Gramática "Can" y "could" se utilizan para expresar permiso, posibilidad o habilidad.

Como regla general "can" se utiliza en el presente y "could" en el pasado, pero hay ciertos matices: a) Posibilidad / habilidad En el presente "can" y en el pasado "could" o "was / were able". With the new motorway you can go from Madrid to Barcelona in less than 4 hours Ten years ago you could go from Madrid to Barcelona in 6 hours I can play tennis I could (was able) to play tennis when I was a child "Could" también se utiliza con un sentido condicional, mientras que en el futuro se emplea "will be able": If I had money I could buy a new car In two years I will be able to speak English fluently b) Permiso En el presente distinguimos: - Tener o pedir permiso: "can" tiene un sentido informal y "could" formal. I can use the company's car for my private trips (informal) I could use the company's car for my private trips (formal) Can I borrow your car ? (informal) Could I borrow your car ? (formal) - Dar permiso: se utiliza "can"; "could" únicamente se emplea con un sentido condicional. Tonight you can stay with us If you don't find any other place, you could stay with En el pasado se utiliza "could" y en el futuro "can". c) Ofrecimiento Sólo se utiliza "can". Can I help you

Can I watch the football match in your house? When I asked him, he said his daughter could come with us to the party You are very strong, I am sure that you can lift a weight of 75 kilos I told my son that it was too late and he couldn't go to the party If I continue training I will be able to run the marathon next summer

My father was very fit; he could run a mile in less than 4 minutes Could I open the window? It is very hot in here The anaesthetist asked the doctor if he could postpone the operation for at least one hour The soldiers are very tired. Please, tell them that they can rest for two hours James says that his daughter can come with us to the cinema My boss gave me an invitation so I could enter the conference In this building you cannot smoke Could I use your phone, please? Mr Wilson, Could I explain to you our new offer? Can I use your phone, please? If you continue drinking you won´t be able to drive home With these new engines, rockets can reach Mars in half the time than before Henry, can you be quiet, please?. I cannot concentrate He couldn't go to France because he had lost his passport When my father bought the car we could go to the beach at the weekends You can leave your car here; we will be back soon My sister is an artist; she can dance like a professional Can you pick me up at the airport at 6 0'clock? Could you explain the lesson to me again, please? I didn't understand it at all When I was a child I was very shy. I couldn't speak in public

The word too can be used in many different ways. Read the examples below and you will get familiar with it's use.
the word too can be used in many different ways. Read the examples below and you will get familiar with it is use.

Also / Too / Either
The following is a mini-tutorial on the use of the words "also," "too" and "either." After you have studied the tutorial, complete the associated exercises. If you already know how to use these words, you can skip the explanation and go directly to the exercises.

Also
USE
"Also" is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought. Examples:
y Jane speaks French. Sam also speaks French. y I love chocolate. I also love pizza. y Frank can come with us. Nancy can also come with us.

PLACEMENT
"Also" comes after "to be." Examples:
y I am also Canadian. y I was also there.

With verbs other than "to be," "also" comes before single verb forms. Examples:
y I also sing. y He also helped us.

In verb tenses with many parts, "also" comes after the first part and before the second.

Examples:
y I have also been to Hong Kong. y I am also studying economics.

Similarly, since modal verbs are usually followed by a second verb, "also" comes after modal verbs. Examples:
y I can also speak French. y I should also be there.

Too
USE
"Too" is used in positive sentences to add an agreeing thought. It has the same meaning as "also," but its placement within the sentence is different. Examples:
y Jane speaks French. Sam speaks French too. y I love chocolate. I love pizza too. y Frank can come with us. Nancy can come with us too.

PLACEMENT
"Too" usually comes at the end of a clause. Examples:
y I am Canadian too. y I can speak French too. y I am studying economics too. y If he wants to go too, he should meet us at 8:00.

IMPORTANT
Although "too" is usually placed at the end of a clause, it can sometimes be used with commas after the subject of the sentence. This is usually only done in formal speech. Examples:

y Mr. Jones wanted the contract. Ms. Jackson, too, thought it was necessary. y Donna is working on a solution to the problem. I, too, am trying to find a way to resolve the

conflict.

Either
USE
"Either" is used in negative sentences to add an agreeing thought. Examples:
y Jane doesn't speak French. Sam doesn't speak French either. y I don't love chocolate. I don't love pizza either. y Frank cannot come with us. Nancy cannot come with us either.

PLACEMENT
"Either" usually comes at the end of a clause. Examples:
y I cannot speak French either. y I am not studying economics either. y I don't want to eat either. y I didn't like the movie either.

Confusing Sentences
Sometimes the first sentence is negative and the agreeing idea is positive. Examples:
y The weather wasn't very appealing. I also wanted to stay home and finish my book. That's why I

didn't go to the beach. y The car wasn't expensive, and I needed a way to get around town too. That's why I bought it. Sometimes the first sentence is positive and the agreeing idea is negative. Examples:
y Jane is too short. She is not a good athlete either. I don't think she would make a good basketball

player.

y He is lazy. He doesn't study either. That's why he doesn't do well in school.