PHILOSOPHY, POLITICS, & ECONOMICS THE WARWICK PPE PROGRAMME INFORMATION FOR PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 2010/2011

Table of Contents I. The Warwick PPE programme II. Programme structure III. First year core modules IV. First year optional modules V. Second and Third year core modules VI. Second and Third year optional modules VII. Studying abroad VIII. Advice on applying IX. Some suggested literature X. People and contacts I. The Warwick PPE programme The interdisciplinary PPE degree has contributed a lot to British life and beyond thanks to the famous Oxford course. It is only more recently that other universities have started to offer PPE as well. Given the increasing realisation that many social phenomena can only be properly understood by combining the insights gained from the different disciplines of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics, it is not surprising that many of these new programmes prove to be very successful. Warwick is proud to be one of them. The PPE degree at Warwick started in 2004 and has now produced four cohorts of graduates. The interest in the course shown by students has surpassed all expectations; the intake has grown and entry has quickly become very competitive. Student numbers have increased to the point where, in October 2010, over 100 students are entering the first year, and the programme will have some 270 students in total. The Warwick PPE programme offers students the opportunity to study the three contributing disciplines at foundation level, and either any two or all three at more advanced (honours) level. The three contributing departments – Philosophy, Politics and International Studies (PAIS), and Economics – are all large and successful. The size and internal diversity of the three departments allow for a wide range of optional modules, while the core is carefully designed to provide exposure to the techniques, content and major concerns of the relevant disciplines. In contrast to the Oxford PPE, which may be characterized as a “pillar model”, Warwick adopts what may be called a “bridge model”. When you study PPE at Warwick, you do not just study the three disciplines independently in parallel,
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Economics. Second or Third Class. Principles of Political Economy. is taught by members of staff from all three disciplines as a team. The first year does not count directly towards the class awarded: First. Students may elect to continue with all three disciplines at Honours level. For example. global economic governance. It aims to provide a context in which students can integrate their studies in the three disciplines with a focus on the global political economy. or less. II.but are given ample opportunities – both formal and informal – to combine insights from the different disciplines. * Teaching credits are also known as CATs. Politics & International Studies (PAIS). First Year: Foundation level Core modules taken by all students: Introduction to Philosophy (30 credits*) Introduction to Politics (30) Economics I (30) Quantitative Techniques (30) Optional module(s): students take 30 credits from Philosophy. Topics vary from year to year according to the interests of the lecturers teaching the module. PPE programme structure Modules taken in the first year are the foundation for study at the honours level in the second and third years. globalization and international trade. poverty and development. Some modules are taught over the full year and count 30 credits. and aid and humanitarian interventions. 12 or 6 credits. and are worth 15. last one term. The class of degree is decided on the basis of performance in these modules only. climate change. in recent years they have included global justice. and economics to select global public policy issues. 3 . students must choose one of three PPE pathways. or other approved option(s) from departments within the Faculty of Social Studies or the Faculty of Arts (more information in section IV). while others are shorter. the final year core module. It explores contributions from politics. Most students graduate with Second Class Honours (divided into Upper and Lower Second Class). Students must pass all their examinations at the end of the first year to qualify to enter the second and third years of study. philosophy. Second & Third Year Students: Pathways at honours level By the end of their first year. or concentrate on any two.

Politics and Economics (30) credits AND c. Economics and Philosophy Economics 2 (30) (15 each) Optional 2nd and 3rd year modules from Philosophy. 4 . PAIS or Economics modules 120 Departments and up to 30 credits of approved Outside Option(s). Bipartite pathway: Philosophy/Politics. Bipartite Economics Major pathway: Either Economics/Philosophy or Economics/Politics The Tripartite and the Bipartite pathway lead to a BA. Politics/Economics or Philosophy/Economics 3.The pathways are: 1. Philosophy and Politics Core AND modules Political Theory from Hobbes 120 b. The Bipartite Economics Major pathway leads to a BSc. Tripartite Pathway* (BA) Third Year 120 credits Principles of Political Economy: History of Modern Philosophy TWO OF OR Ethics 1&2 (30) a. credits Second Year 120 credits * Alternative variants of all three Pathways allow students to take Issues in Political theory in their final year instead of Political Theory from Hobbes in their second year. Politics and Economics 2. Tripartite pathway: Philosophy.

Bipartite Pathway* (BA) Second Year 120 credits Third Year 120 credits TWO OF History of Modern Principles of Political Economy: Philosophy TWO OF Core a. Economics and modules up to 30 credits of approved Outside Option(s) 150 (No more than 120 credits from one department) credits Bipartite Pathway. PAIS. Economics Major* (BSc) Second Year 120 credits Third Year 120 credits Economics 2 (30) AND Principles of Political Economy: Econometrics 1 OR Economic Statistics (30) TWO OF AND Core History of Modern a. Economics and Philosophy OR Ethics 1&2 (15 each) OR Political Theory from Hobbes (30) 3rd Year Economics Option (30) Optional 2nd or 3rd year Economics Option (30) modules 120 credits 2nd & 3rd year Options from Philosophy. Philosophy and Politics OR Ethics 1&2 modules (30) b. Politics and Economics Philosophy 120 credits c. Philosophy and Politics modules b. Economics and Philosophy credits (30) (15 each) Political Theory from Hobbes (30) Optional 2nd and 3rd year Options from Philosophy. PAIS. Economics and up to 30 credits of approved Outside Option(s) (60) 5 . Politics and Economics 90 Economics 2 c.

you’re free to choose your optional module from a broad range of departments (see list below. aesthetics. however. continental philosophy. Republic). Continental Philosophy (Nietzsche. Students are not allowed to take modules at an elementary level towards classification of Honours. Political Philosophy (Hobbes. if you get approval to take a module in History in your 2nd year you will automatically be excluded from taking another outside option in your 3rd year. will give you a flavour of all that the department and the subject have to offer. Logic 6 . For example. If it fits your overall course of studies. Students will acquire a broad grounding in philosophy. epistemology. Moral Philosophy (Mill. The areas covered will be: moral and political philosophy. Meditations). At Honours level.) You may also want to take a language option. Metaphysics). In your first year. we may also approve an optional module or modules (up to 30 credits) from another department. (Text: Plato. however.Choosing your Options Being a multi-disciplinary degree and thus offering a lot of diversity within the programme. in section IV. Some restrictions apply. III. It is a wide-ranging introduction to some of the most important issues and works in philosophy. we expect you to choose your options from Philosophy. Utilitarianism. Aristotle. Aesthetics (Hegel on Tragedy. Epistemology (Descartes. Ancient Philosophy. We are happy to encourage the study of languages. and the Language centre will determine the appropriate level. however. Term 1. which is new in 2010/11. metaphysics. Beyond Good and Evil). Leviathan) Term 2. Hume on Taste) Term 3. Politics. Metaphysics (Aristotle. Nicomachean Ethics). given your previous knowledge. We also need to be satisfied that the module you wish to take is sufficiently demanding for you. you should choose your options from the three PPE departments. or Economics. philosophy of mind. First year core modules • INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (30 credits) This module.

legislative structures and executive power. A and B. supply and demand. Seminars are weekly for students who have not taken A level Economics.• INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS (30) The module divides into three parts. It has three component parts: (1) Mathematical Techniques develops techniques of mathematical analysis needed to study economics. fiscal policy and foreign trade. Costs and Revenues. Students will examine different electoral systems. democratisation and nationalist movements. The ‘political ideologies’ component outlines conservative and liberal thinking as well as Marxist. saving and investment. (2) Examines competing ideas about democracy. for students without. • QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUES (30) This module provides the foundation in quantitative methods. International Trade Macro: Consumption. Fiscal and monetary policy. Some Economics Honours level modules have mathematics and statistics requirements. • ECONOMICS 1 (30) This module provides a foundation in economic analysis (micro and macro). There are two pairs of modules in mathematical and statistical techniques. and with. Open economy macroeconomics: the World economy. (3) Addresses political change or transformation such as may occur through revolution. respectively. the role of political parties and interest groups. socialist and feminist perspectives. the role of the state. power and authority as well as rights and distributive justice. Welfare Economics. Market Structure and Firm Behaviour. IS and LM curve analysis. A level Maths. (3) Computing and Data Analysis develops transferable computing and data awareness skills. (2) Statistical Techniques develops an understanding of probability and the concept of statistical significance needed by all social scientists. (1) Political processes and institutions: introduces concepts of political culture and socialisation before outlining some key political actors and institutions. Aggregate supply. otherwise fortnightly. The Firm's Factor Markets. For 7 . Micro: Market equilibrium. It is an introduction suitable for all students whether or not they have studied the subject previously. Which one you take depends not only on your mathematical background but also your intentions regarding the modules you want to take. Aggregate demand. Economic growth and economic cycles.

Sampling distributions. allowing them to take more technical econometric options. covariance and correlation. In addition. economic applications. hypothesis testing. optimisation. probability. data analysis. We make an initial assignment. uses of the Student t. You have the right to make the choice for yourself. on the assumption that those who have passed A level Maths will take Mathematical Techniques B and Statistical Techniques B. Statistical Techniques B (12) Students taking Mathematical Techniques B will also be entered for Statistical Techniques B. covariance and correlation. exponentials. This module covers the following syllabus: descriptive statistics. simple two variable regression analysis. descriptive statistics. Statistical Techniques A (12) Descriptive Statistics. students who obtain a mid-session test mark of 60% or more in Mathematical Techniques A may elect to join Statistical Techniques B. reportwriting and report-presentation. difference equations. series (AP. continuous random variables. total derivatives. bivariate distributions. correlation and two variable regression analysis. sampling and sampling distributions.example if you wish to study econometrics or mathematical economics. Computing and Data Analysis (6 credits) All students take this module. difference equations. probability concepts and rules. measurement of inequality using Gini coefficients. Mathematical Techniques A (12) Revision of basic algebra. binominal and Poisson distributions. introduction to calculus. economic statistics. 8 . point estimation and confidence intervals. differentiation. bivariate distributions. present value). random variables and probability distributions. solvability of equation systems. GP. matrix algebra. point estimation and confidence intervals. economic applications. uniform and normal distributions. discrete random variables. limit theorems. logarithms. which covers: computing skills. gaussian distribution. data awareness. Taylor series. calculus of functions of two or more variables. hypothesis testing. Mathematical Techniques B (12) Revision of basic differentiation and integration. chi square and F distributions. differentials. integration. you should have studied Mathematical Techniques B and Statistical Techniques B. unconstrained and constrained optimisation.

JAPANESE. WELFARE AND SOCIAL CHANGE GALLEONS AND CARAVANS: GLOBAL CONNECTIONS 1300-1800 DEVELOPING SOUTH ASIA: FROM COLONIALISM TO GLOBALISATION HISTORY OF GERMANY HISTORY OF RUSSIA 9 . GERMAN. FRENCH. CHINESE. RUSSIAN.IV.) Psychology • BRAIN AND BEHAVIOUR • PSYCHOLOGY IN CONTEXT Sociology • INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER. • SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES • MEDIA SOCIOLOGY • SOCIAL WELFARE IN BRITAIN History • • • • • • • • • MAKING OF THE MODERN WORLD THE MEDIEVAL WORLD GHANDI AND INDIAN NATIONALISM BRITAIN IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY FAMILY IN MODERN BRITAIN: HEALTH. SPANISH (Visit the Language Centre early in the first week of term to be sure of a place. First year optional modules Philosophy • INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (30) • IDEAS OF FREEDOM (30) • • • • Economics THE WORLD ECONOMY: HISTORY AND THEORY (30) THE INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY ITS GLOBAL SHIFT IFTL THE INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY: STRATEGY (15) MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMISTS AND LINEAR ALGEBRA (15 EACH) FOR ECONOMISTS Politics & International Studies • WORLD POLITICS (30) Outside options Language Centre Modules in: ARABIC.

If you are interested. The Spring and Summer terms deal with Spinoza and with Kant. • HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY (30) The first part. such as Italian. This list may be expanded to include other modern philosophers.• DRAGON’S ASCENT: THE RISE OF MODERN CHINA • IRELAND 1848-1970: A POLITICAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY Comparative American Studies • LATIN AMERICA: THEMES AND PROBLEMS • NORTH AMERICA: THEMES AND PROBLEMS • COMPARATIVE HISTORY AND LITERATURES OF THE AMERICAS English • MODES OF READING • LITERATURE IN THE MODERN WORLD • THE EPIC TRADITION • MEDIEVAL TO RENAISSANCE ENGLISH LITERATURE French • FRENCH CULTURE AND SOCIETY FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE REVOLUTION • FRENCH IMAGINATION German • WRITERS. however. It is standard. Second and Third year core modules The following modules are core to some or all pathways. taught in the Autumn term. other Departments. V. MEDIA AND SOCIETY IN CONTEMPORARY GERMANY • ASPECTS OF GERMAN CULTURE IN THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT Warwick Business School • FOUNDATIONS FOR ACCOUNTING & FINANCE Other Departments Apart from the modules listed above. such as Bacon and Malebranche. that approximately thirteen weeks are devoted to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. • ETHICS I (15) 10 . may offer options. covers key texts and arguments of Berkeley and Hume. Law or Education. please ask the Secretary of the Department concerned.

Peter Railton. The aim is to gain a grasp of the most important topics in both normative ethics and metaethics. such as contractualism and pluralist intuitionism. Christine Korsgaard. Marx. Robert Nozick. as well as various threats to moral responsibility. • ISSUES IN POLITICAL THEORY (30) The study of politics has included not just the study of how the political world operates. They are: Hobbes. among others. and Michael Smith. but also the study of how it ought to operate. The module is divided into five parts: 1. you should have gained an appreciation of debates about the connections between the ideas presented by these political philosophers and historical developments concerning the state that took place in the period. Three weeks are devoted to the most important ideas of selected thinkers in six blocks. in which this literature will be discussed. as well as the economic transformation from agricultural to industrial society. This module examines a set of issues that have received considerable attention within recent normative political theory. • POLITICAL THEORY FROM HOBBES (30) This module aims to give you an understanding of the political philosophy of some of the most important European writers from 1640 onwards. J. Locke. concerning duties of assistance. such as: “Why be moral?” “Is it rational to be moral?” “Can moral judgments be true or false. Ronald Dworkin and G. Cohen) 2. Rousseau. A. or is it a mistake to think about moral discourse in this way?” In Ethics I we analyse these and other questions. However. Justice and the Welfare State (which considers issues concerning 11 . and terrorism. Conceptions of Justice after Rawls (including those of John Rawls. Mill. You will be encouraged to read widely in both the primary and secondary literature concerning these writers. After having attended the seminar and lectures. We will read classic texts by David Hume and Immanuel Kant as well as texts by contemporary moral philosophers such as Allan Gibbard. we shall examine some debates in applied ethics. In addition.“What does morality require from us?” is often seen as the core question ethics has to answer.S. there are other questions of similar importance. • ETHICS II (15) This module examines some leading positions in contemporary normative ethics. Burke and Paine and Wollstonecraft. rights of self-defense. including consequentialism and various forms of nonconsequentialism.

The analysis of general equilibrium and welfare economics. supply and input demand functions. 12 . pitfalls and alternative sample designs). including the time-consistency problem.education. environmental justice. immigration. use of SPSS). The analysis of production. New concepts include the treatment of risk. War and Punishment (which focuses on the political morality of warfare and the question of punishment and moral luck) • ECONOMICS 2 (30) The module aims to enable students to develop a deeper understanding of economic concepts introduced in first-year analysis and to introduce new concepts in both micro and macroeconomic analysis. • ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STATISTICS (30) The module covers the following topics: Statistical estimation and inference (including non-parametric methods. The open economy. Macroeconomics: The concept of the aggregate supply curve and its derivation from alternative theories of the labour market. introduction to SPSS or STATA). The analysis of unemployment and the determination of the price level. democratic and feminist responses to pluralism. including endogenous growth. and health care) 3. including a focus on markets with asymmetric information. cost. Economics of risk and uncertainty. with an emphasis on markets under oligopoly. Consideration of the economics of public policy issues such as privatisation and regulation. The module aims to introduce students to the analysis of public policy issues such as privatisation. Game theoretic approaches to oligopoly. Microeconomics: The analysis of consumer demand. and considers the political morality of abortion) 4. sampling and survey methods (including questionnaire design. factor analysis and principal component analysis (methods and applications. asymmetric information. Theories of inflation and of counter-inflation policy. Justice across Frontiers (which examines issues concerning the treatment of non-human animals. analysed using the Mundell-Fleming and Dornbusch models. stake-holding. and our duties to the global poor) 5. Theories and evidence about economic growth. general equilibrium. contingency tables. entry and other strategic areas in industrial and business economics. welfare economics and rational expectations. regulation and monetary and fiscal policy. with particular reference to the effect of international capital flows. Diversity Issues (which considers liberal.

diagnostics. in particular. and considers this topic from the perspective of both economics and politics as academic disciplines. Dynamic models. represents the “colonization” of part of the traditional territory of political studies by microeconomics. Nonstationarity and Cointegration. The second is in the provision of public goods. 1. Non-linear models. Prediction. the 13 .g. globalization and international trade. We then discuss critiques of the public choice perspective. and thus. Multiple regression. Errors in variables. and economics to select public policy issues. and aid and humanitarian interventions. Lagged dependent variables. Structural change. This views political decision-making as being the outcome of individual goal-orientated agents interacting in an environment subject to electoral and constitutional rules. Dummy variables. global governance.simple linear regression and multiple regression (dummy variables. Lagged dependent variable models. LIMDEP models. Functional form tests. dynamic models. Linear Restrictions. This approach generates predictions about how such rules will affect government policy e. for some. The module will be taught by members of staff from all three departments and aims to provide a context in which students can integrate their studies in the three disciplines. use of SPSS). Limited Dependent Variable Models. Instrumental Variable estimation. • PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY (30) The module focuses on the global political economy. Heteroscedasticity. Topics addressed will include global justice. Multicollinearity. Gauss-Markov Theorem. the impact of majoritarian or proportional electoral rules on the level and composition of public expenditure. The focus is on the extent to which these perspectives complement or conflict with each other. It will explore contributions from politics. economic rationality and morality. • ECONOMETRICS I (30) The module covers: Linear regression model. Generalised Least Squares. Least squares estimation. Least squares estimation. Omission of relevant variables + inclusion of irrelevant variables. We study three specific areas where these perspectives overlap. Students must take two of the following three 15-credit modules: (1) Politics and Economics (15) This module is concerned with the governance of both the national and the global political economy. 2. Simultaneity. development. philosophy. The first part exposits and critically evaluates the body of work known as public choice.

The Non-identity Problem 7. as they involve cooperation between many different nation-states. Markets. The half-module Economics and Philosophy will explore the philosophical content in the economic analysis and evaluation of public policy. Rationality and Moral Evaluation 3. it will be argued that behavioral economics. International legitimacy 4. Global Justice 2. and overpopulation. and Ethics 8. Global Justice and International Legitimacy 3. In particular. 1. 1. intergenerational and environmental justice. theories of intergenerational justice. Topics addressed include global poverty and egalitarianism. Normative Decision Theory 2. ethics and impacts of climate change. Climate Change: Science. politics. Climate Change: Politics and Policy 9. and bring about a rapprochement with political studies. science.concept of Global Public Goods such as greenhouse gas emission reductions. Freedom and Efficiency 6. Impacts. 3. and economics. Gains from Trade 7. with a thematic focus on global public policy questions. the Kyoto Protocol. (2) Economics and Philosophy (15) The idea behind this core module is to explore theoretical issues at the intersection of philosophy. Population 5. Discussion and Conclusions 14 . Justice 5. and the related and increasingly rapidly growing filed of behavioral economics. Externalities and Public Goods (3) Philosophy and Politics (15) This module focuses on central debates and theories in international. has the potential both to put the whole of microeconomics on a more secure foundation. combined with more careful attention paid to institutions. Justice Between Generations 6. The third part looks at the institutionalist school(s) both in political studies and economics. Collective Choice 4. Well-Being 8. The problems of supply and financing of GPGs is particularly challenging.

and third year students Whole-year (30 credits) module • HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY Part Year (15 credits) modules: Autumn Term • AESTHETICS I • LOGIC II: METATHEORY • ETHICS I • PHILOSOPHY OF MIND • PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION • 20TH CENTURY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY I • POST-KANTIAN CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY I • EPISTEMOLOGY • PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE • WITTGENSTEIN Spring Term • AESTHETICS II • ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY • ETHICS II • PHILOSOPHY OF THOUGHT & LANGUAGE • METAPHYSICS • PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE • 20TH CENTURY CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY II • PHILOSOPHY OF MATHEMATICS • MODAL LOGIC* • CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: RAWLSIAN LIBERALISM & JUSTICE Detailed information on all Philosophy modules (typically including reading lists. Not all options are offered in every year. equally. Philosophy modules available to second.ac. etc.) is available at http://www2.warwick.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/ugstudy/ 15 . handouts. The following list shows the situation in 2004-2005. new options are frequently made available – usually reflecting the research interests of tutors and new developments in the disciplines. Second and Third year optional modules The three departments offer a wide range of optional modules at honours level. but because of staff changes and planning constraints this should be regarded as only an illustrative guide to future years.VI.

ECONOMIC AND LEGAL PROBLEMS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION • GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT • THE EARLY COLD WAR 1945-1962 .Philosophy modules normally available to third-years only (15) Autumn Term Spring Term • CONSCIOUSNESS & REALITY • POST-KANTIAN CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY II Whole-year (30 credits) module: DISSERTATION PAIS modules for second and third years (all 30 credits) Second year • POLITICAL THEORY FROM HOBBES • POLITICS OF DEVELOPING AREAS • POLITICS OF THE UK • POLITICS OF THE USA • FRENCH POLITICS AND INSTITUTIONS • POLITICS AND POLICY • THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS • THE INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF DEMOCRACY PROMOTION • STATES AND MARKETS: AN INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY • INTERNATIONAL SECURITY • CORE ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS Third year • ISSUES IN POLITICAL THEORY • POLITICAL.SHAPE AND SHADOWS • MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL RELATIONS • DISSERTATION • POLITICAL THEORY AND CONCEPTIONS OF INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY • POLITICS OF GLOBALISATION • US FOREIGN POLICY • BRITAIN AND THE WAR IN IRAQ 16 .

• CRITICAL SECURITY STUDIES • VIGILANTE STATE: THE POLITICS OF INTELLIGENCE • THE POLITICS OF RELIGION Economics modules for second and third years Second year Whole year modules (30) • ECONOMICS 2 • ECONOMETRICS 1 • ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL STATISTICS Part year modules (15) Autumn term • DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS 1 (MICROECONOMICS) • THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION: GROWTH AND LIVING STANDARDS Spring term • DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS 1 (MACROECONOMICS) • PUBLIC CHOICE AND VOTING THEORY • WAR AND ECONOMY OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY • INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS 1: MARKET STRUCTURE • ECONOMICS OF MONEY AND BANKING • INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS 1: STRATEGIC BEHAVIOUR • MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 1A: INTRODUCTION TO GAME THEORY • MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 1B: MODELS OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC OPTIMISATION • THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION: SOCIETY AND ECONOMY Third year 17 .

Economics have a similar rule for single honours students but it does not apply to PPE students. Planning your 2nd and 3rd years The programme structure requires you to plan over two years. COMPETITION AND REGULATION • TOPICS IN FINANCIAL ECONOMICS: CORPORATE FINANCE AND MARKETS • INTERNATIONAL TRADE Consult the department webpages for further detail.Whole year modules (30) • • • • THE MAKING OF ECONOMIC POLICY ECONOMETRICS 2 MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS 2 RESEARCH IN APPLIED ECONOMICS Part year modules (15) Autumn term • THE BRITISH ECONOMY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY • INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Spring term • ECONOMIC POLICY IN THE EU • INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS • TOPICS IN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS • TOPICS THEORY IN ECONOMIC • TOPICS IN FINANCIAL ECONOMICS: THEORIES AND INTERNATIONAL FINANCE • THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC SYSTEM SINCE 1918 • ECONOMICS OF PUBLIC POLICY • INDUSTRIAL ECONOMICS 2: MARKET ECONOMICS. In choosing your modules. In PAIS 200-coded modules are restricted to 2nd year students. 18 . and 300-coded modules to 3rd year students. you must respect the rules applying to each department’s modules. but some restrictions apply. There is no such rule for Philosophy modules.

we may also approve an optional module from another department. If it fits your overall course of studies. VII.although there are restrictions in that some modules have prerequisites. PPE 3rd years can take EC200 coded modules. Only language modules of level 3 or above can be credited to an Honours degree. Level 1 or 2 can only be taken in your first year. For example. you need to fill in an Outside Option Request Form. You will not be allowed to take more than one language option in your second and final year of study. You cannot study a language option in your first language under any circumstances. If you take a language option in your first year and want to apply to take another option in this language in your second or third year. by participating in a departmental exchange programme. you will have show that it is at a higher level. You are only allowed a maximum of 30 credits of outside options at Honours level. you will be 19 . You may also be asked to see the Director of Studies to discuss your case and get approval. To get approval. available from the PPE office and on the website. PPE with an integrated year abroad PPE students are eligible to apply to participate in the exchange programmes of the departments of PAIS and Philosophy. The principles that govern building a language into your degree programme are as follows: It has to be established that the language module is sufficiently demanding for you. by spending their 2nd year with a partner university. If you participate in an exchange programme. but some restrictions apply. Taking a language option in your second or third year requires a change of syllabus and you need to fill in an Outside Option Request Form. Studying Abroad: Departmental Exchange Programmes There are two ways in which you might include a year of study abroad as part of your degree. if you get approval to take a History module in your 2nd year you will automatically be excluded from taking another outside option in your 3rd year. Thus. Studying Foreign Languages PPE is happy to encourage the study of languages.

Madrid Carlos III (Spain). Lille CU (France). Sciences Politiques Paris. Canada. The Department also has an exchange scheme with the University of California. France. Italy.uk/fac/soc/economics/ug/admissions/socrates/ . DC the University of California. For more information please go to http://www2.uk/fac/soc/pais/currentstudents/cityu/. These universities are: Amsterdam (Netherlands).warwick.warwick.warwick. PAIS has links with the following European Universities under the EU’s Erasmus exchange programme: Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Bordeaux. Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Grenoble. please go to: http://www2. The Department of Philosophy participates in an exchange scheme with the Department of Philosophy at Queen’s University Ontario. Paris Sorbonne (France). France.uk/fac/soc/economics/ug/admissions/socrates/ . Spain).ac. please go to http://www2. Paris IEP (France). Lisbon Nova (Portugal). Germany. The Department of Politics and International Studies has placements at Georgetown University in Washington.uk/fac/soc/philosophy/student/ug/exchange/. UFSI Antwerp (Belgium). For more information please go to http://www2.ac.ac. Universita di Pavia. For more information on the Erasmus scheme of the Department of Economics. This option adds a year of study and you will complete your degree in 4 years. Universitaet Konstanz. For more information on this exchange programme.expected to choose courses that mimic the Warwick syllabus at your foreign University and you will still complete your degree in 3 years. Milan CU (Italy) and Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona. Austria. PPE with Intercalated Year / Erasmus Alternatively. and the City University of Hong Kong.uk/fac/soc/pais/currentstudents/erasmus The Philosophy Department has links with the Universities of Jena and Bergen under the EU’s Erasmus exchange programme.warwick. Munich (Germany).ac.warwick. please go to http://www2. you have the option of studying at a University abroad for an extra year between your 2nd and 3rd years. The Economics Department has links with ten European Universities under the EU’s Erasmus exchange programme. Barcelona Autonoma (Spain). 20 .warwick.ac. France.ac. For more information on the PAIS Erasmus programme. Universitaet Salzburg.uk/fac/soc/pais/staff/mccrisken/umassgeorgetown/ and http://www2.

There are no prerequisites in terms of particular subjects at GCE A level among the three that we require. what you have read about and. Advice on applying Admissions are made by four criteria: 1. English. 3. not counting General Studies. Expected grades If you have yet to take your exams. we look for expected grades at the level of our typical entry condition (A*AA at Advanced level. 4. An A-level in an applicant's mother-tongue which is actually designed to be taken as a foreign language is not acceptable as one of the three A-levels required. We also look for evidence of ability in examinations and would not normally accept more than one subject that is assessed mainly by coursework. and a B at AS level). Reference We read the UCAS reference in conjunction with the Personal Statement to try to get an overall picture of each applicant. Good subjects to study include traditional academic subjects such as History. Personal Statement We read the personal statement and attach a lot of importance to it. how you respond to what you read. References 4. 21 . Expected grades (or grades obtained) at GCE A level. 2.VIII. modern languages and the Sciences. how you think. especially. we would not accept these combinations among your three A level subjects. or Mathematics and Further Mathematics. Your Personal Statement 1. We want students who can show a serious interest in at least two of the three subjects. for example Economics and Business. Subjects studied Our only subject requirement is a pass in GCSE (or equivalent) Mathematics at grade A or better. We are looking for evidence of what your academic interests are. Mathematics. We are especially keen on recruiting students interested in combining study of philosophy with either politics or economics. Economics. Government & Politics. may be a less successful combination. Too narrow a focus can count against you in a competitive applicant pool. International Baccalaureate or equivalent 3. We are generally looking for academic potential in your choice of A level subjects studied. Subjects studied 2.

here are some suggestions. We would like you to tell us a bit more. and done your exams.but someone who demonstrates an intelligent interest in. which columnists or parts and what you think of them. why you think they are useful. The General Theory of Employment. or wrong. however. and enthusiasm for. • Evidence of a critical intelligence. you might get a lot out of reading columnists in the Guardian. learning them. For example. Interest and Money 22 . We do not require you to have read any of the classic texts on the reading lists for the degree if you are studying for your exams. Some classics you will read on the course: David Hume A Treatise of Human Nature Immanuel Kant Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals Thomas Hobbes Leviathan John Stuart Mill Utilitarianism Adam Smith An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations John Maynard Keynes. what you have got out of them. • Evidence of reading: not just the names of publications but also what you think of them. Mention some writers you have read and tell us something about them that shows what you think about them. (We don’t expect you to have studied in depth great works. treatises or textbooks.We are not looking for someone with a lot of knowledge of any of the three subjects . We want to see evidence of the following: • Awareness of important issues: we want to know what you think are the important issues and why you want to study them.obviously you will study them on the degree . Economist. New Statesman. • That your interests fit within the Warwick PPE approach.) IX. Financial Times or whatever. Some Suggested Readings Students are not expected to have studied any of the three disciplines before coming to Warwick. for example. However we often get asked to suggest reading. If you are particularly enthusiastic and feel like getting started. once you have an offer.

1999. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press … focuses on the philosophy of economics and politics … Richard Titmuss. Values and Ethics in Economics. One World – the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge: Polity Press … a treatment of global justice … Peter Singer. Models of Democracy. World Poverty and Human Rights. 1994. Oxford: Oxford University Press … an introduction to philosophy and politics … David Held. Philosophy of Social Science. 1970. 1971. The Spirit Level … shows how inequality is harmful for all. 2010. 1993. Cambridge: Harvard University Press … an exploration of how economic rationality clashes with ethical judgments … Amartya Sen. Oxford: Blackwell … a discussion of ethical premises in economic theory … Amartya Sen. New Haven: Yale University Press … a proposal for globalizing ethics … Will Kymlicka. 1971. 1987. A Theory of Justice. The Logic of Collective Action. 1987. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Contemporary Political Philosophy. On Ethics and Economics. 1991. New York: Knopf … an alternative philosophy of development … Thomas Pogge.Some contemporary readings: John Rawls. … a contemporary classic … Elizabeth Anderson. The Gift Relationship …famous study of the supply of human blood in Britain and America… Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett. Cambridge: Polity Press … on the philosophy of democracy … Mancur Olson. the rich as well as the poor … 23 . Cambridge: Harvard University Press … a pessimistic discussion of the problem of free-riding … Martin Hollis. Development as Freedom.

in room S1. It is situated in the Social Studies Building. Secretaries: Mrs Maureen Tod and Mrs Lucy Parker Telephone 02476 522582/575285 Email: ppeoffice@warwick. of the Economics Department Departmental PPE convenors: Philosophy: Dr Brian McElwee .warwick.Economics: Professor Robin Naylor PPE Office The PPE office handles the administration of the programme and often provides answers to any questions students might have about their programme.X.uk/fac/soc/ppe.ac.ac.ac.Politics and International Studies: Professor Andrew Reeve .) 24 .uk and about the PPE programme at http://www2.uk Websites Find out more about the University at www. People and contacts Director of Studies: Professor Dennis Leech.warwick. about equidistant from the three Departments.63. (There are also links to the three partner departments from this page.