTlannuchdn;

says,

that this battle was fought on the site of the abbey, between two rivals of the house of

Cpe

dp

jleo, cpe Bpi j, cpe Bagap, leo cip a o-canjaoap.

O'Conor, but he quotes no authority, and we must therefore conclude that he drew his account
of the event
facts.

" The O'Beirnes, a brave battalion,

Are over the

race of

O'Monahan

;

by inference from other collateral The truth would seem to be that there is
to

By
s

fighting,

by

vigour,

The

district into

by which they came

threatning,
is

their's."

no evidence
fought, and
that the

prove that such a battle was ever
therefore,

it is,

but

fair to

assume

Under this year the Annals of Ulster and of Kilronan record the death of Gilla-Ernan O'Martan, chief

name de

Colle Victories is

but a fanciful

Brehon of
;

Ireland,

who had

retired

Latinized translation of cnoc ITIuaiDe, orKnock-

into a monastery

and the

latter annals record

moy.

Hy-Briuin of the Shannon, otherwise called Tir Briuin na Sionna, now Tir ui Bhriuin. -A
1

the death of the poet O'Maelrioc, the most distinguished of the poets of Ireland, next after the

O'Dalys

;

also the death of O'Nioc,
;

Abbot of

beautiful district in the county of lloscommon,

lying between Elphin and Jamestown, of which O'Manachain, now Monahan, was chief up to the

and they also record the burning of that part of the town of Athlone belonging to Meath.
Kilbeggan
E

year 1249, but after that period

it

became the

In

his place.

This passage

is

thus rendered,

12190

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

197

depredation was committed by the English of Meath, and by Murtcmgh Carragh O'Farrell on the Hy-Briuin of the Shannon'. Dermot, the son of

A

Turlough, who was the son of Melaghlin, and some of the Connacians, overtook them, and defeated the English, of whom upwards of one hundred

The son of O'Conor and some of his persons were either slain or drowned. people fell fighting, in the heat of the conflict*.
4

THE AGE OF CHKIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1219.
nineteen.

thousand two hundred

O'Malone, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, was drowned. Fonaghtan O'Bronan, Coarb of St. Columbkille, died and Flann O'Brol-

Hugh

;

laghan was appointed in his place'. Melaghlin, the son of Conor Moinmoy, was slain by Manus", the son of Turlough O'Conor, who had taken his house (by force) at Cloontuskert".

An
word
for

army was

led

by O'Donnell (Donnell More)

into the

Eough Third

of

word, in the old translation of the Annals " A. D. of Ulster 1219. Fonaghtan O'Bronan,
:

him and Godfrey O'Deery, the Erenagh, about the professorship, when the matter was referred to
the Coarb of St. Patrick,

Coarb of Colum-kill,
put

died.

Flan O'Brolcan was

who

settled their dif-

in his place in the coarbship ;"
:

Colgan, in Trias T/taum., p. 506

and thus by " Fanactanus

ferences, and decided, by consent of all the parties, that John Mac Infhir leighinn should be ap-

O'Broin, Abbas Dorensis, obiit; et in ejus locum Flannius O'Brolchain suffactus est."

pointed to the professorship.
u

Manm,

mctjnur-.

He was

the tenth son of

is

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster it stated, that on the death of O'Bronan, a dis-

pute arose between the people of Derry and the Kinel-Owen, about the election of a successor ;
that the people of Derry elected Mac Cawell, and that Hugh O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen
elected

Turlough More O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland See Book of Lecan, fol. 72, b, col. 4. w Cloontuskert, cluctin There are
ruaipcipc
in

two

places of this

name
is

Connaught, but the

one here referred to

unquestionably that situated near the River Suck, about five miles
south of Ballinasloe, in the county of Galway, where are the ruins of an extensive monastery Conor Moinmoy O'Conor, erected by O'Kelly. the father of Melaghlin O'Conor, who had his

Flann O'Brollaghan, and established him
;

in the coarbship

that soon after a dispute arose

between the people of Derry and O'Brollaghan, when the latter was expelled; that after this
the people of Derry and the Kinel-Owen elected Murtough O'Milligan, the Lector of Derry, who

enjoyed his professorship and the abbacy for a
year, vel pauloplus,

house here, made great efforts to wrest the terfrom the O'Kellys of Hyritory of Moinmoy and erected a castle at Ballinasloe, in the Many,
very heart of their country.

when a dispute

arose between

Rio^hachna eiReawN.
-] -\

[1220.

cara aoba pinn uite urhla uf puaipc, i ui ftai^illij, bpuaip bpai^De, gabail Do mp fin cpe pfpaib manach 50 |io milleab laip gac conaip cpep a cuaic ooneoc bai pppfpabhpa ppipp. ccuDlicaiD ecip all,
-[
i

~\

Ualcjia oe lacg, 1

mac

uilliam biipc Do ceacc

a

Sajcoibh.
i

Ouboapa mac

TTluipfoaij ui maille Do

mapbab

n^fimeal la carol

cpoibhbfpcc ina longpopn pfm cpe na

rhijniorhaibh.

Gnoa

ijac t>anaip

ui

rhaoilciapdm Do ecc.

QO1S CR1O3O,
Qoip CpiopD,
i

1220.
pice.

mile,

Da ceo, a

lacobup Do rocc nGpinn ina lejaiDec on bpapa Do pfiDiuccaD, Dal ecclapracoa na hGpeann, ~\ a ool pop cculaibh Dopioipi. DopoucchaD

-\

Concobaip Do mapba6 la comap mac uccpaij ag cecc a hinnpibh gall, ap ccionol coblaij Do Diapmaic 05 cecc Do jabail pije connachr. UlaolpuanaiD ua Duboa Do bacaD ap an ccoblac cceDna.
TCuaiDpi
(.1.

Oiapmaic mac

mac coippDealbaig

rhoip)

ITlaolpeachlainn,

Diapmaic mac
rheabail.

maoilpeclainn bice Do bachab ap loc pib. bpiain Daill Do mapbab Do mac marjarhna ui bpiain cpe
la gallaib mi&e 50 liach liacc 50 nDfpnBrian, the brother of the

mac

SluaijeaD la ualcpa De lacg,
x

-)

Rough Third of Connaught, jaipBcpiun Connacc Connell Mageoghegan, in his translation
of the Annals of Clonniacnoise, states that the

Monarch

Niall, of the
dis-

Nine Hostages, and ancestor of the most
tinguished families of
*

Connnught.

rough third of Connaught comprised the counties of Leitrim, Longford, and Cavan. " A. D. 765. The
Kules of St. Quasran and St. Aidan were preached in the three thirds of Counaught, whereof the

The O'Malleys were CPMattey, ua maille. chiefs of Umhall, a territory comprising the baronies of Murrisk and Burrishoole, in the west
of the county of Mayo.
parts, called
It

was divided into two

two Brenyes and Annally, counties of Leytrym, Longford, and Cavan were one third part called
the
y

Upper and Lower Umhall, the former comprising the barony of Murrisk, and the
latter that of Burrishoole.

Rough Third Part of Connaught." Race of Aedh Finn, car ae6a pinn,

These divisions are
See

i.

e.

the

called the

Owles by English writers

map

O'Rourkes, O'Reillys, and their correlatives, descended from Aedh Finn, son of Feargna, the son
of Fergus, son of Muireadhach, son of

prefixed to Genealogies, Tribes,

and Customs of

Hy-Fiac/irac/t, printed for the Irish ArcliEeological Society in 1844.
a

Sriabh, son of

Eoghan Duach Galach, who was son of

Under

this year

the Annals of Kilronan

1220.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

199

Connaught", and obtained hostages and submission from O'Rourke and O'Reilly, He afterwards passed through Fermaand from all the race of Aedh Finn y
.

nagh, and destroyed every place through which he passed, both lay and ecclesiastical property, wherein there was any opposition to him. Walter de Lacy and the son of William Burke returned from England.

Duvdara, the son of Murray* O'Malley, was put to death for his crimes by Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, while in fetters in O'Conor's fortress.
Enda, the son of Danar O'Mulkieran,
died".

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1220.

thousand two hundred twenty.

Jacobus came to Ireland as the Pope's Legate, to regulate and constitute b the ecclesiastical discipline of Ireland, and then returned home
.

Dermot, the son of Roderic (who was son of Turlough More O'Conor), was slain by Thomas Mac Uchtry, as he was coming from the Insi Gall (Hebrides),
after

having there collected a

fleet,

for the purpose of acquiring the

kingdom

of Connaught.

Melaghlin, Ree.

Mulrony O'Dowda was drowned on the same expedition. the son of Melaghlin Beg [O'Melaghlin], was drowned in Lough
slain

Dermot, the son of Brian Dall, was treacherously
O'Brien.

by the son of'Mahon
to

An

army was led by Walter de Lacy and the English of Meath
Salvation."

contain the following entries, of which the Four Masters have collected no account: "A.D. 1219-

But

in the

The Coarb of Feichin
its

of Fore

mortuus

est."

1221, this entry is given differently, thus: 1221. lacop penciail DO rfcc

Annals ofKilronan, under the year A. D.

"Cluain Coirbthe [Kilbarry] was burned, both houses and church, in this year, and Drogheda was carried away by the flood.
b

map legdm

6

Roim bo pebujao
na n-ec

Returned home.

In the Annals of Clonmac-

7 eipeaju DO eimrujuo 66 o cleipcib 6penn cpe Simoncacc, 7 imceacc DO a

6al ejlapDacoa,

D'dp, 7 o'aipjeo

noise, as translated
is

by Mageoghegan,

this passage

h-6pmn
Rome,

if in

mbliaoum ceona.
to Ireland as a

"A. D. 1221.
Legate from and he

given as follows :
" A. D.
1

Jacob Penciail came

220, Jacob, the Pope's Legate,

came

to settle the ecclesiastical affairs,

to Ireland this year,

went about

all

the King-

collected horse-loads of gold

and

silver

from the

dome

for the

Reformation of the Inhabitants,
for their

and constituted many wholesome rules

clergy of Ireland by simony, and he departed from Ireland the same year."

200

cmwaccmwac-a Kio^hachca eireeaNR

[1221.

cacal cpoibofpcc cap Sionamn ann. Sluaijeab ele la r ac upmop caifUm ab eccla na 5 oill 50 noeapnpac pic le hua cconcobhr oip ip in ccalab, gup 5
aip, i

co po pccaoilpioc connaccaigh an caiplea DO Qn caipneach piabach ma 5 Flanncha6a, -[ pfpjal a 5 pampaDam mac oomnaill mic peapjail, -\ la cloinn .1. mapbao la hdooh ua puaipc
pfprnaighe.

aois cr?ioso,
Qoip
Sancc Dominic [DO
Cpiopt), mfle,
ecc].

1221.

Da

ceo, pice

a

h-doin.

i

Copbmac ab comaip Do rhapbaD. TTlac hujo De laa Do fechc i nGpinn Do Oo coiDpioD ap aon mbaib aoDa uf nell.
c

nfriiroil
i

camij Do najaiD jail Gpeann,

Rig

Sajcan,

-|

-|

baj, now called baile aca liaj and Anglicised Ballyleague. The name ac liaj was
originally applied to the ford

Qr

whereupon, Cahall Crovederg, King of Connought, with his forces, went to the west" [recte
east]

on the Shannon at

" of the river of Synen, and the English-

Lanesborough. Ballyleague

is

now

the

name

of

that part of the village of Lanesborough, on the west side of the Shannon, in the province of Cpn-

men, seeing them encamped at Calace, were strocken with fear, and came to an attonement
of Truce ; the Englishmen returned to their

own

See Tribes and Customs of Hy-Many, naught. for the Irish Archa;ological Society, in printed 1843, and the map prefixed to the same work.

houses, and Cahall Crovederg broke down the
said Castle."

The passage

is

better given in the

Annals of Kilronan, but under the year 1221,
as follows:

The Athliag on the Shannon is called Alhliag Finn in the work called Dinnsenchus, where
it

ford of Finn's [Mac Cumexplained stones. There is another place on the haill's]
is
tlie

A. D. 1221. Cairlen Ctra liaj bo puabaipc Do oenurh oo Ualopa Oelaci, 7 DO fluaj; na
iriibe ule.

River Suck, called anciently Athliag Maenacain, i. e. St. Maenacan's Stony- ford, now Anglicised
Athleague.
d

cualaoap imoppu Connacca pm cancooap caipip miap co pancoDap rpi lap ITluincipe h Qnjoile, 7 a maj mbpeamui6e jup loipceDop Dumjjfn hi Chumn, 7 co noea-

Oo

Caladlt

This territory

is still

well

known

caoap cpetnic pap
ooib
in

ip in

Cala6, cup pacba&
cpe coip pira.

in the country,
cline,

and contains the parish of Eathin the west of the county of Longford.

caiplen ap
1221.

eicin, 7

This passage is given as follows, in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise.

"A. D. 1220. Walter Delacie and the English of Meath, with their forces, went to Athliag, where
they founded a
castle,

The Castle of Ath liag was atto be made by Walter De Lacy and the tempted forces of all Meath. But when the Connacians heard of this, they came across [the Shannon]
from the West, and proceeded through the middle of Muintir-Annaly, and Magh Breagh-

"A. D.

which they finished almost;

1221.]
c

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

201

where they erected the greater part of a castle. Another army was led by Cathal Crovderg, eastwards across the Shannon, into the territory d and the English, being stricken with fear, made peace with him of Caladh
Athliag
, ;

and the Connacians destroyed the castle. The Cairneach Biabhach" Mac Clancy f and Farrell Magauran s were killed by Hugh, the son of Donnell, who was son of Farrell O'Rourke, and by the
, ,

h

Clann-Fermaighe

.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
St.

1221.

Christ, one

thousand two hundred twenty-one.

Dominic

[died].

Cormac, Abbot of Comar', was killed. The son of Hugo de Lacy came to Ireland, without.the consent
of England, and joined

of

the

King

Hugh

O'Neill.

Both

set out to

oppose the English of

mhuidhe, and burned O'Quin's fortress, and passing through it westwards into the territory of
Caladh na h-Anghaile], they compelled the castle to be left to them, on conditions
e. [i.

great priest of Taghshinny" [in the county of

Longford],

"a senior distinguished by his piety,
on his

Caladh

charity, wisdom, learning, and writings,

pilgrimage in the sanctuary of Jniscloghran" [in

of peace."
'

Lough
i.

llee].

The Cairneach Riabhach,

e.

sacerdos fuscus,

They
all

also record the

the swarthy or tan-coloured priest. O'Clery explains the word cuipneuc by receipt, a
priest.
It

treuille [Netterville] into Ireland, as

coming of Lucas de LePrimate of
first

Ireland,

and remark that he was the
this Primate's
i.

was the name of a celebrated

saint,

who nou-

Englishman that became Primate of Ireland. For more of
ris's
'

rished in the sixth century, and had his principal church at Dulane, near Kells in Meath. See Battle of
f

history,

see

Har-

Ware,

vol.

pp. 64, 65.
is

Magh

Eath. pp. 20, 146.

Comar

This place

called

Domhnach Comupon which

Mac

Clancy,

mag

plunnchaoa, was chief of

buir, in the sixth life of St. Patrick,

the barony of Eossclogher, in the north of the county of Leitrim.
l)artry,

now

Colgan writes the following note in Trias Thaum.,
p.

" 114, col. 2, note 142:

Domnach commuir

Magauran, mac rampaoain. This name is sometimes Anglicised Magovern and Magowran.
8

hodie sine addito vocatur Comar, estque nobile coenobium Diocesis Dunensis et Connerensis."
It is

The head of the family was
of Tealach Eachdhach,
h

chief of the territory

now

a village on the north-west branch of

the barony of Tullyhaw, in the north-west of the county of Cavan.

now

Lough Cuan, or the Lake of Strangford, in the
barony of Castlereagh, and county Down. k Wit/tout the consent of, DO nfrhcoil In the
is

See note under the year 1217. Under this year the Annals of Kilronan record the death of Gilchreest Magorman, the

Clann-Fermaighe.

Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster the phrase bu innoeoin, which would mean " in despite

202

[1222.

po pcaoilpioc a caiplen. toccup laparh i niiDe, -| laijmb gup po millpior lie Don cup pom. Cionolaio rpa goill Uainicc aob 6 neill -| mac hugo Gpeann cfcpe cara picfc 50 Dealccam. co cruccpac goill annpinn a bpfr pfin Dua cerpe cara commopa ma nagam

beacarcap cecup 50 ciilpacam,
i

~\

nell.

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopo,
mfle,

1222.

Da ceo, pice aoo.

^elain eppcop cille Dapa t>ecc. Qilbm ua maolmuaiD eppcop pfpna Decc. TTlaoilipa ua ploinn ppioip eapa mic nepc oecc.

Gn reppcop mag

Ua6g ua
~\

baoijill ponup i

cacca6 cuaipcipr Gpeann, noonaicreac peD,
l?o Diojail Dia

maoine oaop jaca Dana Decc. Niall 6 nell Do papucchao ooipe im injin uf cacdin. colurn cille innpin uaip nfp bo cian a paojal pom Dia ep.
of."

-|

The whole passage

is

thus rendered in the
:

old translation of the Ulster Annals

Fabhair" [Aghagower, in the county of Mayo]. m Albin O^Mnlhi/. He was raised to this dignity in the year

"A. D. 1221. Hugo de Lacy
into Ireland against the

his son,

came

King

of England's will,

of Giraldus
ric of

He wns the great rival Cambrensis, to whom the bishop1

186.

and came to

O'Neale, and- they on both sides went against the Galls of Ireland, and

Hugh

much in Meath, Leinster, and Vlster, and broke down the castle of Culrathan. And
spoyled
the Galls of Ireland gathered 24 Battles" [battalions]

Ferns had been oifered by John Earl of Moreton, afterwards King John; but Giraldus refusing to accept of it, Albin O'Molloy, then
elected bishop.
It is

Abbot of Baltinglass, was
stated in the
fallen, that this

" to Delgain, and

Dublin copy of the Annals of Innis"

Hugh

O'Neale and

Hugh de Lacye's son came against them 4 Battles" [battalions] " where the Galls gave O'Neale
his

righteous philosopher preached an excellent sermon at a synod in Dublin, iu the year 1185, on the chastity of the clergy, and

own

will" [co

cuc|xjc juill bpec

a beoil
re-

pein D'
1

O

proved satisfactorily before the archbishop, John

Neill].
this ygar the

Under

Annals of Kilronan

Cumin, and the whole convocation, that the Welsh and English clergy, by their vicious livo
and bad examples, had corrupted the chaste and unspotted clergy of Ireland, a thing which gave
great offence to Giraldus,
brensis."

cord the death of DermotO'Culeachain, "a learned
historian

man who had more books and knowledge than any one of his time, he who
and scribe
;

a

who was

called

Cam-

had transcribed the Mass Book of Knock, and a
befitting Office

Book

for

Dermot Magcraghty,

his

For more particulars of the history of
markable prelate, the reader
ris's
is

this re-

tutor,
ther,

and

for Gillapatrick, his

own

foster-bro-

referred to Har-

who were

successively coarbs of

Achadh

Ware,

vol.

i.

pp. 439, 440;

and Lanigan's

1222.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
and
first

203

Ireland,

went

afterwards went into

where they demolished the castle. They Meath and Leinster, and destroyed a great number of
to Coleraine,

persons on that occasion.
lions at

The English

Dundalk, whither Hugh to oppose them with four great battalions.

of Ireland mustered twenty-four battaO'Neill, and the son of Hugo de Lacy, came

The English upon

this occasion

gave his

own demands

to O'Neill

1
.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1222.

thousand two hundred twenty-two.

Mag-Gelain, Bishop of Kildare, died. Albin 0'Mulloym Bishop of Ferns, died.
,

Maelisa O'Flynn, Prior of Eas-mac-neirc died. Teige O'Boyle, the Prosperity and Support of the North of Ireland, and
,

n

bestower of jewels and riches upon men of every profession, died. Niall O'Neill violated" Derry with the daughter of O'Kane, but God and St. Columbkille were avenged for that deed, for he did not live long after it.
Ecclesiastical History of Ireland, vol. iv. p. 277nell, in his Life

of Columbkille,

lib.

i.

c.

104, dis-

Gap ui pliloinri, from the family of O'Flynn, who were the heWare thought reditary Erenaghs of the place.
Eas-mac-neirc,
called

n

now

tinctly points out the situation of Eas mic Eire, as follows:

" Inde ultra Senannum versus occidentem
progressus pervenit [Columba] ad
aracta

(Antiq.

c.

26, at Roscominon), that this place

eum locum

might have been the same as Inchmacnerin, an island in Lough Key but this notion cannot be
;

cui praeterlabentis Buellii fluininis vicina cath-

reconciled
writers,

with the statements of the older
speak of it as an island, and near the River 6uiU (Boyle).
it

sacravit."

nomen fecit Eas-mic-Eirc, eumque Deo The place is now called Assylyn,
i

who never
it

agree in placing

which is but an anglicised form of Gap u plilomn, and is situated on the north bank of the River
Boyle, about a mile west of the town. of the church still remain, and, in the

Colgan thought that
which,

was the very monastery
fell

The ruins

many

centuries later,

into the posses-

memory of

sion of the Cistercian order, and

became so

fa;

mous under the name of the Abbey of Boyle " Eas mac wire Monasterium ad ripam Buellii
fluvii in Conacia.

the old inhabitants, a part of a round tower was to be seen adjoining it.
Violated.

In the old translation of the An:

Hodie vocatur Monasterium
ordinis
Cisterciensis." Act.
little

nals of Ulster this passage

Buellense

etque

is rendered as follows " A. D. 1222. Neal O'Neal forcibly took away

SS.

p.

494.

But Colgan, who knew but

O'Cathan
kill

of the localities about

Lough Key,

is

unques-

his daughter, and God and ColumbThe miraculously shortened his days."

tionably wrong, for the great Cistercian Abbey of Boyle was that called Ath-da-Laarc. O'Don-

word papujab
or violate.

in

We

this sense means to profane cannot understand from this

2

n2

204

1223.

ua cacail cijeapna ceneoil aooa roip q riap Do na naomli uf Sfchnapaigh mp na bpac Da mapbab la Sfcnapac mac jiolla
police mochoinni
muipcip pen.
TTlop injean
ui

uf beollain Decc. baoijill bfn Qrhlaib

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip CpiopD,
TTlailiopa

1223.

mile,

Da

ceo, pice,

a

cpf.

mac

mfooin Decc. roippDealbaij uf Choncobaip ppioip innpi

Oubcach ua Dubcai^h abb conga Decc. Sloiccheab ta hua noomnaill (Domnall mop) co cpuacham connachc,
sentence what Niall O'Neill did to the daughter of O'Kane ; it merely states that he profaned

was the ancient palace of the Kings of Connaught,
so celebrated in the Bardic histories of Ireland

Derry by some misconduct towards the daughThe papujao -would be comter of O'Kane. mitted by taking her a prisoner from the sanctuary, in order to detain her as a hostage
lating her person, without carrying her
;

having been erected in the first century by Eochaidh Feidhleach, monarch of Ireland, the father of the celebrated Meave, Queen of Conas

by vio-

away; or

have naught. As the remains at Rathcroghan of our never been minutely described by any
the Editor is tempted topographical writers, here to give a list of the forts and other ancient It may be remains still visible at the place.
described as

by

forcing her
her.

away

in abduction,

with a view of

marrying

See note under 1223, on bacall

mop
p

col main cille

mic Duac.

son of Turlough 0''Conor. According to the Book of Lecan, fol. 72, b, col. 4,

Maelisa,

t/ie

the

ruins of a

town of

raths,

this Maelisa

was the eldest of the three sons of

having the large rath called Rathcroghan, placed This great rath is at present in the centre.

Turlough More O'Couor, monarch of Ireland, by It appears that he embraced his married wife.
a religious
life in his youth, and left his younger brothers to contend with each other for the

much

effaced

by

cultivation
it

;

all its

circumval-

lations (for such

originally had) are destroyed,

and nothing remains of it but a flat, green moat, said to be hollow in the centre, and to contain a
large,

sovereignty of Connaught, and crown of Ireland. q Inishmaine, Imp mfooin, i. e. the middle
island. It is situated in the east side of

round chamber with a conical

roof.

The

natives of the district believe that there were

Lough

apertures
light

all

round the moat which admitted
only by Queen

Mask, in the county of Mayo, between the islands called Inis Cumhang and Inis Eoghain. It contains the ruins of a small
'

and

air to this internal

now inhabited
tendant

chamber, which is Mab and her atare the present

but beautiful abbey.

fairies.

The following
it.

Croghan,

Cpuacam, now
It is

Rathcroghan

generally called situated in the parish of

names of the raths and other
which stand around
clearly

artificial features

Many

of

them

are

Kilcorkey, nearly midway between Belanagare and Elphin, in the county of Roscominon. This

modern, though the features to which

they are applied are ancient.

1223.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Mochoiimi O'Cahill, Lord of Kinelea East and West, was
slain

205

Gilla

by

Shaughnessy, the son of Gilla-na-naev O'Shaughnessy, after having been betrayed by his

own

people.

More, daughter of O'Boyle, and wife of Auliffe O'Beollain [Boland], died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Maelisa, the son of
Christ, one

1223.

thousand two hundred twenty-three.
, ,

q p Turlough O'Conor Prior of Inishmaine

died.

Duffagh O'Duffy, Abbot An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) to Croghan r in Connaught,
of Cong, died.
,

1.

Rath

Screig, to the north, in the

townland

is

of a circular form,

is

surrounded with a stone

of Toberrory ; 2. Cuirt mhaol, near Rath Screig, in the same townland ; 3. Rath Carrain, a fort containing a cave, in the same townland ; 4. Rathbeg, in the townland of Rathcroghan, lying to the north-west of the great central rath ; 5.

wall

now

greatly defaced,

and

it

measures one
It ex-

hundred and sixteen paces in diameter.
hibits several small tumuli,

now much

effaced

by

time.

One
it

of the late Mr. O'Conor, of

Rathmore, lying about
i.

five
;

hundred paces to the
Knockaun-Stanly,

found that

was opened by the uncle Mount Druid, who. contained a small square chamber
of these

north-west of Rathbeg
e.

6.

of stone-work, without cement, in which were

Stanly's Hillock, a fort lying a quarter of a mile to the north-west of Rathcroghan ; 7. Rath-

some decayed bones.
Close to the north of Roilig-na-Riogh is a small hillock, called Cnocan na gcorp, i. e. the

na-dtarbh,

i.

e.

Fort of the Bulls, due west of

Rathcroghan ; 8. Rath-na-ndealg, i. e. Fort of the Thorns, which gives name to a townland. lies
a short distance to the west of Rath-na-dtarbh
9.
;

Hillock of the Corpses, whereon,
bodies of the kings were the graves were being

it is said,

the

wont

to be laid while

dug or opened.

About

Rath fuadach,

lies

to the south-west of Rath-

two hundred paces

to the north of the circular

croghan, in the parish of Baslick, and gives to the townland in which it is situated
Caisiol
lies to

name
;

10.

enclosure called Roilig-na-Riogh is to be seen a small circular enclosure, with a tumulus in the

Mhanannain,

i.

e.

Manannan's stone fort,

the south-west, about a quarter of a mile from Rathcroghan, in the townland of Glenbally-

on the top of which is a very remarkable red pillar-stone which marks the grave of Dathi, the last pagan monarch of Ireland, and the ancentre,

thomas.
of stone,
is

This

caisiol or circular

cyclopean fort

cestor of the

O'Dowdas of Tir Fiachrach.

This

with the ground, but its outline can yet be traced 11. Roilig na Riogh,
level
;

now

stone stood perpendicularly when seen by the Editor in the year 1837, and measured seven feet in
height, and four feet six inches in width at its
base,

the Cemetery of the Kings, lies a quarter of a mile to the south of Rathcroghan. This was
i.

e.

and three

feet near the top.

It

gradually
top.

the royal cemetery of Connaught in pagan times, and has been much celebrated by the bards. It

tapered,

and was nearly round at the

It is

called the caipre oeari^, or red pillar-stone,

by

206

[1224.
In

ITlupcTiaD Speippi ap Got)

gup cpfchloipcc cap Suca piap ^np mill a nurhla. co ppuaip a mbpaioe jach cip gup a paimcc uf peachnupaij Do rhapbab DO cloinn Seachnupach mac jiolla na naom Cholmdin cille mic Duach uime. cuilein, i papucchaD na bacMa moipe cappac ua pfpjail Do mapbab Daon upcop paijDe, 05 Denarh

appame

ccuacaib connachc,

i

-)

-\

mac Qmlaoibh

uf pfpjuil.

QO1S CR1O3D,
Cloip CpiopD, mile,
i

1224.

Da ceo, a cfchaip.

Do nonnpcnab la cacal cpoiboeapg ua TTlamipcip. 8. ppompiaip nacluain cconcobaip la pij connacc in eppuccoioeacc cluana mic noip ap bpu na
pionna allanoip.
Duald Mac
Tribes
Firbis, in his account of the

monarch
See
for

the Ordnance

Map

of the county of Roscominon,

Dathi, in the pedigree of the O'Dowdas.

sheets 21 and 22.
8

and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach, printed
1
.

Clann-Cuilen

Until the year 1318 the

the Irish Archasological Society in m 25, note
12.

844, pp. 24,

territory of the Clann Cuileain,
to the

which belonged

Mac Namaras

of

Thomond, was a small
River Fergus in

Cathairna Babhaloide, the caher or stone

district lying eastwards of the

Fort of the feasting Party, lies about three quarters of a mile to the east of Rathcroghan ; 13.

the county of Clare,' and containing the follow-

ing parishes,

viz.,

Carn

Ceit, lies
;

one mile to the south-west of Eath-

Kilraghtis, Kiltalagh,

Quin, Tulla, Cloney, Dowry, now included in the parish

croghan it is a tumulus raised over the celebrated Ceat Mac Magach, a Connacian champion who flourished in the first century, and was con-

of Inchacronan, Templemaley, Inchacronan, and Kilmurry-na-Gall. But after the year 1318, in

which the Hy-Bloid were defeated by the descendants of Turlough O'Brien, aided by the Mac Namaras, the latter got possession of nearly the entire country lying between the River Fergus

temporary with the heroes of the Red Branch in
Ulster.

There are two large stones lying

flat

on the

ground, about one hundred paces to the northwest of Rathcroghan, the one a large square rock
called Milleen Meva, the other, measuring nine
feet in length,

and the Shannon.
'

Backal

lic is

two

feet in breadth,

and about

It is

This retnor, i. e. the great crozier yet extant, but in very bad preservation. in the cabinet of George Petrie, Esq., Au-

two

feet in thickness, is called

Misgan Meva.

There are
this

also

some curious natural caves near

thor of the Essay on the Round Towers, and ancient Ecclesiastical Architecture of Ireland.

fort of

Rathcroghan, in connexion with

which there are some wild legends told in the neighbourhood, and there are also some written
ones in ancient Irish manuscripts. The reader will find all the above forts accurately shewn on

Colman Mac Duach, i. e. Colman the son of Duach, who founded the church called Kilmacduagh, situated in the barony of Kiltartan, in the county of Galway, about the year 620. He

u

was of the

illustrious

tribe of

Hy-Fiachrach

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

207

thence into the Tuathas of Connaught, and westwards across the Suck, and plundered and burned every territory which he entered, until he had received
their hostages

and submissions.

Shaughnessy, the son of Gilla-na-naev O'Shaughnessy, was slain by the 5 Clann-Cuilen a deed by which the Bachal mor' of St. Colman", son of Duacli,
,

was profaned*.
in

Murrough Carragh O'Farrell was slain [at Granard, An. a battle against Hugh, the son of AulifFe O'Farrell".

Ult.]

by an arrow,

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1224.
*

thousand two hundred twenty-four.

The Monastery of St. Francis at Athlone, was commenced by Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, in the diocese of Clonmacnoise, on the eastern bank of the Shannon.
Aidhne,
in the

south of the province of Con-

naught, and nearly related to Guaire Aidhne, King of that province, so famed in Irish history
for

passaper Kernachamimjiliwn Dulgeni ; qui guendam Captiuum eo refugij causa effuffientem, ex
Ecclesia sacrilego ausu extraxit, et in lacu de Loch

unbounded

hospitality.

See Colgan's Jlcta

SS., p. 248.

Kirr vrbi versus occidentem adiacenti, suffbcauit, sed Kernac/iamts iustam tanii sacrilegij poenam,

Was profaned, oo papu jab had sworn on a crozier or any
"

When
relic to

parties

observe

certain conditions, such as to offer protection to a man in case he made his appearance, and that

max luit, per Niettum filium Aidi Regem Aquiloet postea totius Hibernire in eodt-m naris partis lacu suffocatus." Trias Thaum. p. 296 ; see also
:

note on

Termon Caelainne under
this year the

the year 1225.

such an oath was afterwards violated, the crozier or relic, in the language of these Annals, was

w Under

Annals of Kilronan have

be profaned. The true application of the word papu^ab will appear from the following
said to

the following entries, which have been omitted by the Four Masters
:

"A.
cles.

D. 1223.

Clonmacnoise was burned,

in-

passage in these Annals at the year 907 A. D. 907. Sapuccab Gpomacha ta Cfpn:

cluding two churches, and many valuable "

arti-

achan mac Ouiljen .1. cimbib DO bpeic ap in cill, 7 a odbab hi loch Cuip ppi h-apomacha aniap. Cfpnachan DO Bab"b la Niall mac

A great storm occurred the day after the fesMatthew, which destroyed
all the'

tival of St.

oats throughout Ireland that remained unreaped
in the fields.

Goba, pij; in tuaipcipc ip ccionn papai^re paopaicc.
:

in

loc ceona

hi

It is translated by Colgan as follows in his Annals of Armagh " 907. Basilica slrdmathana sacrileqam vim 7

" Finn O'Carmacan, a steward to the King of Connaught, and who held much laud, died. " feet were added to the church of

Twenty-six Tigh .Sinche [Taghshinny,

in

the county of

208

[1224.

cenel ao6a Do ecc. niaolmuipe 6 connmaic eppoc ua bpiacpac Gppoc Conmaicne, .1. an jailleppoc Decc. aon ba Deappcnaijci Do TTluipjiup cananac mac Ruaibpi uf concobaip aoibelaib illegionn, ccannraipeacr, -\ a noenarh ueppa Decc, ~| a abnacal
-|
i i

ccunga.
TTlaolcaoi 17151 n ua Scingin

aipanneac apDa capna Decc. ua TTlaoibpu mac an eppuic uf rhaoilpajmaip peappun ua bpiacpac namalsaba, abbap eppuic ap eccna, DO mapbab Do mac Donnchaba uf buboa map nap t>u 66 uaip nocap mapb neac Dufb Duboa piarh cleipeac 56
-|
]

pin.

Cioc aobal abuarmap Opeapcam ccuiD Do connaccaib, ccip maine Sooam, i m uib oiapmaca ]c. Diap pap ce6m, jalap aibbpec DO cfcpaib
i

.1.

i

i

=

~|

Longford], by the priest of the town, namely,

of Coill

Ua

bh-Fiachrach and Kinel Aodha na

Mael-Magorman. " William de Lacy came to Ireland andmade the
Crannog [wooden house] of Inis Laeghachain ; but the Connacians came upon the island by force,
and
let

h-Echtghe, which would express and distinguish the two districts of which the diocese consisted,
namely, the countries of O'Heyne and O'Shaughnessy but the fact is, that the Four Masters
:

out the people

who were on it, on

parole."

This latter entry is given in Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise under
the year 1222, as follows "A. D. 1222. William Delacie and the English of Meath, with their
:

who compiled this work from various sources, have left many entries imperfectly arranged.
i

Conmaicne,

i. e.

of the people and district so

called,

on the east side of the Shannon.

The

principal families

among

the eastern Conmaicne

forces,

founded a castle at Loghloygeaghan ; the Connoghtinen of the other side came with their " the ward of forces to Loghloygeachan" [and] the said castle came forth to the principalls of Connoght, and as soone as they were out of the
Castle the

were the O'Farrells and Mac Eannalls, whose territories are comprised in the diocese of Ardagh.
his

The name of

this

bishop was Eobert, but

surname no where appears. He was an Englishman, and had been the eleventh abbot of St.

Connoughtmen broke the same, and

so departed.''

Mary's Abbey, Dublin, before he was elevated See Ware's Bishops by to the see of Ardagh
Harris, p. 250.
z

The Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach and Kittelea, eappoc ua ppacpac 7 cinel aooa. By this
the Annalists

*

Maurice.

The

natives of

Cong

still

point

mean the Bishop of Kilmacduagh:

out his tomb in the Abbey, but some suppose
it is

but they have expressed it incorrectly, for the Kinel- Aodha were Hy-Fiachrach, as much as the
inhabitants of the rest of the diocese of Kilmac-

the tomb of his father Roderic.
Poetical compositions,

duagh.

They should have

called

O'Conmaic

a noenarii ueppa, li" in In the Annals of verses." terally making of Kilronan, the term employed is ueppofnmuibeacc,
b
i. e. in verse-making. In the Lowland Scotch a maker signifies, " a poet."

a

Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne, which would
express the diocese of Kilmacduach without adding another word ; or have called him Bishop

Ardcarne,

Qpb

capna.

A

vicarage in the

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
x

209

Mulmurry O'Conmaic, Bishop
died.

of Hy-Fiachrach and Kinelea [Kilmacduagh]

The Bishop
Maurice
2
,

of Conmaicne y [Ardagh], i.e. the English bishop, died. the Canon, son of Roderic O'Conor, the most illustrious of the

Irish for learning, psalm-singing,

and poetical compositions*,
died.

died,

and was

in-

terred at Cong.
5 Mulkevin O'Scingin, Erenagh of Ardcarne
,

Maelisa, son of the Bishop O'Mulfover, parson of Hy-Fiachrach and HyAwley, and materies of a bishop for his wisdom, was killed by the son of Do-

nough O'Dowda, a deed strange
before killed an ecclesiastic.

in him, for

none of the O'Dowda's had ever

A heavy
Many
d
,

and awful shower'
e
,

Sodan

in

on a part of Connaught, namely, on HyHy-Diarmada and other districts, from which arose a murfell
f
,

situated in the barony of and county of Roscommon, and about four Boyle This miles to the east of the town of Boyle.
diocese of Elphin,

nected with the death of Cathal Crovderg, of which the Four Masters represent it as an omi-

church was founded by St. Beo-Aedh, a bishop who died on the 8th of March, 524 and it conti;

nous presage. The lows: "A. D. 1224.

literal translation is as fol-

A

shower

fell

in parts of

nued
see.

for

be the head of a bishop's For some account of the patron saint of
to

some time

this church,

Ada

the reader is referred to Colgan's Sanctorum, at 8th of March ; the Feilire

Tirmany, Hy-Diarmada, and in Clann-Teige, of which there grew a great murrain among the cows, after having eaten of the grass and herbage ; and
flesh, d

Connaught,

namely, in

in Soghan, in

Aenguis, and Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys, at the same day ; and also toLanigan's Ecclesiastical

the people, after having taken of their milk and contracted many diseases."

Hy-Many,

ui

maine.

History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 462. Archdall places Ardcharn in the county of Westmeath, which
is

originally extending

from Athenry

O'Kelly's country, to the Shan-

non, and from the borders of Thomond to Lanes-

a very strange blunder, as Colgan, his autho-

rity,

had described

it

as in

Maghluirg, in Con-

borough, on the Shannon. " Sodan This was the

naught. Considerable ruins of the church of Ardcarne
are
still

country of the O'Mannins, and, as appears from various authorities, was included in the present barony of
Tiaquin, in the county of Galway. For a list of the townlands in the occupation of different persons of the name of O'Mannin in this territory, in the year 1617, the reader is referred to

to

be seen; and in the

field

lying be-

tween the church and the high road are shewn slight remains of the walls of an abbey, and the
foundations of some of the houses which constituted the ancient village of Ardcarne.

Tribes

heavy and awful shower, cior aoBal aouarihap. This shower is also mentioned in
the Annals of Kilronan, but not in any

c

A

and Customs of Hy-Many, printed

for the

Irish Archaeological Society in 1843, p. 164. ' Hy-Diarmada, ui Oiapmaoa. This was the

way

con-

tribe

name

of the O'Concannons, which also be-

2 E

210
net

[1224.

do pliuch an aoc pa 66ib. Do ccpfoc pempairi lap ccaicfrh an peoip inmeoDonca 50 hepcarhail Do na jnioD beop lace na ninnileb pn galpaign

oaomib Do coimleb

Decbip na Deapbaipbi p Do cecc i cconnaccaib ir in mbliaoain pi uatp ba mop an cole, i an nmneb Do pala Doib innre,. .1. cacal cpoiboeaps mac coippbealbaijj moip uf concobaip, T?f Connacc, aon ap
e.

6a

came that of their country. The head of the O'Concannons was seated at a place called Kiltullagh, in the county of

Galway, in 1585, and

holder, mighty and puissant, of the country; keeper of peace, rich and excellent. For in his time was tieth payd and established in Ireland
first legally.

his country

was then considered a part of Hyp.

Threshold,
;

meek and

honest, of

Many.
19, note
8

See Tribes and Customs of Hy- Many,
'.

belief

and Christianity corrector of transgres" sors and thieves ; the banisher of [the] "wicked and robbers" [mujaijceoip na meiplec 7 na " malapcac] ; the defender of the right Law, conning and couragious ; to whom God gave great and everlasting" [life] " in heaven, dying in a Munck's habit, overcoming the world and the Devill."

Cathal Crovderg,

Cathal, or Charles of theRedHand.

Carol cpoiboeapj, i.e. The obituary

of Cathal Crovderg is thus given in the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, with which those
of Kilronan agree. "A.D. 1224. Carol cpoiBoepj
pi
i

honour

in this

life,

connacc, 7

pi jjaioel

hua concobuip, Gpenn ap tocuccaobac

mainipcip cnuic tnuaioe

u. Kul.
;

lunn,

in

caen jaioel

ip pepp camij o bpian bopoma anuap ap uaipli, 7 ap onoip cojbalach rpepajmup cocuccacna cuar; pobapcanacpaiobip

Cathal Crovderg was the son of Turlough More O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland, and the brother of Roderic O'Conor, the last of the Irish monarchs.

According

to

the

traditional

story

fuairnij pomennail na pircana,
peiriiep
i

0615 ip p6 DO jabao oecmaio co olijcech ap cup

neighbourhood of Ballintober, in the county of Mayo, he was the illegitimate son of King Turlough by Gearrog NyMoran of the territory of Umhall. The traditional story,
to

told about

him

in the

n-iar

Gpenn

;

columain connail cpatobec
;

ceprbpiarpac cpemrhi "j cpipcaibecca cepcaijreoip na cincac, 7 na coiboenach ; mujaijceoip na meiplec 7 na malapcac; coimecai jcoiccenn cacbuaoac in pecca poo blepcai^,
o'd cue t)ia be^onoip

which is very vivid, and believed be true, runs as follows
:

"

Shortly before the English invasion of Ire-

culrham, 7 in plaiciup netnoa call ap nej in aibic rhanaic DO, lap mbpeic buaoa 6 ooman 7 o oeman."
i

King of Connaught, who was of the family of O'Conor, having no issue by his lawful queen, took to his bed a beautiful girl, out of
land, the

the territory of Umhall,

by name Gearrog Ny-

Thus rendered

in the old translation of the

Moran, who soon exhibited Symptoms of fertility.

Annals of Ulster, in which it is incorrectly placed under the year 1223.
" A. D. 1223. Cathal Crovderg O'Coner, King of Connaught, and King of the Irish of Ireland,
died at the

When
like

monstration of her

the Queen of Connaught heard of this deown barrenness, she became,
old, jealous in the highest degree,

Sarah of

and used every means
the King's concubine.
to witches,

in her

Abbey Knock-moy, 5 Kal. Junij. The best Irishman that was from the time of
Brien Boroma, for gentility and honor ; the up-

of

power to persecute She even had recourse
in the proat last, shortly

who were then numerous

vince, but without success, until

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

211

and dreadful distemper among the cattle of the aforesaid territories, after and the milk of these they had eaten of the grass moistened by this shower,
rain
It was produced a variety of inward maladies in the people who used it. no wonder that these ominous signs should appear this year in Connaught, for

cattle

in this year, viz., the death great was the evil and affliction which they suffered of Cathal Crovderg*, son of Turlough More O'Conor, King of Connaught, a man

before Gearrog was about to be delivered, a ce-

all sorts

of execrations on the head of the old

lebrated witch, more skilful than the rest,

who

sorceress,

who had

so

much

deceived her.

No

lived in the neighbourhood of Bally toberpatrick,

county of Mayo, presented the Queen with a magical string, with three intricate knots, telling her, that as long as she kept it in her posin the

sooner had the last knot of the string been destroyed by the action of the fire, than the King's
son,

who had been so long kept spell-bound by

its

influence,

session Gearrog

Ny-Moran, against

whom

its

was ushered upon the theatre of his future greatness; but his crov, or that part of

magical properties were directed, could never be delivered of a child. Before, however, the string

the hand, from the wrist out, which he had
thrust into the world before the magical string was perfected, was as red as blood, from which

had been fully indued with the intended charm, the King's child thrust his right hand into the
external world, but farther he could not move;
for, as

he received the cognomen of Cnoib-beapj, or
'

itie

soon as the last word of the incantation
fixed, spell-bound,

"The Queen

Red-handed'' Crov-derg. of Connaught,

who was of a most

had been pronounced, he was
in his

awkward

position.

He

continued thus for

several days

and nights, and though his mother

powerful family, continued to persecute the red-handed child and his mother, with all the perseverance of a jealous barren woman; but
the child,

wished for death she could not

die. At length a certain good man, who had heard of the magical string, and of the pitiable condition of O'Mo-

who had

all

the appearance of royalty

in his countenance,

ran's daughter', called one

day at the palace, with

was sheltered by the clergy of the province ; and when the Queen discovered that he was lurking in one monastery, he was

a view to destroy the properties of the string, and the Queen, who held him in high esteem,

away to another. In this manner was he sheltered for three years in the monastesecretly sent
ries of

having no suspicion of his design, bade him welcome and asked him the news. He answered, with some expression of annoyance on his countenance, that the principal

Connaught.

At

last

the Queen's fury

rose to such a height against the clergy, that they gave up all hopes of being able to protect

news

in the

west of

the child any longer.

His mother then
where,
for

fled

Connaught, was, that Gearrog Ny-Moran had brought forth a son for the King of Connaught.

with

him

into

Leinster,

many

years, disguised, she supported

him by labour-

When the Queen heard this from the lips of one on whom she placed the utmost reliance, she
took the magical string, which she was persuaded to believe would for ever prevent O'Moran's

the boy grew up, although ing work. he was constantly told of the royalty of his

When

daughter from giving birth to a roydamna, and
cast it into the fire in his presence, calling

and of the respectability of the O'Morans, still, having no hopes of being able to return to his native province as long as the Queen
birth,
lived,

down
2

he was obliged

to

apply himself to

common

E2

212

[1224.

mo DO muoaij Do ine]ilechaib, oeapccaipDib Gpenn pe haimpip imcfin, aon ap mo po pap Do clepcib, boccaib, aibelgneachaib, aon ap uille map ooipc-\ ~\

eapoaip Dia jac mair, ~\ gac mop puailce Da ccdimc ouaiplib Gpeann a ccompoccup Dia perhfp, oip ap e po congaib e pen ap aon mnaoi popoa gan co a bap. Qp pe a linn beop ap cpuatlleD a jfnmnaiDeacca cap a heip
po gabao DeacmaD 50 Dlijceac cecup i nGpinn. Qn Rf pfpen poipccliDi an caicmileb conDail cpaibcec ceipcbpfcac D'CCC an coccmab la picfc pi, -] DO pampab (Dia luain Do painnpiub) i naibi'o manaij lee maimpnp cnuic

mo

i

labouring work for subsistence; and it was observed by the clowns of Leinster, that he exhibited no appearance of industry, or taste for
agricultural pursuits, but was constantly telling
stories

known by his right hand, which is as red as blood from the wrist out. " The heart of Cathal bounded with joy at the news, and he stood on the ridge for some miat once

about Kings, wars, and predatory ex-

nutes in a reverie.

His comrades told him to

cursions.

" Time rolled on, and the poor boy with the red hand was necessitated to pass his time in misery,
in the society of Leinster clowns

get on with his work, that he was always last, and that there never was a good workman from
his province.

Hereupon, Cathal pulled

off the

and buddaghs,

whom
lic

he held in the highest contempt. At length a Connaught Bollscaire, or bearer of pubnews, passing through Leinster, happened to come into the very field in which Crovderg

mitten, with which he constantly kept the red hand concealed, and exhibited it to the Bolls-

and his eye beamed, and his countenance glowed with all the majesty of his father's, when he first mounted the throne of Connaught.
caire ;

was employed, with

several others, reaping rye.
his dress that

They immediately recognized by
he was a Bollscaire, and,

therefore,

inquired

The Bollscaire recognizing him at once by his resemblance to his father, fell prostrate at his feet. Cathal cast the sickle on the ridge, saying:

what proclamation he was publishing. He replied in the set words of his commission, that
the King of Connaught was dead, and that the
people, assembled in council,

'Slan leur, a coppam, anoif oo'n
e.
'

cloi-

6eam,' i.

Farewell, sickle,

now

for the sword.'

And to
i.

this day,

Slan charail paoi an cpeajal,

had declared that

his son

they would have no king but Cathal Crovderg he added, I, and many others, have ; and,
diffe-

Cathal's farewell to the rye, meaning a farewell never to return, has been a common proverb
e.

been for several weeks in search of him in

among the Sil-Murray and their " He returned home without

followers.
delay,

and was

rent parts of Ireland, but without success ; some, who wish to support the claim of rivals to the

solemnly inaugurated King of Connaught on Carnfree, near Tulsk, in the presence of the twelve
chieftains and twelve coarbs of Sil-Murray
;

throne of Connaught, have reported that the

and

Queen, his step-mother, had him secretly assassinated, but others are of opinion, that he lurks
disguised in humble garb, and that he will return home as soon as
in place,

though he found many before him, he put them
rior

rivals
all

in

the province
his supe-

down by

some obscure

wisdom and

valour.

When he had restored
he did not

his native province to tranquillity

he

will hear of this proclamation.

He

will

be

forget his old friends the friars,

who had made

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

213

who, of all others, had destroyed most of the rebels and enemies of Ireland, he who had most relieved the wants of the clergy, the poor, and the destitute, he who, of all the Irish nobility that existed in or near his time, had received from
goodness, and greatest virtues, for he kept himself content with one married wife, and did not defile his chastity after her death until his own death,

God most

in

whose time most

tithes

right king, this discreet,

were lawfully received in Ireland this just and uppious, and justly-judging hero, died on the 28th day of
;

the

summer (on Monday), in the habit of a Grey Friar, in the monastery of Knockmoy ( which monastery, together with its site and lands, he himself had
11

,

such

efforts to save

Queen.

He

erected several monasteries for
scale,

him from the fury of the them
and in magnificent
style,

question for another work.

Ledwich,

in his Antiquities of Ireland,
is

second

on an extensive

edition, p. 520, says, that there

a

monument

namely, the monastery of Ballintober in Mayo,

which was three years in building, and which was roofed and shingled with oak timber the
;

to Cathal Crovderg in the Abbey of Knockmoy ; but the monument in that abbey to which he

monastery of Athlone, on the Shannon; and
also that of Knockmoy, in the

county of Galway." Notwithstanding the evidence of this vivid tradition, we must conclude from the Book of
Lecan,
fol.

but which he evidently never saw, is that of Malachy O'Kelly, who died in 1401, and of his wife Finola, the daughter of O'Conor, who
alludes,

died in 1402.
fresco paintings

Ledwich was of opinion that the
on the north wall of the choir
in the seventeenth

72,

b,

O'Conor, King his married wife, namely, Maelisa, Coarb of St. Comau, who was his eldest son and heir, Aedh
L)all,

that Turlough More of Ireland, had three sons by
col.

4,

of this abbey,

were executed

" " the confederate when," he says, century, Catholics possessed themselves of the abbeys of
Ireland,
in

which they everywhere repaired, and,
instances, adorned with elegant sculp-

and Tadhg Aluinn.

many

Dr. O'Conor, in his suppressed work. Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Charles O'Conor of
Belanagare, who was his own grandfather, alludes to the traditions preserved in the country about the valour of " Charles the Red-handed,"

tures;" but

it is quite clear, from the style of these paintings, and from the legible portion of

the inscriptions, among which may be clearly read, in the black letter, otittt pro aninu jTOalarfjiar,
that they belong to the period of the aforesaid Malachy O'Kelly, by whom the abbey of Knockmoy seems to have been repaired if not in great part
re-edified; for it is quite obvious,

but makes no allusion whatever to the story above given, which, though in great part fabulous,
is

generally believed to be true

by the

from the

style

story-tellers

and farmers

in

the counties of

of the abbey of Ballintober,

which unquestion-

Mayo and Galway.

But

to enter

upon the

proofs of the legitimacy or illegitimacy of Cathal Crovderg would swell this note to a length which would interfere with the elucidation of

of the latter part ably exhibits the architecture there is no part of of the twelfth century, that
that of

Knockmoy

as old as the period of Cathal

Crovderg.
h

other entries in those Annals, and the Editor

Knockmoy

According to the Annals of
translated

must, therefore, reserve the discussion of the

Clonmacnoise, as

by Mageoghegan,

214

[1224.

muaibe lap na he&baipr Do bu&en Do t)ia, i Do na manchaib poime pin juna a aDnacal innce co huapal onopac. Q bpupr loca ponn peaponn, rriepcaDo geneab cacal cpoibDeapcc, i a oilfmam in uib Diapmaca ajraocc ua coinceanamn. Qo6 6 concobaip a mac Do gabdil piji Connacc rap a ep
~\
~|

jan cdipDe uaip bdoap bpaijDe Connacc ap a lairii pe necc a acap. Qp pe hucc gabala pije Don aob pa cucc po Deapa mac ui mannacdin Do &alla& a copa Do ben Do neoc oile lap cpe eccfn mnd Do cabaipc, i a Idrha
~\

nDeriarh

meple
Do.

Do.

t)o coimeD

pmacca placa

innpin.
-j

Qo6 mac Concobaip
lopDanen

maonrhoiji Decc 05 coibecc 6 lepupalem,

6

ppur

DonDcacaij mac aipfccaij uf Rabuib cofpec cloinne comalcaij Decc ma oilicpi ace copup paccpaicc. TTlaoilpeaclainn mac raiDg ui cealtaij cijeapna 6 maine Do ecc. ^lolla na naomh cpom 6 Seacnupaij ci^eapna lece laprapaijje cenel
aooa na heccgi Decc.
Dorhnall 6 ceallaij cijeapna 6 maine Decc. Cucfnann ua comcfnainn Decc.
TTIac^arhain Decc.

mac

cerfpnaijui cepin njeapnaciappaije toca na naipnea6

Cathal Crovderg died at Broyeoll in Connoght. Bruigheol, or Briola, is in Clann-Uadagh, near the River Suck, in the county of Eoscommon.

common

The entry "A. D.

is

as follows

:

it means a wet meadow, or a strath or holm on the margin of a lake or river. k This pasrobbery, iap noenarii m6ple is given more satisfactorily in the Ansage

^

1223. Cahall Crovederge O'Connor,
Irish of Ire-

nals of Kilronan, as follows:
his

','

Hugh

O' Conor,

King of Connoght, and King of the
land, one that used reverence

the Church,

and both

ritch,

and bounty towards fortunate, and

assumed the government of Connaught after him, and right worthy of the dignity he was, for he had been a king for his effison,

own

happy, died in Broyeoll in Connought, and

Hugh

ciency, might,
life-time,

and puissance,

in

his

father's

mac
>

Cahall,

his

son,

was constituted King of

and he had the hostages of Connaught

Connoght in his place." Harbour of Lough Mask, popclocha meapca. This place is now called Caladh Locha Measca, and Ballincalla, and is a parish in the barony of Kilmaine, and county of Mayo, verging on

in his hands.
for such
evils

And God

permitted his succession,
that no
in
at his ac-

was the

strictness of his law,

were committed

Connaught

cession,

but one act of plunder on the road to

Lough Mask.

Cula6, in

this part of Ireland,

Croagh-patrick, for which the perpetrator had his hands and feet cut off; and one woman was
violated

signifies a landing place for boats,

and

is

synony-

mous with pope; though

in the county of Eos-

by the son of O'Monahan, was deprived of sight."

for

which he

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

215

granted to God and the monks), and was interred therein nobly and honourably. Cathal Crovderg was born at the Harbour of Lough Mask', and fostered in

Hy-Diarmada by Teige O'Concannon. The government of Connaught was assumed without delay by Hugh O'Conor, his son, for the hostages of Connaught were in his (Hugh's) hands at the time of his father's death. Hugh, upon
his accession to the government,

commanded

the son of

O'Monahan should be

deprived of sight as a punishment for his having violated a female, and ordered the hands and feet of another person to be cut off for having committed a robbery".

This was done to maintain the authority of a prince. Hugh, the son of Conor Moinmoy [O'Conor], died on his return from Jeru-

salem and the River Jordan.

Donncahy, the son of Aireaghtagh O'Rodiv, Chief of Clann-Tomalty
on his pilgrimage, at Toberpatrick"
1
.

1 ,

died

Melaghlin, the son of Teige O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died. Gilla na-naev Crom [the Stooped] O'Shaughnessy, Lord of the Western
half of Kinelea of Echtge, died.

Donnell O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died.

Cucannon O'Concannon
died.
1

died.
,

n Mahon, the son of Kehernagh O'Kerrin, Lord of Kerry ofLough-na-narney

Clann-Tomalty,
tribe

clann comalcai j. This was situated in the plains of Roscommon,

rony of Costello, in the south-east of the county of Mayo. Colgan, and after him O'Flaherty, have supposed, that the territory of Kierrigia de Loch nairne was co- extensive with the barony
of Belathamhnais, otherwise called Costello, in

not far from Rathcroghan, but they sunk into obscurity, and were deprived of property at so
early a period, that the extent, or even exact
position, of their cantred, cannot

now be -deteri.

mined m

-

Toberpatrick,

copap pacpuic,
is

e.

St.

Paof

the county of Mayo. See Trias Thaum., p. 137 ; and Ogygia, part iii. c. 46, p. 276. But this, which is put as a mere conjecture by Colgan, is
certainly incorrect ; for the mountainous district

trick's well

This

certainly the

Abbey

Ballintober, in the county of Mayo. There are countless other places in Connaught so called.
n

of Sliabh Lugha, which belonged to the Galengse, and of which the Kierrigii never possessed any
portion, formed the greater part of that barony.

naipneao.
Irish

Kerry ofLough-na-narney, ciappaije loca na This territory is now simply called
it,

The boundary
as to divide

of the diocese of

ciuppaije by the natives of

who

speak the

across the barony of Costello, in such a

Achonry runs manner

language remarkably well. It comprises the parishes of Annagh, Bekan, and Aghamore, which form about the southern half of the ba-

it into two almost equal parts. That part of the barony to the north of this boundary is, even at this very day, called Sliabh Lugha,

216

emeciNN.

[1224.

Qn capbap
an coccaib,
~]

gan buain 50 peil bpijoe, na DominDe.

-j

an cpeabao aga Denarh Do bpij

TTlainiprip Do cojbdil la TTluipip

mac

gfpailc (6
in

Dapa, i jeapalcaij ofpmuriian) in eochaill TTIurhain Do bpaifpib 8. ppoinpiaip.
and was O'Gara's original country; and the part
of the barony lying to the south of the said

rrdcc jfpalcaij eappcoboicceachr cluana
where they

cille

ip in

-iEneas into Italy,

settled in

Tus-

boundary
lake of loc

is

Kerry of Lough-na-narney. na n-dipnea6, i. e. Lake of the
this territory took its

The
Sloes,
is si-

cany, or Etruria, from whence some of the family passed into Normandy, thence into England, and, in process of time, into Ireland.

But

from which

name,

tuated ou the boundary between the parishes of Bekan and Aghamore, in the barony of Costello, and is now more generally called Mannin Lough. the

of opinion that there is no authentic monument of the history of this family earlier
is

the Editor

than the time of William the Conqueror, with whom they seem to have come into England,

Downing, who wrote about the year 1682, when name of this lake was well remembered, puts

though Mr. Burke, in his pedigree of the of Leinster, asserts that his ancestor Otho

Duke
was a

the situation of this

lake beyond dispute by stating that the castle of Mannin is in Lough

Baron of England
the Confessor.

in the 16th year of

Edward

Arny.

" There

is

" a small likewise," he says,

lough in the barony, called Lough Arny in former times. In the west end thereof stands an
antient ruin of a castle called Mannin."

The character of Maurice Fitzgerald, the first of this family that came to Ireland, and who was one of the principal heroes of the English Conquest,
is given as follows by his contemporary, Giraldus Cambrensis
:

See

Map to the Genealogies, Tribes, and Customs ofHyFiachrach, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in 1 844, on which this lake and its castle
are shewn, as well as the true boundary line between Kerry of Lough-na-narney and Sliabh

"Erat autem Mauritius vir venerabilis
cundus
:
:

& vere-

vultu colorato, decentique mediocri quodam modicitate, tarn mediocribus minor quam
modicis maior.
modificato
:

Vir

tarn

animo quam corpore
nee hoc dilatato: Incura pro-

Lugha, or O'Gara's country. Maurice Fitzgerald. He was the grandson of Maurice Fitzgerald who came to Ireland with the
the Earl Strongbow, and

nee

illo elato,

nata vir bonitate bonus
pensiore bonus
ricio
fieri,

& tamen longe

quam

videri malens.

Mau:

who died on

the 1st of

modus, in omnibus seruare

modum

vt

September, 1177. For the origin of the family of
Fitzgerald the reader
is

credi possit suaruin partium, suique temporis
tarn censura morum,

the Earls of Desmond,

referred to the History of by the celebrated Daniel

quam

facetiarum exemplum.

title

O'Daly, published at Lisbon in 1655, under the of " Initium Incrementum et Exitus Familice
Giraldinorum, Desmonice. Comitum Palatinorum

Virbreuiloquus et sermone perpauco sed ornato: puta, plus pectoris habens quam oris, plus rationis

quam orationis plus sapientia [sapientiffi ?J quam eloquentia. Et tamen cum sermonem res
:

Kyerria in Hibernia, ac persecutionis Hcereticorum
Descriptto, ex nonnullisfragmentis collecia, ac
tinitate

exigebat

:

ad sententiam dicendam, sicut serus,

La-

sic scientissimus.

Rebus quoque

in Martiis, vir

In this work O'Daly deduces the pedigree of the Fitzgeralds from Troy, and
donata."
places their ancestors

animosus

:

et nulli fere strenuitate secundus.

Ad
:

capessenda tamen pericula, nee impetuosus nee
prseceps
:

among the

followers of

sed sicut prouidus in aggrediendis

1224.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

217

The corn remained unreaped until bruary], when the ploughing was going
inclement weather.

the Festival of St. Bridget [1st Feon, in

consequence of the war and
3

monastery was erected by Maurice Fitzgerald from whom the Fitzgeralds of Kildare and Desmond are descended, at Youghal", in the diocese of

A

,

q Cloyne, in Munster for Franciscan friars
,

r
.

sic

pertinax erat in aggressis.
:

Vir sobrius, moatque fidelis. crimine tamen

destus, et castus

stabilis, firmus,
:

Vir quidem non expers criminis

omni

notabili carens et enormi."
lib.
i.

Hibernia Ex-

the Sale Catalogue of the books and MSS. of the late Lord Kingsborough, in which it is stated as follows " But let us pass from the rough seas to the smooth plains, whereof we
:

pugnata,
It is

c.

42.

shall find few

till

we

pass Clancahill, a territory

stated

that

this

by some popular Irish writers first Maurice Fitzgerald was ap-

belonging to the Donovans, a family of Royall Extraction amongst the Irish. They came hither

pointed Chief Governor of Ireland
II.

by Henry

seems to be an error, as no original authority has yet been found for it, and his name does not appear in the list of
in
this

1173; but

from Coshma, in the county of Limerick, and" " built there the famous Castle of Crome, which
afterwards falling to the Earle of Kildare, gave him his motto of CROME-A-BOO, still used in his
scutcheon."

Chief Governors of Ireland given in Harris's Ware, vol. iL c. 15, p. 102, nor in any other trust-

Dr. Smith,

mation in

this

who has used the inforMS. throughout his Natural and
same passage,

worthy authority that the Editor has ever seen ; but his grandson, the Maurice mentioned in the
text,

Civil History of Cork, repeats the
vol.
i.

was Lord Justice of Ireland

in the

year 1229,

and again in 1232. This Maurice is said to have been the first who brought the orders of Friars Minors and Preachers into Ireland. By a mandatory letter of Henry III., dated 26th November, 1216, he was put into possession of Maynooth,

but quotes no authority whatever. This Maurice died on the 20th of May, 1257, in the habit of St. Francis, and was succeeded
p. 25,

by

his son

Maurice Fitz-Maurice Fitzgerald,

appointed Lord Justice of Ireland on See Lodge's Peerage, the 23rd of June, 1272. and a curious pedigree of the Fitzgeralds, in
the handwriting of Peregrine O'Clery, in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy, and another
in the

who was

and

all

the other lands of which his father died
;

seised in Ireland

and was put also into posses-

sion of the castle of

Crome

in the

county of Lithe

merick.

According among O'Donovans, as stated in the Pedigree of the late General O'Donovan, by John Collins, he was the first that drove the head of that family

to the tradition

copy from the Autograph of Duald Mac Firbis, in the same Library.
'

Toughed,

Gocmll,

a

well-known town

in

the county of Cork, situated on the River Blackwater, about twenty miles east of Cork.
q InMunster, if in muriiain, i. e. if in, in the, and murhain Munster ; the article an or in being

from the

castle of

Crome, or Groom, in the

county of Limerick; but the Editor has not been able to find any cotemporaneous authority
for this statement,

sometimes prefixed to names of territories and
countries in the Irish language. ' Under this year the Annals of Kilronan contain the following entry relative to the son of

nor any authority whatever

older than a manuscript, entitled Carbrice
titia,

No-

written in 1686, which formed No. 591 of

2 F

218

aNNa?,a Rioghachca eircecmN.

[1225.

aois crcioso,
QOIJ" Cpiopo, mfle,

1225.

Da

ceo, pice

a

cuig.

Qrhlaoib ua beolldin aipcinneac t>jioma cliab, Saoi eccna,
coircfnn Decc.

~]

biaccac

ITlaoilbpenainn ab leicceab 66.

Ua

maimprpe na

buille Decc Do bicin cuiplinne

DO

TTlaolbpigOe

Gplep
1

]\o

ua maiccin ab copaip paDpaicc, mac oije nonnpcnab ceampal cobaip parpaic,-] po popbaiD
"|

~\

eccnaibe Oecc.

jjona Shanccaip,
i
~\

TTluipe, coin, cpopaib lap mop paocap a nonoip pacpaic, 5'o^ct an coirhDeD mac giolla cappai^ uapal paccapc

na nappcal.

peappun cije

apDa capna Decc. a a&nacal cconga pecin. (5iollacoippre ua mujpoin Decc, Coimepje mop pluaig Do Denam la hua nell cconnaccaib Do congnam le cloinn T?uaiDpi ui concobaip, roippDealbac i aoD rpe popcongpa Duinn 615 mecc oipeaccaij pfojcaofpeac Sil TTluipeDhaij a nDiojail a peapainn oo ben De ouu concobaip (.1. ao6). Qcc cfna 6 po lompaiD mace
"]
i i

baoicin Dej. Dionip 6 maoilciapain aipcinneac

.1.

Hugh
came

to Ireland, despite of the

de Lacy: "A. D. 1224. The son of Hugo King of England,

English were challenged to approach them in
those places. However, when the English of Ireland perceived that they occupied such strong
positions, they

and a great war and contention arose between him and the English of Ireland, all of whom rose

came

to the resolution of

making

up against him and banished him
King of Aileach.
of Ireland

to O'Neill,

Thither the English and Irish pursued them, with their forces,

peace with the sons of Hugo, and to leave the conditions to the award of the King of England. The English of Ireland then dispersed without
obtaining tribute or reward from
s

namely, Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught; Donough Cairbreach O'Brien,

Hugh O'Neill."
Sir

BiatdffA,

biacach, a public victualler.

King
thy,

of Munster ;

King of

Dermot Cluasach Mac CarDesmond and all the other chiefs
;

Richard Cox thought that this term was the same as Buddagh, a clown or villain but the
;

of Ireland, except the Kinel-Connell

and Kinel-

two words are
plication

essentially different in their ap-

Owen.

They marched

to

Muirtheimhne and

and derivation, biacach being derived

Dundalk, where they demanded hostages of the sons of Hugo and of O'Neill. Then came O'Neill
with his English and Irish forces, and distributed them on the passes of Sliabh Fuaid and the Gates
of Emania, and the woods of Conaille; and the

from bia&, food, and booac, which is a name of contempt, from a different radix. The Biatagh was

endowed with a quantity of laud called a baile biacai, or ballybetagh, which was the thirtieth
part of a triocha ced, or barony, and contained

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

219

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1225.
twenty-jive.

thousand two hundred

Auliffe O'Beollan (Boland)

Erenagh of Drumcliff, a wise and learned man,

and

a general Biatagh

5
,

died.

O'Mulrenin, abbot of the monastery of Boyle, died in consequence of

having been blooded.

Maelbrighde O'Maigin, Abbot of Toberpatrick', a son of chastity and wisdom, died. By him the church, of Toberpatrick, together with its sancin honour tuary and crosses, had been, with great exertions, begun and finished, of St. Patrick, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. John, and the Apostles. Gilla-an-Choimhdhe Mac Gillacarry, a noble priest, and parson of Teach

Baoithin, died.

Dionysius O'Mulkieran", Erenagh of Ardcarne, died. Gilla-Coirpthe O'Muron, died, and was buried at Conga-Fechin (Cong). O'Neill mustered a great force at the request of Donn Oge Mageraghty,
royal Chieftain of Sil-Murray, w

be revenged of O'Conor (i. e. Hugh ), for having deprived him (Mageraghty) of his lands, and marched into Connaught to assist the sons of Rdderic, viz., Turlough and Hugh. But
to
four quarters or seisreaghs, each containing one

who wanted

hundred and twenty acres of land. The ancient Irish had two kinds of farmers, the one called
BiataghsandtheotherBrughaidhs(Brooees),who seem to have held their lands of the chief under
different tenures
;

was bound by law to keep one hundred labourers, and one hundred of each kind of domestic animals.

For a curious dissertation on the tenure

of the Irish Biataghs, the reader is referred to Harris's Ware, vol. ii. c. 10, pp. 157, 158; and
Statute

the former,

who were com-

of Kilkenny, edited by Mr. Hardiman
NowBallintober, in the county

paratively few in number, would appear to have held their lands free of rent, but were

for the Irish Archseological Society, pp. 4, 5.
l

Toberpatrick.

obliged to entertain travellers, and the chief's
soldiers,

when on
latter

their

march

in his direction;

of Mayo, where the ruins of a great abbey and of a small church, dedicated to St. Patrick, may be
seen.
u
is

and the
ject to

would appear to have been suba stipulated rent and service. Ac-

O Hulkieran, O
1

maoilcictpam.

This name

cording to the Leabhar Buidlie, or the Yellow Book of the Mac Firbises of Lecan, preserved
in the

still

common

in the vicinity of Boyle

and

Manuscript Library of Trinity College,
3,

Ardcarne. w
Crovderg,

Hugh, GOD,

i.

e.

Hugh, the son of Cathal

Dublin, H.

18,

p.

921,

it

appears that the

who

succeeded his father as King of

Brughaidh, or farmer, called bpugaib ceoac,

Connaught.

2 F 2

'220

[1225.

in

05016 0060 Oo ponpan Sfol muipfohaig plairbfpcaij njeapna mpcaip Connace,
coimepjp ina 05016
uf nell nfp

-\

-]

lapcap connachc im ao6 ua gaoi&il an cuiccm oopmop
Ocila

ace mac Diapmara,
t>d

.1.

copbmac mac comalraij.

haipippeab lep 50 paini^ lap

pfl

muipeaohaij. Gipibe 50 peaoha
50 capn ppaich. T?iojaob ua nell cona mumcip oia

ara

luain,

50 mbaof

ofoce 05 TTiuilleann juanac jup lomaipccfpcup loc

nen 50 puce peoio uf concobaip op.

Ueccam
~|

aipi'6e

rap roippoealbac mac
31

T?uai6pi annpm,

cet>

woods of AtMone.

Foes of AtMone, peaoa aca luain, i. e. the This was the name of O'Nagh-

not overtaken O'Neile, they followed Roary's son until they dog'd him to O'Neile againe.

tan's country, containing thirty quarters of land

Mounster

and county of Eoscommon. See Inquisition taken at Athlone, on the 26th of October, 1587, and another taken
in the barony of Athlone,

journey killed Eghmarkagh Chief of Corkaghlyn at Kill-Kelly, O'Branan, after banishing Roary's son out of Connaght,
in that

Hugh mac
naght
after

Roscommon, on the 23rd of October, 1 604 ; also Tribes and Customs ofHy-Many, printed for
at

him."

Cathall Crovderg reigned in ConThe account of the coming

of O'Neill into

Connaught on

this occasion is also

the Irish Archzeological Society in 1843, pp. 1 75, 1 76, and the map prefixed to the same.
y

given in Mageoghegan's translation of the
nals of Clonmacnoise,

An-

Muitteann

Guanach

In the Annals of

Ulster and of Kilronan this

name

is

written

but incorrectly entered under the year 1224, as follows: " A. D. 1224. Hugh O'Neale and Tyreowen" [recte the Kinel" with their forces, accompanied with O'Conor and his brothers, the sonns Terlagh of Rowrie O'Connor, with their forces also,

muillib ucinac, and muilliB uainioe, in the

Owen],

Annals of Connaught. The Editor has not been able to find this name in any form in
the Faes, or in any part of the county of Ros-

common. The whole passage is given somewhat more intelligibly in the Annals of Ulster, and
thus Englished in the old translation " A. D. 1224. great army by Hugh O'Neale into Connought with the sons of Rory O'Coner,
:

wasted and destroyed all Moyntyrr Arteagh, and the most part of the countrey of Moynoye.

Donn Mac Oyreaghty made

a retraite

A

upon Hugh O'Connor returned O'Neale.

O'Connor, and afterwards went to
to the Deputie,

and consent of all Sylmurea, only Mac Dermot, viz., Cormac mac Tumultach, that he went along

Geffrey March his house in Athlone; whereupon the said Geffrey March sent his letters
to
all

parts

of Ireland,

and assembled

to-

Conought southerly into the woods of Athlone, that they were two nights at the Mills of Vonagh, and prayed Loghnen, and brought O'Conner's Juells and goods out of it. He came after
to Carnefrich

gether his forces of the five Provinces,

which

being so assembled and gathered together, the Deputie and O'Connor, with their great forces,

and prayed"
there,

[recte

inaugurated]

sought to banish O'Neal and the sons of Rowrie " O'Connor, from out of Connought," [and] pur-

"
Tirlagh

mac Roary

and went in haste

sued them.

O'Neale returned to his own house,

home, hearing" [that] "a great army of Galls and JNIounsternion about Donogh Kerbregh O'Brian

and

left

the sons of Rowrie O'Connor in Con-

nought, between

whom
all

and the forces of the De-

and Geffry Mares, with

Hugh O'Coner and Mac
;

putie and O'Connor

Counought was wasted.

Dermot coming uppon him and" [these] "having

Upon

the Deputies and O'Connor's going to

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

221

when Mageraghty turned against Hugh, the Sil-Murray also, and the inhabitants of West Connaught, with Hugh O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught, as well as all the Irish of the province, with the exception of Mac Dermot (Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh), conjointly rose out against him. As to O'Neill he made no delay until lie arrived in the very centre of Sil-Murray,
and he remained two nights at z Muilleann Guanach and totally plundered Lough Nen from whence he cara ried off O'Conor's jewels. Thence he proceeded to Carnfree where Turlough,

whence he marched

to the

Faes of Athlone*

;

y

,

,

,

the son of Roderic,

returned

home

;

was inaugurated; and then O'Neill, with his people, for all their own people were faithful to the sons of Roderic,
in so

Twayme, from Esroe to Clonvicknose,
that there was not in
all

much

those Contreys, the door of a church unburnt, with great slaughters of

both partys. Eachmarkagh taine of Corckaghlan, was

Mac Brannan,
killed.

Chief-

never before pointed out by any of our topoOne of the legends given in graphical writers. the Dinnseanchus points out its situation very conwords " in
the following They the body of Fraech to Cnoc na Dala (Hill veyed of the Meeting) to the SOUTH-EAST of Cruachain,
distinctly
:

Mories

Mac

Murrogh, with his brothers, Mahon Mac Connor Menmoye, Neal O'Teig, Teig mac Gilleroe
O'Connor, Flann O'Ffallawyn, and others, were
all killed.

and interred him there ; so that unde dicitur the earn is named
:

it is

from him
Fraeich,
fol.

Cam

The

sons of Rowrie O'Connor left

i.

e.

the earn of Fraech."
a, col. a.

Book of Lecan, and

Connought.

Hugh O'Connor took hostages of all

243, p.

the Provence, and Geffrey March the Deputie, with the most part of the English, returned to
their houses."
z

It is a small earn of stones

earth, situated

to the south of the village of Tulsk,

and about

Lough Nen, loc

ne"n

This

is

the place

three miles to the south-east of Rathcroghan, in the townland of Cams, to which this earn and a small green mound, or tumulus, situated to the east of the earn, give name. This earn, though
small,
is

now
and

called Loch-na-n-ean, or lake of the birds.

It lies to the west of the castle of
is

Eoscommon,
;

said to have been originally a deep lake
it is

but at present

generally dried up in summer, in consequence of drains which were sunk
to carry off the

of Croghan

a very conspicuous object in the plain and a good view of it, as well as of ;

Rathcroghan,
Elphin.
field, is

may
far

be had from the street of
this earn, in the

water

;

but

in winter the drains

Not

from

same

are not sufficient for this purpose, and the land becomes inundated.

na

This earn, which was called after the son of Fiodhach of the Red Hair, Fraech,
Carnfree.

1

a long standing stone, called cloc F QDa gcapn, which was probably erected here as a

boundary. The Editor visited this place on the 10th of August, 1837, and made every search for
the inauguration stone of theO'Conors,but could
find
is

was the one on which the O'Conor was inaugurated. It
in
is

situated in the townland of Cams,

the parish of Ogulla, in the barony and county of Roscommon. The situation of this
earn, so often

probable that

no such stone, nor tradition respecting it. It it was either destroyed or carried
several centuries since.
is

away

The green moat

to

mentioned in Irish history, was

the east of Carufree

the

Dumha

Kealga, so

222
ccijhib.

ciNNacci Rio^hachca eirceciNN.
(o

[1225.

poba raipipi Id cloinn RuaiDpi a naipecca buDen) ace ma6 aop mac oiapmaoa, Dauic ua ploinn, ^fc. gpaoa ao6a namd, cinneao annpin le mac carail cpoibDeips, Dul Clpf corhaiple ap ap cceann gall co cuipc ara luain, oip Do pala 50 po&dnac Doparh maire gall Gpeann Do beir comcpuinn amnpiDe an ionbai& pin, i bdrcap capaiD a
.1.
-]
i

bd cuapupclac ciobnupmop Doparh alop a arap, i ap apon pepin uaip laicrec mD apaon Doib. piaohaibiD goill poirhe pim 50 lurjdipec q congbaio Uuccparh an uipcip map lop laip fcoppa e 50 16m jpa&ac achaiD lap pin. Do rhainb gall ap cfna ina commbaiD annpin, oonnchab caipbpec ua bpiain, 1 ua maoilpeclainn gona pocpaiDib.
-]

lap cclop an, comcpuinnijci

pin

Do luce moigi

haf,

-\

Do cuacaib

ccpic luijne, ~\ i ccfp namalsaib jona po cecpioD pompa mbuap i inmleaba, ~\ po paccaibpioD meic 17uai&pi in uaca6 pocpaiDi. UeccaiD clann T?uaiopi uf concobaip pompa lapom an lion bdccup co cill

Connacr,

i

mbo a mbuaip. Imcupa aoba 50 ngallaib uime cuipiD uara Dapccain aopa jpdib cloinne Ruai&pi, i congbaio piopra piublaca cpom a ploij ina rnmcel pe hionnpaijiD Do rabaipc oppa bu&en. UeD ao6 mac Ruai&pi rmc TTluipceapcaig, Dorhnall ua plairbfpcaij, cijeapndn mac
ceallaij ap cul a
-|

carail miccdpain,
5pai&. UeccaiD

mac roippbealbaij mic RuaiDpi Danacul coDa Da naop cnmceal coippgoill im ao6 mac carail cpoib&eipg lappin
]

i

celebrated in the Dinnseanchus and Lives of St.
Patrick.

been willing to acknowledge the King's right make such a grant.
c

to

them wages, $c., uaip rlac, cioolaicreac lao apaon doib

b

Had paid

ba ruapupThe cuap-

Troops.

All this

is

much

better told in the

upcul was the stipend or wages paid by the suIt never means tribute, perior to his assistant. or even rent, but a stipend or salary for work

Annals of Kilronan, in which it is stated that the sons of Eoderic were left with a few Koydamnas, chieftains, horse-boys, and servants 7
:

or service done.

The Annalists here look upon

po pa^buic meic Ruaiopi jan cinol aipecca, ni paib'e na Bpappao acr uacao pioamnaD

7
7

the English as hireling soldiers, who were employed in the service of the King of Connaught.

caoipec, 7 jille ech, 7 jplle ppireolriia. d of St. Kllkelly, cill ceallaij, i. e. the church
Ceallach
rish of the

They do not appear to have been aware of the mandate, dated 12th June, 1225, issued by King

An

old church in a village

and pa-

Henry

III.,

directing

William Earl Marshall,

same name, in the barony of Costello, and county of Mayo. See it marked on the

the Lord Justice, to seize on the whole country of Connaught, stated to have been forfeited by

map

prefixed to Genealogies,

1'ribes,

and Customs

O'Conor, and to deliver
or, if

it

to Richard de
it,

Burgo;

of Hy-Fiachrach, printed for the Irish Archasological Society in 1844, and noted in the explanatory Index to the same Map,
p.

they were aware of

they

may

not have

484.

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Mac Dermot, David

223
O'Flynn,

excepting only the supporters of Hugh, namely,
&c.

The

to the English to the

resolution then adopted by the son of Cathal Crovderg, was to repair Court of Athlone ; for it happened, fortunately for him,

very time assembled there, and the greater part of them were friendly to him, on his father's account b as well as on his own, for both had paid them wages [for military services], and
that the chiefs of the English of Ireland
at that

were

had been bountiful towards them. The English received him with joy, and kept him among them with much affection for some time afterwards. He then
of the chiefs of the English of Ireland as he considered necessary, together with Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, and O'Melaghlin, with their forces.

engaged in

his cause the

Lord

Justice,

and

as

many

Moynai and of the Tuathas of Connaught had heard of this muster, they fled into the territory of Leyny and Tirawley, with their cows and other cattle, and left the sons of Eoderic attended by only a few
the inhabitants of

When

The sons of Roderic O'Conor afterwards proceeded to Kilkelly" with troops all the troops they had, and placed themselves in defence of their cows and
.

nocks.

As

for

Hugh

[O'Conor], and the English

who accompanied

him, they

of despatched light marauding parties to plunder the retainers of the sons Roderic, but detained the main body of their army about them for the purpose of making an attack upon sons of Roderic] themselves. Hugh, the son of
[the

Roderic, Donnell O'Flaherty, Tiernan, the son of Cathal Miccarain and the f son of Turlough, son of Roderic, went to protect some of their Aes graidh
,
.

6

e

Catlial

Hiccarain

He

is

called

Cathal

" servants of trust." It

is

stated in the

Annals of

Miogharan by Duald Mac Firbis, in his Pedigree of the O'Conors, in Lord Eoden's copy of his Genealogical Book, p. 219. He was the fifteenth
son of Turlough More O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland.
col. 4.

Kilronan that they went on this occasion to protect the cows and people of Farrell O'Teige, who

had taken an oath
he was the
first

to

be faithful to them, but that

of the Connacians that violated
;

See also the Book of Lecan, fol. 72, b, This Cathal, who was one of the illegiti-

his oath to the sons of Eoderic

and that he
of Cathal

brought

in their stead

Hugh, the son

mate sons of King Turlough, left one son, Conor, of whose descendants no account is preserved.
To protect some of their Aes gradha, oanacul cooa &a naop gpaio, i. e. to protect their stewards and chief servants of trust.
f

Crovderg, and the English, to protect his cows and people ; that it was on this occasion the

English came in collision with Turlough, the son of Eoderic, who, perceiving the treachery
of O'Teige, made a judicious and clever retreat by the help of Donn Oge Mageraghty, Flaherty

Qop

5pcii6

is

used throughout these Annals in the sense of

224

QHHata Kjoshacua eipeaNN.
lap na aipiuccaD pin Doparh cuipip a jlapldic
i

[1225.

pemeup poime, ua plannagain, mag oipeacraij jona anpabaib, plaiebeapcac uaeab Darhpaib eojanac baoi ina pocaip, opoaijip iaD Dia nimDiDfri ina
bealbaij. Oonn occ
-\

nDeoib 50 eeeapnaDap parhlaiD ona mbiobbabaib gan aon no euicim Diob.

pala an la pin Dpong to piopcaib aoba ui concobaip ccfnn eacmapcaij mic bpandin 50 nDeachaib Do copnarh a b'oicpece oppa 50 ecopcaip eacmapcac Don anbpoplann galccao baoi na 05016. Leanaip ao6 6 concobaip 50
i

Oo

ngallaib uime

mac

puai&pi an oibce pin 50 mflecc 50 mbaoi eeopa hoibce

mppin 05 apjain luijne Do gac lee. 6d hionDoconaij Do pala Do eajpa Sir Do Denarii lap na apgain cap cenn an ciopuaippi Do pdccbab Da annpin.
hinnilib illuijmu.

ann bdccap meic T?uai6pi mun ampa a ccorhjap Do loc mic peapnjlfnD na mocapc. Comaiplijip ao& pe na jallaib annpin na abaij

Qp

i

cuaca DionnpaijiD Dia napgain, Siol TTluipeaDhaij, clann comalcaij DinnpaD map an ceDna 6 Do bdccap ap ccec(Y> poirhe. lap ccinneaD na corhaiple pi loccap pompa plijiD nac pmuainpeaD gall co bpctc Dul hi bpio6 ngaclaij 50 cpempe piaccpac dc cfje in meppaij jup aipccpioD
-|
i

.1.

cuil

cepna6a lap noiljfnn a Daoine

Doib.

^ac ap gab
'

50 Dubconga Do luce

soldiers,
8

O'Flanagan, and some of the Tyronian route of who covered their retreat.

to the ratification of the peace.

Tyronian

soldiers.

These were some of the
to assist Turlough, the
set

soldiers left

by O'Neill

Lough Macfarry, loc mic pepaoaig, called loc rntc Gpaocnj, in the Annals of Connaught, and loc mic Gipecroaij, in those of Kilronan.
This name
thinks that
is it

son of Eoderic,

whom

he had

up

as

King of
e.

now

Connaught.

In the Annals of Kilronan these

forgotten ; but the Editor was the old name of the Lake of

are called becigan oon

Rue Go janac,

i.

some

of the Eugenian, or Kinel-Owenian, route, turma, or company of soldiers.
h

Templehouse, in the county of Sligo. This is better told ^Inhabitants of the Tuathas
in the Annals of Kilronan, thus
:

" The resolution

Him

In the Annals

of Kilronan

it

is

stated that

Mac Brannan
too

displayed great valour

in defending himself,

but that he was overof might.

which the son of Cathal Crovderg then adopted, was to go with the English in pursuit of the cows of the Tuathas, of the Sil- Murray, and of the
Clann- Tomalty, by a way which no Englishman had ever passed before, that is, by Fidh Gadlaigh,
until they arrived at Attymas,

whelmed by
1

many men

Meelick,

ITlilmc.

A

church,

near which

are the ruins of one of the ancient
in a parish of the
k

Round Towers,
barony of
the

and they received

same name,

in the

neither javelin nor arrow on that rout.

They

Gallen, and county of

Then

left,

Mayo. Do paccbub That

is,

num-

plundered Coolcarney, where they seized upon the cows and destroyed the people. Some at-

ber not seized upon by the plunderers previously

tempted to escape from them into the Backs

;

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, then

225
set out to sur-

The

English, with
;

round Turlough but the latter, on perceiving this, ordered his recruits in the van, and Donn Oge Mageraghty, with his Calones, Flaherty O'Flanagan,

and a few Tyronian soldiers 5 who were with him in the rear, to cover the retreat, by which means they escaped from the enemy without the loss of a man. On the same day some of Hugh O'Conor's marauding parties
,

encountered Eachmarcach
against

Mac
him
11

Branan,
fell

who had gone

to protect his

cows

them;

and Eachmarcach
.

warriors

fought against the sons of Eoderic that night to Meelick', and for three nights afterwards continued plundering Leyny in all directions. This was unfortunate to

who

by the overwhelming force of the Hugh O'Conor, and the English, pursued

O'Hara,
able

who had to make peace with them, in consideration of the inconsidernumber of its cattle then leftk in Leyny. The sons of Eoderic were at this time stationed near Lough Macfarry in
1 , ,

Hugh then proposed to the English that they should and plunder the inhabitants of the Tuathas m the Sil-Murray, and pursue
him [with their cattle] and this Clann-Tomalty, being agreed upon, they set out, taking a road which the English alone would never have thought of taking", viz. they passed through Fiodh Gatlaigh, and marched until they reached Attymas and they plundered Coolcarney p after
as they

Gleann-na-Mochart.

had

fled before

;

;

,

but such of these as were not drowned in the
attempt were killed
pitiful!

or plundered.
as proceeded to

It

was

A parish Attymas, CMC cijje an rheppai^. about the southern half of the territory forming
of Coolcarney, in the barony of Gallen, and See Map to Genealogies, Tribes, county of Mayo

Such of them

Dubh-

chonga were drowned, and the fishing weirs with their baskets, were found full of drowned children.

Such of the

flitting

Clann-Tomalty

as

and Cwtoms of Hy-Fiachrach, printed in the year 1844, and Explanatory Index to the same,
p.

escaped the English and the drowning, fled to Tirawley, where they were attacked by

477.
P

Coolcarney,

Cuil Ceapna&a

This territory
It
is

O'Dowda, and left without a single cow." n Would never have thought of taking, nac

retains its

name

to the present day.

si-

pmuainpeao jail co bpac t>ul rpeimpe, that is, Hugh, who was intimately acquainted with the
passes and population of the country, conducted the English by a rout which themselves

tuated in the barony of Gallen, and county of Mayo, and comprises the parishes of Kilgarvan
of Sligo

and Attymas, which are divided from the county by a stream called Sruthan geal. Ac-

they

would never have thought of. The Annals of Connaught and of Kilronan describe these transactions more fully than those of the Four Masters.

cording to the Book of Hy-Fiachrach, Cuil Cearnadha extended from Beul atha na nidheadh,
six miles

from Ballina, to the road or pass of
is

Breachmhuighe (Breaghwy), which

the

name

2 G

226

QNNaca Rioghachca eiReaww.

[1225.

an cecrhe po bdi&ic a nopmop. Gp arhlaib Do gebn na cfpcanna nap a ^ac a cceapna Don coipc ccaippib lomldn Do leanbaib lap na mbdchaD.
pin Dfob 6 jallaib,

05 loc mic pea6 apoile Doib 50 pgepDip pocpaioe jail pe hao6. Donn mag pa6ai pgaoileaD oipeccaij, i apoile Dm maieib Do cop DO paijib uf plaicbaepeaij a ppip commuipceapraij uf concobaip, njeapnan mac cacail a minnceap, Sic Do Denarii Doib cap a ccfnn 50 Do Dul ap cul a mbo bpdgbaiDip 501 II mac cacail cpoiboeipj. Qp ann baoi ao6 mun am pom moij
luiji i corhcooaij.

noeacam 6 ouboa UlaD 100 clann RuaiDpi rpa

on lombdeaD pempdice loDap pura jondp pdccaib aon bo aca.
-|

i

ccip

namatjam 50

api comaiple Do ponpae

TTleic
-\

-|

-|

i

neo,

ciajaiD meic muipceapcaij muminij ma cfnn ap Shlanaib"] comaipcib. TTlaD an caob ceap Do connaccaib Dana nip bo cunn Doib Don Dul pom,
]

muipceapcac ua bpiain, goill Dfp gup mapbpac a noaoine beop, Sippiam copcaije a mbailce. ba jup lonnpaDap a mbpuij Doneoc^p a pucpac Diob, hole cpa la hao6 mac cacail cpoibbeipj a ccoccporh Don cupup pin uaip ni he po cocuip iaD, ache cnuc, popmac Da njabail pen pe gac maicfp Da Don lupDip jjona jallaib cconnaccaib an can pom. Qp ccualaDap Dpdjail Don puacap po Do mapbaiD cecpe meic mec mupchaiD ap en lacaip.
uaip canjaDap goill laijfn
~\ ~\

muman

inn

muman

ma ccpecomnpc

-|

-|

"|

i

6d cpuacch cpa an
i

nGpinn an lonbaiD
"]

pi,

nerhpen Do beonaij Dfa Don cuicceD Do bpfpp baoi uaip ni coiccleaD an mac occlaoic apoile ace 50
)

apccain pona curhanj. Do cuipiD beop mnd, poDaome Dpuacc -| jopca Don coccaD pin.

cpeachaD

lenirii,

painn, i

of a townland in the parish of Castleconor, lying to the east of Ardnarea.
q

a oaoine

After having destroyed its people, lapnoiljenn The word bil^erm or oi^eann ooiB.

in the parish of Attymas, in the barony of Gallen, and county of Mayo See Ordnance of the county of Mayo, sheet 40; and also Map

Lough,

signifies destruction, or depopulation. O'Clery writes it biljionn, according to the modern Irish

and Customs of Hy-Fiachand map to the same, rack, pp. 242, 243, s The baskets of the fishing weirs, na cepcanna
Genealogies, Tribes,

orthography, and explains

it

p jpiop, no oiolair-

piujaoh.
total

The compound uile-biljenn means
extirpation, or annihilation,

a ccaippiB In the Annals of Kilronan the na cappanna co na ceapcanoaib; reading is,
uar-

destruction,

See Annals of Tighernach at the year 995. r Duvconga. This place is now called beal

and in the Annals of Connaught, na caipp co na ceppacliaib, i. e. the weirs and baskets. The
children that had been carried

away by the

floods

aca conja

in Irish,

and Anglicised Bellacong
near Ballymore

were found entangled

in the baskets,

which were

and Ballycong.

It is situated

placed for nets in the carrys or fishing weirs.

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
its

227
r

having nearly destroyed

people".
;

Some of them

fled to

Duvconga but the
,

baskets of the fishing weirs were greater part of these were drowned and the found full of drowned children. Such, of them as on this occasion escaped

5

from the English, and the drowning aforesaid, passed into Tirawley, where they were attacked by O'Dowda, who left them not a single cow. As to the sons of Roderic, the resolution they adopted, at Lough Macfarry,

was
to

to

separate

from each

other, until

the

English should leave

Hugh;
their

send Donn Mageraghty, and

others of their chieftains, to O'Flaherty,

sworn friend and partisan; and the sons of Murtough O'Conor, and Tiernan, the son of Cathal', to take charge of their people and cows, and to

obtain peace on their behalf, until the English should leave (Hugh) the son of Cathal Crovderg. Hugh was at this time at Mayo, and the sons of Mur-

tough Muimhneach [O'Conor] went to him under protection and guarantee". As to the inhabitants of the southern side of Connaught, they were not in
a state of tranquillity at this period, for the English of Leinster and Munster, with Murtough O'Brien, the English of Desmond, and the sheriff of Cork, had

made an

upon them, and slew all the people that they caught, and burned their dwellings and villages. Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was displeased at their coming on this expedition for it was not he that sent for them, but were themselves excited by envy and rapacity, as soon as they had
irruption
;

heard what good things the Lord Justice and his English followers had obtained
in

Connaught at that time. During rough were slain on the same spot.

this incursion the four sons of

Mac Murpro-

Woeful was the misfortune, which God permitted

to fall

upon the best

vince in Ireland at that time! for the young warriors did not spare each other, but preyed and plundered each other to the utmost of their power. Women

and children, the
this
1

feeble,

and the lowly poor", perished by cold and famine

in

war

!

Tiernan, the son of Cathal.

of Cathal O'Conor,

He was the son who was one of the sons of

Kilronan it is stated that the sons of Murtough " went into his house make their submis[to
sion] under sureties and guarantees." w The The Annals of Kilronan poor.

Turlough More O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland. u Under protection and guarantee, ap planaiB 7 comaipciB, that is, they had persons to guarantee their safety on their arrival in his presence,
to

state,

that during this
lords,

war women,

children,

young

make

their

mock

peace.

In the Annals of

and mighty men, as well as feeble men, Oo cuipic mnu perished of cold and famine.

2o2

228

QNMaca Rio^hachca eiReawN.

[1225.

Do lacaip aoba ui conlap nDul cpa Do macaib muijicfprai^ muimnij Do pdibfmap, Do cuaiD ap ndbapac 50 cill mf66in. cobaip DO peip map Compaicic rpf ploi na njall arm pin pe poile, -| ap bfg nap bo Ian an cpioca
Uainicc aoD 6 ceD ina mbaccap Ifr ap Ifc eDip gallaib jaoiDealaib. ap pldnaib maire jail, Donnchaba caipbpij ui plaicbeapcaicc ap copaib an mpDip co noeapna ccfnn ao&a in concobaip, bpiain a caipDfpa cpiopD hi
~\

~\

-]

-|

pip, ap macaib Ruainpi Oaccop uaio. Imcijip pic cap ao& tap pin, a joill irnaille pip co cuaim Da jualann, leiccip goill laijean, lompaiDip pen ap ccula Do com uf plaicbfpcaij 1 Drpmurhari uaio annpin. bo caipipe laip epiDe, uaip bacrap meic RuaiDpi poime pin allaniap oip ni'op

cfnn a buaip,
~\

~[

a Daoine

-]

DO loc aicce,

mas oipeacraij apaon piu. mac magnupa pe cloinn RuaiDpi jup Qnnpin po pcap
~\

Donn 6cc

mnpaij; hi ccfp

a mumcipe 50 bpuaip mcr 50 poDanac gan bo, e lap cpeachaD gan apccain. T?ucc leip iao lapam po Dioean ui l?uaipc,
namalgaiD ap cfnn a
-\
-\

ccpeachao pilip meic goipDelbai^.

Dana Do cuip piDe Dpong Dia muincip poime 50 neoalaib aiDblib. lap na piop pin DaoD mac RuaiDpi Deojan 6 eibin uaraD DfjDaoine gup muioeaD pop muimnecaib, jop beanaD a loDup pompa neoala Diob, gup conjbab bpaijDe Da mainb uaca. lap na clop pin Do
bpiain
~\ ~\

OonnchaD caipppeac ua

DonnchaD caipbpeac ncc Do lacaip aoba nuc RuaiDpi 50 nDeapna pfr bdicce cointel pip, i gup jab Do laim jan coi&eacc na aghaiD Dopibipi Dia lecceaD
7

lemb
7

7 oijci^eipn 7

cpeom

7

eccpeom pe
This

aijje, 7

puacc
*

pe jopca oon cogao

pin.

pp )u .

"

a cliamam pem .1. t)ortn Oj maille He then came to another resolution,

Of his gossip, a caipoeupu Cpfopo
is

term

used in the modern language to denote a gossip, or one who is a sponsor for a child at

namely, to return back to O'Flaherty, for he did not like how he left him ; for he had on
the west side of the lake the sons of Roderic,

See O'Brien's Dictionary in voce. baptism. See also Harris's Ware, vol. ii. p. 72, for Gossipred.

an d his

own

son-in-law, that

is,

Donn Oge

along

with
* foi.
i

them." According to the Book of Lecan,
co l. 4, he was the ninth son of Tur-

Hanmer

says,

that

it

was a league of
See note
d

Manus.
72, 4,

amity highly esteemed in Ireland under the year 1178, p. 42, supra.

Donn
herty's
aili

Oge.

It is

stated in the Annals of

ough More O'Conor, monarch of Ireland. His descendants took the surname of Mac Manus,
and we re seated in Tir Tuathail, in the northeast o fthe barony of Boyle, in the county of

Kilronan that

Donn Oge Mageraghty was O'Flason-in-law: Do pome pirn comuipli

ann pin .1. impoo bo cum 1 Plaicbepcai^ up cula, uaip nip caipipi leip map Do puguib e, uaip oo buoap meic Ruuibpi alia amap DO loc

Roscommon.
That
After having first plundered, mp ccpeachao. is, on his passage through the present

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
sons of

229

Murtough Muimhneach [O'Conor] having come before Hugh O'Conor, as we have stated, he went on the next day to Kilmaine, where the three English armies met; and nearly the whole of the triocha ched (cantred)

The

was

filled

with people, both English and

Irish.

Hugh

OTlaherty, under the

protection and guarantee of the

chiefs of the English,

and of

his gossip

1
,

Donough Cairbreach O'Brien, came to Hugh O'Conor and the Lord Justice, and made peace with O'Conor, on behalf of his people and cows, on condition
that he should expel the sons of Roderic.

After

this,

Hugh and

his English
;

went
after

to

Tuam, where he dismissed the English of Leinster and Desmond
to

(watch) OTlaherty, for he did not confide in as OTlaherty had, some time before, the sons of Roderic at the west side him, of the lake, together with Donn Oge y Mageraghty.

which he returned back

The son

of

Manusz then parted from

the sons of Roderic, and set out

for Tirawley, in quest of his

there, without having been plundered or molested.

cows and people, and fortunately found them He then took them with
.

him, under the protection of O'Rourke, after having

first

plundered" Philip

Mac

Costello.

Donough Cairbreach O'Brien sent a detachment of his people before him, with immense spoils; but Hugh, the son of Roderic, and Owen O'Heyne, having heard of this movement, went before them with a few select men, defeated the
Momonians, deprived them of
as hostages.

their spoils,

and detained some of

their nobles

When Donough
made

son of Roderic, and

a solemn peace" with him, and

Cairbreach heard of this, he came to Hugh, the bound himself never
and people, and found them in good condition, without having been plundered or molested, and they took them with them to O'Eourke, and on
Philip
b

barony of Costello, which lay on? his way to O'Rourke, he plundered Mac Costello. In the Annals of Kilronan, the language of this
pas-

sage

is

much

better than that written
:

Four Masters. It runs thus Ip .oeilij meic nflajnupa pe macaiB Ruai&pi, 7 no cuacap a ccip nariialjaio ap cenn a mbo 7 a mumceap, 7 puapaoap lao 50 po&anac can mpao can apjum, 7 pugpac leo lac a nucc 1 Ruaipc, 7 oo ponpar cpeic tnoip ap
Philip

by the ann pin po

their

way they took
Costello."

a great prey from

Mac

A

solemn peace, plr bairce combel,

i.

e.

a peace of the extinguishing of candles, i. e. a peace so solemn, that he who should violate it

would incur excommunication, of which

cere-

mony

the extinguishing of the candles formed

mac ^oipoealbh.

"Then

the sons of

Manus separated from the

sons of Eoderic, and

the last and most terror-striking part. Ma"a so solemn that expresses it, geoghegan peace

they went to Tirawley in quest of their cows

whoever would break

it

was

to

be excommuni-

230

[1225.

a c o 5ill t> mac Ruaibpi cainicc ap an ceD pluaijeao ma (lap bpajail a rhuincipe 66 uam) uaip ajjaiD la hao& mac cacail cpoibDeipg. an mpDip gona jallaib mppm 50 cala6 innpi cpfma jup Ceo ao6 oilen na cipce 50 napcpaijib anloca beccin Do plaicbeapcaicch imp cpfrha, a aop jpaiD cuije.

5 lDeaDn

P

comaM P orn

~[

~\

DO cabaipr ap laim aoba. Upiallaip an lupofp lap pin t)ia nj. Ueo aob 6 concobaip Dia io6laca6 uioe cian Da pb'jiD gup pajaib an lupofp uacaD DO
rhainb a
caipipi
illairii

mumnpe

aicce imaille pe hiomao penneo,

laip connacraij

acrmab

bfcc.

peapojlaoc oip nfop bo Uuccporh annpin maire a oipeacca
-]

plairbeapcac 6 plannaccain, pfpgal ua caibg, i apoile Do mainb connacr, i ap Doib pen DO beccin a bpuap.1.

gall a njioll pe a ccuapaprlaib,

laccaD.

ua plaicbeapcai^, meicc muipceapraij, na liuaiple apcfna ap 006 mac cacail cpoibDeipj lap nimcecr cpoimcionoil na ngall uaib, po gabpac le macaib RuaiDpi. Cuipip ao6 o concobaip

Qp

a haicle

pin lompaiDip

~\

~\

pjpibne Do paijiD an luprfp Dia poillpiujaD pin Do, i DiappaiD puilleaD pocpaioi.. Nip bo haicepc po lap Dopam pin, uaip Do ppeccpaannpin cecca
i
cated with book, bell, and candle."

See note

of

under the year 1200. c Lord Justice He was Geoffry de Marisco, or De Mariscis, or Geffry March, as he is called

Iniscreawa, or Wildgarlick near Cargin, in the barony of Clare ; a small island, where the walls and high ditch of
it

as follows

"

:

Isle, is

by Mageoghegan,
nals
.of

in his translation of the

An-

a well fortified place are still extant, and encompass almost the whole island. Of this isle,

Clonmacnoise, at the years 1225, 1226. He was succeeded by Richard de Burgo, the great
list

Macamh
cian, as

Insicreawa, a memorable ancient magi-

Lord of Connaught, on the 10th of March, 1227.
See
of the Chief Governors of Ireland given
in Harris's

they say, had his denomination." See Territory of Hiar Connaught, by Roderic O'Fla-

Ware,

vol.

ii.

p. 103,

where

it is in-

herty, printed for the Irish Archaeological SoThe walls here referred ciety in 1845, p. 25.
to

Hubert de Burgh, afterwards Earl of Kent, was appointed Lord Justice of Ireland, on the 10th of March, 1227, and
correctly stated that

by O'Flaherty

still

clopean character. was the castle of Orbsen,

remain, and are of a cyThe natives assert that this

from

whom Loch
its

Richard de Burgo appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland, on the same day and year.
d

Orbsen,

now Lough
to

Corrib, took

name.

See

Map
is

Inis

Creamha
Corrib,

This

is

a small island in
of Cargins,

printed in
island

and Customs of Hy-Many, 1843, on which the position of this
Tribes
is

Lough
county

near the Castle

shewn.
thus

and belonging to the barony of Clare, in the
of Galway.

The
stated

transaction narrated in the text

The name

is

translated

Wildgarlick Isle by Roderic O'Flaherty, in his Account of West Connaught, where he speaks

West by O'Flaherty, in his Account Connaught: "Anno 1225. The Lord Justice of
of

Ireland coming to the port of Iniscreawa, caused

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

231

again to oppose him, on condition that Hugh would restore him his Acs graidh. But he did not adhere to this his covenant with the son of Roderic; for,

from him, he came in the first army that Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, marched against him. After this, Hugh [the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor], and the Lord Justice with his English, set out for the port of Inis Creamha" and O'Flaherty was compelled to surrender the island of Inis Creamha, and Oilen na Circe', and
after obtaining his people
,
;

all

the vessels [boats] on the lake, into the hands of

Hugh.

The Lord

Justice

then returned home, and was escorted a great part of the way by Hugh O'Conor, with whom he left a few of the chiefs of his people, together with f many soldiers and warriors; for the Connacians were not faithful to him, except very few.
as hostages for the

English the chiefs of his people, of their wages8 as Flaherty, O'Flanagan, Farrell payment O'Teige", and others of the chiefs of Connaught, who were subsequently obliged
,

After this

Hugh gave up to the

to

ransom themselves.

After the departure of the main army of the English from Hugh, the sons of Cathal Crovderg, the son of Murtough and all the other nobles, O'Flaherty, revolted against him, and joined the sons of Roderic. Hugh O'Conor then
1 ,

despatched messengers and letters to the Lord Justice, to inform him of the
circumstance, and request additional" forces.

His request was by no means

Odo O'Flaherty, Lord of West Connaught,
liver that island,

to de-

Kirke Island, and the boats of Lough Orbsen, into the hands of Odo O'Connor,

the reward or wages to be paid them by the King of Connaught for their services in war.

King of Connaught (Cathald Redfist's son), for assurance of his fidelity." p. 25.
e

This had nothing to do with the tribute to be paid to the King of England in accordance with
the Treaty of Windsor.
CfTeige is now anglicised Teige, and sometimes Tighe. The name is common in the neighbourhood of Castlereagh, in the county of Rosh

Oilen

na

Circe,

now

Castlekirk island, in

the north-west part of Lough Corrib, containing the ruins of a very ancient castle See Hiar

Connaught, by Roderic O'Flaherty, pp. 22, 24. f Soldiers, penneo According to the Annals of Kilronan, the

common.
i

The son of Murtough,
or

Lord Justice

left

with

i.e.

mac ITluipchepcaij, the sons of the celebrated Muirchertach
Murtough
the

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, on this occasion, a few [ua^ao] of the chiefs of the English
and many archers [peipreonuij; imoa]." g In the Annals of Wages, cuaparcluib. Kilronan, the reading is, a n 5 .U pe ccuapupoal, i e in pledge for their
.

Muimhneach,

O'Conor, who, according to the
of Ireland.

Momonian Book of Lecan,

was the eleventh son of Turlough More, monarch
Additional. FuiUe6 is the old form of the modern word cuilleao, more. In the Annals of
*

pay or stipend,

i.

e.

232

[122o.
e.

Dap

goill

50 pomnirh paipepccaib
61

Gcc

cfna ba cuillmeac Doibpiom an

rupup

ba bfcc a nimpeap^na. Cuipceap 501 II laijean cuijipiorh annpin im uilliam ccpap, im macaib gpippfn. lap mbper na pocpaiOi pin aippiom lonnpaijib meic T?uai6pi rap cocap piap, gabaip a ccuala meic Ruampi Do beir jan lion pocpolitic in uib Diapmaca map
pin
p

pa mop a

net>ala,

-\

-\

-|

cuipip peblipangacrap a luce combd6a iao mun am pom, mi& a bpacaip, apoile Do maicib a rhuincipe, i pocpaiOe mop DO jlapldraib

paiDe, uaip nf

~\

"|

gall DionnpaD eojain uf

e&m

in

uib bpiacpac aibne co

mbdoap abaij

long-

puipc
ccionn.

in

apD pacain pa comaip na rfpe Dapccam a muca na mamne ap
Do macaib muipceapraij (baDap DO 6ul Do cpeachaD a bpip comluicce,
]
i

Poillpijceap Dua plairbeapraij,

05 lonnpaijib mac T?uai6pi) goill a mbec an apD pacain, nip paillicceab pin piuporh oip Gojan 6 hei&in, Do Ifnpac mcc Denroil Denaoncaib 50 pangaoap ccompoccup Doib. Oo
)

~|

comaple pe poile annpin,
Kilronan,
the reading
is,

.1.

ruacal mac muipceapcaij,
n

~\

caiclec ua
This cause-

biappaib

cuillenb

The

toffker,

i.

e.

the causeway.

focpume.
1

Struggle trifling,

ba becc a nimpfpjna.
is
:

way, which was called cocap mono comea&a, is still well known, and its situation pointed

In the Annals of Kilronan the reading
^etBci]'

DO

out by the natives, though the country

is

very

erala

cam,

i. e.

pa^oai y gac na himeapap" They used to obtain the spoils, but
7 ni

much

did not expose themselves to the danger of the conflict." The word itnpepjna, which is

situated in the parish of Templetogher, in the barony of Ballimoe, and county of Galway. Hugh O'Conor, who had

improved.

It

is

his residence in the plain of Croghan,

marched
and

used by the Four Masters,
.1.

thus explained in imO'Clery's Glossary of ancient Irish Words
is
:

on

this occasion across the ford at Ballimoe,

directing
this

his

course

south-westwards crossed

.1. Imbpuijean. on every side, i. e. conseargna, striking flict." Both forms of the word are correctly

peapjtjna,

imeapopjam,

"

causeway, and proceeded into Hy-Diarmada,

i.

e.

or O'Concannon's country, where he had heard his rival was staying See note r under the
,

explained in the Irish Dictionaries of O'Brien and O'Reilly, both having taken them from
O'Clery.

year

1 1

77, pp. 34, 35, 36.

Also note under the
e. raw recruits, i. The Annals of Kili.

year 1255.
Recruits, jjlar-taaraib,

m William Grace, Uilliam Ccpap.
Annals of Kilronan he
i.

In the

or soldiers lately enlisted.

is

called

IMliam Cpap,
was the

ronan

call

them juillpeipreancaiB,

e.

Eng-

e.

Gulielmus Crassus.

Cras, or Gras,
le

lish archers.
p

soubriquet of

Raymond

Gras, and afterwards
is

Ardrahin, apt) parain, a fair-town in the

became a family name, which
incorrectly written Grace.

now always
from

It is derived

barony of Dunkellin, and county of Galway, and a vicarage in the diocese of Kilmacduagh.

the French Gras, or Gros.

Here

is still

to be seen a small portion of the

1-225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
call cheerfully

233

an ineffectual one, for the English responded to his
tiously;
1

and well was their promptness rewarded, for their spoil their struggle trifling The English of Leinster, under the conduct of William
.

and expediwas great, and

Grace" and the sons of
forces,

Griffin,

were sent to aid him.

On

the arrival of these

Hugh

the sons of Roderic, and advanced to Hy-Diarmada,

proceeded westwards, across the Togher" [the Causeway], against where he had heard they

were

stationed, without
;

any considerable

forces, for their allies

had not

as yet

joined them
people, and
to plunder

and he sent

his brother Felim,

and others of the
for one night at

chiefs of his

a great

number of the English

recruits into

Owen O'Heyne. These encamped

Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne, Ardrahen p with
,

a view to plunder the country early in the morning following. O'Flaherty and the sons of Murtough [O'Conor], who were then on their

way
had
at

O'Heyne, Ardrahen, did not abandon their friend, but, with one mind and accord, followed the English until they came very close to them. They then held a council", and came to the resolution of sending Tuathal, the son of
r

to join the sons of Roderic, having received intelligence that the English and were stationed gone to plunder their sworn partisan, Owen

Murtough

ruins of an ancient cloigtheach, or Round Tower. 1 They then held a council, Do gniac comaiple

O'Flaherty, and the other son of Murtough, was to remain outside the town. The Irishman

pe poile ann pin
at

Ardrahen

is

much

This attack on the English better described in the An-

nals of Kilronan,

of persons,

particularly in giving the names which are so confusedly given by
It

the Four Masters.

runs as follows

:

" O'Fla-

accompany Tuathal O'Conor, was Hugh O'Dowda and they entered the town with great cotirage and boldness, and the English fled out of the town, one
Taichleach, the son of
;

selected to.

herty and the sons of Murtough [O'Conor], as they were coming to join the sons of Eoderic,

party of them passing eastwards and another westwards. They were pursued eastwards. The
party who fled to the west came in collision with the Irish who were at the back of the town, and
routed them, though there were not living among the Irish any people more vigorous than they; but fortune did not favour them. The party who fled eastwards were pursued by Tuathal [O'Conor] and Taichleach O'Dowda. Tuathal
first
fell

heard of the English having set out to plunder their sworn ally O'Heine, and of their being at Ardrahen and they adopted the resolution of
;

going to Ardrahen, attacking the English early in the morning, and burning the town over

They travelled all night, and morning arrived on the green of the town. The resolution they then came to was, to sent first into the town Tuathal, the son of Murtough, and whomsoever of the Irish chiefearly in the
tains

their

heads.

wounded the constable of the English, who by the hand of Taichleach. It was indeed

fortunate for the sons of Eoderic that they were

not in this conflict," &c.
Tuathal, the son of Murtough

he would wish to accompany him, while

From

the

2H

234

dNNata Rio^hachca emeaNN.
piu

[1225.

DO cup DO poigiD an baile cecup ua plaicbeapmac muipceapcaijj iman mbaile peccaip guna pocpaiDib. LuiD raij cuanal, -| caicleac gona bpianldc 50 mfnmnac meapDana ecpecommupc in mbaile 50 rcucpac eiuj puabaipc bio6bai& oppo. gall ip TTlaiDreap pop

Duboa 50 noipim amaille
-]

i

jallaib poip i piap ap a hairle.

Lfnaicpiom aop na

ma&ma

poip.

Loicip

cuaral conpcapla na ngall Da ceD pupgarh. Qcjonaiy caicleac e gup pajba6 an conpDapla gan anmain DC pf&e. Odla na ngall ap ap mui6ea6 ap an mbaile Don raoib apaill po eipij ua plairbeapcaij, mac muipceapcaij Doib.
~\

5'6ea6 capla Dampen oaibpibe jup bpipearcap joill oppa po ceDoip. Qp Don coipc pin Do mapbaD macjamain mac aoba mic concobaip maonmaije, Clcr cfna jiolla cpiopD mac Diapmaoa, mall mac peapjail ua cai&g, ^jc. an peap po rhapb mall 6 caiDj, .1. bpacaip colen uf biomupaij. po mapbaD

Oala mac Ruai&pi coniDpecaiD ap abapac pe hua pplaicbeapcaij, pip an ccuiD oile Da naop comra 50 rcangacap pompa a nDeap 50 Dpmm cfnannam. CuiD 006 mac cacail cpoibDeipj jona jallaib ma nDiaiD. Comaip-]

li^reap 05 aipeaccaib cloinne Ruaibpi annpin jac aon Diob Do paijiD a mfnnaca pepin, -] Do gnfar pamlaiD ace Donn occ mag oipecraij namd.

CiD cpa ace iap ppajbdil na puipeac, .1. cloinne Ruaiopi uf concobaip Donn mag oipeacannpin in uacaD pocpaiDe looap Do paijiD ao6a uf nell,
-\

caij imaille

pifi.

carail cpoibDeipj ua plaicbeapraij annpin 50 ccuc Uainic poime lapam 50 cill meaDom, -\ 50 jell, i eoipeaDa uam. moij neo i nDiaiD mic muipceapcaij, -] cijfpndm mic carail miccapain 50

lonnpaijip aoD

mac

noeapnpar pic rap cfnn a mbuaip
manner

-]

a muinnpe,

i

50 noeacpac Do lacaip
a ; Book of Bal-

in which this name is given by the Four Masters, one would suppose that this Tuathal was one of the O'Dowda family ; but the more

See Book of Lecan,
lymote,
fol.

fol.

75,

b,

23, p.

b,

col. a, line

29

;

and Duald

Mac
c

Firbis's Genealogical Book, p. 575.

ancient annals shew that he was Tuathal, the son of the celebrated Muircheartach Muimh-

find

Druim Ceanannain __ The Editor could not any place of this name in the county of

neach
5

O'Conor,
-

and the brother

of

Maims

^ onor

In the Annals They joined, comopecaiD ofKilronan the reading is, po compuiceaoap,
i.

There is a Liscananaun in the parish of Lackagh, in the barony of Clare, and county of Galway.
Galway.
"Residence __ )Tlfnnao,
in his

they met. The word comopecam is often used to translate the Latin word conveniunt
e.

Vocabulary, at the
.1.

"

ITluipeaohac

is explained by O'Clery, word muipeaoac, thus: n^eapna. muipeaoac 506

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

235

with numerous forces, into the town, while [O'Conor], and Taichleach O'Dowda, to remain with their forces OTlaherty and the [other] son of Murtough were
outside.

Tuathal and Taichleach, with a strong body of their soldiers, marched into the town, and made a powerful attack upon the spiritedly and boldly routed east and west. They pursued those who fled English there, who were Tuathal wounded the constable of the English with his first shot eastwards. and Taichleach, by another shot, gave him so deep a wound, that he was left
;

lifeless.

routed westwards from the town, they were met by O'Flaherty and the [other] son of Murtough but it happened, through their evil destiny, that the English routed them immediately. On this

As

to the English

who were

;

occasion Mahon, the son of Hugh,

Mac man who
himself

son of Conor Moinmoy; Gilchreest Dermot; Niall, the son. of Farrell O'Teige, and others, were slain; but the

who was

slew Niall O'Teige,

i.

e.

the brother of Colen O'Dempsey, was slain

also.

As

to the sons of Roderic, they joined" O'Flaherty

and their "other
;

allies

the next morning, and proceeded southwards to Druim-Ceanannain' the son of Cathal Crovderg, with'his English, set out after them.

but Hugh,

The

tribes

who supported

the sons of Roderic

now

held a consultation, and came to the
to his
;

resolution that each of

them should return

own

residence",

which

all

accordingly did, excepting Donn Oge Mageraghty and the princes, i. e. the sons of Roderic, being thus left with only a small force, went to Hugh O'NeilF,

accompanied by Donn Mageraghty.

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, then attacked O'Flaherty, and took

He then proceeded to Kilmaine and Mayo, in hostages and pledges from him. pursuit of the sons of Murtough" and Tiernan, the son of Cathal Migaran
[O'Conor]

who came before him under

the guarantee

ofDonough
cattle,

Cairbreach,

meunnacca, .1. cijeapna ap jac lonaoh: mfnnao .1. lonao."
T

turn to his people and
of Roderic.

and leave the sons

The

sons of Eoderic then left the

Went

to

Hugh

O'Neill,

looap oo

paijjio

aooa

country, for they had no English or Irish forces
at hand,

ui neill.

The compound

preposition, or prepo-

and Donn Oge went again to O'Neill,

sitional phrase,

Do paijib, is now obsolete, and o'lonnpuijio, or DO cum, used in its place. This passage is given somewhat differently .in the
" The resolution Annals of Kilronan, thus they adopted was that each of them should re:

And

nothing resulted from this expedition, but

that the best province in Ireland was injured

and destroyed between them.
w

Murtough,

i.

e.

the celebrated Muircheartach

Muimhneach O'Conor.

2

n2

236

QNNata Rioshachca eiRecwN.
ui
-] i

[1225.

aoba

maire na ngall. Concabaip ap planaibeacc oonnchaba caipbpij, 6a cumpanab na lonam pin uaip ni paibe cill na cuaic cconnaccaib an can
loc
~\

pom gan

Idinmilleb.
i

Uebm
lonnca.

Diopulamj DO ceccbdil

ccpic connacc an ionbai6
61

pi,

.1.

cpeablaiD

cpom rfpaijcn gup polmaijeab mop mbailce
plann mac arhlaoib
ui

jan elaibrec bfca Dpdgbdil

paltamam coipec cloinne huaoac DO mapbaoh mac cacail cpoiboeipg Don coccab pin. ^065 ua pfnnacra peap opeblimib 5pai6 Daob mac Ruaibpi Do mapbab la muinnp mec aobasain ip in coccab
ceDna.

Qmlaoib mac peapcaip Don cenel Da mboi Do ecc.
loc oipbpion,

uf pallarhain coipec

a Duccupa pen Do bpeapp
in

TThnpeabac ua pinnacca cofpec
]

cloinni

mupchaba Decc

apcpac ap

e plan

05 Dol

inn.

Ueac Do jabdil pop concobap mac caibj
1

ui ceallaij; (cijfpna
ui

ua mame)

pop apD^al a bpacaip Id macaib caibg

ceallaij,

-j

a lopccab ann ap

aon.

Duapcdn
ui

6 hfjpa,

cabj 6 hfjpa,

-]

eDaoin injean Diapmaca mic Domnaill

ejpa Decc.
x

A ionm
is
:

necessary

curiipanab na In the Annals of Kilronan the reading
tranquillity,

y

Clann-Uadach, a territory in the barony of

pin, uaip ni paibe ceall na ruac jan milLeao in la pin u ConnuccuiB. lap naipgnib 7 lap mapBao bo ip

cumpanao panjjup a leap

Athlone, and county of Roscommon, comprising the entire of the parish of Gamma, and the
greater part, if not the entire, of that of Dysart. Briola, in the parish of Dysart, is referred
to in old manuscripts as in this territory See Tribes and Customs of By-Many, printed for the
Irish Archaeological Society, in 1843, p. 19; and map to the same. O'Fallon resided at Mill-

7 ap cup caic pe puacc 7 oo pap ceiom mop^alaip ip in cip pe jopra, uile .1. cenel cepca cpep a bpolriiui^ce na
in

cipe 7

a buome,

baileaoa jan ouine beo opacbail mncib. " This rest was wanting, for there was not a
church or territory in Connaught, which had not been destroyed by that day. After the
plundering and
killing of the cattle, people had

town, in the parish of Dysert, in the year 1585, as appears from a curious document among the
Inrolments tempore Elizabethce, in the Auditor General's Office, Dublin, dated 6th August,
1585,
Irish chieftains

been broken down by cold and hunger, and a violent distemper raged throughout the whole
country, i. e. a kind of burning disease, by which the towns were desolated, and left with-

and entitled "Agreement between the and inhabitants of Imany, called

Suck
'

O'Kelly's country, on both sides of the River in Connaught, and the Queen's Majesty."

out a single living being."

Clann-Murrough, Clann niupchaoa.

Ac-

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

237

and the chiefs of the English, and on condition that he shotild spare their This was a necessary tranquillity", for there was not a people and cattle.
church or territory in Connaught and desolated.
at that time that

had not been plundered
:

it

of Connaught at this time oppressive malady raged in the province was a heavy burning sickness, which left the large towns desolate, without

An

a single survivor. Flann, the son of Auliffe O'Fallon, Chief of

y Clann-Uadagh was slain by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, in this war; and Teige O'Finaghty, one of the officers [Aes graidh] of Hugh, the son of Roderic, was slain by the people of Mac Egan during the same war.
,

Auliffe, the son of Fearcair O'Fallon, chieftain of his

own

tribe,

and the

best of them, died.

Murray O'Finaghty, Chief of Clann-Murrough died in a vessel on Lough Oirbsen (Lough Corrib), which he had gone into in good health. A house was attacked upon the son of Teige 0' Kelly (Lord of Hy-Many), and upon Ardgal his brother, by the sons of Teige O'Kelly, and both were
,

z

burned within

it.

Duarcan O'Hara, Teige O'Hara, and Edwina, daughter of Dermot, the son
of Donnell O'Hara, died.
cording to O'Dugan's topographical Poem, there were two chiefs of the O'Finaghtys in Conway,' and that each sept had twenty-four Both ballys, or ninety-six quarters of lahd. septs were dispossessed soon after the English
invasion

nought (516 enrhaicne ni hionann), one called Chief of Clann Murchadha, and the other Chief
of Clann Conmhaigh.

by that family of the Burkes

called

Mac

The

latter

name

is

still

Davids,

who descended from

a furious heroine,

remembered and now pronounced Clanconow,
but the former
to
is

named Nuala na meadoige, the daughter of
O'Finaghty, who was the mother of David Burke, the ancestor of Mac David, Lord of Clan-

totally forgotten.

According

Duald Mac

Firbis,

and the tradition in the

country, the O'Finaghtys were seated on both sides of the River Suck, and their territory comprised, before the English invasion, forty-

conow, and by whose treachery the O'Finaghtys, her own tribe, were dispossessed. In the year
1628, Sir Ulick Burke, only son of Edmond Burke, of Glinske, Lord of Clanconow, was
created a baronet of Ireland, and from

Some eight ballys, or large Irish townlands. think that the sept of them called Clann-Murrough were on the
in the present east side of the River Suck,

him the
See

present Sir

John Burke, of Glinsk
is

Castle, the

county of Roscommon, and that called Clannconow, or Clanconway, on the west of the same river, in the now county of Gal-

present head of this family,
Genealogies, Tribes, $c.,

descended

oflly-Fiachracft,

p. 108,

note

b
.

.

[1225.

Do Dul po ceapmann caolainne, ap na ngall DO cop Don caolainne. coipc pin rpe peapcaib De Qri eapbap 50 buam a haicle na pell bpfjDe.
TTluirhmg
-|

goill

-|

1

The Momonians,

fyc

the plundering of TearmannCaelainne,

This entry relating to is entered
1

Caelainne,
in the

is

situated in the townland of Moor,
parish,

same

and from

it

an old road led

in the Annals of Kilronan under the year

224.

across the

These annals state that when O'Neill (after having
inaugurated Turlough, the son of Eoderic, as King of Connaught) had heard that Donough

bog to the Termon, where her nunnery church stands in ruins. See Ordnance Map of the county of Eoscommon, sheets 20 and 26, whereon the ruins of her church and
nunnery, and also her holy well, called Tobercaelainne, are shewn.
This virgin was the patron saint of the tribes
called Ciarraighe or Kierrigii, of the original

and Geoffry Mares were coming into Connaught, he retreated with all Momonians and possible expedition; and that the
Cairbreach O'Brien

English not finding O'Neill in Connaught before them, pursued the sons of Koderie, and banished

settlement, of

whom

in this neigbourhood, as

them

to O'Neill a second time, &c. &c.
:

They

then add

" The English and the Momonians then attacked Tearmann Caoilfinn, but the English

well as in the present barony of Costello, in the county of Mayo, the following account is pre-

served in a vellum
lin,

MS.

in Trinity College,

Dub-

were slaughtered through the miracles of

H.

3, 17, p.

875.
Ciappaijji

Caoilfinn."
b

Cum
i.

tancatap

a Conaccaib?

Tearmann Caelainne,

e.

the Termon, or

Nm. n-aimpp Qe6a itiic Gacach Cipmcapna.
1

The sisanctuary of the virgin, St. Caelainn. tuation of this place has not been pointed out by any of our historical or topographical writers.
Duald Mac
Firbis, indeed, in his Genealogies of

Cia bib cainic ap rup? NTn. .1. Coipbpi mac Conaipe ramie a muriiam a nbeap lap na m-

bapba
co

eipci.

hGeb mac Gachach Cipmcapna.

Uainic cpa co n-a tnumcip uile 6ai m-

the Irish Saints, p. 733, states that it is in " Connaught. Thus: Caolpionn 6 Cfpmonn " CaoLfionn of Caolainne i. e.
i

jfn bfppcaicech la coipppi; po chumoij;

Qeo
i

cconachcaib,"
in

Connaught." from an Inquisition taken on the 27th of May, 1617, that Termon- Kealand belonged to the
monastery of Eoscommon.

Termon Caolainne

It appears

ap a hachuip hi. Camic pi peace aon bo rijj a harap. Ro jab a haruip pein coippi moip n-a piabnaipi. Ro piappaib in injfn oe cib
Ota mbui.
fcc

ap

pe.

Rio beic jjan pfpann pop Canjap on pi j ap cfnn na

The

Editor,

when

lap pin.

Ro

cino

unoppu an

mjm

na pajab

examining the

common
name
is
is.

of the county of Rosfor the Ordnance Survey, found that
localities

cpia Bichu co capoca pfpann maic bia haraip. Oo beappa DO ap Qeo, boneoc a ciucpa am-

this place is still well

known, and that

its

ancient

not yet forgotten, though Termonmore that more generally used. It is situated in the

cheall n-aen lo bo na poichpib pea piap, 7 bo beaprap Caelainb cpaibceach ppip na Cimceallaib pin laparh co mop an cip bilpi.
i

parish of Kilkeevin, and about one mile to the east
of the

pin

town of Castlereagh, in the county of Eoscommon, where the virgin, St. Caellain, is still
vividly remembered,

bia cig.
pin.

amail a bubpab pip 7 bo poich pa beoij 6eipib a tnumcip ip na pfpanbnib Caipijib Connacca co mop an ci Qeo ap

and curious legends told about her miracles. Her holy well, called Tobar

a mec leo bo pab b'pfpanb bo choipbpi, 7 apbeapcacap coipbpi bo mapBur. Ni pfrpaibrfp

1225.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
attacked

239
,

The Momonians" and English
St.

Tearmann Caelainne b but

the

the miracles of English were slaughtered on this occasion, through
Caelainn.

God and

The corn remained unreaped
of February
pin, ctp
6

until after the festival of St. Bridget [the 1st

].

Qe6, ap oca Caelamo a

n-oilpi ppip

Caelainn, the Pious, shall be given as guarantee
of

pern, 7 ppia pfpanb.

Qcc

cfna t>6ncap lino
lino pin,

ajaib DO, 7 cabap oeoc neriie DO aeon jup ob tnapb be. Do jnicfp lapam ariilaib pin an plfo, jup bo uplarh. Poillpijcfp lapath on coiriibi DO ChaelainD in nf pin. Ci pi6e

Coirbri afterwards went round a great extent of that country, according to the mode
it.'

directed,

and

finally

returned to his house.

He

brought

his people into these lands.

The Con-

00 paijib na

pleiji.

Ci6 Dia

pum

papaibip, a
inD.
>

nacians greatly criminated Aedh for the too great extent of land, as they deemed, which he

Sapaiopecpa cupa poo piji eDao <5 C'oi^piap DUIC mo, ap an pij. Caelamb. 6eip oo b'peic ono, ap an
pi.

Qe6? ap

an
pij.

had given, and said that Coirbri should be killed. This cannot be done,' said Aedh, for Caelainn
' '

is

guarantee for himself
let

and

for his land.

But,

6epaD, ap

pi. pi,

Qp

ip

cpta lino po

poibpip a

however,

some beer be made by you for him,

mapba6, ap
pi,
.1.

pi

a meach no eag piprmai^, ap Connacr Dia neaba linb Ciappai je co

and give him a poisonous draught in that beer, feast was, therefore, that he may die of it.'

A

bpar; conao oe pin na benaib ciappaije linb bo pij Connacc bo pfp. pfpann oaiii pm,

afterwards prepared. This thing was afterwards She came to revealed by the Lord to Caelainn.

Rajaio ap an pij. t)o bfprap in Ufpmano mop 01 lapam conab anD pil ceall anm. " WTien first did the Kierrigii come into Connaught ? Not difficult. In the time of Aedh, son of Eochy Tirmcharna. Which of them came Not difficult. Coirbri, son of Conairi, first? who came from the south of Munster, when he
01 in cailleac.
;

the

feast.

'

Why

hast thou violated

my

guaran-

tee,' said she to

Aedh.

'I will violate thee as

i

regards thy kingdom.'
in compensation for
said Caelainn.
' '

Accept thy own award,
said the King.
'

it,'

I will,'

King.
the

I will,'

Pass thy sentence, then,' said the ' said she. Because it is through

medium of beer thou hast attempted to destroy him [Coirbri], may the King of Connaught
meet decline or certain death,
of the beer of the Kierrigii.'
if

had been expelled. He came with all his people to Aedh, the son of Eochy Tirmcharna. Coirbri had a famous daughter. Aedh asked her of her
father.

ever he drink
it

Hence

happens

that the Kierrigii never

She came one time to her father's house

;

her father conceived great grief in her presence ; his daughter asked him from what it arose. ' My

Kings of Connaught. said the Nun. Choose
'

'

brew any beer for the Grant land to myself,'
it,'

said the King.

The

Termonmore was afterwards
church
c

given,

where her

being without land in exile,' said he. Messengers came afterwards from the King to see the
daughter, but she determined that she would not go to the King until he should give a good ' I will portion of land to her father. give him,'

is

at this day."
this year the

Under
as

Annals of Clonmac-

noise,

Aedh, as much of the wooded lands to the west, as he can pass round in one day; and
said
'

by Mageoghegan, record that Moylemorrey O'Connor of Affalie [Offaly], was killed at Eosseglassie" [now Monasterevin], " by Cowlen O'Dempsie."
translated

Under

this year also the

Dublin copy of the

aNNdta Rioshacihca emeciNR
QO1S CR1OSO,
1226.

[1226.

Qoip CpiopD mfle Da ceo pice ape.
eppcop na THiDe Do ecc. ua capppa eppoc luijne Do Connmach

Donum

Dei

ecc.

Qo6 mac
-]

Duinn uf poclacdin aipcmneac conga, Saoi canncaipe, Sccpibmj,

ceapo nejcamail epi&e Do ecc. TTIaca ua maoilmoicepje Do ecc.

Uijeapnan mac cacait miccapam mic UoippDealbaig moip Rfogoamna ba mo eneach, eangnam, ap mo Do pmne Do nficib puaicfnca poDaanacha Da cainic Da ciniD pe haimpip epiDe, Do mapbab Do Donnchab 6 Duboa
"| ~|
-\

cloinn.

Nuala mjCn 17uai6pi uf concobaip bamnjeapna ulaD Decc cconga a ha&nacal 50 honopac creampall cananac conga. pecin, i Dorhnall mac T?uaiDpi ui plaicbeapcaij Do mapbaD Do rhacaib muipcfpi i

caij uf plaicbeapraij
cpoibhDeipg.

mp

rijabail cije paip Doib pfn,

~\

DpeDlim mac cacail

peapgal ua caiDg an ceaglaij, roipec ceajlaij carail cpoibDeipg, i ao6 mac cacail Do mapbaD Id Donnptebe 6 ngaDpa. QoD mac Domnaill uf puaipc DO mapbaD Do cacal 6 pajaillig Do mac copbmaic uf maoilpuanaiD ap loc aillmne. concobap TTluipjfp mac Diapmaca Do mapbaD.
-]

Annals of Innisfallen record the erection of the
castles of
d

arts of poetry, embroidery,

and penmanship, and
This

Dublin and Trim by the English. Donum Dei He is called "Donum Dei,

every other
f

known

science.

CPMulmoghery,
is still

O

Plaolmoceip^e.

BushoppofMeath,"inMageoghegan'stranslation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise ; but in the Anftals

name

common

in the

county of Donegal,
signifies

but anglicised Early, because moceip^e
early rising,
the

of Multifernan he

is

called "

Deodatus

elec-

tue

Midie."

See

Harris's
it

edition
is

of Ware's

early

niaolmoceipje signifies chief of The word maol, when not rising.

Bishops, p.
e

142, where

conjectured that

he was never consecrated.

A

nan,

it is

learned singer In the Annals of Kilrostated that he made a kind of musical

prefixed to the name of a saint, signifies a king or chief, as in the present instance, but when prefixed to the name of a saint, it means one

instrument for himself which had never been made before, and that he was skilled in the

tonsured in honour of some saint, as we learn " from Colgan Mail, seu ut varie scribitur Hibernis maol, mael, moel, idem nunc quod do:

1226.1

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

241

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age

1226.

of Christ, one thousand two hundred twenty-six.
died.

Donum

Dei d Bishop of Meath,
,

a

Connmagh O'Tarpy (Torpy), Bishop of Leyny, Hugh, the son of Donn O'Sochlaghan, Erenagh scribe, and a man expert in many trades, died.
Matthew 0'Mulmoghery f
died.

died.

of Cong, a learned singer1

,

Tiernan, the son of Cathal Miccaruinn, who was son of Turlough More, a Roydamna [prince], the most hospitable man and most expert at arms, and whose exploits had been more various and successful than those of any of his
tribe for a long time,

was

slain

by Donough O'Dowda and

his sons.
,

K Nuala, daughter of Roderic O'Conor, and Queen of Ulidia died at Conga Fechin [Cong], and was honourably interred in the church of the Canons at

Cong.
Donnell, the son of Rory O'Flaherty, was slain by the sons of Murtough O'Flaherty, after they and Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, had attacked and taken the house in which he was.

surnamed an Teaghlaigh, Chief of the household of Cathal Crovderg, and Hugh, the son of Cathal, were slain by Donslevy O'Gara. Hugh, the son of Donnell O'Rourke, was slain on Lough Allen' by Cathal
Farrell O'Teige,
(

11

VReilly and Conor, the son of

Cormac O'Mulrony.

Maurice
minus
vel rex,

Mac Dermot was
Sanctorum,

slain.

idem mine quodeafows,
p. 188,

tonsus,
n. 4.

vd
See

of his son after him."

The word locc nje

is

coronatus."

Ada

also p. 386, n. 1, of the
8

same work.

anglicised Loghty, and Loghtee in some AngloIrish documents, in which the term is used to

She was the wife of Mac Queen of Ulidia who was at this period styled King Donslevy, of Uladh ; but by this is not to be understood
the entire province of Ulster, but only that part of it lying eastwards of Glenree, Lough

maintenance of the chiefs table

denote mensal lands, or lands set apart for the See Harris's
vol.
ii.

Ware,

p.

70.

There was a celebrated

Neagh, and the Lower Bann.
h

luce cije TTIej mar" the jariina, anglicised Loughty," as appears from several ancient maps of Ulster.
territory in Oriel, called
'

Of the
7

household, rea^laij
:

In the Annals

Lough

Allen, loc aillmne.

A

well

known

of Kilronan

Dux
na

locca cije Carail CpoiB6iai6,
i.

oeipj

a

riiic

e.

"Leader or chief

lake in the county of Leitrim, near the source of the Shannon,

of the household of Cathal Crovderg, and of that

2

i

242

ctNHaca Rioshachca
Caiplen
cille

eiraectNN.

[1227.

Qooh
rabaipc
i

cacal 6 Paijillij. moipe Do leaccab la mac cacail cpoibDeips Do jal'd.l QoDlia ui plaicbfpcaij,

-|

a

lairh jail.
_

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopc, mile, Da ceo,

1227.
pice,

apeachc.

la harhpaib laijneac ]io Concobap mac Neill ui chacliapnaij Do mapbab baoi pochaip T?ij Connachc. ua maoileacloimi muipcfpcac ua maoileacloinn Do mapbab la
i

6np(

-|

jalloib.

TVIaolpeacVilaimi
paij.

ua concobaip pailje Do mapbab la cuilen ua nofomu-

ua ttlaoilmuaib DO mapbab la hua TTlopoha.

Gpearn Do comcpuinniuccab 50 hdrcliar.
5 17i

Qob mac

carail cpoib-

connacc DO cocuipeab
e

peallab paip.
j;ona yocpaiDe, i

lap noul Do Da paijib po cionnpcamUilliam mapiipccdl a peap capaDpaib Do rochc cuicce
Doib.

Da bpec Gaimbeoin gall ap lap na cuipne amac,
i

-|

a

loblacab bo 50 nteachaib cconnaccaib. dob mac cacail cpoibbeipg DO benarh coinne lap pin 05 laraij cafccucbil

pe huilliam mapep
k

mac Seappaib
literally,

.1.

mpcip epenn,

-]

nf

Deachaib
Hugh

piorh

cap

Demolished,

bo leaccao,

was

himselfe and his brother.

thrown down. In the Annals of Kilronan, the verb used is oo bpipeao, and in the Annals of
Ulster DO pcaileb, and in the old translation " The Castle of Kilthe passage is rendered
:

committed by
did deliver

Hugh mac

O'Flaithvertay Cathal Crovderg &

him

into the hands of the Galls."

m

Henry (f Melaghlin

This entry

is

given as

follows in Mageoghegau's translation of the
iials

An-

rnore
1

broken down by Cahall O'Kely."
is

The passage
:

given as follows in the An-

of Clonmacnoise, but under the year 1226, " Henry O'Melaghlyn, son of the knight O'Me-

n&ls of Ulster

A. D. 1226. p-eiolim hua Con-

cob'aip DO jabail caiji

ap Domnall hua

plaic-

-laughlyn, was killed by the Englishmen of Ardinuroher. Murtaghmac Melaghlyn Begg was also
killed
n

bepcaic gup
bparaip.

mapb

7

jup

loipc e p^in 7

a

by the English."
In the Annals of Kilis

Qeo hua

placbepcaic oo jabail la

Assembled at Dublin.

lideb

carail cpoiboeipj 7 a cobaipc illaim ngall. And thus rendered in the old " Felim translation O'Conor, taking a house uppon Doneli O'Flaithvertay, killed and burned
:

mac

ronan this passage
year 1226.

entered under the year

Cuipc oo Denarii Gpenn a nQr cliur, 7 UOD mac Carail Cpoiboeipj oo jaipm pnippe,
It begins thus:
7

bo jallaib ara cliar

1-227-]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Castle of Kimlore was demolished" by Cathal O'Keilly.
prisoner,

243

The

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, took Hugh O'Flaherty delivered him up into the hands of the English
1
.

and

*

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1227.

thousand two hundred twenty-seven.

Conor, the son of Niall O'Caharny [Fox], was slain by the Leinster soldiers, who were along with the King of Connaught.
m Henry 0'Melaghlin and Murtough O'Melaghlin were slain by Melaghlin O'Conor Faly was slain by Cuilen O'Dempsy. the English.

Gilla-Colum O'Molloy was slain by O'More. The English of Ireland assembled at Dublin" and invited thither Hugh, the As soon as he arrived they son of Cathal Crovderg, King of Connaught.

began to deal treacherously by him but William Mareschal, his friend, coming in with his forces, rescued him, in despite of the English, from the middle of
;

the Court, and escorted

him

to

Connaught.

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, appointed a conference at Lathach CaichtubiP with William Mares (de Marisco), the son of Geoffry Lord Justice
i

e.

A Court [Council] was formed by the English

England, did
his

of Dublin and of Ireland, at Dublin, and they summoned Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg to
it."

assist Hugh, and by the help of sword and strength of his hand he con veighed Hugh away from them, and so departed to Con-

naught
is

in safety.

Within a week

after the

Eng-

The account of this transaction

more

fully

given in Mageoghegaa's translation of the An" A. D. 1226. nals of Clonmacnoise, as follows
:

lishmen kept court in Athlone, whereunto the Connoughtmen came, and tooke captive William

March, the Deputie's
cipal

son,

Hugh O'Connor, King of Connaught, went to the English Court of Dublin by the com;

men belonging

to him,

and tooke other prinand also killed a

good knight at his taking."
Lathach
is

pulsarie
sonii

and daughter

means of the English they tooke his as hostages, with the hos-

Caiclitubil.

now

dried up, but the .old
still

This Lathack, or slough, men living near
its

tages of all the principall men in Connought; upon examining of some criminall causes there

Athlone
extent.

point out
is

situation

and exact

The name

still

preserved in that of

objected to the said
in

Hugh, he was found guilty their censure, and being to be apprehended

a village and townland lying immediately to the west of Athlone, in the parish of St. Peter, viz.

for the same, a speciall friend of his then within,

Beal-Lathaick,

i.

e.

the

o^ mouth,

or entrance,
is

and of great favour and power with the King of

into the Lathack.

The name

of this village

2

i2

244

aNNdta Rioshachca

eircecmN.
.1.

[12-27.

lacaij anonn

accmab uachab Deagbaoine, copbmac mac comalcaij, ui concobaip, cab^ mac Oiapmaio mac majnupa, majnup mac muipcfpcaij Uilliam mapep Do ceacc macgamna ui cepin, TCuaibpi ua maoilbpenamn. DO cuimmj 6 concobaip an peall pempaice occap mapcac ina combail. O ccoinne na ngall, gpepip a muincip poca lonnpaijib pen uilliam epjip laD a muincip ann po ppeaccaipmapep gup jabapcaip e po ceDoip. Ciob
-j
i

gup moibpioo Slemne hugo oppa, mapbaicc Conpcapla aca tuain, gabam maijipoip mbpaiofnup rap lacaij puap. Luib Cuipip ao6 na goill pin aipDDin. a haicle gu]! aipjfpDai]! mapgab aca luain, gup poirhe jon a pocpame ap an baite 50 hiomtan. ba. jmom pocaip Oo connaccaib an loipcceapcaip
pioo gpeapacc ui Concobaip po ICiccpioO pona gallaib
-|
i

mo

-\

jniom

a mac, a injean, -| bpaijoe connacc ap ceana baclarhaibh gall Do compuapglab ap na bpaijbib pempaice genmocd Sir cap ap
po, 6ip puaippiorh

opajail Dpeapaib connacc.

Oonnplebe ojabpa ci^eapna plebe luja Do mapbab Don jiolla pua6 mac a Deapbpacap pen lap njabdil cije in omce paip, ~| an giolla pua6 Do rhap-

bab

inn lap pin

cpe imbeall aoba

ui concobaip.
"|

CtoD

mac Ruai&pi
-]

ui concobaip,

mac

uilliam bupc Do coibecc ploj Ian-

mop
cpioc

i

ccuaipceapc Connacc ^up loipcpioc imp mfboin gup aipccpiob an
i

ccanjaoap,

gup jabpac a bpaijDe.

Sluaigeab la peappaib
now

mapep

-\

ta coippbealbac

mac

17uaibpi ui conco-

correctly enough Anglicised Bellaugh, and sometimes, but incorrectly, Bellough, and even Bullock. The Irish, however, call it distinctly

Costello included in the diocese

of Achonry.

The remaining parishes in this barony are in the diocese of Tuam, and constitute the territory
of

bcd

ring

to the

larai, and understand it as referlacac which lay between it and

Kerry of Lough-na-uarney.
q

See note under

the year 1224.

Athlone

See

map

prefixed to the Tribes

and

By

the devise,

Tpe imoeall __ In the Annals

Customs ofHy-Many, printed for the Irish Arehseological Society in 1843, on which this name
is

of Ulster the phrase

whole entry
lation: killed

is

is written cpe imoell. The thus rendered in the old trans-

S iven
p

-

"A. D.

1226.

Dunleve O'Grada was

Sliabk Lug/ia,
still

i.

e.

Looee's mountain

This

territory

retains its

name, and comprises

own brother, and he was killed therefor himselfe soone by the devise
by [the son
of] his

the northern half of the barony of Costello, in the county of Mayo, viz., the parishes of Kilbeagh, Kilmovee, Ifclcolman, and Castlemoreof being the portion of the

of

Hugh
r

O'Connor."

The son of William Burke, i. e. Rickard More, the son of William Fitz-Adelm.
Geoffrey Mares.

barony

In Mageoghegan's trans-

1-227.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

245

of Ireland.

A few only of his chiefs went with him across the Lathach [slough],

namely, Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh [Mac Dermot], Dermot, the son of Manus, the son of Murtough O'Conor, Teige, the son of Mahon O'Kerrin, and Rory O'Mulrenin. William Mares set out to meet them, accompanied by

But when O'Conor recollected the treachery already mentioned, he rose up against the English and excited his people to attack them and he himself attacked William Mares, and at once took him prisoner. His people responded to O'Conor's incitement, rushed upon the English, and
eight horsemen.
;

defeated them

and Hugo
to

they killed the constable of Athlone, and took Master Slevin Arddin prisoners. Hugh sent these Englishmen across the Lathach
;

be imprisoned; and then, advancing with his troops, he plundered the market of Athlone and burned the whole town. This achievement was of
great service to the Connacians, for he [O'Conor] obtained his son and daughter, and all the other hostages of Connaught, who had been in the hands of the English, in exchange for the aforesaid prisoners peace for the men of Connaught.
,

;

and obtained moreover a

p Donslevy O'Gara, Lord of Sliabh Lugha was slain by Gillaroe, his own brother's son, after the latter had, on the same night, forcibly taken a house

from him

;

and Gillaroe himself was afterwards put

to death for this

crime by

the devise* of

Hugh O'Conor.
,

r Hugh, son of Roderic O'Conor,. and the son of William Burke marched with a great army into the North of Connaught, and they burned Inishmaine,

plundered the country into which they came, and took hostages.

An army
lation of the

was led by Geoffrey Mares [de Marisco] and Turlough, the son
Connought, returned from Tyrconnell, into which he was banished by Geffrey March,

8

Annals of Clonmacnoise these trans-

actions are given

somewhat more

copiously, as

follows

:

"A. D.

1226. Geffrey March, Deputie of Ire-

brought with him his wife, son, and his brother Felym O'Connor, and came to a place in Connoght called Gortyn Cowle Lwachra, out of which place Mac Meran, his porter, fled from
him, and betraid him to the sons of Terlagh O'Connor, who came privilie to the said Gortyn,

land, with a great

expell

Hugh O'Connor from

army, went to Connought to out of that pro-

vence, which he did accordingly, and established the two sons of Rowrie O'Connor, named Ter-

lagh and
thereof.

Hugh,

in the possession

and superiority

"

without knowledge of the said Hugh. O'Connor, knowing them to be then about the house, tooke
one of his sons, his brother Ffelym tooke the

Hugh

O'Connor, that was before King of

246
baip
i

aNNa^a Rio^hachca eiReawN.
mag
aoi go

[1228.

noeapnpac caiplen

ipTCinn Dinn,

-\

gup gabpac bpaigoi

pil

muipfohaig. Ctob mac cacail cpoibDeipg Do bul ccip conaill Docum uf borhnaill, -j a lompob bu beap DopiDipi, ~\ a bfn Do rabaipc lep. ITleic coippbealbaij Do ceccKail cuicce a ccompoccup na pfgpa, cc bfn -\ a eacpaib Do ben oe, -j
i

an bfn Do cop illaim gall. Sluaicceab oile la coippbealbac beop, i la gallaib mibe in mpcaji cornacc co noeapnpac cpeac mop ap aob mac Ruaibpi ui plaicbfpcaig. noul

Q

ccpich ceapa, -\ bpaigoe mac muipceapcaig Do gabdil ooib, DO buaib peolmaig ap cec cpioca ceo Do coippbealbac uaca.
aipfbe
i

-]

nuimip

Cumapa

o Oomnalldin Do

mapbab

i

ngemil la Ruaibpi

mac bumnplebe

a nDiogail a acap.
bpian mac concobaip uf Diaptnaca DO mapbab. Caiplen aca liacc Do benam la Seppaib mapep.

QO1S CR1OSO,
Cloip Cpiopc, mile,

1228.

oa ceo, pice a hocc.
pi

Ctob

mac

cacail cpoibteipg uf concobaip

ccuipc Sepppaib mapep cpe meabail ap aplac jail
naccaib.
other son, and so departed safely, save only that the Lady Ranelt, Hugh his wife, and
of O'Fferall, was taken.

connacc Do mapbab hi mp na bfocup Do con-

daughter

he calls this castle " Rindowne," and " now called adds, Teagh Eoyn, or John his
this year,

Melaughlyn mac Hugh mac Bryen O'Connor was killed, and the said
Ranelt delivered to the Englishmen.

House, neer Loghree."
of this castle, written

See a curious account

Number
'

of the Irish

The Englishmen immediately founded a castle in Rindowne, now called Teagh Eoyn, or
John
<

"

by Mr. Petrie, in the 10th Penny Magazine, Septem-

ber 5th, 1840, pp. 73-75.

his house, neer Loghree."

The sons of Murtougk In the Annals of Kilronan they are called clann muipceapcai
muiir.nij,
i.

Moynai,
ruagh, and
'

ma^

naoi.

Now

Maghery-Cou-

e.

the sons of Murtough

Muimhneach

naught, lying between Strokestown and Castle-

O'Conor,

Roscommon and Elphin.

More
on
.See
*

of the sons of Turlough O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland.

who was one now

Rindown, Rinn
in the

oum

A

peninsula

Athlcague,

Lough Ree,

county of

Roscommon

Connaught part of the
on the Shannon.
It

Bally league, the western, or village of Lanesborough,
is

note under the In Mageoghegan's year 1199translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, at

in the parish of Cloon-

tuskert, and the barony of south Ballintober

12-23.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
1

247

of Roderic O'Conor, into

Moynai

,

erected a castle at Rindown", and took the

hostages of the Sil-Murray. Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, went to Tirconnell to O'Donnell, and returned again southwards, taking his wife with him but he was met by the
;.

sons of Turlough very near Seaghais [Curlew Mountains], who took his wife and his horses from him, and his wife was given up into the hands of the
English.

Another army was led by Turlough, and the English of Meath, into the West of Connaught, and they committed a great depredation on Hugh, the son
of Rory OTlaherty. They proceeded thence into the country of Carra they took hostages from the sons of Murtough", and Turlough obtained from them
;

a

number of fat beeves out of every cantred in their possession. Cumara O'Donnellan was slain, while in fetters, by Rory Mac Donslevy,
Brian, the son of

in revenge of his father.

The

castle

Conor O'Diarmada, was slain. of Ath league* was erected by Geoffrey Mares [De Marisco].

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1228.

thousand two hundred twenty-eight.
trea-

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, was
the English in the court

cherously killed by [mansion] of Geoffrey Mares, at y the instigation of the English, after he had been expelled by the Connacians
.

See Ordnance

Map

of the county of Roscominon,

Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonraacnoise as follows:

sheet 37. According to the Annals of Clonmacnoise, as translated

castle

by Connell Mageogeghan, this was erected by William Delacie and the Lnglish of Meath. Under this year the same
O'Swaine (now Kahen, near Tullamore, in the

"A. D.

1227.

Hugh O'Connor came

to

an

atonement with Geffrey March, and was again
restored to his kingdome of Connoght by the said Deputie, and being afterwards in the Deputie's house

annals record the erection of the castle of llahen

was treacherously

killed

by an

King

s

County), by Syraon Clifford,

who gave

an annuity of four hundred [?] to the Prior and Convent of Dorrowe.
*

Englishman, for which cause the Deputie the next day hanged the Englishman that killed

him

for that fowle fact.

The cause

of killing

Connexions
is

Hugh O'Conor

The account of the murder of more satisfactorily given in

the King of Connaught was, that after the Wife of that Englishman that was so hanged by the

248

aNNQf,a rcioshactiea emecmN.
CoccuD
moji DO eijije hi cconnaccaib enji

[1228.

.1.

pctpaijeab
Niall

Da mac Ruaibpi ui concobaip, nf rucc an coippbealbac, mp mapbab an ao6a jiempaice, ap ecip ao6 mac bd po urhla Don mac ba pine ju|i millpear Connacca eacoppa po leoo eappoapa co habainn ua ppiacpac po &fp ace mab beacc hi
~|
-\

Sleib luccha,

-]

lucr aipnj nama.
-\

mac congalaij uf Ruaipc njeapna Daprpaicce, cloinne pfpmaije amlaoib. DO mapbab la Da mac aipc mic Domnaill uf T?uaipc, ape DO rhapbab hi pocpaccab la hamlaib Grhlaib gfjip mac neitl mic conjalaij mac aipc ceona. pfpgal mac picpiucca nf puaipc DO mapbaD la macaib nell mic conja.1. ~|

laij uf l?uaipc.

TTluipcfprac

mac plairbeapcaicch

uf

plannaccain Do mapbaD la macaib

raibj uf gabpa. GOD mac oonnchaiD uf peapjail Do
peapjail.

mapbaD la hao& mac amlaoib
-|

uf

DauiD ua
Decc.

ploinn caoipeac pil maoilpuain,

Puai&pi ua maoflbpenainn

mac uilliam bupc DO recc 6 l?ij Saccpan ma lupcfp in epmn. GOD mac Ruai&pi uf concobaip Do gabail pije Connacc Do pfip coccha
17iocapD

an luprfpgomaicib connacc ap belaib coippDealbaij a bpacap pa pine map.
and body with Deputie, had so washed his head sweet balls and other things, he, to gratifie her
for her service, kissed her,

toms of Hy-Fiachrach, on which the relative position of these territories is
a

shewn,

man

seeing, for

which the Englishmeer jealousie, and for none

other cause, killed O'Connor presently at un-

generally called Dartry-Mac being the territory of Mac Clancy, Clancy, It looks wild and romantic at the present day,

Dartry
as

is

awares."

Dr. Leland had this passage furnished

him by Charles O'Conor, of Belanagare, and has
given
1

and was anciently formidable in its mountains and fastnesses. It comprises the entire of the
present barony of Rossclogher, in the north of the county of Leitrim, for which it is at present

its

substance in a note in his History of
i.

Ireland, vol.

p.
is

208,
a

b. 2, c. 1.

Airteach

territory

in

the present
of

county of

Roscommon, comprising the parish

the most usual popular appellation. In this territory were situated the castles of Rossclogher

Tibohine, lately in the west of the barony of Boyle, but at present in the barony of FrenchIt adjoins Sliabh Lugha, which is the park.

(from which the barony took its name), DunCarbry, and the Crannog of Inishkeen, an island
in

Lough Melvin,

as well as all the islands of

northern part of the barony of Costello, in the See map to Tribes and Cuscounty of Mayo

that beautiful lake,

with the monasteries of

Doire Melle, Carcair Sinchill, Bealach Mith-

1228.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
war broke out
in

249

A great
O'Conor,

Connaught between the two sons of Roderic

Turlough, after the death of the Hugh above-mentioned, for the younger son did not yield submission to the elder and they destroyed Connaught between them, and desolated the region extending from Easdara
;

Hugh and

[Ballysadare], southwards, to the river of Hy-Fiachrach, excepting only a small portion of Sliabh Lugha, and the territory of the people of Airtech z
.

Lord of Dartry and Clann Fearmaighe, was slain by the two sons of Art, the son of Donnell O'Rourke^ namely, Art and Auliffe; and Auliffe Gearr, the son of Niall, who was son of Congalagh, was slain, while bathing, by Auliffe, the son of the same Art.
Niall,

the son of Congalagh O'Rourke,

a

Farrell, the son of Sitric

O'Rourke, was

slain

by the sons of Niall, the son
slain

of Congalagh O'Rourke.

Murtough, the son of Flaherty O'Flanagan, was
O'Gara.

by the sons of Teige
AulifFe

Hugh, the son of Donough
O'Farrell.

O'Farrell,

was

slain

by Hugh, the son of

David O'Flynn, Chief of Sil Maelruain, and Rory O'Mulrenin, died. Richard, the son of William Burke, came to Ireland, from the King of
England, as Justiciary Hugh, the son of Roderic O'Conor, assumed the kingdom of Connaught, the election of the Justiciary and the chiefs of by Connaught, in preference to his elder brother Turlough,
".
.

1

idhein (now Ballaghmeehin), and Rossinver.

The

the Plunderer,

who deduced his lineage from

Ith,

ancestors of the family of Mac Clancy, with their neighbours the Calry Laithim, or Calry of

the uncle of that Milesius.
Ogygia, part
iii. c.

See O'Flaherty's 67. There was another family
being descended from the

Lough

Gile, in the

county of Sligo,

barony of Carbury, in the who settled in this part of Con-

of this

name

in the county of Clare, but of a to-

tally different lineage,

naught at a very remote period, have sprung from a stock totally different from the Hy-BruinBreifne and Conmaicne, who occupied the remaining part of the county of Leitrim; but

same stock
b

as the

Mac Namaras.
This passage
is

Both now Angiven in the

glicise their

name Clancy.

Justiciary

we

have no accurate record of how they were enabled to settle here. The. Mac Clancys, and their
correlatives, in this

Annals of Kilronan under the year 1227. According to the list of the Chief Governors of
Ireland, given in Harris's

Ware,

vol.

ii.

p. 103,

neighbourhood, are not of the

race of Milesius of Spain, being, if we can depend on the Bardic pedigrees, descended from Daire,

Richard de Burgo was appointed Lord Deputy of Ireland on the 10th of March, 1227.
Elder
In-other

The

sons of Roderic O'Co-

2u

250
TTIaolpeaclainn

awNata raioshachra eiReaww.
mac coippoealbaij mic RuaiDpi
i

[1229.

uf concobaip

Do rhapbab
,

la haooh-pi Connacc.

^opca oiopulaincc cconnaccaib cpi coccao cloinne Ruai&pi. T?o haipca hollamain hi ccpfochaib ruara. Ro Diocuipic a clepij cicc cealla DO jopca. cianaib corhaijcib, i acbac cm apaill Dib Dpuacr
-\ -] ~\

OauiO ua ploinD caoipeach pi TTlhaeilpuain Do 65. Cte6 mac DonnchaiD uf pfpjail DO mapbab la haeb mac arhlaoib
ghcni.

uf pfp-

QO1S CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopc,
mile,

1229.

Da

ceD, pice anaof.

ITlaineiprip S. ppanpeip hi ccopcaij

DO cogbdil la mag capcaij mop,
mic nepm paoi connachc
hi

Diapmaicc.
TTluipfDac

ua japmjaile
piaic

ppioip innpi

ccpa-

ba6

i in

eccna [oecc].

Diapmaic ua
1

abb pecclepa

jillamolaipi uf

5 10 ^ a r ain

cuaim Decc,

a aDnacal
King of

in

apDcapna.
down
in the follow-

nor,

Ireland, are set

ing order, in the Book of Lecan: Aedh, Tadhg, Concobhar Maenmaighe, Muireadhach, Toirdhel-

suined by Rickard, the son of William Burke, lu c e<^ c na r 'r h-Gpenn oo jabail oo mac

5

uilliam bupc

.1.

bhach, Murchadh, Diarmaid."
it is

Fol. 73.

highly probable that they are set the order of their celebrity, rather than in that
of their births.
d

But down in

old translation

:

picapo. " The

Thus rendered

in the

Justiceship of Ireland

taken by Mac William Bourk." A. D. 1228. Under this year the Annals of

Mdaghlin, maolpeaclamn

He was

the

Kilronan contain the following passages, which have been altogether omitted by the Four Masters
:

son of Toirdhealbach,
e

who was

the fifth son of

Eoderic O'Conor, Monarch of Ireland.

Famine

Thus rendered
Annals of Ulster:

in the old trans-

lation of the

1228. Einn duin was plundered by Felim O'Conor and Conor Boy, the son of Turl u gh, and Teige, the son of Cormac, were killed,

"A. D.

"A. D.

1228.

Hugh mac Roary

tooke the

kingdome of Connaght and prayed [preyed] Church and Laity of Connaght, and their Clerks

and the justiciary came to Tearmann Caoluinne, and the town was burned, as was also the church of Imleach Urchadha. " Felim gained the victory of Cluanacha over
the sons of Roderic, and over Conor, the son of

& Learned men
trys."
f

were banished into strange coun-

Under

this year, 1228, the

Annals of Ulster

Cormac."
&

state that the justiciary ship of Ireland

was

as-

O'GormaUy, O^optnjaile.

In the Annals

1-229-]
d

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
,

251

Melaghlin

the son of Turlough,

who was

the son of Roderic O'Conor,

was war
they

slain by Hugh, King of Connaught. An intolerable dearth prevailed in Connaught, in consequence of the

of the

sons of Roderic.
its

They plundered churches and
.

territories

;

banished

clergy and ollaves into foreign and remote countries, and others of 6 them perished of cold and famine

David O'Flynn, Chief of Sil-Maelruain, died. Hugh, son of Donough O'Farrell, was slain by Hugh, son of Auliffe
O'Farreir.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1229.

thousand two hundred twenty -nine.
Cork, was founded by
h
,

The monastery
(Dermot).

of

St. Francis, at

Mac Carthy More
in

Murray O'Gormally
for piety

8
,

Prior of Inis-macnerin
died.

and the most renowned

Connaught Dermot O'Fiach, Abbot of the church of Gilla-Molaisse Tuaim, died, and was interred at Ardcarne
of Kilronan he
is

and wisdom,

O'Gillarain, of

called

O

^opropuilij ppioip

localities

pegUppa mnp mac neipin." h Inis-macnerin, Imp mac n6pm, now
rally called

1222.

__See notes under the years 1209 and That the correct name of this place is

gene-

Church

Island.

It is situated in

common.

Boyle, in the county of EosArchdall thought that this was the same as Eas-mac-neirc but it appears, from the
;
'

Lough Key, near

Imp mac nBipnin appears from the Irish Calendar of the O'Clerys ; and, that it received this name from St. Barrfionn Mac Ernin, and his
brothers,

who were the patrons of the place, and venerated there on the 22nd of September.
"

meaning of the words and from these Annals, that they were two distinct places. The island fi n 'Pl
of the sons of Erin could not be the same as the
cataract [eap] of the son of Ere.
r
,
.,

,,,

._,

.

-

Sept. 22. Barrfhionn

Mac Ermn.
of Ims-mac
in
,

,

_..

The Cistercian
this

.

n-Lirmn

_...,. m Lough Key,
,

Ihe sons of

Ernm

Connaught."

nipcip

Abbey of Boyle was that called by the Irish mmarc t>a laapc. Gap mic neipc is the preandlnipmac
n-eipin,

The family of O'Gormaly

are

still

numerous

in

sent Assylyn;

ormorepro-

neighbourhood ; but they are to be distinguished from the ui JJa'proleaoatj, or O'Gormlys of Tyrone, who are of a different lineage. This island, which now goes by the name of

perly imp mac nSipntn, is the present ChurchIsland in Lough Key. Ware, Colgan, Archdall, and Weld, have confounded these names, be-

Church

Island,

contains the ruins of a small

cause they had no accurate knowledge of the

church of great antiquity.

2

K2

.

252

aNNCtta Rio^hachca eiReawN.
Oiapmaic mac
jiollacappaiij,
~\

[1230.

aipcmneac cije baoinn, uapal pacapc na cpinoiDe lap nd buam amac 6 ceapr Do na a6laca& mainipcip Decc. bof piDe c|if hoiDce jan aolacanancaib, Do rhancaib maimprpe na buille,

Q

i

~\

cab ap baoap na manaij aga popoaD ma mainipcip peipin. Dob eccnaibe po b'aoi Don opD cananac Decc. 7)ipapD ua carain cananac ecc ina caillig Duibeaya ingean 17uai6pi bean cacail mic Diapmaca Do
ouib.

OiapmaiD mag capraij cijeapna Dfpmurhan Decc. a Oionip ua mopDa eppcop ShfllTluipeDhaij DO cpecceo eppuccoioe ap Do rhapbaD la Deapbparaip a arap. Loclainn ua manncdin

6ia.

QOIS CR1OSO,
Qoip Cpiopr,
mile,

1230.

Da ceD, cpioca.

Decc plopenc ua cfpballain eppcop ripe heojain, uapal pfnoip coccame lap pe blia&noib ochcmogar a aoipi. ceceDam eppcop con^lollaiopa ua cleipi^ eppcop Luijne, lopep mac T?ool pecir eppcop na maicne, TTlac Raic TTlaj Seppaij eppcop conmaicne,

miDe Riagloip coccai&e,

comapba

peicin,

-\

jaile ppioip innpi

coimDeab ua Duilenndin ab peicclepa cananac eappaoapa, TTluipf6ac ua gopmmic nepin, ITIaolmuipe ua maoleoin comapba ciapdm
-]

miliD Cpiopc,

5 10 ^ a

giollacapcaij ua heilsiupdin cananac i anscoipe, Donnplebe ua hionmamen manac naorhca apomaijipcip paoip maimpcpe na

cluana mic

noip,

-]

buille Decc.
1

Died.

His death

is

entered in the Annals

of Ulster, but they make no mention of the contention about his body. The entry is thus " A. D. 1229. given in the old translation
:

holy a man interred in their sanctuary, ' Duvesa. In the Annals of Kilronan she
called the daughter of Koderic O'Couor
:

is

Oui-

beappa mjen Ruaiopi

hi

ConcuBaip, bean
.

Dermot Mac
and gentle

Gillcarrick,

priest,

Erhenagh of Tybohin, and best man for Almes &
Connaught, in Christo

cacuil meic t)iapmuba Do eg ma caillig ouib' m In the Annals of ClonDionysius O'More.
macnoise, as translated by Mageoghegan, he is " Denis called, O'More, Bushopp of Oilfynn."

liberality in those parts of
quieuit."
k

Had

attempted

to

retain

it,

nai j

aj u popoao,

" the literally,

baoap na mamonks were

He resigned the duties of his bishopric to apply himself more sedulously to devotion.
n Bool Petit

keeping it in their own monastery ;" that is, they wished to have the honour of having so

He

is

called

Ralph Petit in
In-

Harris's edition of Ware's Bishops, p. 142.

1230.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
Gillacarry,

253
priest,
died'.

Dermot Mac

Erenagh of Tibohine, and a noble

He was buried in the monastery of the Holy Trinity, his body having been by right obtained by the canons, from the monks of the monastery of Boyle,
after
it

had remained three nights unburied, because the monks had attempted
it"

to retain

monastery. Gerard O'Kane, the wisest of the order of canons, died. Duvesa daughter of Roderic [O'Conor], and wife of Cathal
1 ,

in their

own

Mac Dermot,

died a nun.

Dermot Mac Carthy, Lord of Desmond, died. m Bishop of Sil-Murray [Elphin], resigned Dionysius 0'More
,

his bishopric

for the sake of

God.
father's brother.

Loughlin O'Monahan was killed by his
\

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1230.
thirty.

thousand two hundred

Florence O'Carolan, Bishop of Tyrone, a noble and select senior, died in
the eighty-sixth year of his age. Gilla-Isa O'Clery, Bishop of
;

Joseph Mac Techedan, Bishop of Conmaicne [Ardagh] Magrath Mac Sherry, Bishop of Conmaicne Rool Petit" (Rodolphus Petit), Bishop of Meath, a select ruler and soldier of Christ Gilla-Coimdeadh O'Duileannain, Coarb of St. Feichin, and Abbot

Leyny [Achonry]

;

;

;

of the church of the Canons at Easdara [Ballysadare] Prior of Inis-mac-nerin Mulmurry O'Malone, Coarb of
; ;

Murray O'Gormally,
St.

Kieran, of Clon;

and Donslevy Gilla-Carthy O'Helgiusain, a canon and anchorite a holy monk and the chief master of the carpenters of the monastery of Boyle, died.
;

macnoise

O'Hinmainen

,

the Annals of Kilronan his death

is

thus en-

Abbey."
his

tered under the year 1229: "Rool peicic e'pp. rvi mice, uir religiosus et caritatissimus, et Dei

In the Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster death is entered thus A. D. 1230. t)onn:

famidus

in Christo quieuit."

-pleibe

hua mmuinen
in

This passage is thus correctly translated in Archdall's Monasticon "Died Donn Sleibhe
:

quieuir

Chpipco

;

7 maijiptep paep and thus rendered in the

naerii

old translation:

"A. D. 1230. Dunleve O'ln-

O'Hionmaine, a reverend and holy monk, and now principal master of the carpenters of this

manen, a sacred monk and free master, died." In the Annals of Kilronan, he is styled Dlanac

254

[1230.

mac pipeomD uapal paccapr buille. noinpc rhanaij maimpnp na Sloicceab la hua nDorhnaill (oomnall mop)
TTlaolpeclaimi
i

-]

maijipap

leijinn Decc ina

hi

ccmcceaD Connacc

int>

baoi hi pppicbfpc ppip co po mill aghaiD Ctoba mic Ruai&pi f Cboncobaip Don maj naof, mopdn Don rip, acr apa aof nf po jiallpac clann TCuai&pi
-]

Dnl

pin.

Sloiccheab la

mac
-|

Connaccaib

laip,

cconnaccaib jup milleao mopdn Do po mapba& Donn 65 maj oipeccaij, ~\ eiccijeapn mac an
uilliam bupc
i

naorii

7

aporiiai^ipbip

paop tnam^Opec na

buille.

"Monachus

sanctus, et archimagister

Duff; and Donn Oge and the sons of Manus [O'Conor], and the young soldiers of the Sil-

fabrorum Monasterii Buellensis."

The word

poop means cheap, free, noble, as an adjective, and an artificer, as a noun. It is very probable that it is a noun in this sentence, and in the
genitive
case plural,

Murray, plundered Mac Costello and Hy-Many. The son of William, however, mustered the
greater part of the English of Ireland, and many of the Irish, and marched into Connaught, ac-

governed by mai^ipoip.

But

if

we

take poop to be an adjective, and pre-

companied by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg,' to give him the kingdom of Connaught, and to
expel Hugh, the son of Roderic, and every Connacian who had joined him and opposed himself [the son of William]. They first advanced to the

fix it to rnamir-bpec,

thus

:

aporhaijjir-eip
it

paop-

rhamip opec na &uiUe, then

will

mean " chief

master of the free (or noble) monastery of Boyle; and if we make it an adjective belonging to
appriiaijipcip, the translation will be "noble or free head master (or teacher) of the monas-

Bun-Galvy" [i. e. the mouth of the River Gaillimh, which
castle of

castle

at the

flows through

tery of Boyle." P A. D. 1230.

" to attack the town of Galway], Hugh O'FlaThen Hugh, the son of Roderic, went to herty. the relief of

The Annals of Kilronan give a

longer account of the death of Donn Oge Mageraghty, and of the contentions between the

much

by

Hugh O'Flaherty, and was joined the Connacians under the conduct of the
[Muimhneach] O'Conor; and

sons of Murtough

son of William

Burke and the Connacians, but
It is as follows
:

the Connacians were on the west side of the

under the year 1229.

"A. D.

1229.

Hugh,

the son ofEoderic, and

the Contiacians in general, turned against the son of William Burke and the English, through
the solicitations of

River Galliv, and the English on the east side, and great conflicts were daily carried on between them. The English, having remained here for some time, without having obtained either peace,
hostages, or pledges from the Connacians, consulted together, and resolved upon going in

Donn Oge,

son of Donncahy

Mageraghty, and of Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot of the Eock, and his retainers, for they had pledged their word that they would
not belong to any king who would bring them into the house of the English. Hugh, the son
of Roderic, and the people of West Connaught, plundered the young son of William and Adam

pursuit of the cows and the people who had fled into the mountains and fastnesses of the country

and upon the
from the
hine Goillih
Goillin]

islands,

castle of

Bungalvy

and they went that night to Droichead Ing-

e. the bridge of the daughter of [i. where the morning rose upon them.

1230.]

ANNALS OF THE 'KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

255

Melaghlin Mac Firedinn, a noble priest and a professor of literature, died in his monastic noviciate in the monastery of Boyle. An army was led by O'Donnell (Donnell More) into Connaught, against

Hugh, the son of Roderic O'Conor, who was opposed to him, and destroyed Moynai and a great part of the country [province]. The sons of Roderic, however, did not give him hostages on this occasion.
was led by the son of William Burke into Connavight, and desop lated a large portion of that country, and Donn Oge Mageraghty and EghThen the son of William
'

An army

inquired,

Is there a

Manus, the son of Murtough, came into their

pass between us and the lake, by which a party of the Connacians could come down ?' The

On the day house, and gave them hostages. following the English returned to Muine Maicin,
and remained there
for a night,

Guides answered and

'

said,

There

is.'

He

then

and on the next

arrayed a party of horse to proceed to Cong and

Kilmaine (or Inishmaine).

At

this

time

it

day they went to Magh Sine, and thence they passed through Leyny, and Ceis Corann thence
;

happened that great numbers of the Connacians were coming early in the morning from Cong, having unwisely and unwarily passed the night
before in parties of two and three, and a few of the better sort among them were slain under the

they

out for Coirshliabh [the Curlieu mountains], where though the guides missed the
set

common

pass, they crossed the whole mountain without meeting any accident. With respect to Hugh, the son of Roderic, and Cormac, the son of

conduct of the

officers

of Murtough, the son of

Manus O'Conor, namely, Dermot O'Henaghan, Loughlin Mac Classan, and Teige Mac Gilchreest O'Mulrenin. With respect to the English, they
proceeded after this fortunate occurrence to Mayo of the Saxons, and on the day following

Tomaltaghof the Rock, who was the son of Conor Mac Dermot, and Donn Oge Mageraghty, and the Sil-Murray, they were at this time in a wood,
and the resolution they proposed was this, as they had sent their cows and people into the
fastnesses of Muintir-Eolais,

and of Sliabh an

they went to Toberpatrick [the Abbey of Ballintober], where the canons and victuallers of
the town came to the son of William and begged of him, for the love of God, not to stay with

larainn, not to
lish

come in
;

on this occasion

them that

night.

This request of their's was

he would not agree to he would proceed to the west side of the English ; and he set out forthwith for Fincarn,
accompanied by his
nell

with the Engbut Donn Oge said that this resolution ; but that
collision

complied with, and the English moved onwards to Muine Maicin ; and they would not have marched from Mayo so far, were it not that
they had not obtained hostages or pledges from Manus, the son of Murtough Muimhneach. On
the next day they proceeded to Achadh Fabhuir

own

Sil-Murray, his English

brother, the youths of allies, the son of Don-

Bregach O'Melaghlin with his English, and

On his Brian, the son of Turlough O'Conor. arrival at Fincarn, Donn sent forth to battle a
body of
his troops,

who

fought well with the

[Aghagower], and encamped in the town, on
the east side of the church, that
nana, on the margin of
is,

at

Lough

Crichan.

MargeHither

English, while he himself remained on the top of the earn, earnestly looking on at the conflict.

Then the English

sent a countless

number

of

2.56

emeawN.
f

[1230.

bpficfmain

mionacain

-|

p ochaibe
TCuaibpi

oile

ndc dipimrfp,
la

-|

po hionnapbaDh (rpia
uilliam,
-]

anppoplann) do6 mac
Don cup
pin

T?i

Connacr

mac

la gallaib

mac

66 ap jallaib, i po pfojao peiblim 50 haob ua neill cpe iompu6 carail cpoibt)fipcc la mac uilbam.

Cfo6 6 neill eijeapna eipe heo^ain pfojoamna Gpeann uile, copnamcac lere cuinn pe ^allaib Gpeann, -\ pe lee moja nua&ar. pfp nd cucc geill,

na Do jaomeal, pfp Do eiefpfba, nd cfop Do jail
-\

paD maDmanna, dpa mopa mence pop jallaib. Ctipcreoip jail saoibeal. pfp po cpiall lonnpoijiD Do ace a ruicim Id Gpeann uile Decc jen jup paofleaD bap naile Dpajbdil
-]

jallaib.

Qpc mac

aipr uf puaipc Do

TTlaolpeaclainn ua

Id pa^nall ua ppinD mannacdin DO rhapbab la a bpairpib.

mapbaD

i

meabail.

archers and horsemen towards the earn, and

sent

its shaft

through him, after which he made
in thus cut-

had the earn they were not perceived until they and Donn Oge was thus left almost surrounded,
alone, being accompanied only by Brian, the son of Turlough O'Conor, and a few of his own relatives
;

his escape.

" The English, being fortunate
ting off

and these were but a short time

left

Donn Oge, carried away great spoils on their way to Sliabh an larainn, and they killed women and children, and stripped those they
had not
killed. They carried great booties to In consequence of this spothe English camp. liation many of the natives perished of cold and famine. On the next day the English departed,

thus together.

Donn Oge, being

left

thus un-

protected, was soon recognized, and many archers pressed upon him, and five arrows entered him ;

he was at length overtaken by one horseman, and though he had no weapon but a battle axe, he prevented the horseman from closing upon him, but the horseman drove his spear though

leaving the

kingdom of Connaught to Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, and banished Hugh, the son of Roderic, to Hugh O'Neill."
In the Annals of Clonmacnoise, as translated

him

at each push.

At

last the archers sur-

rounded him on every

side,

and he

fell

attempt-

ing to defend himself against

an overwhelming

number."
" With respect to Hugh, the son of Eoderic, he was stationed at the east side of the English,

by Mageoghegan, it is stated, under the year 1230, that Donn Og Mac Aireaghtie was killed by Ffelym O'Connor, and by Mac William Burke, at the mount called Slieve Seysie [the
Curlieus].
q

and he did not wish to come to an engagement, and indeed it was against his will that Donn had
done so, nor did he know that Donn had been killed
.

Hugh

O'Neill.

The

notice of the death and
is

character of this O'Neill

thus given in the

An-

nals of Clonmacnoise, as translated

by Mageoghe-

The routed

forces

were driven towards him, but

gan:

"A.

D. 1230.

Hugh O

Neale,

King of

Hugh

escaped by the strength of his hand with-

One man pressed upon him, but he turned upon that man, and gave him a shot of the javelin which he held in his hand, and
out discredit.

Aileagh, the greatest spoyler of the Churchmen and Churches of Connaught, and the only banisher and extyrper of the English, and deAnd thus in the stroyer of the Irish, died."

1230.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

257

tighern, the

were

slain.

son of the Brehon O'Minaghan, and many others not enumerated, Hugh, the son of Roderic, King of Connaught, was expelled by

and the English (by overwhelming numbers), on this occasion, to Hugh O'Neill, because he had risen up against the English and Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was proclaimed King [of Connaught]
the son of William [Burke]
;

by the son of William [Burke]. q Hugh O'Neill Lord of Tyrone' and Roydamna [heir presumptive to the the defender of Leth-Chuinn against the throne] of all Ireland, English of
,

Ireland and [the people of] Leth-Mhogha Nuadhat who had never rendered hostages, pledges, or tribute, to English or Irish who had gained victories over the English, and cut them off with great and frequent slaughter; the plunderer
; ;

of the English and Irish a man who had attempted the subjugation of all 5 died [a natural death], although it was never supposed that he would Ireland, die in any other way than to fall by [the hands of] the English.
;

Art, the son of Art O'Rourke, was treacherously' slain

by Randal O'Finn.

Melaghlin O'Monahan was slain by his
old translation of the Annals of Ulster
:

relatives".

"A. D.

of Donegal.

1230.
land,

Hugh
all

Neile,
all

King

of the north of Ire-

name

The inhabitants bore the generic of Kinel-Owen, and had at this period
off into various families,

and King of

bee King of

Leithquin, and that shou'd Ireland ; a man that most killed
Galls,

branched

who were

all

and prayed" [preyed] "

and broke most

tributary to one archchief, commonly called pij; cineil eojum; and who was sometimes of the

and a man thought less to dye by the Galls." A much more patriotic character of him is given in the Annals of Kilronan under the year 1229, thus "A. D.
Castles of the Irish, died,
:

family of

Mac Loughlin, sometimes
two

of that of

O'Neill, and, in one or

instances, of that of

O'Flaherty,
Allan,

now Laverty, descended from Aedh who was one of the sixteen monarchs of

1229. Hugh O'Neill died in this year. He was King of the Kinel-Owen, and inferior to none in renown and goodness a king who had not
;

the Kinel-Owen race. These once great family names are still numerous in this region; but none bearing them at present are above the rank
of farmers, except those

man English or who had gained many victories over the English, and had slain many of them a king who was the support of all the Irish who had never been expelled or exiled a king
given hostages or pledges to any
Irish
;

who have

entered into

a king

holy orders.

;

;

The phrase used in the Died, oecc Dublin copy of the Annals of Ulster, is "quievit
in Christo."
1

s

;

the most hospitable and defensive that had come of the Irish for a long period."
Tyrone, rip 6050:111, comprised the present counties of Tyrone and Londonderry, and the
r

Treacherously,
lation of the

i

meaBcnl.

In the old transthis sentence is

Annals of Ulster,

rendered
llanall
u

:

" Art mac Art OEoirke killed by Fin mutherously."

baronies of Inishowen and Raphoe, in the county

Relatives, bpairpib.

The word bpacaip

in

2

258

aNNata Rio^hachca
QO1S CR1OSO,

eiraectNN.

[1231.

1231.

a hdon. Qoip Cpiopc, mile, Da ceo cpioca, a bfrab in oilen na mopba eppcop ailpmn Do cpiocnuccab oonnchaD ua concobaip Doiponeao an .15. DO Decembep cpmoioe ap loc ce
Oionip ua
-|

na ionaD.
Decc. plann ua connacraij eppcop ua mbpiuin bpeipne eo [oecc]. Srepan ua bpaoin aipcmnec TTlaije camca peap Depcac, cpaiboeac, eccCelecaip ua Dobailen aipcinnech
naiDe, epnaijrec [Decc].

mic Diapmara bfn muipceapcaij muimmj mic pecpoilje injfn concobaip coippDealbaij rhwp [oecc] maraippi&eTTlajnupa TnicTTluipcepcaij, concobaip
puaiD, ruarail,
ppioip pecclepa peaDaip -\ poil. nnc Diapmaca Decc mainipcip na buille. Oubcoblaijj injfn concobaip cloinne cacail meic muipfDaij plairbfprac ua plannaccdin caoipeac muillfcain Decc ina oilicpe maimprip na buille. Dubcfriipac injean uf
-]

coipp&ealbaij paccaipc,

-]

i

i

cuinn bfn an plaicbeapcaij hipin Decc.

Ual^apcc ua Ruaipc njeapna bpeipne Decc ina ailirpe ap
cppoca.

plijiD

an

^lollaiopa mac parhpaDain njeapra ceallaij ecbac, i TTIaolconaipe ollam pil muipfohaij muillfcain Decc.
ancient manuscripts signifies a brother
;

DuinDin

ua

but in

the modern Irish language bpacaip means a kinsman, and oeapBporaip is the word used
to denote a brother.

Hy-Many, that all " St. Bridget baptized here. has the baptism of the race of Maine, and although the children may not (always) be brought
of O'Kelly, and his people of

the

Hy-Many were

This is the Bishop of Hy-Briuin Breifney Bishop of Kilmore, called Florence O'Conacty
in Harris's

w

church to be baptized, her Coarb has the power to collect the baptismal penny from these
to her
tribes.

Ware, vol. i. p. 226. In the Annals of Ulster he is called Bishop of Breifney, and in
those of Kilronan, Bishop of Hy-Briuin.
x

This money

is

divided into three parts,

of which she herself (rectius her Coarb) has one Drum parish) the Druim Dreastan
part,

OfCamma, camca.

A parish church in the
The small
village of

second,

(now and Cluain Eamhain (now Cloonoun)
See Tribes and Customs
d
,

barony of Athlone, and county of Roscommoii,
dedicated to St. Bridget.

the other third part.''

of Hy-Many,
work.
i

printed for the Irish Archaeological

Tober Brighde,
Brideswell,
is

generally called in English in it. learn from a tract pre-

Society, p. 78, note

and map to the same

We

served in the

Book

of Lecan,

fol.

92, treating

Fethfoilge

In the Annals of Kilronau she

1231.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

259

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1231.
thirty-one.

thousand two hundred

Dionysius O'More, Bishop of Elphin, closed his days on the Island of the Blessed Trinity on Lough Key, on the 15th of December, and Donough

O'Conor was appointed

in his place.

Flann O'Connaghty, Bishop of Hy-Briuin Breifney" [Kilmore], died.

Stephen O'Breen, Erenagh of Mayo [died]. Keleher O'Devlin, Erenagh of Gamma ', a charitable, pious, wise, and
3

prayerful

man
y

[died].
,

Fethfoilge

daughter

of Conor

Mac Dermot, and
More
[died].

Muimhneach, the son of Turlough

wife of Murtough She was the mother of

Manus, Conor Roe, Tuathal, and Turlough the SS. Peter and Paul.
Duvcovlagh, daughter of Conor
Boyle.

Priest, Prior of the

Church of

Mac Dermot,

died in the monastery of

Flaherty O'Flanagan, Chief of the race of Cathal, the son of Muireadhach z Muilleathan died on his pilgrimage in the monastery of Boyle. Duvtawragh, of O'Quin, and wife of this Flaherty, died. daughter
,

Ualgarg O'Rourke, Lord of Breifney, died on his way to the River [Jordan]. Gilla-Isa Magauran, Lord of Tealach Eachdhach", and Duinnin O'Mulconry,
Ollave [chief poet] of the race of Muireadhach Muilleathan [the Sil-Murray],
died.
is

called Fethfailghe (Fefalia),

and her death

is

"A. D. 1231. Fethfailghe, the of Conor Mac Dermot, and the wife of daughter Murtough Muimhneach, the son of Turlough More O'Conor, died this year. She was the
thus noticed:
largest, the most beautiful, the most hospitable, the most chaste, and the most famous woman of

nagans, the O'Morans, and their correlatives. The extent of their territory is still remembered in the

neighbourhood of Elphin, Belanagare, and ManSee note tua, between which it principally lies
h
,

under the year 1193, pp. 97, 98. a Tealach Eachdhach, now sometimes

called

Tullaghagh, but generally Tullyhaw, a barony in
the north-west of the county of Cavan, the ancient inheritance of the family of Magauran, or

Leith Chuinn.

She was the mother of Manus,
priest,

Conor Roe, Tuathal, and Turlough the
i.

the Prior of the Regies of SS. Peter and Paul."
e.

Magovern. magauran,
called

The level part of this barony, conthe village of Ballymagovern, or Ballytaining
i.

1

leathan

The race of Cathal, son of Muireadhach MuilThis was the tribe name of the O'Fla-

e.

Magauran's town, was anciently

Magh

Sleacht.

2L2

260

[1232.

Concobap goer ua

lifjpa cijeapna

lmrie Decc.

SloicceaD Id oomnall ua jiDorhnaill rijeapna ripe conaill, -| la haonjup mac gillepinnein co pocpaioe peap nianac Do paijib l^ai^illij cacail. Ruccpac loir.ccfp leo pop loc uaccaip, -] po aipccpfc eo imp. Uucpac apiap
i

la caob peoD niaofne

~\

lonnmup an baile uile leo

pemlimib mac

carail cpoibDeipg Do jabail la

mac

uilliam bupc

i

mfliucc

cap pldnaib maice gall epeann.

QO1S CR10SO,
Qoip Cpiopc,
mile,

1232.

Da ceD, cpioca, aDo.
~\

Paccna ua hallsaic corhopba Dpoma mucaba, oipicel ua ppiacpac pfp cije aoibfD, Ifijinn, lubpa, Ifpaijce cpua^ Do ecc. cille moipe Uempall ccfp bpiuin na pionna Do coippeccao la Donrichao
-| -|
i h

nals of Ulster

Conor God, ConcoBap ^occ In the Anand of Kilronan the name is

from the year 727
this family

to 734.

For the pedigree of
Society in

see Battle

of Magh Rath, printed
1842,

written

Concobop

5-

I'^e adjective

job

is

for the Irish Archaeological
p.

used in medical Irish MSS., to translate the Latin balbus, or balbutiens.
c

335.
c

Eo-inis

An army
more

teas led.

This event

is

given some-

Inis-eo,

was an island

Archdall states that Eo-inis, or in Lough Erne ; and even
SS., p. 222, places Inis-eo, not
this passage af-

what,

satisfactorily in the

Annals of Kilro-

Colgan, in
Eo-inis, in

Ada

nan, as follows:

Lough Erne; but
It
is

army was led by Donnell O'Donnell, King of Tirconnell, and
D. 1231.
great

"A.

A

fords evidence to

shew that Eo-inis .was

in

Lough

Oughter.
in

at present the

name

of an island
(eci-inip,

by Aengus Mac Gilla-Finnen, against Cathal O'Reilly, and they brought a fleet [of boats and

Lough Oughter, Anglicised Eanish

them upon Lough Oughter, and plundered Eo-inis, and killed the best white steed that was in Ireland, and carried away
cots] with

with the Ultonian pronunciation), but no remains of antiquity are to be seen on it,
in accordance

except an earthen
f

fort.

Under

this year the

Annals of Kilronan

re-

Cacht, the daughter of

Mac

Fiachrach, the wife

cord, that Cormac, the son of

of O'Reilly, and the jewels and goods of the

whole town."
d

Tomaltagh [Mac Dermot], commenced the erection of a markettown at Port na Cairrge. This is the place now
called
nificent seat of
8

Mac

Gilla-Finnen,
is still

The name
the

very

now made Mac Gillinnion. common in the west of
;

Rockingham, the well known and magLord Lorton.
This entry
is

but many have county of Fermanagh changed it to Leonard. This family is of the
Kinel-Connell race, and descend from Flaherty Mac Loingsigh, who was Monarch of Ireland

Faghtna.

given

somewhat

differently

and better in the Annals of Kilro-

uan, as follows:

A. D. 1232. puccnu

O

llulljaic

comupba

1232.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

201

Conor Godb O'Hara, Lord of Leyny, died. An army was ledc by Donnell O'Donnell, Lord of Tirconnell, and Aengus Mac Gilla-Finnen d with the forces of Fermanagh, against O'Reilly (Cathal): e they brought boats with them upon Lough Oughter, and plundered Eo-inis
, ,

they carried away with them all the and wealth of the whole town. jewels, treasures, Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg (O'Conor), was taken prisoner by the son of William Burke, at Meelick, in violation of the guarantee given by all
and, after obtaining their
the English chieftains in Ireland
f
.

own award,

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1232.
thirty-two.

thousand two hundred

5 Faghtna O'Hallgaith, Coarb of Drumacoo", and official of Hy-Fiachrach [Aidhne], who had kept an open house for strangers, the sick, and the indigent, and also for the instruction of the people, died.
.

The church
opomma mucaba,
peap cie aioeb,
7

of Kilmore'

1
,

in

Hy-Briuin na-Sinna, was consecrated by
under the name of opium rnocua, as in the trict of COILL UA BH-FIACHRACH, a short
far
disdis-

7

Oippipoel ua ppiacpac,
7 leppuijri

cipe 7 caiman in " A. D. 1232. Faghtna O'Hallgaith, Coarb of Druim Mucadha, and official of Hy-Fiachrach,
a

luBpa 7 leijinn oc anno quieuic.

tance to the south-west of Kilcolgan, and not from the margin of the Bay of Galway.
'

man who had kept

a house for the entertainsick,

Kilmore, in Hy-Briuin-na-Sinna, more, a parish church in the district

now Kilnow called

ment of strangers and of the

and

also for

the instruction and improvement of the country and the land, in hoc anno quimit."
h

Tirarune, but anciently Tir-Briuin, situated in the east of the county of Roscommon, stretching along the western bank of the Kiver Shannon, and about six miles east of Elphin. Archdall has confounded this place with Coill-mor, near
St. John's, at

parish belonging to the diocese of Kilmacduagh, in the of barony of Dunkellin, and

Of Drumacoo, Opoma rnucaoa
county

A

See Ordnance

Map

of the

sheet 103; and also Tribes

Galway County of Galway, and Customs of Hy-

Lough

Ree.

There

is

a curious stone inserted in the wall

for the Irish Archaeological Soin the year 1843, p. 71, note b , where it is ciety

Many, printed

of the church-yard of Kilmore, exhibiting a fragment of an inscription in Saxon characters, which runs thus:

shewn that the territoryof Hy-Fiachrach Aidhne was co-extensive with the present diocese of Kilmacduagh. See also the map prefixed to the same work, on which this church is shewn,

" A. D. M: CCC.L:

vii.

EATHEAN INGEAN MIC

BRANAN ME

FECIT."

" A. D. 1357-

EATHEAN DAUGHTER OP MAC

BRANAN, MADE ME."

2(>2

[1232.

ua concobaip eppcop ailpinn, canancng DO benam ipin mbaile cet>na la conn ua plannaccam baof na ppfoip ann. commdin paof cleipcecca, pfncupa, Uioppaicce ua bpaoin corhopba
-| -]

imp clocpann ina ailicpe. bpficfmnappa Decc Clob mac arhlaoib mic Dorhnaill uf peapjail coipeac
in
i

muincipe hangaile no Ic/pcca6 ap imp loca cuile la cloinn aoba ciabaij mic mupchaba ui mbliaban ccoipijecc na hangaile Dfip mupchaib pepjail lap ccaicfm naoi

cappaij
narha,

i

pepgail.

TTlajnup
-|

mac amlaib mic caibg mic maolpuanaib

cainDel einij, eang-

cpabaib Decc.
paoi ap eineac,
~\

Oonnchab mac comalcaij meic DiapmaDa lecrpoman Connacc DO ecc ip in aiciDecc.

ap fnjnam,

clanna cofpeac Concobap mac Qoba mic Ruaibpi DO elub 6 jallaib, Connacn Do rionol ina cimceall. i a nDol ip na cuacaib ap lonnpaijib. 17o giollaceallaij ua hfibm, giollamapbab cpa eipiom lap na Cuarhaib, pochaibe amaille ppiu. Qpe an cpiopr mac Donnchaba mic Diapmaoa, la pin po jealpac na cuara na pamcaca uile, an can acpubpao peap pam-|

-|

~\

caije gile Do
T?ije

mapbab meic aooha. Do cabaipc Daob mac Ruaibpi

la

mac

uilliam bupc DO pibipe,
Do.

-]

pic

DO Denarh bo pip lap njabdil pfiblim mic cacail cpoiboeipg
k

There.

This passage

is

rendered as follows

Aicidheacht; and at the year 1273, O'Quin

is

in the old translation of the

Annals of Ulster

:

"A.

D. 1232. The church of Kilmore sanctified,

na haicioeacca, from which styled lercoir-eac it would appear that this was another name for
the territory of the Clann Cuain, in which Mac Dermot had a house on an island in the lake called
Claenloch, (see entry under the year 1187, p. 79, note k ), and which O'Quin had placed under the protection of Mac

and canons made in the same by Con O'Flanagan."
1

CoarbofSt. Coman,
Inisclothrann

i.

e.

the

Abbot

of Koscom-

mon.

is

an island, containing the

ruins of seven churches, in
sion of the

Lough Eee, an expanShannon between the counties of
See note under the

Dermot about the year
in the

1

150.

The
was

Longford and lioscommon
year 1193.

word aicioeacca is used nan in such a manner as

Annals of Kilroit

will

shew that

m

used to denote chiefry, as in the following passage:
in

who was

He was the son of Teige, Auli/e, cimlaoiD. the son of Mulrony, the ancestor after
the

"A.D.

1225.

Cotmeipje cocra oeipje

if

whom
n

Mac Dermots

of

Moylurg were

called

pi la CoippoealBac mic Coippoealbaij, 7 le h Qeb mac

mbliaoain

Clann-Mulrony.
Aicideacht
is

7 le

mot

called

Under the year 1206 Mac DerLord of Moylurg, Airteach, and

nacc pe

hQo6 O Neill DO copnurn CUICID ConhGeo mac Cucail Cpoiobeipg cpe

popconjpab t)umn Oij mej oipeaccaij, pig-

1232.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.

263

Donough O'Conor, Bishop of Elphin; and canons were appointed in the same town by Conn O'Flanagan, who was Prior there". in theology, hisTipraide O'Breen, Coarb of St. Coman who was learned
1
,

tory,

and law, died on the island of Inis-Clothran, on his pilgrimage. AnHugh, the son of Auliffe, who was son of Donnell O'Farrell, Chief of

naly,

was burned on the island of Inis Locha Guile by the sons of Hugh Ciabach, the son of Morogh O'Ferrall, having been nine years Chief of Annaly, from
the death of his predecessor,
1 ,

Morrogh Carrach

O'Ferrall.

Manus, son of Auliffe" the son of Teige
feats of arms,

Mac Mulrony, lamp

of hospitality,

and

piety, died.

Donough, son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot, eminent
feats of arms,

for his hospitality

and

died in Aicideacht",

a great loss to Connaught.

Conor, son of Hugh, the son of Roderic, made his escape from the English, and the sons of the chiefs of Connaught assembled around him, and they made

but Conor, with Gilla-Kelly O'Heyne, and Gilchreest, the son of Donough Mac Dermot, and many others along with them, were slain by the people of the Tuathas. This was the day on which [the people
an incursion into the Tuathas
;

of] the

Tuathas whitened
that
it

all

the handles of their battle-axes, because

it

was

was by a man who carried a white handled battle-axe that the son of Hugh had been slain. The kingdom [of Connaught] was again given to Hugh, the son of Roderic,

rumoured

p by the son of William Burke who made peace with him
,

after

he had taken

Felim, son of Cathal Crovderg, prisoner.
raoipij pi rnuipeaoatj a noijuil a peapuinn war was 1 a aicioeacra oo buam oe. i. e.

who had opposed him whitened

the handle of

A

his battle-axe, in order that his slayer

might

kindled in this year by Turlough, the son of Roderic, who was the son of Turlough, and
in contesting the province of

not be identified, from fear of the vengeance of his father, who was then very powerful, and be-

Hugh, the son of Roderic, and by Hugh O'Neill, Connaught with

came King of Connaught immediately after, P The son of William Burke. This was the
celebrated Richard de Burgo, Great Lord of Connaught.

licitation of

Hugh, the son of Cathal Crovderg, at the soDonn Oge Mageraghty, royal chieftain of Sil-Murray, in revenge of the loss of his

who was called the

He was

the son of

lands and Aicidheacht.'"

William Fitz- Adelm de Burgo, by Isabel, natural daughter of Richard I., and widow ofLle-

Whitened, po ealpac, i. e. a spread abroad, that the person

rumour having who slew him

He is said to have wellyn, Prince of Wales. struck off the arm of King Roderic O'Conor, in
the Battle of Leithridh, near Dublin.

carried a white-handled battle axe, each of those

He was

264
-|

[1232

oe bupco, caiplen Duin Caiplen bona jaillme DO benam la RiocapD la haoam Soonoun. lomjjain Do cinDpcfccal ua odlaij paof pe Dan, le rfj ai6ea6 coiccfnn DO conj;^lolla na naorh bail Do rpuaccaib -\ Do rpenaib Decc. TTlaeleom bobap ua TTlaolconaipe Do jabail cluana bolcain. mac cacail cpoiboeipj DO leccab amac la jallaib.
-|

pfiblimib

Concubap mac
njaoibealaib
riaill
i

neill uf

Sloijeab la Doriinall
uf baoijill,

gaipmlfohai^ coipeac cenel Tfloain Decc. ua laclamn njeapna cfpe heojain co ngallaib,

-]

co

ccfp conaill Dia po mill
-]

mop

hi

ppanaic, i cue bpaijoe DomDia po cainic ap

uf caipceipc Ifif.
i

Sloicceab la hua noorhnaill

ccfp

eojam co piacc culac nocc
-]

mapb bu lomba
TTliDbec i

Dia po loiyc apbanna,

Dia po milleab mopan,
cinel eojain uaip

~\

cula co copccpach.
fajhinif Do

opccam la

Do poccaccap a

Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1227t and died on his passage to France in January, 1243, in proceeding to meet the King of England at Bourdeaux, attended by his barons and knights. He married Hodierna, daughter of Robert de Gernon, and grand-daughter, maternally, of Cathal

of Bonagalvie was made by the son of William Burk ;" and in the old translation of the Annals of Ulster
it is

"A. D.
[recte,

1232.

made Bun-Gallaway. Thus An army by William Burke
:

the son of William Burke] to the castle of Bun-Gallaway, and there made another cas 7
tie."

Crovderg O'Conor, King of Connaught, and had by her two sons, Walter and William, the former of whom marrying Maud, daughter and
heiress of

This castle was erected near the mouth of

the River Galway, on the east side.

There had been an
in the year
1 1

earlier castle erected here

Hugh de Lacy, Junior, became, in her Earl of Ulster on the death of his fatherright, in-law, and had by her one son, Richard, commonly called the Red Earl, who was considered the most powerful subject in Ireland. See Pedigree of the Earl of Clanrickard
Firbis,

part of these

24 by the Irish. See the earlier Annals at the years 1124, 1132, 1149; see also O'Flaherty's Account of West

by Duald Mac

Connaught, printed for the Irish Archaeological Society in 1845, p. 31 ; and Hardiman's History of Galway, p. 47, note u ; and the old map of

O'Clery, Lodge, and Burke-, and the

Galway
1

in the

same work,

at p. 30.

manuscript entitled Historia Familice
preserved in the

De JBurgo,

Dunamon, Gun lomjum

A

place on the

MS. Library

of Trinity College,

River Suck, on the borders of the counties of

Dublin, F.
q

4, 13.

OfBungalvy, bona
its

juillriie,

i. e.

of themouth

Roscommon and Galway. Tradition says that Dunamon was originally the residence of O'Finaghty, whose territory, consisting of forty-eight ballys, or townlands, lay on both sides of the

of the River of Gal way, from

which river the town

takes

name.

In Mageoghegan's translation of

the Annals of Clonmacnoise, this
cised Bonagalvie, thus:

name

is

Angli-

River Suck, and this tradition

"A. D.

1222. The Castle

is curiously corroborated by a notice given of this family in

1232.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
castle of

265

q Bungalvy was erected by Bickard de Burgo, and the erection r of the castle of Dunamon was commenced by Adam Staunton. Gilla-na-naev O'Daly, a learned poet, who had kept a house of hospitality

The

for the indigent

and the mighty,
[the Deaf]

died.
8
.

O'Mulconry took Cluain Bolcain Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, was set at liberty by the English. Conor, the son of Niall O'Gormly, Chief of Kinel-Moen, died.
Donnell O'Loughlin, Lord of Tyrone, at the head of an army composed of the English and Irish, made an incursion into Tirconnell, and did much injury in Fanat', and carried away the hostages of Donnell O'Boyle and O'Tairchirt.

Malone Bodhar

was led by O'Donnell into Tyrone, and arrived at Tullaghoge, on which occasion he killed many cows, burned the corn crops, and did much
injury,

An army

and then returned home in triumph. w Mevagh" and Aughnish were plundered by the Kinel-Owen,
Firbis's
is

fpr their ships

Mac

of which

in the possession of
it

Book of Pedigrees, the original Lord Roden, and
in the Library of the
literal

Cathal, son of Teige Oge, son of Teige, son of Cathal."

a faithful copy of Irish Academy.
is

Royal
of
it
is

The

translation

fort

Dunamon, oun lom^uin, means the dun or of lomghuin, a man's name the dun
:

as follows

:

yet in existence

See Ordnance
sheet 38
;

Map

of the

" Conmhach was the son of Muireadhach, and

County of
8

Roscommon,

and of Gal-

he was his eldest
inferior in

son,

and

in

consequence of this

way, sheets 8 and 20.
Fanat.

seniority, the descendants of

Conmhach (though

A

district in the north-east of the

power) are entitled to great privileges from the descendants of the other sons of Muireadhach, viz., to drink the first cup at every feast and banquet of a king and all the descendants of the other sons of Muireadhach must rise up be:

barony of Kilmacrenan, in the county of DoSee note s , under the year 1 186, p. 70. negal.
1

Cluain Bolcain
still,

The O'Mulconrys were,

and are

seated at Clonahee, near Strokes-

fore the representative of

Conmhach, or Chief of

town, in the county of Roscommon; but there is no place in that neighbourhood now called

Clann Conway. O'Finaghty was the royal chieftain of Clann Conway, and had forty-eight ballys
about the Suck before the English Invasion but the Burkes drove him from his patrimonial inheri;

Cluain Bolcain.
u Mevagh, mioBeac. A parish in the barony of Kilmacrenan, and county of Donegal, a part of which forms a well-known promontory called

tance, so that there livcth not of the family of this Book O'Finaghty, at the time of

Ros

Guill, extending into

writing

Atlantic

Ocean

See

Sheephaven and the Ordnance Map of the
i.

(1650), any one

more

illustrious than the blessed

and miraculous
are William and
of

priest,

James, whose brothers

County of Donegal, sheets 7 and 16. v Aughnish, Gagimr recte eac-mip,
1

,

e.

horse-

Redmond, sons of Cathal, son

island.

Donough, son of Hugh, son of Rory, son of

Lough Swilly, near Rathin the east of the barony of Kilmacrenan, melton,

An

island in

M

266
loingfp

aNNCita Rioshachca eiRecwR
-|

[1233.

Do pala Dpfm Do cenel conuill im mac neill uf Dorhnaill an Du pn, po mapbaD pom peipin hi pppiorguin. cuca, po lab dp na lomjpi laip, na nafrh 6 odlaij paoi noan Decc.
~\ i

aois cr?iosu,

1233.
arpf.

Goip Cpiopc, mile, Da ceo, cpioca,
j ua oaijpe aipcinnec Doipe colaim
TTlaoliopa

cille [oecc].

ua

TTlaonaij;

uapal paccapr no jabab a pyalcaip gac

laoi

ace

Dia Dorhnaij

namd

[DO ecc].
~\

jaca Oonncarhaij aipcinnec achaib pobaip pfp pfibijce gaca cuipi, co ncnpmiom, co nonoip Decc an .15. Do Decembep. caingne, pfp DO Deacaib Sloijeat) la peiDlimio mac cacail cpoibDeipj cconnaccaib,
-\
i

~\

copbmac mac comalcaij (ijeapna maije
luipcc
e.

luipj)

ma

Dail,

-]

Oo ponab longpopr leo occ Dpuim jpegpaije. a mac, na cpf cuaca, Da mac muipcfpcaij meic Diapmaoa, .1. concobap Do ponpac Dol Donncab, Ctpi comaiple TTluipcfprac ina pappaiD annpin.
~\
i ~\

rue lep maij baoi copbmac,
i

nDiaiD aoba (pij Connacc),

~|

cloinne 17uai6pi

ap

cfna.

noocum, po ppaofneab pop aob mac Ruai&pi po mapbab
in the

lap nool Doib ina 6 pein, ~| ao6 muirhnec

county of Donegal. The ruins of the original church of the parish of Aughnish are
still

Hugh was King

of Connaught for five years, and that he was the last of the descendants of

to

be seen on this

Map
46.
x
y

of the

See Ordnance island. County of Donegal, sheets 37 and

Roderic that was King of Connaught ; that the

Pope
if

offered Roderic,

and his

issue, for ever, the

title to

Gilla-na-naev

This

is

a repetition.

the sovereignty, and six married wives, he would thenceforward abstain from the sin

In the old translation Excepting Sunday of the Annals of Ulster this passage is rendered " A. D. as follows 1233. Moylisa O Moynig,
:

that Roderic did not accept of this offer on such conditions ; and, as he did not, of the
;

women

a gentle priest that

would repeat

his

psalter

deprived him and his race for ever of reign and sovereignty, in revenge of the sin of
that

God

every day, Sunday excepted, died." z The Three Tuathas These were three districts

concupiscence.

t)eobplair cloinni 'Ruaiopi hi

on the west side of the Shannon, in the east of the county of Roscomnion See note d under the year 1189, p. 86.
,

a

stated in

It is Defeated Hugh, the son of Roderic. the Annals of Kilronan, that this

ConcuBaip pi Gpenn innpn. Uaip capcaio an papa ceapc ap Gpmn oo pein 7 oa piol na oiaio 50 bpasr, 7 peipeap oo mnaib popoa, 7 r5 u P P eca no mban 6 pin amac; 7 nip ab Uuaiopi pin, 7 6 nap jab oo bean oia pije
7

plaicearhnup Da piol co ppac

i

noiojolcap

1233.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
at these places
;

267

but a party of the Kinel-Connell, with the son of Niall O'Donnell, came upon them, and slaughtered the crews, but the son of

touched

Niall himself

was
x

slain in the heat of the conflict.

Gilla-na-naev

O'Daly, an adept in poetry, died.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1233.
thirty-three.

thousand two hundred

Geoffry O'Deery, Erenagh of Derry-Columbkille [died]. Maelisa O'Maeny, a noble priest, who was wont to sing his psalter every
day, excepting Sunday' only [died].

a

man

Donncahy, Erenagh of Aghagower, settler of every dispute and covenant, of esteem and honour, died on the 15th of December.

was led by Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, into Connaught, and Cormac, the son of Tomaltagh (Lord of Moylurg), went to meet him and brought him with him into Moylurg. A camp was formed by them at Druim
2 Gregraighe, and Cormac, his son Conor, the people of the Three Tuathas the two sons of Murtough Mac Dermot, namely, Donough and Murtough,
,

An army

joined him there.

resolution they adopted was to go in pursuit of Hugh, King of Connaught, and the other sons of Roderic. On overtaking them they attacked and defeated Hugh, the son of Roderic", slew himself and his brother,
pecaib na tnban. Dr. Hanmer, in the speech which he has manufactured and put into the

The

but

it is

certain that Giraldus Cambrensis does

Dermot Mac Murrough, King of makes him say to the men of Leinster Leinster, and the British knights " The tyrant Eoderic

mouth

of

not make Dermot charge King Roderic with any such crimes, in the speech which he puts into his mouth. In this speech no allusion

:

whatever

is

made

to Roderic's

lasciviousness,
artful,

hath murdered his

own

naturall brother, he hath

but he
tious

is

called a tyrant,
:

and an

ambi-

three wives alive, he hath eleven bastards
severall

by

man

" Malleus

ille

malarum artium &

women.

O

villaine ! to

behold a mote

in

our eye, and cannot see a beam in his owne." Hammer's Chronicle, Dublin Edition of 1809, p.
235.

ambitionum omnium magister & author, violento dominatu cunctos opprimere cupiens ad nos
:

iterum a patria pellendos, vel etiam in ipsa

Whether Dr. Hanmer found

materials

for this speech in

any old historical collection
it is

(quod absit) delendos, ecce super, capita nobis iam imminet. De multitudine superbus elatus

among the
land, or

families of the English Pale in Ire-

ambitionem suam
multitudini

brrfchio metitur.

Sed inermi

a pure fabrication of his own, the Editor has not been able to determine ;

whether

&

inerti

plerunq

;

gravis esse solet
(si)

animosa paucitas

et armata.

Sed

Lageniam

2

M

2

268

QNNCK,a
-j

Ri

.

[1233.

oonnchab mop mac Diapmaoa mic Ruaibpi, 1 lie Ro mapba6 ann Dana Rajallac ua plannagdin, comdp gaill iom6a ele na hGpeann, eoan a bparaip, eoan juep, bipip conpcapla bachab comoell bacall, mp nDenarh eapccaome -\ beop lap mburnn clog DO cleipcib Connacr oppa uaip po papaig -\ po ylacc ao6 muimneac ceaj cealla lomDa ap cfna ^up po cuicpfc pein in enec na naom ipa baoinn, TCo bfnab pije, 1 cfnoup ConDace DO cloinn ftuaibpi cealla po pdpaijpfc. abaib peblmnb mac carail cpoiboeipj mic ip in 16 pin.
a Deapbparaip, oile cfnmorac.

a mac,

-\

-|

-|

-|

-]

coippbealbaij

pije

Connacr mpccain,
-\

concobaip,

na caiplefn DO ponab la neapc cloinne T?uai6pi uf mic uilliam bupc DO pgaoileaD Imp iao, caiplen bona gmllme,
-]

.1.

na caillije, -\ caiplen Duin lom^ain. caiplen na cipce, caiplen Sloicceab la huilliam mac hugo DC lari (m^fn Ruaibpi uf concobaip a in mbpeipne in Docum cacail maraip pibe), i la gallaib mi&e amaille ppip ip ui Rajallaij co noeapnpac cpeaca mopa. Ruccpac imoppo Opong Do mum-

np

ui

ccpeac

rhainb an cploij i nDeoib na ftajallaij pop uilliam De laci, -\ pop ann uilliam bpic, i Dponj Do ciiccpac cacap Dia poile, mapbcap
gall ap aon pip.
cip T?o

mainb
ap an

jonao uilliam De

laci co pocaibib oile.
-\

Soaicc

Seplup mac ceap uilliam De laci carail gaill uf concobaip, peopup pionn mac na gaill piojna, oiapmaiD beapnac ua maoilpeclamn Do na ^onaib DO paDab poppa in lomaipecc TDona

jan giall jan eiccepe.

Do

-|

quserit:

subiecta fuit:

quoniamaliciiiConnactensmm aliquando Ea ratione & nos Connactiam pe-

dropping stones into the lake.

See this castle
.

timus,

quia nostris aliquoties

cum

totius Hi-

referred to at the year 1195, p. 102, note r d William. He was the ancestor of the cele-

bernias subdita fuerat monarchia.

Nee ille more
iura solus

monarchy dominari
a patria propellere,

quserit

:

sed damnare, sed

brated Pierce Lacy, of the county 'of Limerick ; and also of the Lynches of Galway. See note

&

in

omnium

succedere:

& omnia
lib.
i.

solus obtinere."

Hibernia

Expugnata,
b

c. 8.

under the year 1186. In Mageoghegan's translation of the Annals of Clonmacnoise, this event " A. D. 1233. William is noticed as follows
:

Castle-Kirk,

now

called the Hen's Castle.

Delacie,

chiefest

Champion

in

these parts of

Its ruins are still to

be seen on a rocky island, in

the north-west part of Lough Corrib, in that arm of the lake which receives the river of Beal-

Europe, and the hardiest and strongest hand of any Englishman, from the Nicen seas to this
place, or Irishman,

was hurt

in a skirmish in

anabrack, and belongs to the parish of Cong. Caislen-na-Caillighe, now called the Hag's
Castle,

the Brenie, came to his house, and there died of

the wound. Charles O'Connor was also wounded
the same day, and died thereof. Neale Ffox, King of Teaffa-land, was likewise hurt in the
said skirmishe,

which

is

a translation of

its Irish

name,

It stands

on an

artificial island in

the east side

of

Lough Mask,

said to

have been formed by

came

to his house in like

man-

1233.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
his son,

269

Donough More, the son of Dermot, who was son There were also slain of Roderic [0' Conor], and many others besides them. on this occasion Raghallagh O'Flanagan, Thomas Biris, Constable of Ireland,

Hugh Muimhneach,

John, his relative, John Guer, and many other Englishmen; after they had been cursed and excommunicated by the clergy of Connaught, by the of candles; for Hugh ringing of bells with croziers, and the extinguishing

Muimhneach had
so that

violated

he [and his The kingdom and government of Connaught was on they had violated. After this that day taken from the sons of Roderic, the son of Turlough.

and plundered Tibohine, and many other churches, in revenge of the saints whose churches pa,rty\ fell

Felim, the son of Cathal Crovderg, assumed the government of Connaught, and demolished the castles which had been erected by the power of the sons of Roderic O'Conor, and the son of William Burke, namely, the castle of c b Bungalvy, Castle-Kirk and Castle-na-Cally and the castle of Dunamon.
,
,

was led by William d the son of Hugo de Lacy (whose mother was the daughter of Roderic O'Conor), accompanied by the English of Meath, into Breifny against Cathal O'Reilly, and committed great depredations but

An army

,

;

a party of O'Reilly's people overtook William de Lacy, and the chiefs of his army, who were behind the preys, and they gave battle to each other, in which William Britt, and a number of the chiefs of the English along with him,' were

William de Lacy, with many others, was wounded. They returned from the territory without hostage or pledge. And William de Lacy, Charles,
slain.

the son of Cathal Gall O'Conor, Feorus Finn
g

the son of the English Queen, and Dermot Bearnagh O'Melaghlin, died of the wounds they received in that battle of Moin-crann-chaoin". Niall Sinnagh O'Catharny, Lord of Teffia, was
,

6

f

ner, and, after receiving the sacraments of the

Marche
s

in

France

See Hanraer's Chronicle,
p.

altar
e

and Extream Unction, died penitently."

Dublin edition of 1809,
Bearnach.
is

353.

Catlial Gall,

Cacal

gall,

i.

e.

Cathal the Eng-

This

word,

which

signifies

lishman; he was so called by way of reproach,
for speaking the
f

gapped,
h

often applied to a person

who had

lost

English language. Feorus Finn, i. e. Pierce the Fair. He must have been half brother to Henry III., whose
inother,

his front teeth.

Maoin-crann-caoin,

i.

e.

the bog or morass
is

of the beautiful trees.
sent bearing the

Queen

Isabella,

who was

the daughter
after the

and heir of Amerie, Earl of Angolesm,

at preof Cavan, county which comprises the entire of the territory of

There

no place

name

in the

death of King John, married the Count de la

Breifny O'Reilly.

270

aNNCtca Rio^hachca eiRectNN.

[1234.

cpann caom.
in

amup

Niall pionnac ua cacapnaij cijeapna peap ceacba DO juin ip ceona, -j a ecc ina cigh lap noenam a ciomna, -| lap na ongab.

Q01S CR10SU,

1234.

Qoip Cpiopc, mile, Da ceo, cpioca, acfcaip.

ui

bpaoin aipcmneac

a a mac aipr Gonjup ua maolpojmaip eppcop ua ppiacpac, <5iH " naomh mac oamel uf jopmjaile Ropa commain, THaoliopa

Ppioip innpi
1

ua capmacdin maigipcip Ropa comain, ancoipe oilein na cpinome Decc. jiolla lopa ua gibellain manac Oomnall mac aoba f neill cijeapna cenel eojain, abbap pfj Gpeann DO

mac

nepin, TTlaolpeaDaip
-|

mapBab la mag laclamn
gabdil cijeapnaip.

.1.

Domnall

-\

la cenel eojain po&em,

-|

Domnall Do

Qonjup mac jillepmDein cijeapna loca
naill,
-]
i

hfipne Do
.1.

aip, i

a Dol ap cpeic ccfp conuill, i 6 Domnaill, a mapbab a noiojail eiccneacam.
(lap lopccab cije paip,

iompu& ap ua noomDomnall mop, DO bpfic

Ctob ua hfjpa cijeapna luijne Do rhapbaD la DonnchaD

mac Duapcdm

i

eagpa
-]

coipc

a nDiojail a Deapbparap, a Deapbpacaip ele DO mac Deapbparap a arap DO mapbpom,
~\

lap ccecc app),

~\

&alla& laip.

OiapmaiD ua cuinn caoipeac mumcipe jiollgain Do mapbaD. Riocapo mac uilliam mapapcal DO ool inD ajaiD 17ij pa^an
Under this year the Annals of Kilronan record the death of Donncatha, Erenagh of Ag1

hi

Muinter Pheodachain.
This territory was disHuintir-Gittagan. tributed among the baronies of Ardagh, Moyk

hagower, on the 18th of the Calends of January; a man respected in the Church and State for his

wisdom and personal form

;

a

man

the most

dow, and Shrule, in the county of Longford. The townlands of which it consisted are specified

bountiful of his cotemporaries in bestowing cattie and food; protector of the poor and the

in

an Inquisition taken at Ardagh, on the

mighty; the ornament of the country, and the guide and settler of every covenant among his own people, and all in general.
>

4th of April, in the tenth year of the reign of James I., which found that thirty-five small
cartrons

of Montergalgan

then

belonged

to

O'Farrall Bane, and seventeen one-half cartrons
of like measure to O'Farrall Boye's part of the county of Longford. The territory of Caladh

Mac

Gittafinnen,

now Mac

Gillinion.

Ma-

guire was not as yet powerful in Fermanagh, The Mac Gillinions were afterwards chiefs of

na h-Anghaile, called in

this Inquisition

" the

1234.]

ANNALS OF THE KINGDOM OF IRELAND.
in this battle,

2?1

also

wounded

and died

at his

own

house, after

making

his will

and being anointed'.

THE AGE OF CHRIST,
The Age of
Christ, one

1234.

thousand two hundred thirty-four.
;

Aengus O'Mulfover, Bishop of Hy-Fiachrach [Killala] Gilla-na-naev, the son of ArtO'Breen, Erenagh of Roscommon; Maelisa, the son of Daniel O'Gormally, Prior of Inismacnerin

Mulpeter O'Carmacan, Master at Roscommon and Gilla-Isa (G