PETE G.

WILCOX FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
Funding to Penn State University, including its branches, such as
the Hazleton campus, would be cut under the governor’s proposed
budget.
Penn State and 16 other state
colleges and universities, already
struggling with deep cuts to allo-
cations this fiscal year, now are
facing even further reductions
under Gov. Tom Corbett’s pro-
posed 2012-13 budget.
The governor’s spending plan
seeks to cut 20 percent, or $330
million, from the budget for 14
state-owned universities that in-
clude Bloomsburg, East Strouds-
burg and Lock Haven. He also
proposed Tuesday to reduce
funding to Penn State by 28 per-
cent and to Temple University
and the University of Pittsburgh,
classified as state-related univer-
PA . B U D G E T Decreases last year led to tuition increases at schools
State universities face deeper cuts
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See BUDGET, Page 4A
C M Y K
6 09815 10011
WILKES-BARRE, PA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 50¢
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After strong showing, Rick
Santorum raises $250,000.
NATION & WORLD, 5A
Momentum
equals money
Misericordia stays in first
place with dramatic OT win.
SPORTS, 1B
Cougars claw
out victory
WILKES-BARRE – The state
attorney general has deter-
mined no criminal charges will
be filed against Mayor Tom
Leighton or former city admin-
istrator J.J. Murphy regarding
the installation of alarm sys-
tems at their homes that were
paid for with city funds.
According to a letter sent to
Luzerne County District Attor-
ney Stefanie Salavantis, the case
“has been closed and four pri-
vate criminal complaints have
been disapproved.”
SamSanguedolce, first assist-
ant district attorney, provided
The Times Leader with a copy
of the letter, dated Jan. 6, that
identified Linda Urban as the
complainant.
According to the letter –
signed by Frank G. Fina, chief
deputy attorney general, and
Anthony W. Forray, senior depu-
ty attorney general – the deter-
minationthat nocriminal charg-
es would be filed was made “af-
ter careful review of this mat-
ter.”
The letter states that on Oct.
21, 2011, former Luzerne Coun-
ty District Attorney Jacqueline
No charges
for alarms
in homes
State AG: No criminal action
against W-B mayor, ex-official
although city funds used.
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
Leighton Murphy
See ALARM, Page 12A
WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep.
Lou Barletta took to the House
floor Wednesday to rail against
the Obama administration’s
plan to require that employers
include birth control, steriliza-
tion and
abortion-in-
ducing drugs
in health in-
surance
plans. There
is no man-
date to cover
abortions.
Barletta, R-
Hazleton,
spent five
minutes of
general
speech time
taking um-
brage that re-
ligious insti-
tutions, including Catholic col-
leges and hospitals, are includ-
ed in the mandate. The
requirement stems from the
2010 health care reform law.
“The Obama administration
will force Catholics to buy in-
surance coverage that includes
coverage for services that
many of them find morally
wrong. For many Catholics,
this requirement violates their
core beliefs about the sanctity
of the life of the unborn,” said
Barletta, a Catholic.
The new regulations were
announced last month by the
Department of Health and Hu-
Barletta
criticizes
insurance
mandate
U.S. Rep. takes to House
floor to blast birth control
coverage requirement.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See BARLETTA, Page 12A
Barletta
Visit http://
tlgets.me/
catholiccon-
cerns
T O S E E
V I D E O
A REAL W-B/SCRANTON
PENGUIN
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
B
illy Bartolomei, a pre-kindergar-
ten student at Wyoming Semi-
nary Lower School in Forty Fort,
checks out Tahbo, a 4-year-old Afri-
can, black-footed penguin from the
Lehigh Valley Zoo that stopped
by the school as part of the
students’ studies. For the story,
see Page 6A.
INSIDE
A NEWS
Obituaries 2A, 8A
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Editorial 11A
B SPORTS
B BUSINESS 7B
Weather 8B
C LIFE
Birthdays 4C
Television 6C
Movies 6C
Puzzles 7C
Comics 8C
D CLASSIFIED
Spurred on
Sixers fall to
San Antonio.
Story, 5B
PHILADELPHIA -- A federal
judge has ruled that Pennsylva-
nia’s 2001 legislative district
maps should be used in this
year’s elections, a setback for
Republicans who had tried to
get the court to block their use.
The ruling follows one by the
state Supreme Court that re-
jected redrawn districts it said
were gerrymandered in a way
that made no sense other than
to serve the interests of one po-
litical party over another.
In his 24-page opinion, Se-
nior U.S. District Judge R. Bar-
clay Surrick said the election
cycle has already begun and it’s
too late for the state’s Legisla-
tive Reapportionment Com-
mission to develop new maps
and guide them through adop-
tion.
“With election deadlines
Pa.’s ’01 district maps
OK, federal judge says
Ruling a blow to Republicans
who tried to block their use,
saying they are outdated.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See MAPS, Page 12A
WASHINGTON -- House
Speaker John Boehner ac-
cused the Obama adminis-
tration Wednesday of an “un-
ambiguous attack on religious
freedom,” promising that
Congress will reverse a new
policy requiring religious
schools and hospitals to pro-
vide employees with free birth
control if the president
doesn’t.
Boehner demanded that
President Barack Obama
overturn the policy the speak-
er called a violation of First
Amendment rights. The ad-
ministration’s mandate has
angered religious groups,
especially Catholics, who say
the requirement would force
them to violate their beliefs
against contraception.
“This attack by the federal
government on religious free-
dom in our country cannot
GOP vows
policy change
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
See REVERSE, Page 12A
HARRISBURG—JerrySand-
usky’s lawyer filed court paper-
work Wednesday arguing that
jurors in his child sex abuse trial
should be chosen fromthe com-
munity where he lives and sug-
gesting that a trial delay might
be the best way to address the
intense publicity generated by
the case.
Defense attorney Joe Amen-
dola wrote that the former Penn
State assistant football coach is
opposed to a request by the
state attorney
general’s of-
fice to bring in
out-of-county
jurors, saying
publicity
about Sandus-
ky’s case has
been so perva-
sive that jurors fromother coun-
ties will also have been saturat-
ed with news coverage.
Sandusky “believes selecting
jurors from a county outside
Centre County will involve the
same difficulties that the parties
and the court will face in selec-
ting a Centre County jury, and
the jurors fromany other county
in Pennsylvania will face
Sandusky requests jury
from State College area
Lawyer also says Children
and Youth told him 2 recent
abuse allegations unfounded.
By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
See SANDUSKY, Page 12A
Sandusky
K
PAGE 2A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Belaus, John
Cardoni, Irene
Crompton, Amelia
Cummins, Marjorie
Farrell, Patrick
Gallagher, Frederick
Janezic, Donald
Kupp, Nancy
Lukaszewski,
Clement
Mignone, Anna
O’Malley, James
Ramsey, Marie
Reese, Lewis J. Jr.
Space, James
Tetlock, Theresa
Vonsavage, Bette
Wolsieffer, Mary
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 8A
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – Thursday’s
“Pennsylvania Cash 5” jack-
pot will be worth at least
$225,000 because no player
matched the five winning
numbers drawn in Wednes-
day’s game.
Lottery officials said 49
players matched four num-
bers and won $319.50 each;
1,864 players matched three
numbers and won $14 each;
and 23,036 players matched
two numbers and won $1
each.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER – 0-3-5
BIG 4 – 2-6-0-3
QUINTO - 8-5-4-4-1
TREASURE HUNT
07-19-23-27-28
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 5-1-7
BIG 4 - 2-8-2-2
QUINTO - 2-8-4-0-6
CASH 5
12-19-32-40-42
POWEBALL
17-28-38-39-51
POWER BALL - 33
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E D I T O R ’ S N O T E
The Diagramless and the Cryptogram puzzles in the Etc. section of
the Sunday Times Leader were discontinued by the syndicate that
had been providing them. No similar replacement was offered. We
regret faithful puzzle fans were disappointed by the change. We
hope fans of puzzles try the new Kenken numbers challenge.
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USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-040
WILKES-BARRE-- Council will
consider anordinance to establish
a taxation fee schedule for a li-
cense for “every person, firm, cor-
porationor association” operating
a place or establishment that
stores milk, eggs, or other refriger-
ated or frozen foods.
Drew McLaughlin, administra-
tive coordinator for Mayor Tom
Leighton’s administration, said
there are about 14 businesses in
the city that will require the in-
spections.
“Convenience stores like Tur-
key Hill are already coveredby the
normal restaurant inspections
conducted by the city health de-
partment,” McLaughlin said.
If food is prepared on site,
McLaughlinsaidthose businesses
are already being inspected. The
newordinance will require inspec-
tions of stores – like pharmacies –
that sell refrigerated food items
like eggs, juice, milk or frozen
foods.
McLaughlin said the inspec-
tions are mandated by the state
under Act 106. On Nov. 23, 2010,
Act 106 of 2010 was enacted,
which strengthens oversight of
food safety inspections for all re-
tail food facilities, or restaurants
and retail food stores, by amend-
ing the 1945 Public Eating and
Drinking Place Act and the 1994
Food Act.
The newlawtook effect on Jan.
22, 2011.
McLaughlin said notification to
the Health Department regarding
the requirements of the inspec-
tions wasn’t provided to the city
until mid 2011, at which time the
newordinance was compiledwith
the target date for enactment of
early this year.
The initial license would cost
$100 and each annual license re-
newal would be $40. A fine of $10
per day for every day of operation
without a license is alsopart of the
ordinance.
McLaughlin said inspections
will include checking the temper-
ature of refrigerationunits, expira-
tion dates of food contained with-
in those units and the cleanliness
of the refrigeration units and sur-
rounding areas. The inspections
will be done annually, but
McLaughlin said the Health De-
partment will respond to com-
plaints or concerns registered by
residents.
Under Act106, thestateDepart-
ment of Agriculture will no longer
license or inspect retail food facil-
ities in a local health jurisdiction.
Thelocal healthauthority–inthis
case the city – will be responsible
for licensing and inspection of re-
tail food facilities in its jurisdic-
tion.
Anyone with concerns about re-
frigerationunits incity businesses
can call the Health Department at
208-4268 and request an inspec-
tion.
W-B eyes fees for chilled, frozen foods
Official: About 14 businesses
that sell chilled or frozen
foods will require inspections.
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
City Council meets today at 6 p.m.,
Council Chambers, Fourth Floor,
City Hall. Public comment is wel-
come.
W H AT ’ S N E X T
More Obituaries, Page 8A
I
rene Cardoni, 87, of Plains Twp.,
passed away Wednesday morn-
ing, February8, 2012, inManor Care
Health Services, Kingston.
Born in the Brookside section of
Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of
the late Peter and Bertha (Piska)
Smolenyak.
Irene was a graduate of James M.
Coughlin High School, class of
1942. She was employed as a floor
lady for LP Sportswear, and as a
bookkeeper for Tavella and Cardoni
Trucking, both of Hilldale; a mem-
ber of the I.L.G.W.U. and a lifelong
member of Sacred Heart Church,
Plains Township, and currently a
member of Ss. Peter &Paul Church,
Plains Township.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Joseph “Pepi” Cardoni;
son, Dennis “Chipper” Cardoni;
brother, Peter Smolenyak, and an
infant brother.
Surviving are her children,
Wayne Cardoni and his wife, Gayle,
Allentown, Joseph Cardoni, John-
son City, N.Y., and Monica Stevens,
Plains Township; grandchildren, Dr.
Wayne Cardoni Jr., Maria Burke,
ElissaDeCarlo, Lt. Col. Christopher
Cardoni, who is currently serving
our country in Afghanistan, Dou-
glas Cardoni, Lia Cardoni, and Josh
Stevens; 11 great-grandchildren;
brother, John Smolenyak, Port St.
Lucie, Fla.; several nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral will be held Friday at
10:30 a.m. in the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 11 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul
Church, Plains Township. Inter-
ment will be heldinthe ItalianInde-
pendent Cemetery, West Wyoming,
at the convenience of the family.
Friends may call Friday morning
from 9 until 10:30 a.m.
Memorial donations may be
made to the charity of one’s choice.
Online condolences may be made at
www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
Irene Cardoni
February 8, 2012
M
arjorie H. Cummins, died
peacefully on Monday, Febru-
ary 6, 2012 in Wesley Village, Jen-
kins Township.
She was born in Plymouth, on Ja-
nuary 22, 1918, to Leroy K. and Hul-
dah M. (Thommen) Honeywell.
She attended Plymouth schools
and graduated in 1935 after which
she attended Bucknell Junior Col-
lege receiving her associate degree
in 1937.
She earned a bachelor’s degree
(cum laude) in education from
Wilkes College in 1965, and a mas-
ter’s degree in education from
Wilkes College in 1972.
Marjorie began teaching elemen-
tary education in the Wyoming Val-
ley West School District in 1965,
starting at Rutter Avenue School,
then moving onto Loveland Avenue
School, Church Street School, and
finishing at Chester Street, where
she taught second-grade students in
the gifted program. She retired in
1986.
She moved from the area in 1991
to be close to her daughter and
grandchildren, and then moved
back to Edwardsville in 2001, even-
tually living at Wesley Village for
the last five years.
Marjorie was married to Gordon
Dietterick in 1939.
She was president of the Ply-
mouth Junior Women’s Club, presi-
dent of the Wyoming Valley Wom-
en’s Club, and president of the Lu-
zerne County Federation of Wom-
en’s Clubs.
She was an officer in the Order of
the Eastern Star, Chapter 345, Ply-
mouth, and associated with the Red
Hats, Salvation Army, Philharmon-
ic, Mozart Society, Moody Bible In-
stitute and Radio Bible class.
Marjorie loved to travel and had
the opportunity to see many far
away countries on five continents
during her lifetime.
Survived by her son, Scott Diet-
terick and his wife, Nancy, King-
ston; daughter, Holly Desvignes
and her husband Bob, Powatan, Va.;
grandchildren, Jennifer Dietterick,
Kingston, andher friend, JohnNice,
Julie Pajic and her husband Tom,
Bloomsburg, Brian Desvignes,
Abingdon, Md., Jeffrey Desvignes,
sergeant in the U.S. Army, Fort
Bragg, N.C., Christopher Des-
vignes, CampBob, N.C., andMegan
Desvignes, Powhatan, Va.; great-
grandchildren, Grace Pajic andTho-
mas Pajic, Bloomsburg.
She was affiliated with the
Church of Christ Uniting, Kingston.
Family would like to thank the
staff of Wesley Village and Erwine’s
Home Health and Hospice for their
caring comfort.
A funeral will be held at 10 a.m.
Saturday in the Church of Christ
Uniting, Market St. and Sprague
Ave., Kingston, with the Rev. Dr.
Carol Ann Fleming, officiating. The
interment will be in the Hanover
Cemetery, Hanover Township.
Friends may call from 9 a.m. until
the time of service Saturday in the
church.
In lieu of flowers, donation may
be made to the SPCA or to the
Church of Christ Uniting or to the
organization of the donor’s choice.
Arrangements have been entrusted
to the Hugh B. Hughes & Son Inc.
Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort.
Marjorie H. Cummins
February 6, 2012
P
atrick M. Farrell, 52, of Califor-
nia, Maryland, and formerly of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away sudden-
ly on Monday, February 6, 2012, at
St. Mary’s Hospital in Leonard-
town, Md.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre, on
April 6, 1959, son of Joseph G. and
Elizabeth (Betty) Mayer Farrell of
Wilkes-Barre.
In his youth, he was a member of
Cub Scout Pack 43 and Boy Scout
Troop 43 at St. Nicholas Church.
Patrick was 1977 graduate of
Bishop Hoban High School, where
he was a member of the high school
band.
He formerly served as a lector,
Eucharistic minister andmember of
the adult choir at St. Aloysius
Church.
He was also formerly employed
as a supervisor at McDonald’s Res-
taurant in Wilkes-Barre.
After high school, he joined the
U.S. Army servingas anIntelligence
Specialist.
He later attended college at St.
Mary’s Seminary and University,
graduating in 2002 with a bachelor
of science degree in Theology.
Later that year, Patrick joined St.
Mary’s Ryken (SMR) High School
in Leonardtown, Maryland, where
he began a 10-year adventure of en-
lightening students both spiritually
and academically.
Patrick loved working with stu-
dents. He was the quintessential
teacher: the educator, the mentor,
the coach, the moderator and the
advocate.
He dedicated his life to benefit,
whether it was through “Friday
Night Flicks” to provide a place for
teens togather ina positive environ-
ment to “Road Trip,” where he led
bus loads of students toanawaybas-
ketball game to cheer on our team.
His focus and essence was the
students. He singularly developed a
project based program to help his
11th-graders better understandmor-
ality and social justice issues
through hands-on involvement.
As the Future Business Leader of
America (FBLA) moderator, Pa-
trick strived to make the club the
best in the state. Patrick has tou-
ched the lives of thousands of stu-
dents.
His tireless service to teaching
and his selfless example inspired
both his peers and students alike to
live the Xaverian values of humility,
trust, zeal, compassion and simplic-
ity.
His deep faith and strong reli-
gious foundation has made him the
rock for many needing a listening
ear and advocate for the unprotect-
ed and needy.
His legacy of service, protecting
the marginalizedandhis zeal for life
will live forever in the hearts of
many.
Surviving in addition to his par-
ents are sister, Dorothy (Dottie) Po-
vilaitis, and her husband, Edward,
Wilkes-Barre; brother, Joseph W.
Farrell, and his wife, Mary Jean,
Hampton, Va.; nieces, Betty Jo
Niemkiewicz and her husband,
Brian; Gina Povilaitis and her fian-
cé, Cody Kyttle; grandnephews, Ga-
vin Fincke, Tristan Niemkiewicz
and Edward James Kyttle.
Funeral services will be held
on Friday morning at 11:30
a.m. in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral
Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre,
with a Mass of Christian Burial to
follow at noon in St. Nicholas
Church, 226 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in
St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call today
from5 to8 p.m. inthe funeral home.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made in Patrick’s
memory to the St. Joseph’s Center,
2010 Adams Avenue, Scranton, PA
18509. Online condolences may be
made at www.natandgawlasfuneral-
home.com.
Patrick M. Farrell
February 6, 2012
T
heresa Dawn Tetlock of Lower
Mill City Road, Dalton, died at
her home on Wednesday, February
1, 2012.
She was born in Tunkhannock,
on October 13, 1972, daughter of
Carol Ann Garey Jonas of Mill City
and Michael Shoemaker of Alaba-
ma.
She was last employed at Pump
and Pantry in Nicholson.
Surviving, in addition to her par-
ents, are sons, Todd Michael Tet-
lock, Gabriel Alexander Tetlock, at
home; daughter, Courtney Tetlock,
Waymart; sisters, Doris Mae Kron-
muller, Falls; Jessica R. Kucharski,
Carbondale; Crystal L. Jonas, Dal-
ton; maternal grandmother, Ellen
M. Garey, Mill City; paternal grand-
mother, Janet Shoemaker, Tunk-
hannock.
Amemorial service will be held
on Saturday at 11 a.m. in the Pleas-
ant ViewBaptist ChurchonOrchard
Drive, Lake Winola, with Pastor Co-
lin Morley, pastor of the Pleasant
View Baptist Church. Interment
was at the convenience of the family
in FairviewCemetery, Lake Winola.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the Carol
Jonas Fund for Todd and Gabriel, at
any P&G Credit Union office. Ar-
rangements are by the Sheldon-Ku-
kuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W.
Tioga St., Tunkhannock. Online
condolences may be sent tothe fam-
ily at www.sheldonkukuchkafuner-
alhome.com.
Theresa D. Tetlock
February 1, 2012
L
ewis John Reese Jr., 53, of Dal-
las, passed away Saturday, Feb-
ruary 4, 2012, unexpectedly at
home.
He was born in Kingston, son of
Mary Templin Reese and the late
Lewis John Reese.
Johnwas a1976 graduate of Dal-
las High School, where he was a
standout baseball player.
He went on to play baseball at
the University of South Florida,
and graduated from Florida Inter-
national University with a degree
in environmental science.
He was an avid sportsman and
enjoyed hunting, fishing and
spending time in the woods enjoy-
ing nature. He was a member of
Tennesen Sportsmen’s Club.
JohnretiredfromthePennsylva-
nia Turnpike Commission.
In recent years, he was well
known in the area for boat restora-
tion and repair.
In addition to his mother, Mary
TemplinReese, Johnis survivedby
his son, Jesse John Reese, Dallas;
sisters, Margaret and her husband,
Tom Bowers, Stuart, Fla.; Kathy
Reese, Bridgeport, Conn.; Diane
and her husband, Gary Klossner,
Jamesville, N.Y.; niece, Rebecca
Klossner, Greensboro, N.C.; neph-
ew, Gregory Klossner, Lexington,
Ky.; aunts, Betty Templin, Teques-
ta, Fla.; Pat Templin, Golden, Co-
lo.; Shirley Templin and Marian
Templin, both of Dallas; and sever-
al cousins.
John was a very generous per-
sontoall as evidencedby his gift of
life to others through his organ do-
nation.
Funeral will be held Saturday at
11 a.m. in the Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 2940 Memo-
rial Highway, Dallas, with the Rev.
Robert Wood, pastor Dallas Unit-
ed Methodist Church, officiating.
Friends may call from10 a.m. until
time of services.
In lieu of flowers, donations
madebemadetotheDallas United
Methodist Church, Parsonage
Street, Dallas, PA 18612, or Jack’s
Place, Vail Valley Medical Center,
Box 1067, Vail, CO 81658.
Lewis John Reese
Jr.
February 4, 2012
WILKES-BARRE – Wilkes-
Barre Area School Board ap-
proved the formation of a girls
lacrosse team at Coughlin High
School on Wednesday, with the
caveat that it must cost the dis-
trict nothing.
The board also rejected two
motions by Christine Katsock –
one to let the public speak dur-
ing work sessions, the other to
advertise for a newsolicitor and
paralegal, a position created to
save money spent on an assist-
ant solicitor but never filled.
The board voted unanimous-
ly to approve the lacrosse team,
stalled because the board want-
ed, and ultimately received, as-
surance the operation could be
self-sustaining. Colleen Wood,
who had pushed the plan, said
the team will charge a $50 fee
per player, but expects to raise
enough money to refund those
fees. The board required that
any student unable to pay the
fee still be able to play.
Katsock made her motion to
advertise for a new solicitor af-
ter rattling off statistics for the
district’s legal expenses. She
noted the district budgeted
$425,000 for legal services this
year, “approximately two times
the budgeted amount of the
largest district in this county,
Hazleton Area, and greater than
that of Hanover Area and
Wyoming Valley West com-
bined.
She also cited a recent settle-
ment with architectural firm
Highland Associates involving
drawings for a feasibility study.
The district sued for $88,000,
contending the work done was
not the work requested.
The case was settled for
$47,500 last month, but Kat-
sock said a review of the bills
from Solicitor David Lupas and
Assistant Solicitor Ray Wendo-
lowski showed legal fees were
higher than that. “The district
is actually over $400 in the red,”
Katsock said.
The board rejected the mo-
tion 8-1, with Katsock the lone
yes vote, though several mem-
bers said they felt it would make
more sense to delay such a
move until next year’s budget
was closer to completion.
The vote against allowing
public comment at work ses-
sions – usually held Monday fol-
lowed by regular meetings
Wednesday -- was 5-4, with Kat-
sock, President Maryann Toole,
Lynn Evans and Robert Corco-
ran voting yes. Some board
members questioned the tech-
nical aspects of allowing public
comment at meetings that are
not recorded and have no min-
utes. Others pointed out the
public can still comment at the
regular meeting.
“Logistics outweighed free-
domof speech,” Katsock said af-
ter the meeting.
W-B Area approves Coughlin girls lacrosse squad
Conditions are that district pay
nothing toward team and that
any student be able to play.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Mark Guydish, a Times Leader staff
writer, can be reached at 829-7161
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
NICHOLSON TWP.
Crash kills dad, daughter
S
tate police at Tunkhannock said a
father and his 3-year-old daughter
were killed in a two-vehicle crash on
West Nicholson Road, Wyoming
County, on Wednesday morning.
State police said Jeffrey Pifcho, 25,
of Lawton, driving a 1994 Chevrolet
Silverado pickup, was traveling east
on West Nicholson Road and crossed
into oncoming traffic, colliding head-
on with a 2000 Dodge 2500 pickup
driven by Loren Lee Welch, 48, of
Springville.
The crash happened just after 9
a.m.
Pifcho and his daughter were killed
in the crash. They were pronounced
dead at the scene, state police said.
State police said the girl was not in
a child safety seat.
Welch was transported to Geisinger
Community Medical Center in Scran-
ton with moderate injuries.
The investigation is continuing.
WASHINGTON
Casey urges buyout OK
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey, D-Scranton,
on Wednesday urged the federal and
Pennsylvania emergency manage-
ment agencies to
quickly approve
applications sub-
mitted by Wyoming
County to acquire
properties damaged
or destroyed in the
flooding from Irene
and Lee.
Wyoming County
has applied for the acquisitions of 92
homes that were damaged or de-
stroyed by Irene and Lee or have been
repeatedly damaged by flooding.
Buyouts help homeowners relocate to
safer areas and minimize the poten-
tial impact of future disasters on
vulnerable areas.
Wyoming County was one of the
hardest-hit flood areas of Pennsylva-
nia, with more than 3,200 homes and
businesses damaged.
HARRISBURG
Free tax prep available
State Rep. Karen Boback, R-Har-
veys Lake, is reminding residents
about a free tax preparation service
available through
the IRS Free File
Program, which
helps taxpayers who
earn $57,000 or less
annually.
The program,
instituted in 2003,
offers free assistance
with tax preparation
and online filing through a partner-
ship between the Internal Revenue
Service and the Free File Alliance, a
coalition of tax software companies.
Eligible individuals who want to
take advantage of the service may
visit www.irs.gov/freefile to find a list
of Free File Alliance member compa-
nies.
NANTICOKE
Cops seek Nanticoke man
Nanticoke police said they are
searching for Joseph A. Klesmer, 25,
who is wanted in a
home burglary on
Perry Street on Jan.
10.
Klesmer, of Mo-
sier Street, Nanti-
coke, is also accused
of possessing stolen
credit cards at the
Walmart store in
Hazle Township and a Kmart store on
Jan. 11, police said.
Anyone with information about
Klesmer is asked to call Nanticoke
police at 735-4000 or 911.
DALLAS TWP.
MacDowell on state panel
Misericordia University President
Michael A. MacDowell has been
named by Gov. Tom Corbett to a
newly created state panel that will
study how to make higher education
accessible and affordable to the stu-
dents and taxpayers of the common-
wealth.
The 29-member panel is charged
with developing a long-term strategy
for higher education related to future
demands for jobs.
Panelists are being asked to submit
their findings to the governor by Nov.
15.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Boback
Casey
Klesmer
The Hotel Sterling’s nonprofit owner
CityVest has not yet signed an agree-
ment with Luzerne County needed to al-
lowdemolitionof the downtownWilkes-
Barre landmark, raising questions about
the project’s status.
Luzerne County Interim Manager
TomPribula saidhe will discuss the mat-
ter with county coun-
cil members on Tues-
day.
CityVest representa-
tives haven’t signed
the agreement in large
part because it holds
CityVest and its volun-
teer board liable for
any damage or injury
claims that aren’t cov-
ered by CityVest’s in-
surance, county offi-
cials said.
The agreement is
designed to remove
the county from liabil-
ity during demolition
and ensure the county
acquires the more than
3-acre lot of prime land after the struc-
ture at the corner of River and Market
streets is demolished.
CityVest owes the county $6 million
loaned to preserve and market the struc-
ture, and the county has set aside anoth-
er $1millionincommunitydevelopment
funding for demolition. The nonprofit is
out of money andaskedthe county tode-
cide the building’s fate last year.
Assistant county solicitor Stephen
Menn said the county and CityVest have
“gone back and forth” with language.
County officials won’t release the docu-
ment until it’s finalized.
Menn said he is proposing language
clarification that will be “more palata-
ble” to CityVest without reducing the
county’s protection. CityVest represen-
tatives could not be reached for com-
ment Wednesday.
Pribula said he won’t support agree-
ment alterations that put the county at
risk.
“We’ve already wasted enough time
and money on that project, and we’re go-
ing to protect Luzerne County’s interest
above and beyond anybody else’s inter-
est,” he said. “I’m not political in any as-
pect of the word, and I won’t bend for
any political reasons,” he said.
If an agreement isn’t reached, Wilkes-
Barre eventually may be forced to de-
molish the city-condemned structure at
its expense. The city would then have to
put a lien on the property in an attempt
to recoup the money, though the county
wouldalsobe inline withits ownlienfor
$6 million.
Wilkes-Barre also must sign off on the
county agreement because the city has
pledged about $260,000 in local share of
gaming taxes toward demolition.
Assistant cityattorneyBill Vinskosaid
the city’s delay involves a “very minor
language adjustment” to ensure the
city’s code enforcement office keeps its
mandated power.
“We’re not going to hold this up. We
want this building down,” Vinsko said.
CityVest yet
to sign deal
on Sterling
Nonprofit objects because deal
holds group liable for damages not
covered by insurance, county says.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
If a deal
isn’t reac-
hed,
Wilkes-
Barre may
be forced
to demol-
ish the
structure
at its ex-
pense.
PLAINS TWP. – Wilkes-Barre Town-
shipFireChief JohnPaul Yuknavichmust
randomlysubmittodrugandalcohol test-
ing as part of his one-year probation sen-
tence imposedWednesday after pleading
guiltytoassaultinga man.
PlainsTownshippolicesaidYuknavich,
48, punched Kenneth Scialpi several
times inthefaceoutsidethehomeof Yuk-
navich’s ex-girlfriend, Denise Pavlick, on
Nov. 6.
In an unrelated case, Yuknavich is fac-
ingtwocounts of drunkendriving. Police
sayYuknavichhadablood-alcohol level of
0.162 percent when he was stopped after
driving past Pavlick’s residence on Nov.
27. Anadultdriverisconsideredintoxicat-
ed with a blood-alcohol level of 0.08 or
higher.
The two separate cases are before Dis-
trict JudgeDiana Malast.
In a negotiated plea deal reached be-
tween Yuknavich’s lawyer, Barry Dyller,
and Assistant District Attorney Shannon
Crake, Yuknavichpleadedguiltytosimple
assault for punching Scialpi. Charges of
terroristic threats, harassment and theft
werewithdrawn.
Thepleadeal wasreachedafter 45min-
utesof privatediscussionsinvolvingScial-
pi andPavlick.
Pavlicktoldpoliceshewas withScialpi
at a nightclub at the Woodlands Inn and
Resort andspottedYuknavich. She asked
Scialpi tofollowher andthetwosat inhis
car outsideher OakStreet residence.
Yuknavich showed up and pulled Pav-
lickfromthecar andpunchedScialpi sev-
eral times, accordingtothecriminal com-
plaint.
Scialpi andPavlicktoldpolicethat Yuk-
navich threatened to put bullets in both
John Paul Yuknavich, embattled head of Wilkes-Barre Township’s
department, must submit to random drug and alcohol testing
Fire chief given probation
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
W-B Township Fire Chief John Paul
Yuknavich arrives for a hearing on
assault charges Wednesday at the
office of District Judge Diana Malast. See CHIEF , Page 6A
UNIONTWP. – Grace Weed and Ma-
lik McDonald practiced in a corner of
Northwest Area High School Auditori-
um, he on the cello and she on the vio-
lin. They not only tuned out the din of
more than100students gatheredfor the
annual District 9 High School Orches-
tra Festival, they also tuned out each
other. Both were playing “Pomp and
Circumstance,” yet neither hadnoticed.
“I’ve been to three of these,” Weed
said of such cacophonic events, though
of course there is only one District 9 fes-
tival each year. Both were preparing for
the first phase of the three-day festival –
auditions for regional concert.
Everyone must try out, Host Director
Scott Quinnsaid, andthe event organiz-
er – the Pennsylvania Music Educators
Association – apparently prefers to get
those auditions out of the way quickly
so students can focus on rehearsal for a
Friday night concert.
Weed said she started playing when
she was 8, after her father obliged when
she requested a violin. Asked why he
picked the cello years ago, McDonald
just shrugged.
Quinn said this year’s event drewstu-
dents from 23 high schools. Typically,
the sending school districts pay the stu-
dent’s fees, and the only cost to the host
district is the use of the facilities. While
students are sometimes housed in ho-
tels, Quinn said Northwest was able to
line up enough volunteer host families
to handle the visitors.
Most students plucked violins or
warmed up on reeds and woodwinds
while sitting or standing among the
rows of seats. But that wasn’t an option
for Wyoming Valley West senior Derick
Haigh, who played “Finlandia” on his
bass while standing in the aisle of the
auditorium.
Haigh, of Plymouth, said he’s been
playing since sixth grade. Why the
bass? “I just like it,” he said, though he
also admitted he prefers ragtime and
jazz.
The musicians held their first re-
hearsal as a single orchestra Wednesday
night, and will spend most of today in
rehearsal, though there will be a break
for some non-instrument socializing in
the evening – unless bowling counts as
part of the percussion section.
They get two last rehearsals Friday
before the 7 p.m. concert, open to the
public.
During a short break, Weed looked
about and conceded “It’s a little over-
whelming,” but went right back to prac-
ticing as if alone.
Nearby, Quinn scanned the crowd
and summed it up.
“This is controlled chaos.”
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Malik McDonald, a Coughlin junior, warms up on his cello, as Grace Weed, a Coughlin freshman, warms up on her violin
Wednesday as they wait for try outs for the regional orchestra at Northwest Area High School in Union Township.
On a note of distinction
Music festival held at Northwest
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
Mark Guydish, a Times Leader staff writer,
can be reached at 829-7161
Lynn Ahmad and Pamela Zo-
tynia hope theyget tomeet Pres-
ident Barack Obama on Friday,
but the local women are thrilled
just to be meeting with top
White House and Administra-
tionofficials onissues important
tothemandthepeopletheyhelp
in Luzerne and Wyoming coun-
ties.
Representing The Arc of Lu-
zerne County, an advocacy
group for people with intellec-
tual and developmental disabili-
ties (I/DD), the womenwill join
about150other Arc leaders from
across the country at a White
House Community Leaders
Briefing.
“They will be providing brief-
ings to us on topics that are rele-
vant to people with intellectual
and developmental disabilities,
Medicaid being a major one,”
said Zotynia, executive director.
Even middle-class families
with private insurance struggle
to meet the needs of a child with
I/DDthat neither the insurance
nor Medicaid fully cover. With
more government funding cuts
everyyear, she fears the Pennsyl-
vanians with I/DD on waiting
lists – now at 16,000 – will con-
tinue to grow.
“I am also concerned that
there is no money to allow peo-
ple to leave institutional living
and come to the community.
Andwithnonewmoney, thereis
a possibility that people may be
getting readmitted to institu-
tions,” Zotynia said.
Zotynia said one of the best
waysthefederal government can
help people with I/DD in Lu-
zerne County is to enforce
Two county Arc officials to attend White House briefing
Women hope to meet Obama,
glad to have issues heard by
top administration officials.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See ARC, Page 4A
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Lynn Ahmad, left, and Pamela Zotynia, of The Arc of Luzerne
County, will attend a briefing Friday at the White House.
C M Y K

PAGE 4A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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sities, by 30 percent.
Corbett did not propose cut-
ting the appropriation to another
state-related institution, Lincoln
University, this coming year. The
latest reductions would be on top
of 19-percent cuts last year. Those
decreases contributed to affected
schools increasing tuition be-
tween 5 and 10 percent.
Penn State hiked tuition 3.5
percent, or about $900, for out-of-
state freshmen and sophomores
attending the main campus, to
about $27,200 a year. Tuition at
satellite campuses, including
Penn State Hazleton, Wilkes-
Barre and Worthington Scran-
ton, went up 2.9 percent for both
in-state andout-of-state students.
“It’s certainly disheartening to
hear that such a massive cut has
been proposed for our institu-
tions, and obviously, any cut will
have an impact on the university
and our campus; however, at this
point it is tooearlytospeculateas
to what those impacts will be,”
said Amy Gruzesky, a Penn State
Worthington Scranton spokes-
woman.
Both Gary Lawler, chancellor
at Penn State Hazleton, and
Charlie Davis, the chancellor of
Penn State Wilkes-Barre, said the
proposed budget is just a starting
point.
“At this point we can’t specu-
late on what the final plan will
look like or what our response to
that will be,” Davis said.
The governor’s higher-educa-
tion appropriations, under the
proposal, would include:
• $163.5 million for Penn
State, representing a 28 percent
cut.
• $95.2 million for the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, a 30 percent
cut.
• $97.9 million for Temple
University, a 30 percent cut.
• $330.2 million for the 14
state-owned universities in the
State System of Higher Educa-
tion, a 20 percent cut.
• $221.9 million for communi-
ty colleges, including Luzerne
County Community College, a 4
percent decrease.
•$395.7millioninfinancial as-
sistance for college students
through the Pennsylvania Higher
EducationAssistance Agency, a 6
percent decrease.
The governor also announced
the creationof a panel toexamine
higher-education funding.
“We need to open the discus-
sion about how best to finance
higher educationinthis state. We
need to have a thorough, public
and candid conversation about
how best to deal with the spiral-
ing costs and our own obliga-
tions.”
He said the panel will “study
our systemand make recommen-
dations on how our universities
can best serve the students and
citizens of this new century.”
The task force will be headed
by Rob Wonderling, a former
state senator and current head of
the Greater Philadelphia Cham-
ber of Commerce. Corbett said
the group must report back to
him by Nov. 15.
The Associated Press contrib-
uted to this story.
BUDGET
Continued from Page 1A
the Olmstead Decision – a 1999
Supreme Court ruling that
states must put plans in place to
enable people to leave institu-
tional living and “come back to
the communities of their
choice.”
“The state of Pennsylvania re-
ally does not have an Olmstead
Plan in place,” she said.
Board President Ahmad
would like to see the feds pro-
vide more funding to states for
people with I/DD “so our wait-
ing lists could begin decreasing
instead of increasing.”
Zotynia said the Washington
visit is an exciting opportunity
to make a difference.
“This is the first time that
we’ve been invited in by … the
president, really, to have this
conversation. So we’re thrilled
that theyfeel TheArcis inaposi-
tion to help the government
with making these decisions.
Lynn and I are just very honored
that we were selected,” she said.
Ahmad said the approximate-
ly six hours of discussions will
provide “a lot of opportunity for
ideas to be passed and informa-
tion to be shared. … We’re not
the only ones looking for infor-
mation. I think they’re looking
for feedback … as to what the
needs are and how they can be
filled.”
ARC
Continued from Page 3A
KINGSTON – Wyoming Valley
West School District Finance
Manager Joseph Rodriguez ex-
plained a recent public notice an-
nouncing the district intends to
apply for an exemption from the
state that would allow it to raise
property taxes by a greater per-
centage than the law allows.
Rodriguez said after the school
board’s monthly meeting Wednes-
day that the board applied for an
exception to cover $480,000 in re-
tirement funds.
“It’s a precautionary measure. It
doesn’t mean that we are raising
taxes,” he said. “We’re in the early
stages of the budget process and
we’re goingtotrytoreduce expen-
ditures and seek more resources
for revenue.”
He said the school district can
raise taxes up to 2.4 percent of the
current rate. The exemption
would allow taxes to be raised up
to 4.15 percent of the current rate
of 13.5 mills. A mill is $1 in tax on
every $1,000 of assessed property
value.
He said the highest increase
would work out to be about a 0.5
mill increase in taxes.
“This is not saying we’re going
to go that high,” Rodriguez said.
The board last year unanimous-
lyapproveda$59.6millionbudget
that raised property taxes about 6
percent and used a wide range of
spending cuts to save more than
$2 million. Property taxes in-
creased to 13.5 mills from 12.7
mills.
In other business:
•Thedistrict is seekingbids for
medical and dental insurance, pa-
per andgeneral supplies andphys-
ical education. The bids will be
opened on March13 at 11 a.m.
• The board approved long-
term status for the following sub-
stitute teachers: Christine Carl-
son, Tiffany Swaboski, Charles R.
SupponJr., RandyShoemaker and
Tiffany Kuzma.
•The board accepted the resig-
nation of Steven Modrow as boys
assistant track coach and Michael
Munzing as junior high girls track
coach, effective immediately.
• Amy Walsh was appointed
boys assistant track coach.
• The board approved a procla-
mation making Feb. 12, 2012 Do-
rothy Turner Day in the district.
WVW begins budget process, eyes potential tax hike
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
The school board’s next meeting is
March 14 at 7 p.m.
W H AT ’ S N E X T ?
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 5A
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
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SOFIA, BULGARIA
Danube shipping frozen
A
t least four Balkan nations suspend-
ed shipping on the Danube River
because of severe frost and the vast
amount of ice blocking the heavily
traveled waterway.
Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Ser-
bia made the decision because up to 90
percent of the river’s surface is covered
with floating ice, authorities said
Wednesday. It is Europe’s main com-
mercial waterway.
Europe has been battling a deep
freeze that has killed hundreds, snow
that has trapped thousands in Balkan
mountain villages and prompted wor-
ries of flooding as heavy snow melts. In
Greece and Bulgaria, flooding on Mon-
day and Tuesday left dozens of homes
under water and at least eight dead.
JERUSALEM
Israel talks peace to Iran
Israel’s president reached out to the
Iranian people with a message of peace
Wednesday, as the West tightened
sanctions over Iran’s nuclear program.
Shimon Peres, an elder statesmen
who is a Nobel Peace laureate, ap-
pealed to the people of Iran to look
beyond the current crisis.
Speaking at a ceremony marking the
63rd anniversary of the founding of
Israel’s parliament, Peres directed his
remarks to the people of Iran.
“We were not born enemies and
there is no need to live as enemies. Do
not allow the flags of hostility to cast a
dark shadow over your historic heri-
tage,” Peres said. “Your people are a
sensitive people that aspire for friend-
ship and peace, and not for conflicts
and wars.”
CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
New way to get caffeine
Move over, coffee and Red Bull. A
Harvard professor thinks the next big
thing will be people inhaling their
caffeine from a lipstick-sized tube.
Critics say the novel product is not
without its risks.
The product, called AeroShot, went
on the market late last month in Mas-
sachusetts and New York. A single unit
costs $2.99 at convenience, mom-and-
pop, liquor and online stores.
Biomedical engineering professor
David Edwards said AeroShot is safe
and does not contain common addi-
tives, like taurine, used to amplify the
caffeine effect in common energy
drinks. Each grey-and-yellow plastic
canister contains 100 milligrams of
caffeine powder, about the amount in a
large cup of coffee, plus B vitamins.
But Democratic U.S. Sen. Charles
Schumer of New York wants the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration to re-
view AeroShot, saying he fears it will
be used as a club drug so that young
people can drink until they drop.
OLYMPIA, WASH.
House OKs gay marriage
Washington state lawmakers voted
to approve gay marriage Wednesday,
setting the stage for the state to be-
come the seventh in the nation to allow
same-sex couples to wed.
The action comes a day after a feder-
al appeals court declared California’s
ban on gay marriage unconstitutional,
saying it was a violation of the civil
rights of gay and lesbian couples.
The Washington House passed the
bill on a 55-43 vote. The state Senate
approved the measure last week. And
Democratic Gov. Chris Gregoire is
expected to sign the measure into law
next week.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Wishing Shrek was backing him up?
A riot policeman wipes his brow
Wednesday in front of a mural of the
animated film characters Shrek during
a demonstration against the Conga
gold and silver mining project in Hua-
cho, Peru. Demonstrators say they
fear the Conga mine will taint their
water and affect a major aquifer.
BEIRUT — The European
Union will impose harsher
sanctions on Syria, a senior EU
official said Wednesday, as Rus-
sia tried to broker talks be-
tween the vice president and
the opposition to calm vio-
lence. Activists reported at
least 50 killed in the regime’s
siege of the restive city of
Homs.
Russia, a close ally of Syria,
and the West are pushing down
starkly different paths in trying
to deal with Syria’s nearly 11
months of bloodshed. After
blockinga WesternandArabat-
tempt tobringU.N. pressure on
President Bashar Assad to step
down, Russia has launched a
bid to show it can resolve the
turmoil.
Moscow is calling for a com-
bination of reforms by the re-
gime andnegotiations, without
calling for Assad to go. Its pro-
visions are so far finding no
traction with the opposition,
whichdismisses promises of re-
formas empty gestures, refuses
any negotiations while vio-
lence continues and says As-
sad’s removal is the only option
in the crisis.
Russian Prime Minister Vla-
dimir Putin said outside forces
should let Syrians settle their
conflict “independently.”
“We should not act like a bull
in a china shop,” Putin said, ac-
cording to the ITAR-TASS
news agency. “We have to give
people a chance to make deci-
sions about their destiny inde-
pendently, to help, to give ad-
vice, to put limits somewhere
so that the opposing sides
would not have a chance to use
arms, but not to interfere.”
Russian Foreign Minister
Sergey Lavrov, who met with
Assad Tuesday in Damascus,
told reporters in Moscow that
the Syrian president delegated
to his vice president, Farouk al-
Sharaa, responsibility for hold-
ing a dialogue with the opposi-
tion.
Lavrov blamed both Assad’s
regime and opposition forces
for instigating the violence,
which the U.N. says has killed
well over 5,400 people.
Rebel soldiers are playing a
bigger role in Syria’s Arab-
Spring inspired uprising, turn-
ing it into a more militarized
conflict and pushing the coun-
try toward a civil war.
New Syria sanctions threatened
Russia and the West are
pushing different paths to
find way to end bloodshed.
By BASSEMMROUE
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
An injured rebel fighter is carried into a local hospital Wednes-
day after an exchange of fire with army troops in Idlib, Syria.
WASHINGTON — Resurgent
Rick Santorum said his sweep of
three GOP contests earned his
shoestring campaign $250,000
overnight, cash he needs to take
his upstart bid for the Republican
presidential nomination to Mitt
Romney’s turf.
Santorum’s stunning victories
Tuesday in Minnesota, Missouri
and Colorado
marked his best
performance
thus far in the
rollicking con-
test for the Re-
publican presi-
dential nomina-
tion — and
Romney’s
worst. Thebetter-fundedandorga-
nized former Massachusetts gov-
ernor shrugged off his poor show-
ing, but his losses werestingingre-
minders of a stubborn weakness:
Romney’s inabilitytoappeal tothe
conservatives at the base of the
party.
It was far from clear, though,
that Santorum would be able to
turn his momentum into the mil-
lions of dollars he would need to
overtakeRomney. But inthehours
after his victory, Santorum said
he’s finally being heard and sup-
ported by conservatives who want
a clear contrast to President Ba-
rack Obama.
“I think last night we raised a
quarter of amilliondollarsonline,”
Santorum told CNN’s “Starting
Point” the morning after. “We are
going to have the money we need
tomakethecasewewanttomake.”
And to take the fight to Rom-
ney’s virtual home states. On
MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” Santo-
rum said he’d debate Romney in
Arizona, home of a sizable Mor-
mon population. .
The developments shifted the
Republican political narrative just
as Romneyhadaggressivelycourt-
ed conservatives and they had be-
guntoembracehiminthefirststep
toward what many Republicans
hoped would be a swift end to the
nomination fight.
Instead, Santorum thrived and
relegated House Speaker Newt
Gingrich, another contender for
theconservativevote, totherearof
the results Tuesday with Texas
Rep. Ron Paul.
Santorum
rakes in
$250,000
after wins
Tuesday’s sweep a reminder of
Romney’s inability to appeal
to party’s conservative base.
By LAURIE KELLMAN
Associated Press
Santorum
LOS ANGELES — Investigators said
Wednesday they have found 200 addi-
tional photos theybelieveweretakenbya
former teacher who is accused of com-
mitting lewd acts on 23 children over a
five-year period.
The photos were found late last week
at the same pharmacy where a photo lab
technician had first noticed odd pictures
that led to Mark Berndt’s arrest, said
sheriff’s Lt. Carlos Marquez. The recent
discovery brings the total number of pho-
tos to roughly 600.
Many of the photos involve children al-
ready identified by authorities, but there
may be other potential victims, Marquez
said.
Berndt has been charged with lewd
acts on children between 2005 and 2010.
Some of the photos showchildren ages 6
to10 blindfolded, their mouths tapedand
beingfedamilky, whiteliquidauthorities
believe was semen. The new batch of
photos depicts similar poses, Marquez
said.
Berndt taught at Miramonte Elemen-
tary School, where all 120 staff members
were replaced this week amid outrage
from parents.
The furor led two parents to come for-
ward Thursday to complain that teacher
Martin Springer, who had worked at the
school for 26 years, fondled two second-
grade girls in his classroom.
Springer, 49, pleaded not guilty Tues-
day after he was charged with commit-
ting lewd acts upon one girl in 2009. Bail
was set at $300,000.
Police have set forth no connection be-
tween the cases, but parents’ confidence
has been badly shaken.
Meanwhile, the mother of an 11-year-
oldboy toldthe Los Angeles Times that a
teacher’s aide, a woman the mother said
appeared to be in her 50s, sent at least
three letters to her son in 2009, including
one that said: “When you get close to me,
even if you give me the chills, I like that.
Don’t tell nobody about this!”
Two teachers charged with commiting lewd acts on children, school
district replaces elementary school staff amid parents’ outrage
AP PHOTO
Student Stephanie Perez, left, reacts, as she demands to keep her teacher. She is with her friend Ruby Garduno as some
parents gather to show support for teachers Wednesday outside the Miramonte Elementary School in Los Angeles.
200 more abuse photos found
By CHRISTINA HOAG
Associated Press
SEATTLE — A 911 record-
ing reveals a social worker’s
urgent attempts over more
than six minutes to get a dis-
patcher to send deputies after
Josh Powell locked himself
and his two sons in his home.
The social worker tried re-
peatedly to relay the gravity of
what was going on. Josh Po-
well was scheduled for a su-
pervised visit with his sons
Sunday, but he slammed the
door in her face —then used a
hatchet on his sons and
torched the building in a gas-
fueled inferno. All three were
killed.
In the first minutes of the
911 call, the woman laid out
the situation.
“Something really weird
has happened. The kids went
into the house and the parent
— the biological parent —
whose name is Josh Powell
will not let me in the door.
What should I do? ... I could
hear one of the kids crying,
and he still wouldn’t let me
in.”
The social worker told the
dispatcher she “was one step
in back of (the boys). He shut
the door right in my face.”
At one point the dispatcher
asked the social worker what
address she was at. The social
worker didn’t know and need-
ed to look for it. It took her
about 1
1
⁄2 minutes to find it in
her car. At one point she asks,
“You can’t find me by GPS?”
While she’s still looking for
the address she says, “But I
think I need help right away.”
After six minutes on the
call, a dispatcher says: “We’ll
have somebody look for you
there.”
“OK, how long will it be?”
the woman asks.
“I don’t know, ma’am. We
have to respond to emergency
life-threatening situations
first. The first available depu-
ty ...”
The woman responded:
“This could be life-threaten-
ing ... I’m afraid for their
lives.”
Pierce County Sheriff’s De-
tective Ed Troyer said
Wednesday that his depart-
ment is still waiting to receive
a copy of the “call-and-dis-
patch” log fromthe 911 center
to see exactly how long it
took for deputies to respond.
Thecenter didnot immediate-
ly respond to a public records
request from The Associated
Press for the document.
However, Troyer said the
sheriff’s department is dis-
pleased with the dispatcher’s
etiquette because he left the
social worker with the impres-
sion that no help was immedi-
ately on the way.
After the home erupted in
flames, the woman screamed
in a separate call: “He explod-
ed the house!”
Case worker made frantic 911 call at Powell home
By MIKE BAKER
and GENE JOHNSON
Associated Press
Braden Powell Charlie Powell
C M Y K
PAGE 6A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
7
3
7
9
2
8
their heads.
Malast sentencedYuknavichto
one-year probation, pay restitu-
tion to Scialpi, undergo mental
health and drug and alcohol eval-
uations and submit to random
drug and alcohol testing. Also,
Yuknavich was ordered not to
have any contact withScialpi and
Pavlick.
In the DUI case, officer Daniel
Lewis testified he responded to
Pavlick’sresidenceonareportof a
PFAviolation on Nov. 27.
At the time, Pavlick had a tem-
poraryPFAorder against Yuknav-
ich, who was found not guilty of
violating after a hearing on Dec.
13.
Lewis said he spotted a vehicle
in the area driving in the middle
of Cleveland Street. The vehicle,
allegedly driven by Yuknavich,
stopped in Wilkes-Barre.
Lewis and Officer Michael
Smith testified Yuknavich
showed signs of intoxication and
wasnotinaconditiontosafelyop-
erate a vehicle. A blood-alcohol
test at Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital allegedlyshowedYuknavich
had a level of .162 percent, Smith
said.
Malast determined Crake es-
tablished a case against Yuknav-
ich, sendingtwocountsof driving
under the influence and a traffic
offense of careless driving to
county court.
Yuknavich is scheduled for a
preliminary hearing on Feb. 22
before Malast oncharges he stole
$11,865 from the fire department
he oversees, and used the depart-
ment’s credit card for Sam’s Club
in the amount of $3,706 for per-
sonal use.
CHIEF
Continued from Page 3A
FORTY FORT -- Maybe Tahbo
should have been escorted in on
foot; an African black-footed pen-
guin waddling into a class of pre-
kindergarten students certainly
would have been cute. But
Wyoming Seminary student Bil-
ly Bartolomei provided plenty of
that, waddling toward the table
Tahbo stood on once released
from his pet taxi.
Clearly impressed by the vis-
iting little dignitary, Bartolomei
tugged the pant leg of Amanda
Anastasio, but the Lehigh Valley
Zoo intern didn’t seem to notice
as she spoke to a rapt crowd of 3-
and 4-year-olds. Holding up her
hand and making a small circle
with finger and thumb she asked
“howmany feathers do you think
are in this little circle?”
“10 … 20 ... 100 …” the tykes
shouted, eventually hitting on 70
– the right number.
“I was going to say 70!” Bran-
don Scotto D’Abusco insisted.
Anastasio explained the black
backs of penguins make them
hard to see in the water from
above while the white stomachs
make them blend in with the sky
when viewed from below.
“No predators will see her
there,” D’Abusco said, suddenly
sprawling onto the floor and
waving a hand under the table
supporting Tahbo, “or under this
table!”
The inquisitive youngsters
couldn’t touch Tahbo because
she likes to nip at fingers, but
that didn’t seem to detract from
the glee of seeing a creature na-
tive to another continent and
hemisphere. The students study
penguins (among other animals)
each year, and teacher Natalie
Granger had trained them well.
“Do they do the marriage
dance?” one girl asked, learning
that African penguins mate by
call – and by shaking heads at
each other when they are really
interested.
Because they live in a warmer
climate than the more famous
emperor penguins of Antarctica,
they “make their nests out of
rock and something that’s kind
of gross,” Anastasio said, asking
if the students knew what that
was.
“Guano!” one shouted without
hesitation.
Tahbo eventually went back
into the pet taxi so the children
could try some simple examples
of environmentalism, including
dipping a feather into oil, run-
ning it through a bowl of deter-
gent and water, and rinsing it in
another bowl, to show how hard
it is to clean a bird stained by a
spill.
Granger declared the event a
success. Asked if she will do it
again, she grinned broadly.
“Absolutely!”
So count on it: An annual pre-
kindergarten white tie and tail
gala.
Tahbo, an African black-footed penguin from the Lehigh Valley Zoo,
visited a class of pre-kindergarten students at Wyoming Seminary
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
The pre-kindergarten class at Wyoming Seminary Lower School in Forty Fort got a visit on Wednesday morning from Tahbo, a 4-year-
old African, black footed penguin from the Lehigh Valley Zoo. Teacher Natalie Granger arranged the bird’s visit.
Waddling and learning
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
JENKINS TWP. – WVIA, the
region’s public broadcasting
station, received a gift recently
that may be the first of its kind.
WVIA is operating and ma-
naging a jazz record company –
Chiaroscuro Records – that was
donated to the station by long-
time WVIA trustee, regional
businessman and philanthro-
pist Andrew Sordoni, for the
purposes of preservation, edu-
cation and entertainment.
“To the best of our knowl-
edge nobodyinour industryhas
ever received a gift like this,”
said Bill Kelly, president and
chief executive officer of WVIA
Public Media. “We are very
grateful toAndySordoni –a life-
long advocate of public broad-
casting in Northeastern Penn-
sylvania.”
Kelly said some of the world’s
most venerated mainstream
jazz artists have recorded for
Chiaroscuro Records.
“This gift was given for the
dual purposes of preserving the
music and the sharing of the
music with the public,” Sordoni
said. “The digital format allows
us to save the music forever and
the modernelectronics allowus
to share it worldwide at no cost
to the listener.”
Sordoni said the stewardship
of Chiaroscuro by WVIA is “un-
precedented.” He said he hopes
it will inspire other similar gifts.
Sordoni explains how and
why he became part of Chiaros-
curo in a special WVIA-TV
“State of Pennsylvania” inter-
view. That is scheduled to air
tonight at 7 p.m., Friday at 7
p.m. and on Sunday at 1 p.m.
Kelly said Chiaroscuro Re-
cords will be broadcast interna-
tionally via a new digital radio
frequency devoted solely to the
Chiaroscuro library.
“Researchof other worldwide
webmusic services ledWVIAto
realize how discriminating lis-
teners around the world might
be attracted to the format and
purchase or download an al-
bum,” Kelly said. “Our ultimate
goal is to sell CDs.”
WVIA given jazz record label
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
To hear WVIA’s Chiaroscuro Chan-
nel anywhere in the world go to
wvia.org and click on the banner.
G E T T H E B E AT
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 7A
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HARRISBURG — A Democrat-
ic state lawmaker who has been
convicted on corruption charges
said Wednesday he will followtra-
dition and step down from the
House of Representatives whenhe
is sentenced, but that he hopes to
delay the proceedingsohe canrun
for re-election.
“The state constitution requires
that, upon sentencing, I would re-
linquish my seat and I certainly
will behave in this honored cham-
ber, as I always have,” Rep. Bill De-
Weese said in a telephone inter-
view.
ADauphin County jury convict-
ed DeWeese on Monday of five of
thesixcounts against him—three
counts of theft and one count each
of conspiracy and conflict of inter-
est. The charges stemmedfromal-
legations that he used legislative
employees and other public re-
sources for political campaign
work.
The longtime House Democrat-
ic leader is currently scheduled to
be sentenced on April 24 — pri-
mary election
day. He said he
plans to file his
nomination pet-
itions by Tues-
day’s deadline
and to seek a
postponement
of the proceed-
ing until after the Nov. 6 general
election so he can remain in the
Legislature and campaign for re-
election.
“If I were to exit the stage in
April, having been re-nominated
and benefiting from my name be-
ing on the November ballot, I
would certainly hope that the ap-
propriate (courts) would give
prompt and fair hearing to our ap-
peals and that, if and when vindi-
cated, I could return to the hall of
the House,” he said.
DeWeese, 61, from Greene
County, said it was premature to
speculateabout whether hewill be
forced to step down in April but
that he would do so without “any
personal passions or pyrotechnics
on the floor of the House of Repre-
sentatives ….”
DeWeese eyes re-election,
to resign when sentenced
By PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
DeWeese
HARRISBURG — Gov. Tom
Corbett is expected to sign a
sweeping bill that would force
Pennsylvania’s booming natural
gas industry to help pay for a
wide range of state andlocal gov-
ernment programs, toughen
safety standards and limit the
ability of local officials to keep
drilling out of their towns.
The state House voted 101-90
on Wednesday after two days of
debateona bill that has beensev-
eral years in the making. The
Senate passed it Tuesday. Cor-
bett negotiated the bill with Re-
publican legislative leaders.
Democrats weren’t included
in negotiations and were strong-
ly critical of the bill.
Republicans said the bill is a
balance between a range of com-
peting interests, and rejecting it
would simply force Pennsylva-
nians to wait longer to update
decades-old, out-of-date laws.
Voting on the bill fell along
party lines, with 10 Republicans
voting against the bill and only
two Democrats voting for it.
Of House legislators repre-
senting Luzerne County, only
Republicans Karen Boback, Har-
veys Lake, and Tarah Toohil,
Butler Township, voted in favor.
Boback said the bill “breaks
the gridlock and moves us to-
ward a resolution.”
“While not perfect, it is a start
… ,” she said. Rep. Phyllis Mun-
dy, D-Kingston, by contrast,
calledthe bill “a missedopportu-
nity to do this right.”
Rep. Eddie Day Pashinski, D-
Wilkes-Barre, criticized the fee
rate as inadequately low.
“The bill is a gift to the indus-
try which will make billions of
dollars in profits from our natu-
ral resources and the people of
Pennsylvania will get pennies in
return,” Pashinski said.
The fee could be paid on all
wells, and the total amount
would rise in ensuing years as
more wells are drilled, tallying
$180 million for 2011 and more
than $1 billion over the first five
years, according to Republicans.
Times Leader reporter Matt
Hughes contributed to this sto-
ry.
State lawmakers send gas drill fee bill to Gov. Corbett
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
K
PAGE 8A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
Funeral Lunches
starting at $
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www.omarscastleinn.com • 675-0804
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825.6477
JOSHUAFOGARTY
We all want to wish you a Happy Birthday.
Here’s your Hugs and Kisses XX00XXX00
Today you would have turned
Thirty-Two years old.
But you’d still be teasing Kristina for
turningThirty.
Happy 32nd,We Love and MissYou
Daddy, Sean, Kristina, Lance, Kyle,
Aunt Megan, and Everyone Else.
FromUncle Josh: Thanks kids for my
Beautiful Christmas Decorations. Love You.
ANNA M. MIGNONE, 74,
passed away Tuesday, January 17,
2012. Anna was married to Frank
on May 4, 1957 and lived in Brook-
lyn until moving to Mountain Top
in1970. AnnaandFrankcelebrated
their 54th anniversary on May
2011.
Aprayer service will be heldto
remember Anna at 2 p.m. on Sun-
day, February 19, in St. Jude’s
school cafeteria, Mountain Top.
Memorial contributions may be
sent to the American Cancer So-
ciety, the AmericanDiabetes Asso-
ciation, or St. Jude’s Church,
Mountain Top, Building Fund.
JOHN BELAUS, 74, of Bing-
hamton, N.Y., passed away sud-
denly at home on Saturday, Janu-
ary 28, 2012. John was born on
June 30, 1938 in the Hudson sec-
tion of Plains Township, to his late
parents, AndrewBelaus and Helen
Guresh Belaus. Surviving him are
his wife, Mary; sons, Michael and
Randy, Fla.; Mark, Pottsville, Pa;
daughter, Cindy, Fla.; step-chil-
dren, Patti Decker, Ed and Scott
Reuscher; sister, Connie Padrezas
and husband Tom, Jenkins Town-
ship; brother, Andrew, and wife
Karen Belaus, Peculiar, Mo.; aunt,
Janet Liput, Elmwood Park, N.J.;
two nephews; 12 grandchildren;
and two great-grandchildren. John
was a graduate of Jenkins Town-
ship High School, class of 1956.
Afuneral was held in Bingham-
ton, N.Y., on February 2.
FREDERICK (RICK) GAL-
LAGHER, of Plains Township,
passed away unexpectedly, Thurs-
day, February 2, 2012 at home.
Born in Plains Township, on De-
cember 21, 1948, he was a son of
the late James and Regina Schu-
macher Gallagher. He attended
Plains Township High School, and
served in the U.S. Army, Airborn
Paratrooper unit stationed at Fort
Carson, Colo. He was previously
employed at the International Col-
or andPrinting andTobyhanna Ar-
myDepot. Ricklovedthe outdoors
andas ayoungmanheenjoyedsky-
diving, hunting, and swimming at
Valley Dam. He will be greatly mis-
sed by his brothers, Jim, Patrick,
Michael, Kevin, and Sean; sisters,
KarenOstopick, MaureenGallagh-
er; several nieces and nephews.
Memorial service will be Fri-
day at 9 a.m. in St. Peter’s and
Paul’s Church, Plains Township.
Visitation will begin at 8:30 a.m.
JAMES J. SPACE, 47, of Price
Street, Kingston, passed away on
Tuesday, February 7, 2012, at
Mountain City Nursing &Rehabil-
itation, Hazle Township.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe George A. Strish
Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N. Main
St., Ashley.
BATIUK – Leonard, funeral 10:30
a.m. Friday in the S.J. Grontkow-
ski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main
St., Plymouth. Mass of Christian
Burial at 11a.m. in St. Robert
Bellarmine parish, the former St.
Aloyisius Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 9 a.m. until
funeral time at 10:30 a.m. Friday.
CHUNG – Dr. Hiyoung, funeral 9
a.m. Friday in the Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parish St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:45 a.m. in St. Anthony
of Padua Church (St. Barbara’s
Parish), Exeter. Friends may call 4
to 7 p.m. today in the funeral
home.
CONWAY – Joan, celebration of life
10:30 a.m. today in McLaughlin’s –
The Family Funeral Service, 142 S.
Washington St., Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. in the
Church of St. Aloysius, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call 9 to 10:30
a.m.
HOGAN – John, funeral 9 a.m.
Friday in the Kielty-Moran Funeral
Home Inc., 87 Washington Ave.,
Plymouth. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in All Saints
Parish, Willow Street, Plymouth.
Family and friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. today in the funeral home.
HORNICK - Marie, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Friday in the Louis V. Ciuccio
Funeral Home, 145 Moosic Road,
Old Forge. Mass 10 a.m. at the
Prince of Peace Parish - St. Ma-
ry’s Church, W. Grace and Law-
rence Sts., Old Forge. Friends may
call 6 to 8 p.m. today.
KILLIAN – Rodger, funeral 11 a.m.
today in Heller Funeral Home,
633 E. Third St., Nescopeck.
Friends may call 10 a.m. until time
of service today in the funeral
home.
KOYTEK – Mary, funeral 9 a.m.
today in Kiesinger Funeral Ser-
vices Inc., 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. at Holy Rosary
Church, 127 Stephenson St.,
Duryea.
KUPINEWICZ – Helen, Memorial
Mass 10 a.m. Friday in St. Faustina
Parish, primary site, Nanticoke.
MARIANI – Rita, funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Graziano Funeral
Home Inc., Pittston Township.
Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. today in St. Barbara’s Parish
(St. Cecelia’s R.C. Church) Exeter.
MEEKER – Patricia, memorial
service 11 a.m. Saturday in the
Town Hill United Methodist
Church. Luncheon served for
family and friends at the church
following the services.
MIGNONE – Anna, prayer service 2
p.m. Sunday, February 19, in St.
Jude’s school cafeteria, Mountain
Top.
OLIVER – Peter, friends and family
may visit 5 to 7 p.m. today in the
Lehman Family Funeral Service
Inc., 689 Hazle Ave, Wilkes-Barre.
ORLOSKI – Debbie, funeral 9:15 a.m.
Friday in the McCune Funeral
Home, 80 S. Mountain Blvd.,
Mountain Top. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. at St. Jude
Church, Mountain Top. Friends
may call 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9
p.m. today in the funeral home.
PETRILLO – Lucy, funeral 9 a.m.
today in the Nat & Gawlas Funeral
Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. in St. Nicholas Church,
Wilkes-Barre.
SANTORO – Maria, funeral 10:30
a.m. today in the Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Mass of
Christian Burial at 11 a.m. in the
main site of St. Faustina’s Parish,
520 S. Hanover St., Nanticoke.
RAMSEY – Marie, Mass of Christian
Burial 11:30 a.m. today in St.
Nicholas Church, 226 S. Washing-
ton St., Wilkes-Barre.
SHOEMAKER – Stefana, funeral
9:30 a.m. Friday in the Kiesinger
Funeral Services, 255 McAlpine St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial at
10 a.m. in Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Dupont. Friends may call 5
to 7 p.m. today.
SKOVRONSKY – Otto, funeral 11 a.m.
Saturday in the Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga St.,
Tunkhannock. Friends may call at
the funeral home 9 a.m. until the
time of service.
SMITHONIC – Louise, funeral 9:30
a.m. Friday in Kiesinger Funeral
Services, 255 McAlpine St., Du-
ryea. Mass of Christian Burial at 10
a.m. in Sacred Heart Of Jesus
Church, Dupont. Friends may call 5
to 7 p.m. today.
TURRELL – G. Henry Jr., funeral 9
a.m. Saturday in the P. Dean
Homer Funeral Home, 1 Grovedale
Lane, Wyalusing. Friends may call
5 to 7 p.m. Friday at the funeral
home.
WASSIL – Theresa, funeral 9:15 a.m.
Saturday in the Metcalfe and
Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy
Redeemer Church of Corpus Cristi
Parish, Harding. Friends may call
Friday 4 to 8 p.m. in the funeral
home.
ZEEDOCK – Robert, blessing service
noon Friday in the Stanley S.
Stegura Funeral Home Inc., 614 S.
Hanover St., Nanticoke. Friends
may call 10 a.m. until the time of
service Friday.
FUNERALS
C
lement L. Lukaszewski, 82, of
North Main Street, Ashley, and
formerly of Nanticoke, died Tues-
day, February 7, 2012, in his home.
He was born in Mocanaqua on
March 2, 1929. He was a son of the
late Stephen and Helen (Szcepan-
ski) Lukaszewski.
Clem was a graduate of Nanti-
coke High School, class of 1947.
Hewas employedbyFortuneFab-
rics, Swoyersville; I.G.A. Food
Mart, Nanticoke; Basic Bagels,
Kingston; and WalMart, Wilkes-
Barre Township.
Clem enjoyed polka dancing at
WVIAand many other towns. He al-
so enjoyed going to Resorts Casino
in Atlantic City, N.J., via Auto Bus.
His greatest joy was spending
time with his family at numerous
family functions.
Clemwas a member of St. Fausti-
na Kowalska Parish, Nanticoke. He
was very active in the church’s Holy
Name Society and its Ushers Club.
Preceding him in death are his
wife, the former Theresa Stacho-
wiak; brothers, John, Frank, Ches-
ter and Joseph; sisters, Anna Mosca
and Stacia Azzara.
Surviving is his son, Clem E. Lu-
kaszewski and his wife Meg of Nan-
ticoke; daughter, Theresa and her
husband, Stanley Kulakowski, Bear
Creek; grandchildren, Sarah Wil-
liams, M.D. and her husband Craig,
Maryland; Nick Kulakowski and his
wife, Ashley, New Hampshire; Jus-
tin and Joshua Lukaszewski, Nanti-
coke; great-grandson, Tyler Rhys
Williams, M.D.; sisters, Phyliss Cok-
er, N.Y.; Mary Czapla, Alden; broth-
er, Daniel and his wife, Maria, Mas-
sachusetts; numerous nieces and
nephews. Also surviving him is
friend and loving companion, Kath-
erine Stack, Ashley.
Funeral services for Clem will
be held on Saturday at 9:15 a.m. in
the George A. Strish Inc. Funeral
Home, 105 N. Main St., Ashley, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m.
in St. Faustina Kowalska Parish,
Main Site, South Hanover St., Nan-
ticoke. Interment will be heldinHo-
ly Trinity Cemetery, Sheatown.
Family and friends may call on Fri-
day evening from 5 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of flowers and Mass cards,
Clem requests donations be made
to the charity of the donors choice,
in his memory.
Clement L. Lukaszewski
February 7, 2012
J
ames W. “Jim” O’Malley, 78, of
Avoca, passed away unexpected-
ly Sunday, February 5, 2012, in Boca
Raton Regional Hospital, Fla.
Jim was born on September 21,
1933, in Avoca, to the late, James
and Arlene (Gabello) O’Malley.
He was a graduate of Avoca High
School and the University of Scran-
ton, and attended the U.S. Coast
Guard Academy in New London,
Conn.
Jim was a dedicated and active
member of his community. He
served on the board of the Lacka-
wanna Valley Sanitary Authority,
the Avoca Borough Council, the Jol-
ly Boys Association, the Ancient Or-
der of Hibernians andtheKnights of
Columbus. He also coached St. Ma-
ry’s boys basketball team.
In the 1950s, Jim and Tess pur-
chased the train station located at
501 Main St., in Avoca, one of only
three remaining in the area, for
Main Pool and Chemical, a business
that was originally started by his fa-
ther in 1930.
The station, which he preserved
and beautifully renovated, is now
home to Main Pool &Chemical Co.
Inc., which Jim expanded with the
help of his son, Tom.
Jimtruly cherishedthe friends he
made throughout his lifetime. He
was admired for his generosity, and
he was passionate about making a
difference in the lives of others.
Local politicians, businessmen,
neighbors and friends would fre-
quently visit him at his Main Street
business to enjoy his company and
conversation, and to tap into his ex-
tensive knowledge about topics
ranging from history to sports.
Duringthe past several years, Jim
was semi-retiredandenjoyedspend-
ing time visiting his family and trav-
eling with his wife.
He is survived by his wife, There-
sa “Tess” (McGrail) O’Malley; his
five children, Eileen and her hus-
band, AlIudicello, of McLean Va.;
Erin and son-in-law, Matt Ross, Bos-
ton, Mass.; Terri O’Malley, Dow-
ningtown; Jim O’Malley and his
wife, Trish, McLean, Va.; and Tom
O’Malley, Avoca; sister, Rose Ann
Drummond, and family of Spring-
field, Pa. Hewill bedearlymissedby
his loving grandchildren, Kelly Ann
Gilmore, Esquire, of Washington,
D.C.; James and Connor O’Malley,
McLean, Va.; uncle, William Gabel-
lo, Old Forge; aunts, Catherine
McMullen, Plattsburg, N.Y., and
Marguerite Gaylets, Pittston; many
nieces and nephews.
Jim was preceded in death his
brothers, Francis “Nick” O’Malley
and Lawrence O’Malley.
The funeral will be 9:30 a.m. Sat-
urday in Kniffen O’Malley Funeral
Home Inc., 728 Main St., Avoca,
witha Mass of ChristianBurial at 10
a.m. in The Queen of the Apostles
Church in Avoca, of which he was a
lifetime member. The Mass will be
celebrated by the Rev. Raymond Di-
vinney, andthe Rev. PhillipSladicka
will co-celebrate. Interment will fol-
low in Cathedral Cemetery, Scran-
ton. A visitation for family and
friends will be held from4 to 8 p.m.
on Friday in the funeral home.
Condolences may be sent at
www.BestLifeTributes.com. Me-
morial contributions may be made
to the American Heart Association,
613 Baltimore Drive, Wilkes-Barre,
PA18702-7902.
James W. O’Malley
February 5, 2012
D
onald Francis Janezic, 78, of Jer-
myn, died Tuesday, February 7,
2012, in Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center, Wilkes-Barre.
Born in1933, in Forest City, he is
a son of the late Frank and Johanna
Carli Janezic, one of eleven chil-
dren.
Amember of Sacred Hearts of Je-
sus and Mary Parish, Jermyn, he at-
tended Ascension Parish, Forest
City.
Prior to his retirement, he was
employed by General Dynamics,
Eynon, as a certified inspector in
quality control, receiving advanced
certifications in several specialties.
In his early years, he was a volun-
teer fireman for the Greenfield
Township Volunteer Fire Company.
He was an avid sports fan and his
favorite teams were Penn State and
the Philadelphia Eagles. Don most-
ly enjoyed spending time with his
grandchildren; they were his prized
possessions.
He spent many hours enjoying
and being entertained with con-
certs, plays andmany, manyathletic
events.
He enjoyed traveling with his
children and grandchildren; fishing,
hunting, andplaying games. He was
dearly loved by many and Papa will
surely be missed. His final weeks
werespent surroundedbyhis loving
family.
Surviving are three daughters,
Doreenandhusband, AlanDeSa, St.
Denis, Md., Suzanne and husband
Gary Clauss, Colchester, Conn.; Li-
saandhusband, BernieStrobel, Dal-
las; two sons, Donald Janezic and
wife, Sharon, Boyton Beach, Fla.;
Frank Janezic, Catonsville, Md.
He was the treasuredgrandfather
of 14 grandchildren, Melinda, Phil-
lip, Kyle, Erica, Gary, Ryan, Lexi,
Chelcie, Peyton, Justin, Alyssa,
James, Kayla, and Amelia; sister,
Agnes Rutkosky, Aldenville; broth-
er, Thomas Janezic and wife, Ann
Marie, Forest City; his former wife,
Carmella Flynn, Port Charlotte,
Fla.; many nieces, nephews, other
relatives and many friends.
He was preceded in death by
three sisters, Jane Edmunds, Ange-
la Swegel, Mary Andrilla; five broth-
ers, Frank, George, William, Joseph,
and John Janezic.
The funeral will be at 11:45 a.m.
Saturday fromthe Jones &Brennan
Funeral Home, 430 Main Street,
Forest City, with Mass of Christian
Burial at noon in Sacred Heart
Church, Hudson St., Forest City. In-
terment will be held in St. Joseph’s
Cemetery, Forest City. Friends may
call Saturday, from 10 a.m. until
11:45 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to the American Diabetes
Association, Suite 212, 501 N. 17th
St., Allentown, PA18104, 1-800-dia-
betes or www.diabetes.org/dona-
tion. Online condolences may be
sent at www.brennanfuneralhome-
s.com.
Donald F. Janezic
February 7, 2012
M
ary H. Wolsieffer, 76, of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away on Wednes-
day, February8, 2012, inthehomeof
her son, William.
She was born in Brewer, Maine,
on October 5, 1935, daughter of
James E. and Georgianna Stone
Welch.
Mary was formerly employed as
the cafeteria supervisor at St. Ni-
cholas/St. Mary’s Parochial School,
Wilkes-Barre, and she was also an
active volunteer at the school.
She was a member of St. Nicholas
Church in Wilkes-Barre, where she
was active on the Bazaar Commit-
tee, the church Bingo, and assisted
with instructions for First Holy
Communion.
She was a member of the St. Con-
rad’s Society Auxiliary, Wilkes-
Barre.
Mary was an avid fan of the
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins,
and enjoyed attending their games.
She also loved her annual trip to the
Jersey Shore with her bingo family.
Mary was a loving and devoted
wife, mother and grandmother. She
was affectionately known as
“GrandmaMary” byall of her grand-
children’s friends.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, William P. Wolsieffer, in
1984. She was also preceded in
death by her brothers, Richard
Welch, andJames EdwardWelchJr.;
and sister, Barbara Brooks.
Surviving are sons, William Wol-
sieffer and his wife, Deneva, Wilkes-
Barre; Richard Wolsieffer and his
wife, Wendy, Ashley; Michael Wol-
sieffer and his wife, Suzanne, Ha-
nover Township; Timothy Wolsieff-
er andhis wife, Amy, MountainTop;
daughter, Theresa Flowers and her
husband, William, Wilkes-Barre
Township; grandchildren, Kyle Wol-
sieffer and his wife, Mandy, Keith
and Kyra Wolsieffer, Nicholas and
Thomas Wolsieffer, Michael and
Ryan Wolsieffer, Grace and Nathan
Wolsieffer; sisters, Katherine Leo-
nard, Maine, Joanne Goodson, West
Virginia; and two nieces.
Funeral services will be held on
Saturday morning at 9 a.m. in the
Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a
Mass of ChristianBurial to followat
9:30 a.m. in St. Nicholas Church,
226 S. Washington St., Wilkes-
Barre. Interment will be in the Par-
ish Cemetery, Shavertown. Friends
may call on Friday from 5 to 8 p.m.
in the funeral home.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to Hospice Care
of the VNA, 900Rutter Ave., Suite 8,
Forty Fort, PA18704, or to the Med-
ical Oncology Prescription Fund,
382 Pierce St., Kingston, PA18704.
Online condolences may be made at
www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Mary H. Wolsieffer
February 8, 2012
M
arie Ramsey, 94, of Washington
Square Apartments, Wilkes-
Barre, passedaway onMonday, Feb-
ruary 6, 2012, in the Little Flower
Manor in Wilkes-Barre.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre, on
March 17, 1917, a daughter of the
late Jacob and Louise Juran Bitzer.
Marie attendedSt. Nicholas High
School in Wilkes-Barre.
She was formerly employed as
cashier at Boscov’s Department
Store, andat OldRiver RoadBakery
in Wilkes-Barre.
Marie was a member of St. Nicho-
las Church in Wilkes-Barre, and a
member of its Altar &Rosary Socie-
ty. She was a volunteer at the week-
ly church bingo, and she served on
various church ministries, bazaar
committees and as treasurer of the
former St. Nicholas Senior Citizen’s
Club.
Marie was a volunteer for the
American Red Cross, and a volun-
teer at the JohnHeinz Institute. She
also volunteered her time and tal-
ents crocheting Afghans for the Re-
tired Senior Volunteer Program.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, James Ramsey, in 1979;
and by her daughter-in-law, Patricia
Ramsey. She was also preceded in
death by her brothers, William, Leo
and Joseph Bitzer; and by her sis-
ters, Agnes Davis, Rose Plotts and
Margaret Wolfe.
Surviving are son, James Ram-
sey, and his wife, Dianne, Camp
Hill; daughter, KathrynMassey, and
her husband, Ray, Dallas; grandchil-
dren, James Ramsey and his wife,
Anne; Matthew Ramsey and his
wife, Judy; Michael Ramsey and his
companion, Sandy; Ann Marie
Ramsey and her companion, Tho-
mas; Alison Watson and her hus-
band, Al; Susan Ramsey; Jack and
Corey Woods; nine great-grandchil-
dren; several nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held this morning at 11:30 a.m. in
St. Nicholas Church, 226 S. Wash-
ington St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment
will be private and at the conve-
nience of the family in St. Nicholas
Cemetery, Shavertown. There will
be no public calling hours. Family
and friends are respectfully request-
ed to go directly to the church for
the funeral service.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to St. Nicholas
Church, 226 S. Washington St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, to the St.
Vincent de Paul Kitchen, 39 E. Jack-
son St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701, or
to the charity of the donor’s choice.
Funeral arrangements are by the
Nat & Gawlas Funeral Home, 89
Park Avenue, Wilkes-Barre. Online
condolences may be made at
www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Marie Ramsey
February 6, 2012
More Obituaries, Page 2A
N
ancy G. Kupp, of Southampton,
died Tuesday, February 7, 2012,
at Southampton Estates in South-
ampton. She was 87.
Nancy was the beloved wife of the
late Joseph E. Kupp.
Born in Sugar Notch, she was a
daughter of thelateJohnT. andMary
Frances Riley Caffrey, and sister of
the late John, James and Leo Caffrey.
Nancy was a former resident of
Sugar Notch, before movingtoBucks
County, where she hadresidedinIvy-
land and Southampton.
She had worked at Hurst Perform-
ance inWarminster for over 20 years.
Nancy was a founding member
and devoted daily communicant of
St. Cyril of Jerusalem Church in Ja-
mison, andhaddevelopedandpartic-
ipated in the Prayer Garden of the
original church. She will be deeply
missed by her family and by all who
knew her.
Nancy is survived by her children,
Thomas J. Kupp and his wife, Jane,
Syracuse, N.Y., Marianne Mahon and
her husband, John, NewBritain, and
Michael D. Kupp and his wife, Linda,
Newtown. She is survived by her sis-
ter, Mary Messner, Willow Grove;
two grandchildren, Jennifer Skates
and her husband, Randall, and Liza
Marie Kupp-Hamberger and her hus-
band, Bryan.
Relatives and friends are invited
to attend her viewing, Saturday from
9:30 a.m. until her funeral Mass at
10:30 a.m. in St. Cyril of Jerusalem
Church, 1410 Almshouse Road, Jami-
son. Interment will followat St. John
Neumann Cemetery in Chalfont.
www.fluehr.com.
Nancy G. Kupp
February 7, 2012
A
melia H. Crompton, 86, of
Trucksville, went home to be
with the Lord Tuesday, February 7,
2012. She was a resident of Manor
Care Nursing Center, Kingston.
Born in Hendersonville, N.C., she
was a daughter of the late Allen and
Thressa Sieber Hawkins.
Ameliawas a1953graduateof Fair-
view High School, Mountain Top.
She graduated in 1948 from the
Nesbitt School of Nursing. She was a
member of the Nesbitt Hospital Aux-
iliary and the Luzerne County Med-
ical Society Auxiliary.
Amelia was an avid painter and en-
joyedplaying the piano. She was a de-
voted mother and grandmother.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Dr. Richard E. Crompton,
in 1988.
Surviving are sons, Gary and his
wife, Anne Crompton, Dallas; Ri-
chard and his wife, Barbara Cromp-
ton, Syracuse, N.Y.; daughter, Jill and
her husband, Tony Sandutch, Hazle-
ton; grandchildren, Gary, Steven, Jef-
frey, Katie, Kyle and William.
Funeral will be held Saturday at 2
p.m. in the Richard H. Disque Funer-
al Home Inc., 2940 Memorial High-
way, Dallas, with the Rev. Jamie
Saunders, pastor Highpoint Baptist
Church officiating. Interment will be
inMt. GreenwoodCemetery, Trucks-
ville. Friends may call Friday 6 to 8
p.m.
Amelia H.
Crompton
February 7, 2012
B
ette L. Vonsavage, 86, of King-
ston, died Tuesday, February 7,
2012, in the Meadows Nursing and
Rehabilitation Center, Dallas.
She was born in Kingston, daugh-
ter of the late Walter and Julia Skam-
mer Lelokas.
She was a graduate of Kingston
High School, and worked for many
years in the Catalog Department at
Sears.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Ralph S. Vonsavage; and
sister, Marian Verosky.
She is survived by her daughter,
Sharon Molyneux and her husband,
Harry, Shavertown; son, James Von-
savage, Kingston; sister, Loretta Ko-
laski, Courtdale; several nieces and
nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held Friday at 10:30 a.m. in St. Ig-
natius Church. Privateinterment will
be in the St. Mary’s Annunciation
Cemetery, Pringle. Thefamilywill re-
ceive friends beginning at 9:30 a.m.
at the church.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contri-
butions may be made to The Mead-
ows Nursing and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, 55 W. Center Hill Rd., Dallas, PA
18612.
Bette L.
Vonsavage
February 7, 2012
C M Y K
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KINGSTON TWP. -- A man
was arraigned Wednesday on
charges he stabbed another
man.
Timothy C. Hillman, 38, of
Bodle Road, Kingston Town-
ship, was charged with aggravat-
ed assault, simple assault and
terroristic threats. He was ar-
raigned by District Judge James
Tupper and jailed at the Lu-
zerne County Correctional Facil-
ity for lack of $10,000 bail.
According to the criminal
complaint:
Township police responded to
a reported stabbing at 643 Bo-
dle Rd. just before 5 a.m. Mon-
day. Upon arrival, police were
called to an unknown call at
Hillman’s residence at 747 Bo-
dle Rd.
Police were advised the caller
from 747 Bodle Rd. only wanted
state police and if any township
police officers arrived, the caller
stated "he would shoot them,"
the criminal complaint says.
Police said Hillman was found
lying on a floor inside the resi-
dence.
Police learned an intoxicated
Hillman showed up at the resi-
dence of Emory Ishley at 645
Bodle Rd. and was allowed
inside where he fell and struck
his head. Ishley told police
Hillman stabbed him in the leg
while helping him walk across
the street, according to the
criminal complaint.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Feb. 16.
HAZLETON – Two people
were arraigned Wednesday in
Wilkes-Barre Central Court on
charges they burglarized an
apartment building for metal.
Jenny Kosdick, 29, of West
13th Street, and James Fairchild,
35, of North Wyoming Street,
both in Hazleton, were charged
with burglary, theft, criminal
trespass and receiving stolen
property. They were jailed at the
Luzerne County Correctional
Facility for lack of $25,000 bail
each.
Police allege Kosdick and
Fairchild stole metal from an
apartment they burglarized on
Grant Street on Tuesday, ac-
cording to the criminal com-
plaints.
Preliminary hearings are
scheduled on Feb. 15 before
District Judge Joseph Zola in
Hazleton.
WILKES-BARRE – An in-
mate at the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility was ar-
raigned Wednesday in Wilkes-
Barre Central Court on an es-
cape charge.
John Anthony Catalano, 53,
was permitted work release and
failed to return to the prison on
Dec. 9, according to the crimi-
nal complaint.
Catalano is serving a parole
violation on a drug conviction,
court records say. He was re-
manded to the county prison for
lack of $5,000 bail.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Feb. 16.
WILKES-BARRE – A man
was arraigned Wednesday in
Wilkes-Barre Central Court on
charges he sold crack cocaine.
Anthony Davis, 26, of Wilkes-
Barre, was charged with posses-
sion with intent to deliver a
controlled substance, posses-
sion of a controlled substance
and communication facility. He
was jailed at the county prison
for lack of $5,000 bail.
State police at Wyoming al-
lege Davis sold crack cocaine in
the area of South Meade and
South streets, Wilkes-Barre, on
Jan. 27, 2011, according to the
criminal complaint.
State police said Davis was
known at the time by his street
name Bliz.
Davis’ true name was learned
when he was arrested on drug
charges by police in Wilkes-
Barre and Plains Township in
January.
A preliminary hearing is
scheduled on Feb. 16.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Police said they cited Dean-
na Mirra, 33, of North River
Street, with retail theft after she
allegedly stole jewelry from
Boscov’s Department Store,
South Main Street, on Tuesday.
• Earlette Luton reported
Wednesday someone stole the
Pennsylvania license plate
GMG-8526 from her vehicle
while it was parked at South
Main Plaza, South Main Street.
• Police said they charged
Frederick McElwee, of King-
ston, with possession of mari-
juana when he was allegedly
found with the drug in a parking
lot on Livingston Lane on Tues-
day.
HAZLETON – State police at
Hazleton said they arrested
Shawn Patrick Malloy, 24, of
Hazleton, on evidence of drunk-
en driving after a traffic stop at
Grant and 15th streets on Sun-
day.
State police said Malloy dis-
played signs of intoxication.
HAZLETON – City police and
state constables executed 36
warrants resulting in the collec-
tion of $9,160 in fines on Feb. 4
and Feb. 5.
DUPONT – The Polish-Amer-
ican Citizens Club of Dupont,
111 Elm St., was recently cited
with possessing or operating
gambling devices or permitting
gambling or lotteries, state
police Bureau of Liquor Control
Enforcement reported.
HAZLE TWP. – State police
at Hazleton said a 17-year-old
boy from McAdoo was charged
Tuesday with pushing a teacher
at Hazleton Area High School.
State police said the teacher, a
41-year-old man, attempted to
direct the student into a class-
room. The boy pushed the
teacher in the back and shoved
the teacher into a book shelf,
state police said.
State police said the boy will
be charged with aggravated
assault, simple assault and ha-
rassment in Luzerne County
Juvenile Court.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following
incidents:
• Claude Webb said someone
stole money from a safe at Dun-
kin Donuts, 41 Public Square,
Tuesday.
• Paul Nicastro, of 496 S.
Franklin St., said someone en-
tered his residence through an
unlocked door and removed a
computer Tuesday.
• Police said they cited Frank
Schwartz, 25, of Hanover Town-
ship, on public drunkenness
charges at 41 S. Main St. at 6:47
p.m. Friday.
• A child was injured when
two vehicles collided on Black-
man Street on Tuesday, accord-
ing to police.
Police said Dave Hurley, 30, of
Kingston, tried to turn right
onto Blackman Street from the
Turkey Hill parking lot at the
corner of Blackman Street and
South Main Street, crossing in
front of the car driven by Sara
Mats, 30, of Hanover Township.
The two vehicles then collided
on Blackman Street, police said.
A 7-year-old boy riding in
Mats’ vehicle complained of
back pain and was taken to
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Med-
ical Center, police said.
POLICE BLOTTER
SHICKSHINNY – In its strug-
gle to recover from the Septem-
ber’s flooding, the boroughTues-
day night received some good
news from the Luzerne County
Transportation Authority.
Robb Henderson, operations
manager for the LCTA, an-
nounced that bus runs between
the Wyoming Valley and Shick-
shinny will be implemented this
year.
Henderson told council a
study will be undertaken to ex-
tend the LCTA route through
Glen Lyon to include Mocana-
qua and Shickshinny, although
there would only be a passenger
pickup in Shickshinny. Hender-
son said the run will traverse
Route11to Kingston and Wilkes-
Barre, withprojecteddrop-offs at
the Wyoming Valley Mall, super-
markets and, possibly, the casi-
no.
Henderson said what can be
considered is a 10 a.m. pickup
and a return trip to Shickshinny
at 4:15 p.m. He said that after the
study implementation can be
within a month.
Besides the LCTA, council
said it has had discussions with
officials of the Berwick Hospital
to establish as a medical outpa-
tient clinic in the municipal
building, which is currently be-
ing renovated after the flood. Ro-
salie Whitebread, council chair-
woman, said the hospital has ex-
pressed “a strong interest” in
renting space on the first floor
once all the repairs have been ac-
complished.
In that regard, Councilman
Michael Steeber reported resto-
ration work has progressed to
the point a newfurnace has been
installed and placed into oper-
ation, fire alarms have been
made operable, emergency light-
ing has been installed and paint-
ing on the second floor is almost
finished. Steeber said a major
goal of this workis toget District
Judge John Hasay re-established
in the building as soon as possi-
ble.
In contrast, there was also
some discord at the meeting. Af-
ter council went into executive
session for what attorney Jeff
Malak described as a personnel
matter, there was an expression
for the need for unity among the
council members. At one point,
Whitebread slammed her fist on
the table and threatened to re-
sign immediately “if we can’t
work together.”
Councilmen Kevin Morris and
Steeber also expressed a need to
“work together.” Morris, howev-
er, prefaced his remarks with the
comment: “While we have made
great progress ... I’m disappoint-
edinthe changes we made inthe
sewer authority,” although he
didn’t say that was the reason for
the dispute
Morris, who serves on the fire
and safety committee, an-
nounced the fire department has
taken delivery on a 2012 fire
truck from Kovatch Mechanical
of Nesquehoning. He said the
cost of the truck, $163,000, was
covered entirely by grant funds.
Council also rejecteda propos-
al from Jim Brozena, Luzerne
County Flood Protection execu-
tive director, that he serve as
manager of theborough’s Hazard
Mitigation Grant Program.
Council decidedinstead“tokeep
it local,” retaining Melissa Web-
er, secretary-treasurer.
Buses to run to Shickshinny
Hospital also has ‘strong
interest’ in renting space for
clinic in municipal building.
By TOMHUNTINGTON
Times Leader Correspondent
WEST PITTSTON – Borough
council on Tuesday night ap-
proved payments for flood clea-
nupwork inthe boroughuponre-
ceipt of reimbursement money
from the Federal Emergency
Management Agency.
Council approveda payment of
$107,530 to Smart Recycling for
the final flooddebris removal and
$133,041 to Utility Services
Group Inc. for cleaning of the
flood mud in the borough’s sewer
pipes.
Councilman Jim Rose offered
acknowledgement and thanks to
the Luzerne/Schuylkill Work-
force Investment Board Program
for the 11 workers who have
helpedcleanuptheriverbankand
parts of West Pittston at no cost.
In other business, council
opened newbids received for the
borough’s 2003 Chevy 1-ton
dump truck.
Last month, solicitor Mark Bu-
falino asked borough council to
re-advertise for bids for the truck
due to an accidental opening of
one of the sealed bids before the
meeting.
On Tuesday night, the sealed
rebids were opened. Mike Vene-
zianio offered the highest bid of
$9,101 for the truck. Other bids
were from Grace Quality Used
Cars, $8,585; United Sanitation,
$7,650; Ken Stackhouse, $7,010,
and DeNaples Used Auto Parts,
$6,500.
Council will decide on one of
theoffersonceofficialsreviewthe
bids.
President ProTemPeteMusin-
ski presided over the Tuesday
night’scouncil meetingduetothe
absenceof Council President Bar-
ryHosier andVicePresident John
Hood. CouncilmanBarry L. Stan-
kus and Mayor Tony Denisco
were also absent.
Due tothe absence of the coun-
cil president, the appointment of
council committees will occur at
next month’s meeting.
W. Pittston OKs flood cleanup payments
By AMANDA MYRKALO
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
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“The mood is just better in this
country than it has been for a
while.”
John Prestbo
The executive director of Dow Jones Indexes
recently talked about the markets’ reactions to signs
that the economy is getting back on its feet. The Dow Jones industrial
average is within reach of the rarefied 13,000 mark.
She’s back in Pittston
and proud to be there
I
grew up in Pittston, where my grandpar-
ents opened a family restaurant in the
early 1940s. They raised seven kids from
their downtown location – a marvelous
piece of architecture, three-stories tall,
with a mahogany staircase, etched crown
molding and ceilings 12 feet high.
As a kid, it didn’t matter to me that my
grandparents didn’t have a backyard. Their
“house” faced Main Street, which in my
eyes was no different than Manhattan’s
famous 34th Street. From the big front
windows, I could watch and listen for
hours as the traffic – cars, trucks, buses
and all kinds of people – came through the
“big city” to shop, work and play.
But as the years unfolded, the traffic
slowed, local merchants struggled, facto-
ries closed their doors, and America’s
downtowns began to fade. With the de-
cline of the manufacturing industries, for
us mainly in garments, the ripple effect on
small business was inevitable, and it had
taken its toll on our downtown by the late
’70s. My uncle held on to the family busi-
ness as long as he could, but when urban
sprawl and strip malls became the trend,
his business, like many others, closed.
After years away from home, until 2002,
I never dreamed I’d again be working in
Pittston. The other day I ran into an old
friend whom I hadn’t seen in years and he
said, “It’s good to have you back in Pitt-
ston.”
Where else in the world could you feel
more welcome than home?
Now that I find myself again driving on
Main Street, I often reminisce about the
family’s gatherings and the conversations
of patrons who passed through for a cup of
Grandpa’s homemade soup or a bran muf-
fin at the familiar restaurant on the corner
of Main and Charles streets. The building’s
structure is the same today, where now a
small business is undergoing an expansion.
I know Grandpa would be pleased.
Looking up and down Main Street, it’s
exciting to see the new shops, restaurants,
professional services, recreation venues
and works of art popping up everywhere,
bringing back the image and opportunity
our ancestors enjoyed.
A lot of great people are helping to revi-
talize Pittston, and they deserve our grat-
itude.
Thanks to the Pittston Chamber of Com-
merce, the Redevelopment Authority, city
administration and the many hometown
professionals, families and volunteers – all
of whom are dedicated to restoring our
city and making us proud, again, to call
Pittston our home.
Susan Parrick
Kingston
Township’s citation cruel
in light of father’s grief
S
hame on the Fairview Township police,
along with the help of seemingly heart-
less township residents, for issuing Dan
Madry a criminal trespass citation.
This father is grieving for his son. How
dare they intrude on his grief?
As a mother who lost a son, I under-
stand this man’s pain. I also understand
that it’s private property, but obviously
Dan Madry feels a deep connection near
the roadside memorial created for his son.
If walking his dog nearby makes his pain
more bearable, then so be it.
To issue a trespass citation under cir-
cumstances such as these is absurd. Dan
Madry would be better served with a little
compassion rather than a citation.
My condolences to the Madry family.
Bev Connelly
Drums
Closing of refineries
can only hurt economy
A
t a time when the price of heating oil is
experiencing high spikes and commu-
nities are facing shortages, why are we
taking our economic security out of our
hands?
The decision by ConocoPhillips and
Sunoco to close their three refineries along
the Delaware River is just another example
of big corporations putting profit ahead of
their own country. One of the companies
said it could record a pre-tax gain of about
$2 billion if it sells or closes the refineries.
For years the oil companies have been
telling us that the price of fuel is high
because the government won’t let them
open new refineries. Here they are willing-
ly shutting three of them.
Shutting these refineries only means
more dependence on foreign oil, and de-
pendence on foreign oil was what led to
the invasion of Iraq in 2003.
The U.S. Department of Energy already
has shown that the decision to close these
plants will cause shortages and price
spikes in the cost of home heating oil for
almost 6 million families in the Northeast.
The closing of these refineries will be
devastating to the economy of Marcus
Hook and the surrounding towns, since
Sunoco is the largest employer in the area.
Our elected officials are allowing our
economic security to be eroded without
any public input from Pennsylvania fam-
ilies. They should hear from us.
I urge our elected officials to hold public
hearings on the sale of the Sunoco plant.
WilliamJ. Herbert
Wilkes-Barre
Zachary’s Law takes
a huge step forward
J
an. 24 was a monumental day.
About two years earlier an idea was
born for a law in Pennsylvania. My
14-month-old son, Zachary Scott, had been
murdered in 2005. I learned that in Penn-
sylvania a crime of third-degree murder
could carry a sentence of as little as six
years in prison. I wanted to change the law
to help ensure that anyone who murders a
child, age 13 or younger, in the third de-
gree would serve at least 13 years in pris-
on.
The members of CHILD (an organiza-
tion that I co-founded) approached state
Rep. Kevin Murphy of Scranton and told
him how we wanted to change the law. He
signed on right away. He understood that
this was the most heinous crime against
our most vulnerable citizens, our children.
Rep. Murphy and the founders of CHILD
worked diligently to help gain support for
our bill: HB 601, “Zachary’s Law.”
The journey was long, and we had many
hurdles to pass and many supporters to
gain. All of the hard work over the past
two years led us to Tuesday, Jan. 24.
This was the day the House of Repre-
sentatives would vote on our bill.
As a constituent and someone who had
never been to the House chamber, I need
to explain to you the magic of that after-
noon through my eyes. I saw Rep. Murphy
speaking to other representatives on both
sides of the aisle. He had educated every-
one about the importance of our bill. I saw
Rep. Murphy deliver a passionate speech.
Even when opposition arose he didn’t
quiver. He responded with confidence.
Following Rep. Murphy were the voices
of Rep. Ronald Waters, Rep. Todd Ste-
phens, Rep. Thomas Caltagirone and both
House leaders, Rep. Frank Dermody and
Rep. Mike Turzai. When it was all over, the
final vote was recorded: 192-1 in favor of
our bill!
It was a tremendous victory. I am honor-
ed to have Rep. Murphy as the prime spon-
sor of our bill.
I know that we have the right leader
who will see it through the Senate and to
the governor’s desk.
Chrissy McLaughlin
Centreville, Va.
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 11A
A
FTER PRESIDENT
Obama announced
his latest effort to try
to stem foreclosures
last week, House Speaker John
A. Boehner, R-Ohio, said it was
time for Washington to stop
meddling and let the market
bottom out. But the problem
hasn’t been Washington inter-
ference; it’s been poorly de-
signed programs and hesitant
lenders.
The right response to the lin-
gering malaise in housing is to
keep trying to persuade banks
to take some short-term losses
to minimize the long-termcost
of the housing meltdown, for
their own sake and their cus-
tomers’.
The White House’s latest
plan prods Fannie Mae, Fred-
die Mac and banks to refinance
millions of creditworthy bor-
rowers who can’t get newloans
because they owe more than
their homes are worth (so-
called underwater mortgages).
It also would raise the subsi-
dies available for banks that
write down the debt of default-
ing borrowers, enabling deeply
underwater loans to be modi-
fied, but only if it saves the
lender money in the long run.
Research by the Federal Re-
serve shows that writing down
debt is not only the most effec-
tive way to keep borrowers in
their homes, but also can cut a
lender’s losses significantly.
Nevertheless, lenders have
been timid when it comes to
debt reduction, fearful that bor-
rowers who aren’t in trouble
would default just to obtain a
modification.
That’s why it’s important for
Washington to keep tweaking
these programs until lenders
respond, rather than sitting
back and waiting for the wave
of foreclosures to subside.
Los Angeles Times
OTHER OPINION: FORECLOSURES
Healthy lending
can help housing
G
OV. TOM Corbett’s
proposed state bud-
get could be a pre-
scription for disaster
for higher education in Penn-
sylvania.
The total $27.13 billion
spending plan would avoid tax
increases but deeply cut funds
for most state colleges and uni-
versities.
Three of the four state-relat-
ed universities – Temple, Penn
State and the University of
Pittsburgh – would take the
biggest hits, about a 30 percent
cut each. Only Lincoln Univer-
sity among that group would
not see a reduction; its funding
would remain at the current-
year level of $11.1 million.
The 14 colleges in the State
System of Higher Education
would see their funding
slashed by 20 percent. Com-
munity colleges could get a
smaller funding cut.
In his budget address to law-
makers Tuesday, Corbett said,
“Thesetoughdecisions will lay
the groundwork for the pros-
perity of tomorrow.” But for
thousands of struggling fam-
ilies, the governor’s proposed
budget brings the likelihood of
more tuition increases, which
could put a college education
for their children beyond their
reach.
It’s true that higher educa-
tion can and must do a better
job of finding efficiencies and
reducing costs. But the state’s
colleges and universities can-
not afford another major hit
like the one
Corbett now
proposes. If it
really values
higher edu-
cation, the
Legislature
must find an-
other way.
In seeking alternatives, law-
makers should first demand
that the state-related schools
have a chance to appear at bud-
get hearings tomake their indi-
vidual appeals for adequate
funding.
In a highly unusual move,
Senate appropriations Chair-
man Jake Corman, R-Centre
County, has decided not to
hold the budget hearings for
higher education that usually
occur each February. Corman
said they were not needed be-
cause hearings were held last
fall across the state. But those
fivehearings wereheldmonths
before Corbett’s budget ad-
dress and before school offi-
cials had a clear picture of his
proposed cuts.
Budget hearings last year
helped then-Penn State presi-
dent Graham B. Spanier per-
suade the Legislature to re-
duce Corbett’s planned cuts.
Senate Democratic appropri-
ations Chairman Vincent
Hughes, D-Philadelphia, says
he might hold hearings if Cor-
man won’t. That’s good. High-
er education should have a fo-
rum to plead its case.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
OTHER OPINION: PA. BUDGET
Let’s hear colleges
state their cases
Corbett
QUOTE OF THE DAY
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and InterimCEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
EDITORIAL BOARD
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
C M Y K
PAGE 12A THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Musto Carroll wrote to the AG’s
office and requested the AG as-
sume jurisdiction of the matter
because of a conflict of interest.
“On Nov. 1, 2011, our office as-
sumed jurisdiction of this case,”
the letter states.
No reaction fromUrban
When contacted at her home,
Urban said she didn’t have much
to say about the AG’s decision.
“I guess the attorney general
doesn’t feel this particular crimi-
nal complaint was valid,” she
said. “I really have no comment;
it’s the way it is. There’s nothing
to say.”
In November, Urban sharply
criticized Leighton and Murphy
for spending more than $15,000
of public money to equip their
homes with security systems. Ur-
ban filed private criminal com-
plaints against them alleging
theft andmisappropriationof tax-
payer funds.
At the time, Urban said she
contacted the Attorney General’s
Office to look into whether the
city’s tax-exempt status was ille-
gally used in the purchases from
Torbik Safe & Lock Inc. She said
“there seems tobe a criminal con-
spiracy issue between J.J. and the
mayor.”
In her complaints filed on Oct.
14 at the office of District Judge
Andrew Barilla, Urban accused
Leighton of misappropriation of
taxpayer funds by an elected city
official, unlawful taking, illegal
disposition of funds and criminal
conspiracy to commit a crime of
larceny. Against Murphy she filed
charges of larceny, criminal con-
spiracy illegal disposition of pub-
lic funds and theft by unlawful
taking.
The complaints were forward-
ed to then-Luzerne County Dis-
trict Attorney Musto Carroll for
reviewand a decision on whether
to approve the charges.
When contacted Wednesday,
Carroll said she forwarded the
charges to the AG’s Office for con-
sideration.
Leighton said Wednesday he
was not aware of the letter sent to
the DA’s Office and he expressed
relief to learn of the decision.
‘Baseless allegation’
“I have been consistent from
the beginning that these com-
plaints were frivolous and would
be dismissed as such,” Leighton
said. “We fully cooperated with
this inquiry, andI amhappytosee
that these allegations were right-
fully dismissed.
“This is yet another baseless al-
legationfromcritics of myadmin-
istration that has been dismissed
in recent days. They are nothing
more than attempts by some in
this community to distract the
city from completing the impor-
tant work that the people sent us
here todo. They will not succeed.
My administration has been and
remains anhonest andopenone.”
Murphy, who left the adminis-
tration in early 2010 to start a pri-
vate consulting business, saidthe
charges have had a direct impact
on his business.
“I’ve said all along anybody can
file whatever they want – valid or
not,” he said. “In the end, justice
prevailed. And I hope she (Ur-
ban) has a good attorney.”
Murphy said he “found it inter-
esting” that Urban removed sev-
eral posts on social media sites
that he says defamed his name.
Murphysaidthealarmsystems
were installed after “multiple
events” at his home. He said he
feared for his safety and his fam-
ily’s safety.
Leighton has stated in the past
that he received numerous
threats as well prior to the alarm
systems being installed.
“This is a warning to anybody
who wants to slander public or
private individuals and should
make themthink twice,” Murphy
said. “All they are doing is discou-
raging good people from getting
involved in government.”
Murphy said the incidents at
his home are all documented. He
said the Pennsylvania State Po-
lice were involved and investigat-
ed some of the cases.
“It was all part of a campaignto
negatively affect Tom Leighton,”
he said. “Mrs. Urban thought it
was important to also defame my
character.”
Alarms recommended
In 2005, after several incidents
were reported, city Chief of Po-
lice Gerard Dessoye recommend-
ed the alarmsystems be installed
at the homes of Leighton and
Murphy. The reports said both
men received threats, verbal at-
tacks and intimidating letters
when the mayor decided to close
firehouses. The city paid for
monthly monitoring and rein-
stalled the system at Murphy’s
home at a cost of $6,500 when he
moved in late 2007.
In filing the complaints, Urban
citedthecitycharter that shesaid
prohibits gifts to oneself.
Urban, a Republican, lost her
bid for City Council in District D,
to former city police Chief Bill
Barrett.
ALARM
Continued from Page 1A
quickly approaching, and no ex-
isting alternative reapportion-
ment plan, defendant needs cer-
tainty as to how to proceed.
There is no reasonable alterna-
tive at this point but to allowthe
elections to proceed under the
2001 Plan,” Surrick wrote.
The ruling is a setback for Re-
publicans and Latino groups,
the parties that asked the court
to block the use of the 2001
maps basedonequal representa-
tion and constitutionality.
But late Wednesday, in a joint
statement by House Majority
Leader Mike Turzai, R-Bradford
Woods, and Senate Majority
Leader Dominic Pillegi, R-Ches-
ter, the Republican leaders dis-
agreed on the issue of timing
and noted legal options are still
being reviewed.
“(A)s directed by the Legisla-
tive Reapportionment Commis-
sion, we will present revised
maps on Feb. 15 and vote on
those maps at the commission’s
meeting on Feb. 22,” the state-
ment read.
That would forego a required
30-day waiting period for public
comments, something Turzai
said is unnecessary because
public comment was taken into
account during appeals to the
new maps.
State Rep. Eddie Day Pashin-
ski, D-Wilkes-Barre, took issue
with that logic and said he
doubts it will pass legal muster.
“This gives us two years to
make sure a fair and appropriate
plan is put forward based on the
rules,” Pashinski said.
Under the 2011plan, the 121st
District that Pashinski repre-
sents would have gained Fair-
view Township, Sugar Notch,
Laurel Run, Warrior Run a por-
tion of Hanover and Wright
townships and lost Plains Town-
ship and Ashley.
The ruling means his only de-
clared opponent, Fairview
Township businessman Pete
Mailloux, lives outside of the
district and can’t run against
him.
State Superior Court Presi-
dent Judge Correale Stevens
calledthe redistrictingprocess a
“legal mess” when summarizing
the situation earlier Wednesday
as guest speaker at a meeting of
the Rotary Club of Hazleton.
Stevens noted there have
been informal discussions in the
Legislature about holding the
state’s primary election in April
as planned, but including only
federal offices on the ballot and
having a special election for
state-level offices later in the
year, possibly in the summer.
That would give the reappor-
tionment commission time to
make a new plan, he said.
Surrick said he doesn’t want
to postpone the primary be-
cause it could deprive residents
the right to vote in the presiden-
tial primary.
Pashinski said the two-pri-
mary option would be costly
and confusing.
Surrick’s opinion essentially
upholds a previous state Su-
preme Court ruling urging use
of the 2001legislative maps that
have been in place the past dec-
ade.
In that state court ruling, is-
sued Jan. 25, the court foundthe
redistricting plan created by the
five-member commission failed
to meet the standards required
by the state Constitution and or-
dered new districts be drawn.
Democratic state Sen. JohnYud-
ichak, D-Plymouth Township,
agreed.
He and other critics said the
rejected districts were drawn to
benefit Republicans, not for the
sake of residents and communi-
ties. “The federal court denied a
Republican lawsuit to delay the
primary. The Supreme Court
and now a federal court have
spoken. Partisan politics can’t
rule the process. It belongs to
the people, not the parties.”
Times Leader staff writer
Steve Mocarsky contributed to
this report.
MAPS
Continued from Page 1A
STEVE MOCARSKY/THE TIMES LEADER
State Superior Court President Judge Correale Stevens gives his
perspective on the status of the state legislative redistricting
process at a meeting of the Rotary Club of Hazleton on Wednes-
day at Genetti’s in Hazle Township.
man Services as part of an effort
to guarantee that womenreceive
free “preventive” health care ser-
vices, including cervical cancer
screening, breast pumps — and
contraception. They require em-
ployers to include those services
in their employee health insur-
ance plans by August. Religious
institutions are granted an ex-
tension until August 2013.
Exemptions are possible if the
services violate institutions’ be-
liefs, but not if they employ large
numbers of people who do not
share those beliefs. This means a
Catholic hospital or university
that employs largely non-Cathol-
ic workers must providefreecon-
traception in its employees’
health insurance, even though
birth control violates Catholic
doctrine.
Bishop Joseph Bambera, in an
open letter to Catholics within
the Scranton Diocese sent out
Wednesday, wrote about the per-
ils of the mandate and the conse-
quences of not following it.
“Unless the rule is overturned,
we Catholics will be compelled
either to violate our consciences
or to drop health coverage for
our employees (and suffer the
penalties for doing so),” he
wrote. “Simply put, as Catholics,
we cannot comply with this un-
just law.”
Presidents of local Catholic
colleges, including the Rev. John
Ryan at King’s College, Michael
MacDowell at Misericordia Uni-
versity, the Rev. Kevin Quinn at
the University of Scranton and
Sister Anne Munley at Mary-
wood University, signed a letter
sponsored by the U.S. Confer-
ence of Catholic Bishops that
was published in The New York
Times and The Washington Post
in December.
The full-page advertisement
read: “As written, the rule will
force Catholic organizations that
play a vital role in providing
healthcareandother neededser-
vices either to violate their con-
science or severely curtail those
services. This would harm both
religious freedom and access to
health care.
“TheHHSmandateputs many
faith-based organizations and in-
dividuals in an untenable posi-
tion. But it also harms society as
a whole by undermining a long
Americantraditionof respect for
religious liberty and freedom of
conscience. In a pluralistic socie-
ty, our healthcare systemshould
respect the religious and ethical
convictions of all. We ask Con-
gress, the administration, and
our fellow Americans to ac-
knowledge this truth and work
with us to reformthe lawaccord-
ingly,” the letter reads.
JohnMcAndrew, a spokesman
for King’s College, said since the
mandate is more than a year
away, the school is hopeful an
agreement can be worked out
that removes religious institu-
tions from the mandate.
He added that the school “is
working with the U.S. Confer-
ence of Catholic Bishops and the
National Association of Catholic
Colleges and Universities on the
matter. King’s is also in agree-
ment with Bishop Bambera’s re-
cent statement on the issue.”
He declined to provide details
of the school’s health plan, of-
fered through Blue Cross of
Northeast Pennsylvania and
made available to the college’s
448 full-time employees.
Paul Krzywicki, a spokesman
for Misericordia University, is-
sued a terse statement saying,
“Misericordia stands by the
statement inthe adandwill offer
no further comment on this is-
sue.” He declined to provide de-
tails of the health care plan em-
ployees receive through the
school’s Geisinger plan.
Following the pending closure
of Marian Community Hospital
in Carbondale later this month,
there will be no Catholic hospi-
tals remaining in the region.
Gladys Bernet, a spokeswo-
man for Regional Hospital of
Scranton, whichhadbeenMercy
Hospital prior to being sold to
Community HealthSystems Inc,
said “contraceptives are covered
under our current employee
health care plan. Going forward
wewill complywithanynewreg-
ulations.”
BARLETTA
Continued from Page 1A
stand, and will not stand,”
Boehner, a Catholic and Ohio Re-
publican, said in a rare floor
speech.
On the other side of the Capi-
tol, the Republican onslaught
continued, with GOP senators
vowing to push ahead with legis-
lation to undo the requirement.
The White House, facing a
public and political outcry, sig-
naled on Tuesday that a compro-
mise is possible. Options could
include granting leeway for a
church-affiliated employer to not
cover birth control, provided it
referred employees to an insurer
who would provide the coverage.
Another idea, previously re-
jected by the administration,
calls for broadening the defini-
tion of a religious employer that
would be exempt from the man-
date beyond houses of worship
and institutions whose primary
purpose is to spread the faith.
That broader approach would
track a definition currently used
by the IRS, bringing in schools,
hospitals and social service agen-
cies that deal with the general
public.
Boehner said that if the admin-
istration fails to reverse the pol-
icy, then Congress will act. He
said in the coming days, the
House Energy and Commerce
Committee will move ahead on
legislation.
REVERSE
Continued from Page 1A
the same challenges and con-
flicts in being fair and impar-
tial,” a defense filing stated.
The attorney general’s office
asked for an out-of-county jury
last week, calling news coverage
of Sandusky’s arrest “spectacu-
lar in its breadth and intensity.”
Prosecutors said in that mo-
tion that people who live near
Penn State might not be able to
“insulate themselves” from the
school and would face “a Gor-
dian knot of conscious and even
subconscious conflicts and diffi-
culties.”
“It would put potential jurors
in that county in an extremely
difficult if not impossible posi-
tion, and that is something that
does not exist in the same de-
gree inanyother countyinPenn-
sylvania,” Nils Frederiksen,
spokesman for the attorney gen-
eral’s office, said Wednesday.
Frederiksen said the court’s
deadline to ask that the trial be
held outside Centre County has
passed without either side mak-
ing such a request.
Amendola said one solution
might be to delay the trial, let-
ting the news coverage “sub-
side” and giving the judge time
to determine how to proceed.
Amendola said in an email
Wednesday that he planned to
discuss the idea with prosecu-
tors “to see how everyone feels
about it in light of all the media
coverage.”
Frederiksen declined to com-
ment Wednesday on a potential
delay.
Amendola also filed a re-
sponse inoppositiontoa request
prosecutors made Tuesday to
have Sandusky’s bail conditions
amended so that he would not
be permitted outside his home
except for medical treatment.
Prosecutors said neighbors have
raised safety concerns and re-
ported seeing Sandusky watch
children on the school play-
ground adjacent to his backyard.
Sandusky “denies that anyone
is at risk in his neighborhood or
any adjourning neighborhoods
and that any fears on the part of
any of his neighbors about their
safety or the safety of others is
totally unfounded,” Amendola
wrote.
A court hearing is scheduled
for Friday in Bellefonte on vari-
ous pretrial issues, including a
request bySanduskythat his bail
conditions be loosenedsohe can
have contact with his grandchil-
dren and others. Amendola said
Sandusky was likely to be in
court for the proceeding.
Also Wednesday, Amendola
saidhe receivedcorrespondence
from the Centre County Depart-
ment of Children and Youth Ser-
vices that said two recent cases
involving abuse allegations
against Sandusky were deemed
to be unfounded. That develop-
ment was first reported by The
Patriot-News of Harrisburg.
SANDUSKY
Continued from Page 1A
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012
timesleader.com
HARRISBURG—Agroup represent-
ing Pennsylvania horse trainers, owners
and breeders is warning that Gov. Tom
Corbett’s budget could devastate the
state’s horse racing industry.
Pennsylvania Equine Coalition
spokesman Pete Peterson said Wednes-
day that the governor’s plan to transfer
$72 million from a state fund set up to
bolster the industry with money from
slot-machine gambling could undo the
progress made so far toward improving
prizes for racers and breeders.
Corbett wants to shift the money into
other programs, including agricultural
research, the University of Pennsylva-
nia’s veterinary school and agricultural
fairs, as part of the $27.1 billion state
budget blueprint he presented to law-
makers Tuesday.
More than11percent of gross revenue
from the 10 slot-machine casinos was
earmarked for the Race Horse Develop-
ment Fund as part of the law that legal-
ized slots in 2004, according to the
Pennsylvania GamingControl Board. In
2010-11, about $275 million was sup-
posed to go into the fund.
But changes made in 2009, during
Gov. Ed Rendell’s administration, re-
quired that nearly $50 million a year be
transferred into the state General Fund
through June 2013 to help ease pressure
on the state budget. Corbett’s proposal
would result in nearly $120 million be-
ing diverted fromthe racing fund in the
year that starts July 1.
Mohegan Sun at Pocono Downs in
Plains Township features harness rac-
ing four days a week fromApril through
November.
The coalition accused the Republican
governor of breaking a campaign
H O R S E R A C I N G
Horse racing group blasts state budget
Pennsylvania Equine Coalition says
current plan will hurt state’s
horsemen and their industry.
The Associated Press
See HORSES, Page 4B
SHAVERTOWN — In the
spring of 1963, President John F.
Kennedy strongly urged his mil-
itary officers to become more ac-
tive in the pursuit of physical fit-
ness, resulting in numerous 50-
mile events that took place all
over the country.
One such event, simply called
the JFK50 Mile
Run, is the only
one of these 50-
mile challenges
that is still held
on an annual
basis.
While the
JFK 50 Mile
Run was first
created with
the fitness of
military per-
sonnel in mind,
all healthy and
able-bodied
members of the
public are open
toparticipate in
the challenge.
With February being cardiac
health month, it would also be a
great time for a runner to check
with their doctor and then begin
a training program for the next
installment of the event.
In November, local athletes Er-
ic McCabe of ShavertownandKe-
vin Bandru of Dickson City were
among several who decided to
take part in the long-distance or-
deal. For McCabe, it was his first
time running the daunting 50
mile course while Bandru return-
ed to endure the annual event for
the third consecutive year.
“I kept saying I was going to
wait until I turned 50 (to run in
the JFK50 Mile Run), but when I
was 48, I kept injuring my calf
muscles soI decidedtojust gofor
it,” Bandru said. “Since I was
forced to run slower, it made
sense togolonger. Awhole group
of my friends had been going
downyearlytodoit andtheykept
bugging me, so I gave it a shot.”
Two years later, Bandru is still
running strong.
McCabe added that the run is
alsoa goodway toshowapprecia-
tion to our military personnel,
who deserve our utmost grati-
tude and respect.
The JFK 50 Mile Run takes
place on a truly grueling course,
beginning in the small town of
Boonsboro, Md. (located outside
of Hagerstown). The first 5.5
miles, which start on a road sur-
face before joining the Appala-
chian Trail at the 2.5 mile mark,
take place on a steep, windy path
that gradually gains over 1,000
feet in elevation.
R U N N I N G
Kennedy
50-miler
a unique
challenge
Local runners conquer course
that follows part of the hilly
Appalachian Trail in Maryland.
By ZACH DOLEIDEN
For The Times Leader
McCabe
Bandru
See KENNEDY, Page 4B
I
t’s difficult to call the King’s Col-
lege women’s basketball team pret-
ty these days, after the Lady Mon-
archs have been winning so ugly.
But what they’ve accomplished is
head-turning.
The Lady Monarchs are making
clutch shots, making games come out
in their favor and making history.
They became the first King’s wom-
en’s team to ever go unbeaten through
the first 11 league games by beating
Delaware Valley on Wednesday. In the
process, the Lady Monarchs, 19-3 over-
all, clinched the Freedom Conference’s
regular-season championship. And that
gives them the No. 1 seed and home
court advantage throughout the up-
coming Freedom Conference tourna-
ment.
All of that looks absolutely stunning
to the Lady Monarchs.
“It’s actually really exciting,” King’s
college senior guard Paige Carlin said.
But is beauty in the eye of the be-
holder?
The margin of victory for King’s is
shrinking faster than the waistline of a
person on a Slim-Fast! diet.
Those earlier double-digit victories
turned into a steady diet of nail-biters
over the past couple of weeks, when
King’s captured four games by less
than six points.
Even their 79-69 victory over a Dela-
ware Valley team that fell to 12-10
overall and 3-8 in conference play start-
ed as a struggle for the Lady Mon-
archs, who trailed 37-33 at the half.
“You can look at it as a wakeup call,”
said King’s guard Katlin Michaels, a
Berwick High grad.
Or you can look at it as true grit.
The close calls King’s has been sur-
viving since the middle of January
suggest the Lady Monarchs had plenty
of opportunity to falter.
Yet, they never did.
“I just think our team is so talented,”
said Carlin, who came off the bench
Wednesday to pop home a game-high
20 points and pull within 14 of her
career 1,000th point. “They are getting
closer, the game scores. That’s just
because it’s February. I just think ev-
eryone knows what we run.”
Suggest the Lady Monarchs may be
running out of gas, and King’s coach
Brian Donoghue gets more defensive
than one of his team’s typical zone
lockdowns in the second half.
“Goodness, no,” said Donoghue,
who watched the Lady Monarchs turn
the game Wednesday by holding Dela-
ware Valley scoreless for more than six
minutes at the start of the second half.
“League play, this time of year, scores
are always going to be close. It hap-
pens in every league across the coun-
try.
“We did a lot of good things to-
night.”
They promise the best is yet to
come.
“We have league goals and we have
national goals,” Donoghue said. “To
achieve both of those, we need to keep
going.”
That’s why the Lady Monarchs will
come hard into their regular season
home finale against Manhattanville on
Saturday, then into their remaining
two road games against area rivals
Misericordia and Wilkes next week.
Even with the top spot in the play-
offs fitting firmly under their belts, the
Lady Monarchs say they can’t afford to
start acting like fat cats.
“We can never let up,” Carlin insist-
ed. “Being 11-0, we’ll get everybody’s
best game against us.
“We’re just in it to win it.”
In other words, King’s wants to win
out. That goal of being unbeatable in
the conference remains within reach
for King’s, no matter how unglamorous
its path seems in the scorebook. And a
14-0 conference finish would look
mighty attractive come playoff time.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
King’s women
living large
atop Freedom
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
DALLAS — For a rare few moments,
the Anderson Center went silent. The
lulls didnot come whenMisericordia was
on the verge of losing a 17-point lead, but
rather when the Cougars were poised to
pull out the win.
Three trips to the foul line for Miser-
icordia in overtime, three chances for a
boisterous student section to rest its col-
lective voice.
And six made free throws, helping the
Cougars hold on for a dramatic 94-89 win
over Eastern on Wednesday night.
“I believe that our last game (an over-
time win at DeSales) prepared us,” Cou-
gars coachTrevor Wood-
ruff said. “I said in the
huddle coming out for
overtime, ‘We’ve been
here. We’ve proven we
can win a game in over-
time against a good op-
ponent. So let’s just go
and do what we do.’
“Fortunately, it worked out.”
Feeding off of an energized atmo-
sphere, Misericordia extended one of the
best stretches inthe program’s recent his-
tory, winning a seventh straight game to
pull alone into first place in the Freedom
Conference. The Cougars (16-6, 8-3)
moved a game ahead of Eastern and
Wilkes with three left to play.
Not that it was easy.
What had looked to be a safe 17-point
second-half lead for the Cougars quickly
vanished.
Down 68-51 with under seven minutes
to play, Eastern (14-8, 7-4) ripped off a
stunningly quick 13-0 run to pull within
four and eventually took a 76-74 lead on a
Mike Donatoni three with 1:50 to play.
Steve Artzerounian (career-high 30
points) put theCougars backontop78-77
with 40 seconds on the clock. But a mis-
sed free throw on the next Cougars pos-
session allowed Colin Whipple to grab
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
Cougars roar in OT
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Misericordia’s Ethan Eichhorst (23) fights his way to the basket after grabbing a rebound in front of Eastern’s Collin Whip-
ple in Wednesday’s Freedom Conference game in Dallas.
Win leaves Misericordia alone in top spot
By DEREK LEVARSE
dlevarse@timesleader.com 94
MISERICORDIA
89
EASTERN
See COUGARS, Page 3B
K
PAGE 2B THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
from10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Signups will
be held at Firwood Church, 130 Old
River Rd., and Stanton Bowling
Lanes. Players ages 4-14 are eligi-
ble, and players residing in the
Mayflower section of Wilkes-Barre
are now eligible. First-time players
must bring a birth certificate and
proof of residency. Cost is $45 per
player or $60 per family for T-ball
through Little League, and $75 for
Junior League. There will also be a
$40 deposit for a lottery ticket
fundraiser. More information can
be found at www.swblittleleague-
.com. The Swoyersville Girls
Softball Slow-Pitch League will
be holding signups today and
Thursday, Feb. 23, from 5:30-7:30
p.m., and Saturday, Feb. 25, from
noon to 3 p.m. at the borough
building on Main Street for girls
ages 7-17. No residency required,
girls from all towns are welcome.
For more information, call Craig at
287-8074.
Nanticoke Area Little League will
have signups Saturday and Sunday
at Newport Township Firehouse
from11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Feb.
25-26 at the elementary center
cafeteria from11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Nanticoke, Newport Township and
Plymouth Township residents are
eligible. Players must present a
birth certificate and three recent
proofs of residency. For more
information, go to nanticokelittle-
league.com or call Wade at 735-
0189, Ken at 735-2386 or Dave at
262-5970.
Plymouth West Side girls softball
will hold signups today from 6-8
p.m., and Saturday, Feb. 11 from11
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Plymouth
Borough building. Cost is $35 for
the first child and $50 for a family.
For more information, call Shawn
at 406-2385.
The Wyoming Valley Flames girls
softball club is looking for pitchers
for its U12 team. For tryout in-
formation, call Paul at 779-1583,
Pat at 466-9644 or Hank at 328-
2643.
Plains Little League will be holding
final signups Sunday from1-3 p.m.
at Plains American Legion for
children ages 4-and-up. Those
interested in volunteering should
have a photo ID present at time of
registration.
West Pittston Little League will
have tryouts on the following
dates: Monday, Feb. 13 from 6-8
p.m. for girls minor and majors;
Feb. 15-16 from 6-8 p.m. for boys
minors; Feb. 17 from 6-8 p.m., and
Feb. 18 from10 a.m. to noon boys
majors. All tryouts will be held in
the indoor facility.
UPCOMING EVENTS
King’s College Softball is holding its
Champions Softball Clinic on
Sunday, Feb. 19, for girls ages 9-18.
A pitching clinic will be held from 9
a.m. to noon, while a hitting and
fielding clinic will run from1-4 p.m.
Cost of each clinic is set at $40.
For those wishing to attend both
clinics, the cost will be $70. For
more information or to make a
reservation, call 208-5900, ext.
5397, or email softball@kings.edu.
Specialty Baseball Camps will be
held at King’s College on Feb. 12
and 26 in Scandlon Gymnasium.
The program is designed for play-
ers in grades K-12. For more in-
formation, go to www.kingscolle-
geathletics.com or contact coach
Greeley at baseball@kings.edu or
592-7797.
Jenkins Twp. Little League will hold
a field preparation day on Sat-
urday, March 10, from 8 a.m. to
noon. All managers and coaches
must be present on this day for
field preparations for the up-
coming season. If you can not
make it on this day, you must
designate someone to be there in
your absence. An alternate day will
be scheduled in case of inclement
weather.
LEAGUES
Kingston Soccer is forming a spring
league for players in age groups
from U8-U14. Online registration
can be found at www.kingstoncor-
nerkicksystems.com. For more
information, call Ben at 332-0313.
MEETINGS
Kingston/Forty Fort Little League
will meet Monday, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m.
at the Kingston Rec Center. All
interested members are asked to
attend.
The Crestwood Football Booster
Club will meet Thursday, Feb. 16, at
7 p.m. at Tony’s Pizza in the back
room. For more information, call
Melanie at 606-4223.
The Wyoming Valley West Baseball
Booster Club will meet Monday,
Feb. 13, at 7 p.m. at Murphy’s
Swoyersville. Parents of players are
asked to attend.
The Duryea Little League will have a
mandatory coaches meeting Sun-
day, Feb. 12, at 5 p.m. at the Duryea
VFW. Anyone interested in coach-
ing this year must attend. Teams
and divisions will be discussed, as
well as upcoming season items.
The Luzerne County Federation of
Sportsmen will meet Monday, Feb.
13, at 7:30 p.m.at American Legion
Post 609, at the corner of Lee Park
Ave. and St. Mary’s Rd. Club dele-
gates and interested sportsmen are
invited.
The Wyoming Valley Chapter of
PIAA Baseball Officials will hold a
meeting Feb. 19 at 6:30 p.m. in
Room107 of Breiseth Hall on the
Wilkes University campus. In addi-
tion, a “rules interpretation” meet-
ing will be held March 11 at 6:30
p.m. in Room107 of Breiseth Hall
on the Wilkes campus. This meeting
is open to PIAA baseball umpires
and coaches, as well as all PIAA
baseball coaches of any level and
any PIAA umpires in need of fulfill-
ing their mandatory meeting re-
quirements. For directions to Brei-
seth Hall, visit http://
www.wilkes.edu/pages/201.asp.
REGISTRATION/TRYOUTS
Dupont Softball/T-ball signups will
be held at the Dupont field house,
200 Elm St., on the following dates:
Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon,
Sunday from noon to 3 p.m., Mon-
day, Feb. 13 from 6-9 p.m., Feb. 19
from noon to 3 p.m., Feb. 20 from
6-9 p.m., Feb. 27-29 from 6-9 p.m.
Signups are open to all boys and
girls of the greater Pittston Area
and surrounding communities.
T-ball is for boys and girls ages 4-7
and is $25 per player with no
family discount or fundraiser.
Softball is for girls ages 7-17 and is
$50 per player, $85 per two players
and $110 for three players of the
same family (sisters) with no fun-
draiser. For more information, call
Bob Cappelloni at 881-8744.
Plains American Legion Baseball
Teams will hold registration Sun-
day, Feb. 19, at the Plains American
Legion home on East Carey Street
in Plains from1-3 p.m. Players
between the ages of 13-19 are
eligible to sign up who reside in
Plains, Laflin, Bear Creek, Parsons,
Miners Mills, North End, East End,
Avoca, Dupont, Jenkins Township
and Pittston Township, East of the
Pittston Bypass. For more informa-
tion, call Don at 822-0537 or Jack
at 947-7246.
Ashley/Newtown Little League will
hold registration on the following
dates and times at the Hanover
Area High School cafeteria: Feb. 13
from 6-8 p.m., and Feb. 25 from10
a.m. to noon. Registration is $40
per child or $60 per family for
Little League, and $65 per child or
$90 per family for Junior and
Senior League baseball. You must
present the child’s birth certificate
along with three proofs of resi-
dency. At registration, you must
choose between a 10-lottery ticket
fundraiser or a $30 buyout.
South Wilkes-Barre Little League
will hold signups on the following
dates and times: Feb. 15 from 6-8
p.m., Feb. 18 from10 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Feb. 22 from 6-8 p.m., and Feb. 25
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD W V C G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
S T A T S
DIVISION I
VALLEY WEST (4-0, 14-5) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Tara Zdancewicz 19 329 17.3 28 67.0 77 115 13 0 0.0
Kaitlyn Smicherko 19 204 10.7 19 71.3 62 87 6 28 1.5
Cheyenne Reese 18 96 5.3 12 66.7 40 60 0 0 0.0
Cassie Smicherko 19 95 5.0 13 66.7 28 42 0 13 0.7
Olivia Hoffman 18 71 3.9 12 36.8 7 19 0 0 0.0
Taylor Reilly 18 69 3.8 8 53.1 17 32 0 0 0.0
Tara Judge 19 46 2.4 7 68.8 11 16 0 1 0.1
HAZ. AREA (4-0, 8-11) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Keanna Schoennagle 19 124 6.5 16 61.1 22 36 1 20 1.1
Becca Zamonas 19 104 5.5 13 69.6 16 23 0 22 1.2
Alyssa Sitch 19 96 5.1 16 47.1 8 17 1 2 0.1
Josie Bachman 19 96 5.1 13 63.8 30 47 0 2 0.1
Annie Bono 19 65 3.4 9 84.6 22 26 0 7 0.4
Brianna Woznicki 19 51 2.7 8 21.4 3 14 0 0 0.0
Alyssa Pfeil 17 41 2.4 8 60.0 9 15 0 6 0.4
CRESTWOOD (2-2, 13-6) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Sydney Myers 16 194 12.1 22 61.5 48 78 6 0 0.0
Kayla Gegaris 17 150 8.8 17 47.6 20 42 2 18 1.1
Rebecca Rutkowski 17 120 7.1 17 52.6 20 38 2 2 0.1
Sarah Andrews 17 116 6.8 12 66.7 40 60 0 2 0.1
Taryn Wojnar 14 75 5.4 16 75.0 6 8 3 18 1.3
Carina Mazzoni 16 59 3.7 10 100.0 4 4 0 13 0.8
Amy Jesikiewicz 17 51 3.0 10 0.0 0 1 0 11 0.6
PITTSTON AREA (1-3, 15-4) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Mia Hopkins 19 390 20.5 39 63.3 93 147 14 3 0.2
Grace O’Neill 19 212 11.2 26 56.1 23 41 4 45 2.4
Allie Barber 19 149 7.8 15 61.4 35 57 2 4 0.2
Liz Waleski 19 129 6.8 19 65.6 21 32 1 0 0.0
Jacqueline Rabender 19 50 2.6 6 58.8 10 17 0 0 0.0
Kelly Mitchell 18 35 1.9 8 84.6 11 13 0 0 0.0
Kristen Fereck 18 33 1.8 6 75.0 6 8 0 1 0.1
COUGHLIN (0-4, 1-17) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Marissa Ross 11 83 7.5 14 23.3 17 73 0 0 0.0
Dannah Hayward 14 76 5.4 13 59.1 13 22 0 13 0.9
Kayla Eaton 15 59 3.9 14 55.6 5 9 0 10 0.7
Cayla Sebastian 18 61 3.4 11 50.0 3 6 0 8 0.4
Danielle Georgetti 16 47 2.9 10 45.7 21 46 0 0 0.0
Shelby Flaherty 18 50 2.8 7 54.5 6 11 0 2 0.1
Sierra Williams 17 16 0.9 4 20.0 2 10 0 0 0.0
DIVISION II
HOLY REDEEMER (4-0, 11-7) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Alexis Lewis 13 200 15.4 26 64.2 34 53 6 4 0.3
Paige Makowski 17 127 7.5 16 67.6 23 34 1 0 0.0
Alana Wilson 15 112 7.5 15 63.6 21 33 1 15 1.0
Shannon Murray 17 118 6.9 11 80.0 12 15 0 18 1.1
Alyssa Platko 17 101 5.9 13 50.0 19 38 0 0 0.0
Julia Wignot 17 99 5.8 10 66.7 14 21 0 15 0.9
Sara Altemose 16 78 4.9 10 73.1 19 26 0 11 0.7
TUNKHANNOCK (2-2, 13-5) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Lisa Kintner 16 193 12.1 22 56.9 37 65 4 0 0.0
Kassie Williams 16 168 10.5 18 58.0 29 50 3 21 1.3
Gabby Alguire 16 111 6.9 15 57.0 45 79 1 8 0.5
Amelia Ayers 16 76 4.8 13 58.2 39 67 0 2 0.1
Katie Proulx 15 53 3.5 11 42.3 11 26 0 0 0.0
Ashleigh Nafus 16 53 3.3 9 57.9 11 19 0 0 0.0
Shequoya Bonner 11 16 1.5 5 50.0 4 8 0 0 0.0
DALLAS (2-2, 11-6) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Ashley Dunbar 17 213 12.5 26 62.0 62 100 5 8 0.5
Tanner Englehart 17 132 7.8 17 48.5 47 97 1 0 0.0
Jessica Hiscox 17 107 6.3 14 51.7 15 29 0 8 0.5
Samantha Missal 17 85 5.0 12 80.0 4 5 0 18 1.1
Sara Flaherty 16 72 4.5 14 64.0 16 25 0 0 0.0
Katy Comitz 17 69 4.1 10 64.3 9 14 0 8 0.5
Talia Szatkowski 14 51 3.6 9 48.6 17 35 0 0 0.0
BERWICK (1-3, 7-12) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Caty Davenport 19 149 7.8 15 63.2 55 87 3 0 0.0
Kelly Sheptock 17 131 7.7 13 55.6 35 63 0 0 0.0
Geena Palermo 18 93 5.2 12 42.5 17 40 0 0 0.0
Margaret Bridge 19 86 4.5 10 57.1 16 28 0 12 0.6
Allison Rinehimer 17 45 2.6 8 83.3 5 6 0 0 0.0
Bri Floryshak 18 44 2.4 8 57.7 15 26 0 1 0.1
Alexis Steeber 19 42 2.2 10 71.4 10 14 0 0 0.0
WYOMING AREA (0-4, 5-14) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Serra Degnan 19 198 10.4 17 46.0 52 113 3 8 0.4
Ashlee Blannett 19 129 6.8 18 71.4 35 49 2 0 0.0
Abby Thornton 19 125 6.6 15 45.7 37 81 1 0 0.0
Sara Radzwilka 19 73 3.8 10 60.0 6 10 0 8 0.4
Nicole Turner 14 51 3.6 11 44.4 12 27 0 1 0.1
Lexi Coolbaugh 18 36 2.0 9 57.1 4 7 0 2 0.1
Sally DeLuca 14 17 1.2 4 29.4 5 17 0 0 0.0
DIVISION III
LAKE-LEHMAN (4-0, 13-5) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Nikki Sutliff 15 209 13.9 24 58.2 53 91 6 25 1.7
Cayle Spencer 18 237 13.2 20 57.1 44 77 8 9 0.5
Emily Sutton 18 102 5.7 17 47.1 8 17 1 0 0.0
Shoshana Mahoney 17 53 3.1 9 58.3 14 24 0 1 0.1
Jen Konopinski 12 36 3.0 8 57.1 4 7 0 6 0.5
Carol Mosier 18 49 2.7 6 36.8 7 19 0 0 0.0
Emily Leskowski 18 46 2.6 6 27.8 5 18 0 1 0.1
NANTICOKE (3-1, 17-2) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Katie Wolfe 19 260 13.7 27 74.7 65 87 5 3 0.2
Samantha Gow 19 207 10.9 21 55.2 16 29 5 44 2.3
Kayley Schinski 18 146 8.1 24 61.5 32 52 2 22 1.2
Alex Brassington 18 123 6.8 23 62.5 30 48 2 16 0.9
Brittany Sugalski 19 99 5.2 11 60.0 9 15 0 8 0.4
Alex Holl 18 62 3.4 11 45.5 10 22 0 0 0.0
Cassie Yalch 19 49 2.6 8 69.2 9 13 0 10 0.5
NORTHWEST (3-1, 12-7) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Alivia Womelsdorf 19 410 21.6 36 57.3 82 143 15 1 0.1
Sarah Shaffer 19 178 9.4 28 54.2 13 24 4 45 2.4
DeAnna Gill 19 156 8.2 19 71.2 52 73 2 0 0.0
Maranda Koehn 19 63 3.3 8 45.8 11 24 0 0 0.0
Christa Bosak 19 51 2.7 9 75.0 9 12 0 0 0.0
Kelsey Yustat 18 38 2.1 11 20.0 1 5 0 9 0.5
Emily Buerger 4 4 1.0 2 ERR 0 0 0 0 0.0
MEYERS (2-2, 9-10) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Amy Kowalczyk 18 145 8.1 17 57.9 22 38 2 33 1.8
Jazma Robertson 19 135 7.1 14 57.7 15 26 0 0 0.0
MacKenzie Winder 17 112 6.6 16 52.6 10 19 1 0 0.0
Salimah Biggs 19 120 6.3 20 48.1 13 27 2 5 0.3
Brianna Dimaggio 18 85 4.7 12 34.8 8 23 0 11 0.6
Cathy Quinones 19 31 1.6 7 33.3 5 15 0 2 0.1
Brandilee Soto 18 29 1.6 5 32.1 9 28 0 0 0.0
WYO. SEMINARY (2-2, 7-10) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Jessica Neare 14 120 8.6 14 71.8 28 39 0 9 0.6
Bridget McMullen 14 101 7.2 16 50.7 35 69 1 0 0.0
Ann Romanowski 11 73 6.6 13 51.3 20 39 0 1 0.1
Jane Henry 15 91 6.1 10 45.5 15 33 0 0 0.0
Haley Karg 16 92 5.8 12 25.0 9 36 0 1 0.1
Emily Gabriel 16 41 2.6 6 48.1 13 27 0 0 0.0
Dinah Williams 11 16 1.5 7 25.0 1 4 0 0 0.0
GAR (2-2, 5-13) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Quieterriua Gross 7 61 8.7 13 60.7 17 28 0 2 0.3
Brenan Mosier 17 139 8.2 19 43.3 13 30 2 0 0.0
Marena Spence 16 122 7.6 16 40.3 29 72 1 11 0.7
Quinniea Gross 7 52 7.4 18 46.2 6 13 1 0 0.0
Unique Twyman 12 72 6.0 12 20.0 6 30 0 0 0.0
Brea Seabrook 15 84 5.6 11 25.0 8 32 0 2 0.1
Julianna Leco 17 95 5.6 23 75.9 22 29 1 11 0.6
HANOVER AREA (0-4, 5-13) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Danielle Tuzinski 17 297 17.5 30 65.5 93 142 11 19 1.1
Brittany Miller 17 95 5.6 13 43.5 10 23 0 1 0.1
Katie Zuranski 17 77 4.5 8 61.5 8 13 0 12 0.7
Julie Mizenko 15 47 3.1 8 45.5 5 11 0 2 0.1
Julia Smith 17 46 2.7 8 36.4 4 11 0 2 0.1
Mickie Kaminski 17 40 2.4 9 66.7 4 6 0 10 0.6
Samantha Masher 17 34 2.0 6 62.5 10 16 0 0 0.0
MMI PREP (0-4, 3-16) Gms Pts Avg Hi FT% FTM FTA 15+ 3s Avg
Rachel Stanziola 19 149 7.8 17 48.4 31 64 2 2 0.1
Maria Carrato 19 145 7.6 17 32.4 12 37 2 13 0.7
Kristen Purcell 19 104 5.5 19 50.0 15 30 1 2 0.1
Kayla Karchner 19 95 5.0 12 56.0 14 25 0 3 0.2
Gabriella Lobitz 19 70 3.7 11 56.0 14 25 0 0 0.0
Hayle Shearer 19 59 3.1 8 33.3 5 15 0 0 0.0
Andrea Lara 19 22 1.2 8 0.0 0 4 0 0 0.0
NBA
Favorite Points Underdog
CELTICS 3 Lakers
NUGGETS [5] Warriors
SUNS 3 Rockets
Thunder 6.5 KINGS
[]-denotes a circle game. A game is circled for a va-
riety of reasons, withtheprimefactor beinganinjury.
When a game is inside a circle, there is limited wa-
gering. The line could move a fewpoints in either di-
rection, depending on the severity (probable, ques-
tionable, doubtful, out) of the injury.
College Basketball
Favorite Points Underdog
NC State 2.5 GEORGIA TECH
MISSISSIPPI ST 7.5 Mississippi
FLA ATLANTIC PK Denver
FLORIDA INT’L 1 N Texas
Wisconsin 1.5 MINNESOTA
CLEVELAND ST 9 Valparaiso
YOUNGSTOWN
ST
PK Butler
UL-LAFAYETTE 6 Ark-L Rock
MIDDLE TENN ST 14.5 W Kentucky
S ALABAMA 3 Arkansas St
INDIANA 7.5 Illinois
ARIZONA 7.5 Colorado
ARIZONA ST 11.5 Utah
NORTHWESTERN 7 Iowa
MIAMI-FLORIDA 6 Virginia Tech
UTAH ST 10 Louisiana Tech
OREGON ST 9 Washington St
Fresno St 1.5 SAN JOSE ST
SAN FRANCISCO 12.5 Santa Clara
PEPPERDINE 2 San Diego
CS-Northridge PK CAL-DAVIS
CAL-POLY SLO 9.5 Cal-Riverside
CS-FULLERTON 11.5 Cal-Irvine
Long Beach St 8.5 PACIFIC
California 8.5 USC
Loyola-M’mount 3.5 PORTLAND
OREGON PK Washington
UCLA 6 Stanford
GONZAGA 2.5 St. Mary’s-CA
New Mexico St 1.5 IDAHO
Nevada 1 HAWAII
Wofford 1.5 GA SOUTHERN
Davidson 17.5 CITADEL
FURMAN 6.5 Appalachian St
NIAGARA 4 Siena
Rider 4.5 CANISIUS
TENN-CHATT 5.5 Elon
FAIRFIELD 3.5 Manhattan
CHARLESTON 11 W Carolina
SAMFORD 4 NC-Greensboro
MURRAY ST 12 Tennessee St
TENNESSEE
TECH
13 E Illinois
SE MISSOURI ST 12 Tenn-Martin
Weber St 11.5 NO ARIZONA
ST. PETER’S 5 Marist
Montana 7.5 NO COLORADO
Portland St 1.5 IDAHO ST
SACRAMENTO ST 3.5 Montana St
NHL
Favorite Odds Underdog
Stars -$125/
+$105
BLUE JACKETS
DEVILS -$110/-
$110
Blues
CAPITALS -$175/
+$155
Jets
ISLANDERS -$125/
+$105
Canadiens
RANGERS -$200/
+$170
Lightning
FLYERS -$160/
+$140
Maple Leafs
Predators -$125/
+$105
SENATORS
PANTHERS -$110/-
$110
Kings
Canucks -$150/
+$130
WILD
COYOTES -$150/
+$130
Flames
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
CIRCULAR REPORT: On the NBA board, the Nuggets - Warriors circle is for
numerous Denver injuries.
Follow Eckstein on Twitter at www.twitter.com/vegasvigorish.
BOXING REPORT: In the WBC middleweight title fight on February 4 in San Anto-
nio, Texas, Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. is -$380 vs. Marco Antonio Rubio at +$320; in
the WBA super welterweight title fight on May 5 in Las Vegas, Nevada, Floyd
Mayweather Jr. is -$600 vs. Miguel Cotto at +$400.
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
GIRLS BASKETBALL
Berwick at Wyoming Valley West, 7:15 p.m.
Coughlin at Tunkhannock, 7:15 p.m.
Crestwood at Holy Redeemer, 7:15 p.m.
GAR at Nanticoke, 7:15 p.m.
Hazleton Area at Pittston Area, 7:15 p.m.
Lake-Lehman at MMI Prep, 7:15 p.m.
Northwest at Hanover Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Area at Dallas, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Seminary at Meyers, 7:15 p.m.
HS BOWLING
Berwick at Columbia-Montour Vo-Tech, 3 p.m.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 8:30 p.m.
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Luzerne CCC at Central Penn, 6:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. 10
BOYS BASKETBALL
Dallas at Wyoming Area, 7 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
Holy Redeemer at Crestwood, 7:15 p.m.
Pittston Area at Hazleton Area, 7:15 p.m.
Wyoming Valley West at Berwick, 7:15 p.m.
MMI Prep at Lake-Lehman, 7:15 p.m.
Nanticoke at GAR, 7:15 p.m.
Meyers at Wyoming Seminary, 7:15 p.m.
Hanover Area at Northwest, 7:15 p.m.
HS SWIMMING
Pittston Area at Coughlin, 4:30 p.m.
HS WRESTLING
Wyoming Seminary at St. Alban’s tourney
COLLEGE SWIMMING
MACSwimChampionships (at Wilkes-Barre CYC),
TBA
COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD
Misericordia at Lafayette, 2 p.m.
COLLEGE WRESTLING
Ithaca at Wilkes, 7 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
GOLF
12:30 p.m.
TGC — LPGA, Women’s Australian Open, first
round, at Black Rock, Australia (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
TGC—PGATour, Pebble Beach National Pro-Am,
first round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
4:30 a.m.
TGC—EuropeanPGATour, Dubai Desert Classic,
second round, at Dubai, United Arab Emirates
HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS BASKETBALL
7:15 p.m.
SE-2 — Crestwood at Holy Redeemer
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN — Wisconsin at Minnesota
ESPN2 — Mississippi at Mississippi St.
8 p.m.
BTN — Illinois at Indiana
9 p.m.
ESPN — Colorado at Arizona
ESPN2 — Virginia Tech at Miami
11 p.m.
ESPN2 — Saint Mary’s (Cal) at Gonzaga
PLUS, ROOT --- Washington at Oregon
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m.
CSN, NHL — Toronto at Philadelphia
MSG --- Tampa Bay at N.Y Rangers
PLUS --- St. Louis at New Jersey
PLUS2 --- Montreal at N.Y. Islanders
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
TNT — L.A. Lakers at Boston
10:30 p.m.
TNT — Oklahoma City at Sacramento
WOMEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 p.m.
BTN — Northwestern at Michigan State
9 p.m.
ROOT — Southern California at Stanford
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE — Suspended free-
agent minor league RHP Rolman Candelario 50
games for testing positive for metabolites of Stano-
zolol.
National League
NEWYORKYANKEES—Agreedtoterms withINF
Russell Branyan on a minor league contract.
CINCINNATI REDS — Agreed to terms with OF
Ryan Ludwick on a one-year contract and LHP Jeff
Francis on a minor league contract. Designated
RHP Carlos Fisher for assignment.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NEW ORLEANS HORNETS — Signed G Donald
Sloan to a 10-day contract. Released G Carldell
Johnson and F DaJuan Summers.
Women's National Basketball Association
ATLANTA DREAM — Signed F Cathrine Kraaye-
veld to a multi-year contract.
INDIANA FEVER — Re-signed F Tamika Catch-
ings.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS — Moved wide receivers
coachMikeMcNulty toquarterbacks coach. Named
Frank Reich wide receivers coach.
CHICAGO BEARS — Named Tim Holt offensive
line coach.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS — Promoted director of
player personnel Tom Telesco to vice president of
football operations.
NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed DB Brandon Bing,
RB Andre Brown, OL Selvish Capers, WRDan De-
Palma, DT Dwayne Hendricks, TE Christian Hop-
kins, QB Ryan Perrilloux, WR Isaiah Stanback and
DE Adrian Tracy.
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEGBLUE BOMBERS —Re-signed S Bra-
dy Browne.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
CALGARY FLAMES — Re-signed D Derek Smith
to a two-year contract.
COLUMBUSBLUEJACKETS—Signed LWVinny
Prospal to a one-year contract.
FLORIDAPANTHERS—ReassignedGBrianFos-
ter to San Antonio (AHL).
NEW YORK ISLANDERS — Agreed to terms with
C Frans Nielsen on a four-year contract extension
though the 2015-16 season.
ST. LOUIS BLUES —Recalled F Evgeny Grachev
from Peoria (AHL).
American Hockey League
BRIDGEPORTSOUNDTIGERS—SignedDBarry
Goers to a professional tryout contract.
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
PHILADELPHIA UNION — Signed F Lionard Pa-
joy.
COLLEGE
BIGEASTCONFERENCE—Announcedtheaddi-
tion of the University of Memphis as a full confer-
ence member beginning in the 2013-14 academic
year.
AIR FORCE — Fired men’s basketball coach Jeff
Reynolds. Promoted assistant coach Dave Pilipov-
ich interim coach.
ST. ANDREWS — Announced the resignation of
men’s and women’s golf coach Lisa Becka.
H O C K E Y
National Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
N.Y. Rangers............... 51 33 13 5 71 141 103
Philadelphia ................ 53 30 16 7 67 173 157
New Jersey ................. 53 31 19 3 65 150 148
Pittsburgh .................... 54 30 19 5 65 163 141
N.Y. Islanders.............. 52 22 22 8 52 126 150
Northeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Boston.......................... 51 33 16 2 68 180 111
Toronto ........................ 54 28 20 6 62 168 157
Ottawa.......................... 56 27 22 7 61 162 174
Montreal....................... 54 21 24 9 51 140 147
Buffalo.......................... 52 22 24 6 50 126 154
Southeast Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Washington................. 53 28 21 4 60 149 149
Florida.......................... 52 24 17 11 59 131 149
Winnipeg...................... 55 25 24 6 56 131 151
Tampa Bay................... 52 23 24 5 51 148 176
Carolina ....................... 54 20 25 9 49 137 165
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit .......................... 54 35 17 2 72 172 129
St. Louis....................... 52 31 14 7 69 129 106
Nashville...................... 54 32 17 5 69 152 140
Chicago........................ 54 29 18 7 65 171 163
Columbus .................... 53 15 32 6 36 123 175
Northwest Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Vancouver ................... 53 33 15 5 71 171 133
Minnesota.................... 53 25 20 8 58 122 136
Colorado...................... 55 27 25 3 57 140 153
Calgary ........................ 53 24 22 7 55 126 144
Edmonton.................... 53 21 27 5 47 141 158
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose...................... 50 29 15 6 64 145 117
Los Angeles ................ 54 26 18 10 62 118 117
Phoenix........................ 54 25 21 8 58 143 143
Dallas ........................... 52 27 23 2 56 137 148
Anaheim ...................... 52 20 24 8 48 135 156
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime
loss.
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Islanders 1, Philadelphia 0, SO
Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2, SO
Vancouver 4, Nashville 3, SO
New Jersey 1, N.Y. Rangers 0
Washington 4, Florida 0
Columbus 3, Minnesota 1
St. Louis 3, Ottawa 1
Los Angeles 3, Tampa Bay 1
Winnipeg 2, Toronto 1
Phoenix 4, Dallas 1
Colorado 5, Chicago 2
Wednesday's Games
Buffalo 6, Boston 0
Detroit 4, Edmonton 2
Carolina at Anaheim, late
Calgary at San Jose, late
Today's Games
St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Winnipeg at Washington, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Nashville at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Friday's Games
Dallas at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Chicago at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
American Hockey League
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
St. John’s .............. 47 29 12 5 1 64 157 135
Manchester ........... 50 27 21 0 2 56 133 136
Worcester.............. 44 21 14 4 5 51 119 115
Portland ................. 47 23 19 2 3 51 132 147
Providence............ 48 22 21 2 3 49 111 133
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Penguins.............. 48 28 13 2 5 63 157 142
Hershey................. 47 26 14 4 3 59 171 142
Norfolk ................... 48 27 18 1 2 57 166 138
Syracuse............... 45 19 19 4 3 45 146 151
Binghamton........... 48 20 25 2 1 43 130 151
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Connecticut........... 47 22 16 4 5 53 140 138
Bridgeport ............. 46 23 18 3 2 51 137 135
Springfield............. 47 22 22 1 2 47 136 145
Albany.................... 45 19 18 5 3 46 115 137
Adirondack............ 46 22 22 1 1 46 128 136
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Charlotte................ 48 28 16 2 2 60 140 127
Chicago................. 47 26 17 1 3 56 135 122
Peoria .................... 47 24 20 2 1 51 143 136
Milwaukee ............. 45 24 19 1 1 50 128 120
Rockford................ 47 20 22 1 4 45 139 158
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto.................. 48 26 17 3 2 57 140 120
Rochester.............. 48 21 18 6 3 51 133 143
Grand Rapids........ 45 19 18 4 4 46 143 145
Lake Erie............... 47 21 22 2 2 46 114 131
Hamilton ................ 46 20 21 1 4 45 114 139
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Oklahoma City...... 47 30 12 2 3 65 139 103
Houston................. 48 23 13 3 9 58 130 129
Abbotsford ............ 47 26 18 3 0 55 114 118
San Antonio .......... 47 25 20 2 0 52 117 127
Texas..................... 46 20 22 2 2 44 135 143
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Wednesday's Games
Toronto 4, Rochester 3
St. John’s 2, Providence 1 OT
Lake Erie 4, Rockford 3
Milwaukee at Texas, 8:30 p.m.
Today's Games
Oklahoma City at Abbotsford, 9 p.m.
Friday's Games
San Antonio at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Houston at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
Portland at Providence, 7:05 p.m.
Albany at Hamilton, 7:30 p.m.
Hershey at Syracuse, 7:30 p.m.
Connecticut at Springfield, 7:30 p.m.
Adirondack at Norfolk, 7:30 p.m.
Manchester at Worcester, 7:30 p.m.
Texas at Rochester, 7:35 p.m.
Lake Erie at Peoria, 8 p.m.
Charlotte at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Chicago at Rockford, 8:05 p.m.
B A S K E T B A L L
National Basketball
Association
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia ................. 18 7 .720 —
Boston........................... 14 10 .583 3
1
⁄2
New York...................... 10 15 .400 8
New Jersey .................. 8 18 .308 10
1
⁄2
Toronto ......................... 8 18 .308 10
1
⁄2
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
Miami .............................. 19 6 .760 —
Atlanta............................. 16 9 .640 3
Orlando........................... 15 10 .600 4
Washington.................... 5 20 .200 14
Charlotte ........................ 3 22 .120 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago......................... 21 6 .778 —
Indiana .......................... 17 7 .708 2
1
⁄2
Milwaukee..................... 10 14 .417 9
1
⁄2
Cleveland...................... 9 14 .391 10
Detroit ........................... 6 20 .231 14
1
⁄2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
San Antonio.................. 17 9 .654 —
Dallas ............................ 14 11 .560 2
1
⁄2
Houston ........................ 14 11 .560 2
1
⁄2
Memphis....................... 12 13 .480 4
1
⁄2
New Orleans ................ 4 21 .160 12
1
⁄2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
Oklahoma City............... 20 5 .800 —
Denver............................ 15 10 .600 5
Portland.......................... 14 11 .560 6
Utah ................................ 13 11 .542 6
1
⁄2
Minnesota ...................... 13 12 .520 7
Pacific Division
W L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers.................. 15 7 .682 —
L.A. Lakers..................... 14 11 .560 2
1
⁄2
Phoenix .......................... 11 14 .440 5
1
⁄2
Golden State.................. 8 14 .364 7
Sacramento ................... 9 16 .360 7
1
⁄2
Tuesday's Games
Indiana 104, Utah 99
Boston 94, Charlotte 84
Miami 107, Cleveland 91
Minnesota 86, Sacramento 84
Phoenix 107, Milwaukee 105
Oklahoma City 119, Golden State 116
Wednesday's Games
Cleveland 99, L.A. Clippers 92
Milwaukee 105, Toronto 99
Orlando 102, Miami 89
New York 107, Washington 93
San Antonio 100, Philadelphia 90
Atlanta 97, Indiana 87
Detroit 99, New Jersey 92
Chicago 90, New Orleans 67
Memphis 85, Minnesota 80
Dallas at Denver, late
Houston at Portland, late
Today's Games
L.A. Lakers at Boston, 8 p.m.
Golden State at Denver, 9 p.m.
Houston at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Chicago at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Miami at Washington, 7 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Memphis, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New York, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Utah, 10:30 p.m.
College Basketball
Men's College Basketball Schedule
Today's Games
EAST
Lehigh at American U., 7 p.m.
Maine at Boston U., 7 p.m.
Rider at Canisius, 7 p.m.
Utah Valley at NJIT, 7 p.m.
Albany (NY) at New Hampshire, 7 p.m.
Siena at Niagara, 7 p.m.
UMBC at Stony Brook, 7 p.m.
Manhattan at Fairfield, 7:30 p.m.
Marist at St. Peter’s, 8:30 p.m.
SOUTH
Winthrop at Campbell, 7 p.m.
High Point at Charleston Southern, 7 p.m.
Elon at Chattanooga, 7 p.m.
High Point at Coastal Carolina, 7 p.m.
W. Carolina at Coll. of Charleston, 7 p.m.
Denver at FAU, 7 p.m.
North Texas at FIU, 7 p.m.
Appalachian St. at Furman, 7 p.m.
Radford at Gardner-Webb, 7 p.m.
Wofford at Georgia Southern, 7 p.m.
NC State at Georgia Tech, 7 p.m.
Mississippi at Mississippi St., 7 p.m.
VMI at Presbyterian, 7 p.m.
Davidson at The Citadel, 7:05 p.m.
Liberty at Charleston Southern, 7:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky at Middle Tennessee, 8 p.m.
Tennessee St. at Murray St., 8 p.m.
UNC Greensboro at Samford, 8 p.m.
E. Illinois at Tennessee Tech, 8 p.m.
UALR at Louisiana-Lafayette, 8:05 p.m.
Arkansas St. at South Alabama, 8:05 p.m.
Virginia Tech at Miami, 9 p.m.
MIDWEST
Valparaiso at Cleveland St., 7 p.m.
Wisconsin at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Butler at Youngstown St., 7:05 p.m.
Illinois at Indiana, 8 p.m.
UT-Martin at SE Missouri, 8 p.m.
S. Dakota St. at South Dakota, 8 p.m.
North Dakota at Chicago St., 8:05 p.m.
N. Dakota St. at UMKC, 8:05 p.m.
Wright St. at Green Bay, 9 p.m.
Iowa at Northwestern, 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
IUPUI at Oral Roberts, 8:05 p.m.
FAR WEST
Utah at Arizona St., TBA
Washington St. at Oregon St., TBA Stanford at
UCLA, TBA
Weber St. at N. Arizona, 8:35 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 9 p.m.
W. Illinois at S. Utah, 9 p.m.
Montana at N. Colorado, 9:05 p.m.
Louisiana Tech at Utah St., 9:05 p.m.
UC Riverside at Cal Poly, 10 p.m.
San Diego at Pepperdine, 10 p.m.
Loyola Marymount at Portland, 10 p.m.
Fresno St. at San Jose St., 10 p.m.
CS Northridge at UC Davis, 10 p.m.
UC Irvine at Cal St.-Fullerton, 10:05 p.m.
Portland St. at Idaho St., 10:05 p.m.
Montana St. at Sacramento St., 10:05 p.m.
Long Beach St. at Pacific, 10:30 p.m.
California at Southern Cal, 10:30 p.m.
Saint Mary’s (Cal) at Gonzaga, 11 p.m.
Washington at Oregon, 11 p.m.
Santa Clara at San Francisco, 11 p.m.
New Mexico St. at Idaho, 11:05 p.m.
Nevada at Hawaii, Mid
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
Feb. 10
At Uncasville, Conn. (ESPN2), Demetrius Andrade
vs. Derek Ennis, 12, IBF junior middleweight elim-
inator.
At Buenos Aires, Argentina, Luis Alberto Lazarte
vs. Johnriel Casimero, 12, for the interim IBF junior
flyweight title.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 3B
➛ S P O R T S
Behind multiple wins from
Sam Scialpi and Mia Nardone,
Pittston Area defeated Wyoming
Area 135-45 in Wyoming Valley
Conference girls swimming on
Wednesday night.
Wyoming Area was led by
multiple wins from Amy Alder.
200 MEDLEY RELAY – 1. PIT Sam Scialpi,
Antoinette Antonnacci, Mia Nardone, Tiffany
Smith, 2:05.70; 2. PIT; 3. WA. 200 FREE – 1. WA
Amy Alder, 2:24.42; 2. PIT Nina Fischer; 3. PIT
Kallie Miller. 200 IM – 1. PIT Mia Nardone, 2:26.20;
2. PIT Emily Seaman; 3. WA Nina Cruz. 50 FREE
– 1. PIT Sam Scialpi, 26.58; 2. PIT Sarah Kosik; 3.
WA Alex Holtz. DIVING – 1. PIT Lauren Diagon,
142.15; 2. PIT Theresa Domarsky. 100 FLY – 1.
PIT Mia Nardone, 1:04.03; 2. PIT Emily Seaman;
3. PIT Lauren Senese. 100 FREE – 1. PIT Tiffany
Smith, 1:02.84; 2. PIT Sarah Kosik; 3. PIT Liz
Scialpi. 500 FREE – 1. WA Amy Alder, 6:40.81; 2.
PIT Nina Fischer; 3. PIT Katie McGinty. 200 FREE
RELAY – 1. PIT Liz Scialpi, Kallie Miller, Lauren
Senese, Sarah Kosik, 1:59.78; 2. PIT; 3. PIT. 100
BACK – 1. PIT Sam Scialpi, 1:07.44; 2. PIT
Shannea Brady; 3. PIT Ashley Menichini. 100
BREAST – 1. PIT Antoinette Antonnacci, 1:22.47;
2. WA Genea Laviston; 3. PIT Jordan Gruttadavia.
400 FREE RELAY – 1. PIT Sam Scialpi, Tiffany
Smith, sarah Kosik, Mia Nardone, 4:18.20; 2. PIT;
3. WA.
GIRLS SWIMMING
Meyers 131, Dunmore 48
Meyers place first in every
event, sweeping Dunmore in
girls swimming action on
Wednesday night.
Julia Kerr placed first in two
events for the Mohawks.
200 MEDLEY RELAY – 1. MEY Emmalie
Langan, Allison Berman, Alanna Monte, Catherin
Morocho, 2:35.65; 2. DUN; 3. MEY. 200 FREE – 1.
MEY Cynthia Menges, 2:34.95; m21. DUN Abby
O’Neil; 3. MEY Kristen Cease. 200 IM – 1. MEY
Julia Kerr, 2:45.60; 2. MEY Allison Berman; 3.
DUN Em Fedor. 50 FREE – 1. MEY Eilish Hoban,
28.82; 2. DUN Dani Bistron; 3. MEY Florence
Kwok. DIVING – 1. MEY Amilyn Konopki, 144.40;
2. MEY Julia Miller. 100 FLY – 1. MEY Julia Kerr,
1:10.44; 2. MEY, Brianna Wallace; 3. DUN Gina
Bewick. 100 FREE – 1. MEY Emmalie Langan,
1:08.40; 2. MEY Cynthia Menges; 3. DUN Abby
O’Neil. 500 FREE – 1. MEY Allison Berman; 2.
DUN Dani Bistron; 3. MEY Sydney Rentch. 200
FREE RELAY – 1. MEY Brianna Wallace, Kelly
Mahalak, Julia Kerr, Eilish Hoban, 2:21.09; 2.
MEY; 3. DUN. 100 BACK – 1. MEY Brianna
Wallace, 1:23.58; 2. MEY Emmalie Langan; 3.
DUN Val Agular. 100 BREAST – 1. MEY Katie
Lehnert; 2. DUN Em Fedor; 3. MEY Kelly Mahalak.
400 FREE RELAY – 1. MEY Kristen Cease,
Sydney Rentch, Julia Miller, Catherin Morocho; 2.
MEY; 3. DUN.
BOYS SWIMMING
Pittston Area 77,
Wyoming Area 18
Tyler Cummings led Pittston
Area to a win over Wyoming
Area with wins in two events.
Mike Parovsky led the effort
for Wyoming Area with a win in
the diving event.
200 MEDLEY RELAY – 1. PIT Brandon
Winters, Nick Ramsky, Tyler Cummings, Dave
Whispell, 2:02.93. 200 FREE – 1. PIT Eana
McCloe 2:34.24; 2. PIT Scott Sayer; 3. PIT Jared
Barrett 50 FREE – 1. PIT Tyler Cummings, 25.76;
2. PIT Brandon Winters; 3. WA Ryan Flynn.
DIVING – 1. WA Mike Parovsky, 208.85; 2. PIT
Keith Tonte; 3. WA Jesse Synask 100 FREE – 1.
PIT Tyler Cummings, 57.24; 2. PIT Dave Whispell;
3. Eana McCloe. 200 FREE RELAY – 1. PIT
Brandon Winters, Nick Remsky, Eana McCloe,
Dave Whispell, 1:48.82; 2. PIT. 100 BACK – 1.
PIT Brandon Winters 1:26.55; 2. WA Ryan Flynn;
3. PIT Dave Whispell. 100 BREAST – 1. PIT Nick
Remsky, 1:18.64.
H I G H S C H O O L S W I M M I N G
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Area’s Amy Alder swims to victory in the girls 200 freestyle against Pittston Area during
a WVC Division 3 meet in Yatesville on Wednesday afternoon.
Patriots romp over rivals
The Times Leader staff
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. — In
what Robert Louis Stevenson
called “the most felicitous meet-
ing of land and sea,” the sea was
winning Wednesday at Pebble
Beach.
Jimmy Walker stood in the
bunker next to the sea wall
along the 18th fairway, soaking
up the scenery. Every 15 sec-
onds, waves crashed into the
rocks and sent a spectacular
splash of white surf some 15 feet
high.
There was so much salt water
in the front of the bunker that
the father of Harris English said
to Bob Estes, “Is this played as a
waste area?” Estes smiled and
pointed to the rakes placed neat-
ly next to the sand. “No, these
are bunkers,” he replied.
If the final day of practice for
the Pebble Beach National Pro-
Am was any indication, then this
could be a special week.
Not just because Tiger Woods
is back at this event for the first
time in 10 years. He practiced on
the Shore Course at Monterey
Peninsula, which he had never
seen. The last time he played,
Poppy Hills was part of the rota-
tion.
And not just because of the
unique blend of amateurs from
the world of Hollywood, sports
and Wall Street. One group at
Pebble featured San Francisco
49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, quar-
terback Alex Smith, retired line-
man Harris Barton and
Deutsche Bank Americas chief
executive Seth Waugh.
There are times when the
beauty of Pebble Beach makes a
six-hour round tolerable.
No one was in any hurry
Wednesday.
“If you have a bad experience
here, it can feel like the longest
week of your life,” Geoff Ogilvy
said as he walked up the fourth
fairway at Pebble, his head turn-
ed to the right to gaze at the sea.
“If it’s a good experience, it’s en-
joyable. And if it’s like this, it can
feel like the greatest week of the
year.”
It proved to be a tonic for
Spencer Levin.
Only four days ago, Levin was
poised to win his first PGA Tour
event when he took a six-shot
lead into the final round of the
Phoenix Open. He found himself
rushing, just wanting the final
round to be over, and he kept
dropping shots. A double bogey
on the 15th hole doomed him,
and Kyle Stanley rallied from
eight shots behind to win.
Levin was heartbroken, which
was to be expected.
“I was really bummed out Sun-
day night, pretty bummed out
Monday,” Levin said. “But I got
here, and then I was like, ‘Man, I
get to play Pebble Beach today,
so that’s pretty cool.’ It’s not like
you’re going home and playing
the muni in your backyard.
‘Wow, I’m at Pebble.’ So I didn’t
think about it much playing out
here.”
Davis Love III is making his
27th start at the AT&T Pebble
Beach National Pro-am.
G O L F
A beautiful week awaits field at Pebble Beach
By DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
Nick Palkovic (160) pinned
his opponent to started things
off for Wyoming Valley West as
the Spartans defeated West
Scranton 42-27 in high school
wrestling Wednesday night.
Ian Moran (195), Brandon
Baird (285) and Brian Dwyer
(152) also pinned their respec-
tive opponents.
106 – James Wright (WVW) maj. dec.
Stephen Capal 9-0; 113 – Alex Tirko (WVW) maj.
dec. Jayvon Jones 12-3; 120 – Kyle Krop-
manvich (WSCR) pinned Tyler White :30;. 126 –
Tom Hendry (WSCR) dec. Travis Roper 8-2; 132
– Nathan Cheek (WVW) dec. Zach Smith 12-6;
138 – Derek Simms (WVW) dec. Declan
Haggerty 16-10; 145 – Cody Tortes (WVW) tech.
fall Alex Way 17-2; 152 – Brian Dwyer (WVW)
pinned Pat Cooper 3:22; 160 – Nick Palkovic
(WVW) pinned Cody Walsh 1:54; 170 – John
Kobrynich (WSCR) forfeit; 182 – Tray Cowman
(WVW) tech. fall Connor Duffy 16-0; 195 – Ian
Moran (WVW) pinned Joe Bareff 5:25; 220 –
Jason Manning (WSCR) pinned TJ Evans :59;
285 – Brandon Baird (WVW) pinned Cameron
Vanwert 2:47. Note: Match started at 160
pounds.
Wyoming Area 56, Elk Lake 21
Andrew Schutz (132), Ryan
Filipiak (152), Corey Popovich
(220) and Carl Zielinski (285)
pinned their opponents to lead
Wyoming Area to a victory
over Elk Lake.
Elk Lake was led by Blaise
Cleveland (120), Dan Daly
(138), and Jared Curry (170),
who each had a pin.
106 – Shaun Vasquez (WA) forfeit; 113 –
Mark O’Malley (WA) forfeit; 120 – Blaise
Cleveland (ELK) pinned Carmen Mauriello 3:00;
126 – Stephen Barush (WA) forfeit; 132 –
Andrew Schutz (WA) pinned Frank Delesky 1:07;
138 – Dan Daly (ELK) pinned Sean O’Malley :52;
145 – Nicholas Heck (WA) dec. Derrick Smith
2-1; 152 – Ryan Filipiak (WA) pinned Dakotah
Sherman 4:21; 160 – Nick Mazzone (WA) forfeit;
170 – Jared Curry (ELK) pinned Evan Petrosky
1:43; 182 – Isaih Ofalt (ELK) dec. Jude Poliat-
Moran 4-0; 195 – Shawn Whiting (WA) tech. fall
Jared Kirchner 3:50; 220 – Corey Popovich (WA)
pinned Austin Bomboy :38; 285 – Carl Zielinski
(WA) pinned Harold Wehler :33.
Mount Carmel 39,
Hazleton Area 22
Hazleton Area fell on the
road to Mount Carmel.
Leading the effort with pins
for the Cougars were Tom
Biesadesky (170) and Chad
Hoffman (195).
106 – Lucas Johnson (HA) maj. Dec. Shane
Gudonis 13-2; 113 – Brendin Pancher (MCH)
forfeit; 120 – Micahel Saukaitis (MCH) dec.
Jeremy Vopava 2-0; 126 – Derek spachman
(HA) dec. Troy Tafner 4-3; 132 – Blake Panko
(MCH) dec. Kody Masters 6-4; 138 – Tyler Wariki
(MCH) dec. Daniel Bove 10-4; 145 – Zeke Zsido
(MCH) dec. Jonathan Veet 3-1; 152 – Daniel
Fletcher (MCH) pinned Randy Lisnok :36; 160 –
Meyrick Lamb (MCH) dec. Adam Fredmund 8-3;
170 – Tom Biesadesky (HA) pinned Cody Haupt
3:31; 182 – Brett Przekop (MCH) pinned William
Ramire Ramirez 2:35; 195 – Chad Hoffman (HA)
pinned Christen Howerter 4:21; 220 – Taylor
Schrmerhorn (HA) dec. Derek Urbanavage 3-0;
285 – Seth Stblewski (MCH) forfeit.
Note: Match started at 138 pounds.
H I G H S C H O O L W R E S T L I N G
Spartans triumph over Invaders
The Times Leader staff
the rebound and tie the game up for Eastern
on a coast-to-coast drive with 12.7 seconds
left.
Misericordia turnedit over just before time
expired in regulation and Eastern’s ensuing
half-court heave was off the mark, bringing
on overtime.
The teams traded early buckets before Art-
zerounian put the Cougars up for good, scor-
ing off a well-executed lob under the basket
with1:41left in the extra frame. Misericordia
iced it from the foul line from there.
Shooting 55 percent from the floor on the
night (47 percent from three), Misericordia
didn’t cool down in overtime, hitting 4-of-6
shots in the period and all six free throws.
Following up Artzerounian’s big night was
Ethan Eichhorst, who turned in a double-
double with 17 points and 11 rebounds while
adding seven assists. Matt Greene (16
points), Jeff Slanovec (13) and Joe Busacca
(10) also finished in double figures.
EASTERN (89): Donatoni 4-7 4-4 16, Soaries 3-12 2-4 8, Whipple
12-241-125, Nelson10-215-728, Kaiser 3-50-16, Bertolino0-00-00,
Singer 0-0 0-0 0, Merriman-Brown 0-1 0-0 0, Stowers 0-1 0-0 0, Werth
2-4 1-2 6, Malloy 0-1 0-2 0. Totals 34-76.
MISERICORDIA (94): Greene 4-5 4-4 16, Undersinger 1-4 0-0 3,
Artzerounian 10-19 10-11 30, Eichhorst 6-10 5-5 17, Slanovec 4-10 2-2
13, Busacca 4-5 2-3 10, Reilly 0-0 0-0 0, Bieski 0-0 1-2 1, Stone 0-0 0-0
0, Evans 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 31-56 24-27 94.
Halftime— Misericordia, 39-32; Regulation— Tied, 79-79
3-point field goals— EU 8-14 (Donatoni 4-4, Nelson 3-7, Werth
1-1, Whipple 0-1, Stowers 0-1); MU 8-17 (Greene 4-5, Slanovec 3-6,
Undersinger 1-4, Eichhorst 0-1, Busacca 0-1)
Misericordia women clinch
For the fourth straight season since joining
the Freedom Conference, the Misericordia
women’s squad is headed to the postseason.
The Cougars picked up one of their biggest
wins of the year on Wednesday, outlasting
Eastern 68-56 at the Anderson Center to
wrap up a berth in the Freedom Conference
tournament.
“I was thrilled with our effort tonight,” in-
terim coach Dave Martin said. “I thought we
competed, I thought we really defended and
we’regettinggreat leadershipout of (seniors)
Jess Robinson and Chris Marks.”
For at least one night, the logjam was bro-
ken near the top of the league standings, as
the win put Misericordia (12-9, 8-3) alone in-
to second place.
The Cougars now sit a game in front of
Eastern and a half-game ahead of DeSales,
which plays tonight. Misericordia split the
season series with both teams in the battle to
host a semifinal game on Feb. 22.
On Wednesday, Marks led four Misericor-
dia players in double figures with 16 points,
followed by Tyann McDaniel (15), Robinson
(13) and Hannah Seely (12).
The latter was a bit of a surprise, as Seely
hadmissedthelast threegames withanankle
injury but returned early to give the Cougars
a lift with a strong effort at both ends of the
court.
Seely and Robinson had four steals apiece
as the Cougars forced the Eagles (16-6, 7-4)
into 21 turnovers.
EASTERN (56): Boreman 2-5 0-0 4, Lincoln 4-11 1-2 12, Roland
8-19 4-6 21, Wileczek 1-3 0-0 2, Nowak 3-4 1-2 8, DiDomenico 1-2 0-0
3, Gavitt 0-1 0-0 0, Dougherty 2-5 0-0 4, Dvorak 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 21-50
8-12 56.
MISERICORDIA(68): Robinson 4-15 4-4 13, McDaniel 5-8 1-3 15,
Drayton1-30-13, Sileo2-50-04, Marks5-126-716, Seely6-100-012,
Kessler 0-1 0-0 0, Smicherko 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 25-60 11-15 68.
Halftime– Misericordia, 33-29
3-point field goals— EU 6-22 (Lincoln 3-7, DiDomenico 1-1, No-
wak 1-2, Roland1-4, Gavitt 0-1, Wileczek 0-2, Dougherty 0-2, Boreman
0-3); MU 7-20 (McDaniel 4-5, Drayton 1-2, Smicherko 1-3, Robinson
1-7, Sileo 0-1, Marks 0-1, Kessler 0-1)
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Joe Busacca of Misericordia shoots while
Eastern defender Collin Whipple pursues
himduring Wednesday’s FreedomConfer-
ence game in Dallas.
COUGARS
Continued fromPage 1B
CORAL GABLES, Fla. —
Shenise Johnson scored 19
points and Riquna Williams
added 17 to lead No. 6 Miami
to a 61-37 win over No. 22
North Carolina on Wednesday
night.
Stefanie Yderstrom chipped
in 10 points for the Hurricanes,
who won their 38th straight
home game.
The 38-game home streak is
the third-longest active streak
in the nation. Only Connecticut
(98) and Stanford (74) have
longer streaks.
With the win, Miami (21-3,
10-1 ACC) avenged its only loss
in the ACC. North Carolina
beat Miami 65-63 in Chapel
Hill on Jan. 2.
Georgetown 56,
Seton Hall 51
WASHINGTON — Sugar
Rodgers had 23 points and 11
rebounds to help Georgetown
beat Seton Hall.
Texas A&M67,
Kansas State 36
COLLEGE STATION, Texas
— Kelsey Bone and Karla Gil-
bert scored 14 points apiece to
lead No. 15 Texas A&M to its
fourth straight win, beating
Kansas State.
Texas A&M had a 20-point
lead at halftime and used a 12-5
run early in the second half to
extend its advantage to 51-24.
Tyra White had five points to
lead the Aggies in that span.
St. Bonaventure 69,
Massachesetts 54
AMHERST, Mass. — Megan
Van Tatenhove and Armelia
Horton scored 17 points each
and St. Bonaventure tied a
school single-season record for
wins with a victory over Mas-
sachusetts.
WOMEN’ S BASKET BAL L
Hurricanes blow past Tar Heels
The Associated Press
The King’s women’s basket-
ball team remained perfect in
league play and clinched the
top seed in the upcoming Free-
dom Conference tournament
courtesy of a 79-69 win over
Delaware Valley on Wednesday
night at Scandlon Gymnasium.
It was the 12th straight win
for the Lady Monarchs (19-3,
11-0), who overcame a four-
point halftime with a 16-0 run
to start the second half.
Paige Carlin led four King’s
double-figure scorers with a
team-high 20 points and six
rebounds. Katlin Michaels
added 13 points, six rebounds,
eight assists and three steals
while Samantha Simcox con-
tributed 13 points, seven re-
bounds, and two steals.
Ashley Davies score 13 points
while Celia Rader chipped in
with 10 points.
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
FDU-Florham55, Wilkes 50
The road was unkind to
Wilkes (1-10 Freedom, 6-16), as
the Colonels lost at FDU-Flor-
ham.
Allison Walsh led Wilkes
with nine points and 12 re-
bounds. Three players had
eight points -- Megan Kaz-
merski (five rebounds), Angela
Palmerio and Whitney Connol-
ly.
For the Devils, Kyra Dayon
posted 14 points and grabbed
nine rebounds.
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Delaware Valley 70, King’s 66
Matt Fiorino drained six
three-pointers, but it wasn’t
enough to stop the Monarchs’
losing slide as they lost their
seventh straight game.
Fiorino’s three with two
minutes left gave King’s a 63-62
lead, but the Aggies shot a
perfect 6-of-6 from the free
throw line to hold off the Mon-
archs’ charge.
Fiorino led the Monarchs
offense with 18 points 6-of-9
shooting from beyond the arc.
Freshman guard Mike Foster
hit four threes to finish with 13
points while senior Nick Reisig
had 10 points, five assists and
four boards.
FDU-Florham68, Wilkes 66
A last-second shot by Tyler
Breznitsky missed the mark
and the Colonels fell on the
road to FDU-Florham, losing
for the fourth time in five
games to fall out of first place
in the Freedom Conference.
Kendall Hinze scored 23
points to lead Wilkes (14-7, 7-4)
while Paul Huch added a dou-
ble-double with 12 points and
12 rebounds.
Matt Mullins scored seven
points with four assists and
four steals.
WRESTLING
Elizabethtown 40, King’s 18
The Monarchs traveled with
just seven grapplers due in-
juries and academic commit-
ments and won only one match
that was contested.
Senior All-American Mike
Reilly earned a first-period pin
over Kyle Deeds in 1:09. The
Monarchs picked up two for-
feits of their own as Chris Maz-
zocchi (149) and Peter Dwyer
(285) had their hands raised.
L O C A L C O L L E G E R O U N D U P
King’s clinches Freedom
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
PAGE 4B THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
Based on the background of
the two fighters, it would make
sense to assume the main event
of PA Cage Fight 10 will come
down to wrestling skills.
Not so fast, according to Justin
Hickey, who will take on Jason
McLean in the main event of the
card scheduled for Friday at The
Woodlands.
Hickey that although both
competitors have his roots in
wrestling, his style as a Mixed
Martial Arts fighter is a little
more difficult to label.
“I’m still trying to figure that
out myself,” Hickey said. “I have
the wrestling background, but
I’ve worked on everything else in
my game.
“I love striking. I love every-
thing about the sport, so there’s
not really one word to describe
me.”
Still, Hickey has a few.
“I’m explosive. I’m exciting,”
he said. “I try to do whatever
comes to mind at the time.
“I don’t really have a built-in
game plan. I go for whatever is
open at the time.”
Hickey, a 5-foot-7, 145-pounder
from northern Virginia, was in-
troduced to the sport by Kris
McCray, his wrestling coach at
Gar-Field High School. McCray
won the main event of PA Cage
Fight 9 on Nov. 25 in Scranton.
Before attending Old Domin-
ion University, where he compet-
ed unattached in some tourna-
ments while being redshirted in
his freshman year on the wres-
tling squad, Hickey already tried
his first MMA bout as an ama-
teur.
Hickey, 23, left Old Dominion
to attend college closer to home
at George Mason University in
Fairfax, Va., ending his wrestling
career, but leaving him in posi-
tion to continue his MMA train-
ing.
After going 4-0 as an amateur,
Hickey is 5-2 as a professional, in-
cludingwins inhis last twobouts.
Hickey is currently working
out in Toms River, N.J., after
spending time in New Mexico,
where he still heads at times for
more training. He will be making
his first appearance in a profes-
sional main event and will be
headingtotheareatofight for the
first time.
“I’ve heard a lot of good
things,” Hickey said. “I’m really
close friends with Jimy Hettes.
I’m actually going to go there to
train before the fight.”
Hettes, from Swoyersville,
picked up his second Ultimate
Fighting Championship victory
Dec. 30 to improve to 10-0 as a
pro.
Hickey is still trying to make
his name in the sport, but said he
is trying not to place too much
emphasis on the main event sta-
tus.
“I don’t really want to make it a
big deal,” Hickey said. “It’s a
fight. I don’t really want to have
that too much in my head.
“I’dwant to put ona goodshow
even if I was the first fight.”
McLean, from Plainfield, N.J.,
is 6-4 as a professional but has
lost two of his last three bouts.
Theformer DivisionIII All-Amer-
icanat Muhlenbergis a headhigh
school wrestling coach in New
Jersey.
The card currently calls for
three professional and up to 11
amateur bouts.
The highlight of the amateur
card is Mayfield’s Martin Wojna-
rowski (5-0) taking on East
Stroudsburg’s Eric Roncoroni
(3-0) in a PA Cage Fight Series
Light Heavyweight title bout.
Tickets are available at
www.pacagefight.com as well as
Max Performance Supplements
in Scranton, Dooley’s Pub & Eat-
ery in Old Forge, Peanut Bar in
Carbondale, The Woodlands and
World Class Boxing in Wilkes-
Barre, and Northeastern Jiu Jitsu
Martial Arts Academy in
Swoyersville.
M I X E D M A R T I A L A R T S
Woodlands main event features former wrestlers
Transplanted Virginian has
been encouraged by a friend,
MMA rising start Jimy Hettes.
By TOMROBINSON
For The Times Leader
promise to support the horse
racing and breeding industry,
which the group says employs
more than 23,000 Pennsylva-
nians.
“This budget is not support-
ing the horse racing industry in
Pennsylvania — it’s gutting it,”
said Todd Mostoller, director of
the Pennsylvania Horsemen’s
Benevolent and Protective Asso-
ciation.
“Owners, trainers and breed-
ers have invested millions of dol-
lars in Pennsylvania with the
legislative promise that horse
racing would provide a good re-
turn on their investment,” said
Kim Hankins of the Meadows
Standardbred Owners Associ-
ation. “It is unfathomable that
the governor now wants to stifle
the growth of this still emerging
industry.”
Corbett’s spokesman, Kevin
Harley, said his boss did not
break a campaign promise. Cor-
bett pledged only to promote
the industry through education-
al venues such as the agricultu-
ral fairs, he said.
“He never made a commit-
ment of financial support,” Har-
ley said, citing the state’s ongo-
ing budget problems.
HORSES
Continued from Page 1B
once you get through that, you’ve
got it made. It’s just a matter of
keeping ongoing forward.”
McCabe was also able to block
out the pain, choosing to use the
emotional pain of loss as motiva-
tionto press onward.
“I ran the JFK50 in memory of
several close family members
who recently passed after coura-
geouslybattlingcancer,” McCabe
said. “For me, whatever pain my
body may have felt from running
that day never really registered.”
Eight hours and 27 minutes af-
tertherunbegan, Bandrucrossed
the finish line. He was the 134th
participant todoso. It washissec-
ondbest time inhis three years in
the run.
McCabe joined the ranks of
thosetofinishtherunjust 2hours
and 17 minutes later with a final
time of 10 hours and 44 minutes.
Hewas 574thout of 865finishers.
After the pain subsided, both
men had a chance to really rest
and reflect on what they had ac-
complished. Not only did they
meet the challenge posedby Ken-
nedy49yearsago, buttheygained
several life experiences simply
through running along the way:
strength of character, the power
of determination and the forging
of friendships.
WhileMcCabestatedhewould
cherish his experiences for a life-
time, it was Bandruwhosummed
up his love for the JFK 50 Mile
Runbest.
“I usually compare the week-
end to Christmas weekend be-
cause I look so forward to the
whole expo and the camaraderie
of all the people,” Bandru said. “I
plan on doing it as long as I possi-
bly can.”
Other regional finishers in-
clude: Mark Monahan of Scran-
ton 8:25, 131st; Helene Strutko of
Harveys Lake, 9:28, 282nd; Robin
Mancinelli of Moosic, 10:12,
468th; AnthonyCerminaroof Jer-
myn, 10:15, 474th; Donald Ka-
nauyof Archbald,10:22, 496th; Jo-
nathan Louiselle of Taylor, 10:36,
544th; Jeffrey Ginsburg of Jer-
myn, 10:37, 545th; and Chris
Scalese of Moscow, 10:54, 597th.
From2.5 to15.5 miles, runners
navigate the rugged Appalachian
Trail beforedescendingaseriesof
steep slopes and eventually con-
necting withthe C&OCanal tow-
path. Fromthere, the course con-
tinues on a flat, unpaved surface
for 26.3 miles.
The final 8.4 miles of the run
takeplaceonpavedcountryroads
that lead to the finish line in Wil-
liamsport, Md.
Inordertotrainforarunof such
magnitude, Bandru mentioned
that he participates inat least one
marathonona monthly basis. Ac-
cording to him, even those who
are able to run over 50 miles a
weekrequireaspecial mindset for
long-distance runs.
“It’salot of negotiatingthelong
runs,” Bandru said. “In your head
youtell yourself that if youcanget
to here, you canmake it there. It’s
really about mental toughness.”
McCabe also outlined the impor-
tance of building up physical
strengthprior toa harshlong-dis-
tance run.
“The key for me was to contin-
ually increase my weekend long
run over a period of several
months,” McCabe said. “My final
long run, which was three weeks
prior to the race, was about 30
miles.”
When the day of the run finally
arrived and their numbers were
put on, the two eagerly awaited
thestart of theraceandwondered
to what extent their training
would pay off once the 50 miler
began.
For many first time participa-
nts in the run, the pain following
the rocky terrain of the Appala-
chian Trail can be excruciating.
For the veteran Bandru however,
the pain was anticipated and he
knewexactly howto deal withit.
“There is a point at mile 27
where a lot of people choose to
pull out if they’re hurting,” Ban-
dru said. “That’s where you’re re-
ally at your weakest point, but
KENNEDY
Continued from Page 1B
BUFFALO, N.Y. — With
Buffalo Sabres coach Lindy
Ruff nursing three broken ribs
and watching from the press
box, goalie Ryan Miller made
36 saves to earn his second
shutout in three games in a
6-0 win over the Boston
Bruins on Wednesday night.
Jason Pominville scored
twice, set up both times up
by Ville Leino, and helped
Buffalo improve to 4-0-1 in its
past five. Tyler Ennis had a
goal and assist, and Drew
Stafford, Christian Ehrhoff
and Patrick Kaleta also
scored for Buffalo, 5-0-4 in its
past nine home games.
The Northeast Division-
leading Bruins fell to 5-6-1 in
their past 12 games. Boston,
which won at Washington on
Sunday, hasn’t won two
straight victories since beat-
ing Winnipeg and Montreal
on Jan. 10-12.
Bruins starter Tuukka Rask
didn’t last 22 minutes before
being pulled after allowing
three goals on 10 shots. Tim
Thomas gave up three goals
on 19 shots.
Red Wings 4, Oilers 2
DETROIT — Drew Miller
and Henrik Zetterberg scored
in the third period, and De-
troit extended its home win-
ning streak to 18 games with
a victory over Edmonton.
The Red Wings overcame
two more goals by Edmon-
ton’s Sam Gagner to move
within two wins of the NHL
record of 20 straight home
victories, set by the Boston
Bruins during the 1929-30
season and matched by Phila-
delphia in 1976. The Bruins
also won 19 in a row in Bos-
ton during the 1970-71 sea-
son.
Johan Franzen and Cory
Emmerton also scored for
Detroit, but Gagner answered
with a pair of goals to tie the
game. He has eight goals and
six assists in four games.
N H L
AP PHOTO
Edmonton Oilers right wing Ryan Jones (28) and Detroit Red Wings left wing Justin Abdelkader fight during the first period
Wednesday in Detroit.
Sabres blank Bruins; Wings win
The Associated Press
Source: Wings, Leafs in next Winter Classic
ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A person familiar with the NHL’s plan said
the Detroit Red Wings will play the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 2013
Winter Classic.
The person spoke on the condition of anonymity Wednesday
because the league isn’t expected to announce the matchup until
Thursday.
Earlier Wednesday, the University of Michigan Board of Regents
authorized the athletic department to seek a contract with the NHL
that would allow the league to hold next year’s showcase at
Michigan Stadium. The NHL has offered to pay up to $3 million for a
license to use the iconic college football stadium, according to the
recommendation approved by the board.
The recommendation also said the Winter Classic would be
scheduled for Jan. 1, 2013, with an alternate date of Jan. 2. A liquor
license would be obtained so alcohol could be served at the event,
and the NHL would bring its “advertising and other sponsorship
arrangements” into the stadium.
NEW YORK — It appears San-
tonio Holmes is sticking around
—justastheNewYorkJetssaidhe
would.
By remaining on the roster
through the second day of the
NFL’s waiver period Tuesday, the
talented but troublesome wide re-
ceiver will get $15.25 million in
guaranteed money over the next
two seasons. A clause in Holmes’
five-year, $5 million contract,
signed last offseason, kicked in
Wednesday morning.
Holmes’ futureappearedmurky
with the Jets after a tumultuous
season in which he feuded with
quarterback Mark Sanchez and
the offensive line, and was
benched during the season finale
inMiami forarguinginthehuddle.
Still, owner Woody Johnson,
GMMikeTannenbaumandcoach
Rex Ryan all insisted that Holmes
would remain with the team de-
spite the squabbles.
Holmes, alreadyguaranteedhis
salary for next season, had a $7.5
millionguaranteefor the2013sea-
son kick in after Tuesday. While
the Jets could still theoretically
cut himor try to trade him, the fi-
nancial commitment makes that
an unlikely scenario.
So, New York is stuck hoping
that Holmes can work out his is-
sues with his teammates and re-
turn to the playmaking form that
Ryan and the Jets became so
enamored of when they re-signed
himlast July.
AP FILE PHOTO
New York Jets wide receiver Santonio Holmes pulls in a touch-
down pass during the second half against the Washington Red-
skins in Landover, Md., in December 2011. By remaining on the
roster through the second day of the NFL’s waiver period,
Holmes will get $15.25 million in guaranteed money over the
next two seasons.
N F L
Holmes staying put with Jets
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Russell Bra-
nyan has agreed to a minor
league contract with the New
York Yankees and will try to
win a bench job as a corner in-
fielder during spring training.
The Yankees announced the
deal Wednesday.
Branyan hit .197 with five
homers and 14 RBIs in 127 at-
bats last seasonfor the Arizona
Diamondbacks and Los An-
geles Angels, playingfirst base,
third base and designated hit-
ter. He has not played the out-
field in the major leagues since
2007.
The 36-year-old has a .232
career average with 194 home
runs in 14 major league sea-
sons with 10 teams.
The Yankees also signed mi-
nor league deals with right-
handed reliever Manny Delcar-
men and outfielder Dewayne
Wise on Wednesday.
M L B
Branyan,
Yanks agree
to contract
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ S P O R T S
The Big East has acquired all
the pieces needed to build a new
coast-to-coast conference. Put-
ting them all together, though, is
going to take a while.
The conference wanted to re-
build itself into a 12-team foot-
ball league that can hold a cham-
pionship game, and Memphis of-
ficially became that 12th mem-
ber on Wednesday when it
accepted an invite it has long
coveted.
But the new Big East isn’t
scheduled to be fully functional
until the 2015 football season. As
for the next three years, what the
Big East will look like is any-
body’s guess.
Memphis is the seventh
school, and fourth from Confer-
ence USA, to sign up since De-
cember for future membership
in the Big East. The Tigers will
compete in the Big East in all
sports.
“It certainly is an historic day
for us,” University of Memphis
President Shirley Raines said
during a teleconference with Big
East Commissioner John Mari-
natto and Memphis Athletic Di-
rector R.C. Johnson.
Memphis has been trying to
upgrade its conference affiliation
for years, and the Big East was
always the most likely landing
spot. The Tigers were snubbed
during the Big East’s last mas-
sive expansion in 2005 and lost a
longtime rivalry with Louisville
in the process.
Now with the Big East in need
replacements for West Virginia,
Pittsburgh and Syracuse, there
was finally room for Memphis.
In December, the Big East an-
nounced Boise State and San
Diego State from the Mountain
West Conference would join in
2013 for football only, and Hous-
ton, SMU and Central Florida,
from C-USA, would become
members in all sports.
Last month, Navy football
jumped on board, though that
won’t happen until 2015.
The Big East pitched Air Force
and BYU on joining, but couldn’t
work out a deal with either. Tem-
ple was also being considered,
but the Philadelphia school and
former Big East member was
passed over for Memphis be-
cause the conference wanted to
bolster its new west wing.
AP PHOTO
Memphis athletic director R.C. Johnson cheerfully belts out his
catch phrase, "It’s a great day to be a Tiger," as the school offi-
cially became the 12th member of the Big East Conference.
B I G E A S T C O N F E R E N C E
Memphis welcomed with open arms
By RALPH D. RUSSO
AP College Football Writer
SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Kris
Joseph scored a career-high 29
points, hitting a go-ahead 3-
pointer in the final minute of
overtime, and No. 2 Syracuse
beat 12th-ranked Georgetown
64-61 on Wednesday night to
give coach Jim Boeheim his
880th career win.
Boeheim took sole posses-
sion of third place all-time in
Division I, one more than North
Carolina’s Dean Smith, but it
wasn’t easy against the Or-
ange’s rival.
The game was tied at 55 after
regulation, and freshman Otto
Porter scored the first four
points of overtime for the
Hoyas, swishing two free
throws and hitting a baseline
jumper to give Georgetown
61-59 lead with 2:19 left.
Dion Waiters tied it with a
pair of free throws for the Or-
ange, and after Porter lost the
ball out of bounds at the other
end, Scoop Jardine fed Joseph
in the left corner, and he buried
his career-best sixth 3 of the
game with 29 seconds left.
Jardine sealed it by forcing a
turnover by Jason Clark with
4.9 seconds to go, allowing
Syracuse (24-1, 11-1 Big East) to
remain unbeaten at home at
16-0. Georgetown (18-5, 8-4),
had won five of six entering the
game.
Fab Melo had 11 points, seven
rebounds and six blocks for
Syracuse, which won despite
being dominated on the glass
52-35. Jardine finished with
eight assists.
Porter led Georgetown with
14 points, Clark had 12 and
Hollis Thompson 10.
The 87th meeting between
the staunch rivals — Syracuse
leads 48-39 — had added signif-
icance. With Syracuse’s impend-
ing move to the Atlantic Coast
Conference, it might have been
the last time the teams meet as
Big East foes in the Carrier
Dome.
It turned into one to remem-
ber for the crowd of 27,820.
Michigan State 77,
Penn State 57
EAST LANSING, Mich. —
Draymond Green had 23 points
and 12 rebounds and made
some timely shots to help No.
11 Michigan State pull away
from Penn State in a win.
The Spartans (19-5, 8-3 Big
Ten) pulled within a game of
conference-leading and third-
ranked Ohio State, setting up a
big game Saturday on the road
against the Buckeyes.
The last-place Nittany Lions
(10-15, 2-10) have lost five
straight and eight of nine.
Michigan State’s Adreian
Payne matched a career high
with 12 points and freshman
Branden Dawson also had 12,
scoring in double figures for the
fifth straight game.
Tim Frazier scored 19 on
6-of-18 shooting for the Nittany
Lions.
Duke 85, North Carolina 84
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. —
Freshman Austin Rivers buried
a 3-pointer at the horn to give
No. 10 Duke a win over No. 5
North Carolina.
Rivers scored a season-high
29 points and hit six 3s, though
the last will certainly live on in
the lore on the fierce rivalry.
With the Blue Devils (20-4,
7-2) trailing by two, Rivers
launched a 3 over 7-footer Tyler
Zeller from the right wing. The
ball swished through the net,
sending Rivers running down
the court in celebration while
the rest of his teammates gave
chase before mobbing him in
front of a stunned UNC crowd.
Rivers’ 3 capped a wild rally
for the Blue Devils, who trailed
by 10 points with about 2
1
⁄2
minutes left.
Harrison Barnes scored 25
points for the Tar Heels (20-4,
7-2), while Zeller finished with
23 points and 11 rebounds. But
Zeller missed a free throw with
13.9 seconds left, setting up
Rivers’ winning shot.
Michigan 62, Nebraska 46
LINCOLN, Neb. — Zack
Novak scored 14 points to go
over 1,000 for his career and
No. 22 Michigan defeated Ne-
braska.
The Wolverines (18-7, 8-4)
outscored Nebraska 15-4 to
start the second half and went
on to only their second win in
six Big Ten road games. The
Cornhuskers (11-12, 3-9) lost
their third straight.
Stu Douglass had 13 points
and Trey Burke 12 for Michi-
gan. Bo Spencer scored 13 to
lead Nebraska.
Temple 79,
George Washington 72
PHILADELPHIA — Ramon
Moore scored 25 points and
Khalif Wyatt added 22 as Tem-
ple rallied in the final minutes
to overtake George Washing-
ton.
The Owls (17-5, 7-2 Atlantic
10 Conference), trailing 67-57
with 5:09 remaining, went on
an 18-2 run to lead 75-69 with
22 seconds to go. George Wash-
ington went the entire stretch
without a field goal.
Cincinnati 76, St. John’s 54
NEW YORK — Sean Kil-
patrick scored 10 of his 14
points in the opening 5 minutes
of the second half and Cincinna-
ti went on to a victory over St.
John’s.
The blowout win by the Bear-
cats (17-7, 7-4 Big East) ended a
string of four straight games
between the teams that ended
with two-point margins, in-
cluding St. John’s 57-55 win at
Cincinnati on Jan. 7.
Kansas 68, Baylor 54
WACO, Texas — Jeff Withey
scored a career-high 25 points
and Kansas went ahead to stay
during a stretch without Tho-
mas Robinson as the seventh-
ranked Jayhawks had another
convincing victory over sixth-
ranked Baylor.
After a 14-3 run over the final
4
1
⁄2 minutes of the first half with
Robinson on the bench to take
its first lead, Kansas (19-5, 9-2
Big 12) scored 14 consecutive
points early in the second half
to take complete control of the
game.
Boston College 64,
Florida State 60
BOSTON — Jordan Daniels
scored a career-high 19 points,
including four 3-pointers, to
lead Boston College to a victory
over No. 15 Florida State and
snap the Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence-leading Seminoles’ win
streak at seven games.
BC (8-16, 3-7 ACC) had lost
six in a row and nine of its
previous 11. It had not beaten a
ranked team in three years.
But the Eagles took the lead
midway through the first half
and fell behind only briefly in
the second, running their lead
to eight points and holding on.
Virginia 68,
Wake Forest 44
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. —
Mike Scott made all nine of his
shots and scored 19 points to
lead No. 19 Virginia to a win
over Wake Forest.
Guard Joe Harris added 11
points and three other players
were in double figures for the
Cavaliers (19-4, 6-3 Atlantic
Coast), who ended a six-game
losing skid at the hands of the
Demon Deacons.
Travis McKie scored 16
points for Wake Forest (11-13,
2-8), which has dropped five in
a row and nine of its past 11.
C.J. Harris scored 10.
MAJOR COL L EGE BASKETBAL L
Syracuse survives G-town
AP PHOTO
Georgetown’s Hollis Thompson, right, shoots over Syracuse’s Scoop Jardine during the first half
Wednesday in Syracuse, N.Y.
The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — Tony
Parker scored 37 points, Gary
Neal added 18 off the bench and
the San Antonio Spurs beat the
Philadelphia 76ers 100-90 in a
matchup of division leaders
Wednesday night.
Tim Duncan had 16 points
and 11 rebounds and Tiago Split-
ter scored 15 for the Southwest
Division-leading Spurs.
Lou Williams led Philadelphia
with 22 points. Andre Iguodala
had 17 and Thaddeus Young
scored 16.
The Atlantic Division-leading
Sixers fell to 4-2 during a seven-
game stretch that coach Doug
Collins termed “Death Row”
because of the quality of their
opponents. After building a
strong record early in the season
against lesser competition, they
beat Orlando, Chicago, Atlanta
(on the road) and the Los An-
geles Lakers. Their other loss
was at home to Miami.
Knicks 107, Wizards 93
WASHINGTON — Jeremy
Lin had 23 points and a career-
high 10 assists, and Tyson Chan-
dler scored 25 points and had 11
rebounds to lead the New York
Knicks to their third straight
win.
Chandler, a 10-year NBA vet-
eran, finished two points short
of his career high, but it was
again Lin’s night. Following his
two breakout games of 25 points
against New Jersey and 28 in
Monday’s win against Utah with
a dazzling display of his passing
and shooting skills, Lin was 9
for 14 from the field, and five of
six from the line.
Magic 102, Heat 89
ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight
Howard had 25 points and 24
rebounds, Ryan Anderson
scored 27 points and the Orlan-
do Magic hit 17 3-pointers in a
victory over the Miami Heat.
Cavaliers 99, Clippers 92
CLEVELAND — Ramon
Sessions scored a season-high
24 points as a last-minute re-
placement for injured rookie
Kyrie Irving and Antawn Jami-
son scored 27, leading the Cle-
veland Cavaliers to a win over
the Los Angeles Clippers.
Bucks 105, Raptors 99
TORONTO — Carlos Delfino
scored a season-high 25 points
against his former team, Drew
Gooden had 20 points and 14
rebounds and the Milwaukee
Bucks snapped a three-game
losing streak, beating the Toron-
to Raptors.
Pistons 99, Nets 92
NEWARK, N.J. — Greg Mon-
roe had 20 points and 12 re-
bounds and the Detroit Pistons
won their season-high third
straight game with a victory
over the New Jersey Nets.
Jonas Jerebko added 16 points
and Tayshaun Prince had 15 as
the Pistons snapped a seven-
game road losing streak. Ben
Gordon, playing for the first
time in 11 games, added 14
points for Detroit, which almost
blew an 18-point second-half
lead.
Hawks 97, Pacers 87
ATLANTA — Josh Smith
scored 28 points and grabbed 12
rebounds, leading the Hawks to
a victory over the Indiana Pac-
ers that snapped Atlanta’s three-
game home losing streak.
Bulls 90, Hornets 67
NEW ORLEANS — Carlos
Boozer scored 18 points and the
Chicago Bulls won their fourth
straight game while nearly hold-
ing New Orleans to a franchise
low in points during a rout.
Joakim Noah had 13 points
and 10 rebounds for the Bulls.
Taj Gibson scored 14 and Kyle
Korver 12.
Grizzlies 85,
Timberwolves 80
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Rudy
Gay had 19 points and nine
rebounds, and Quincy Pondex-
ter added a career-high 17 points
as the Memphis Grizzlies
snapped a three-game losing
streak with a victory over the
Minnesota Timberwolves.
Marc Gasol and Dante Cun-
ningham scored 12 apiece, and
O. J. Mayo finished with 10 for
Memphis despite connecting on
only three of 11 shots as the
Grizzlies shot just 37 percent
overall.
AP PHOTO
The San Antonio Spurs’ Tony Parker drives against the Philadel-
phia 76ers’ Jrue Holiday in the first half Wednesday in Philadel-
phia.
N B A
Parker scores 37 points,
leads Spurs over 76ers
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6B THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
7
1
3
5
2
3
Social Security
Disability
Claimants represented by
attorneys are more successful
in obtaining benefits. Call me
for a FREE CONSULTATION.
I can help.
Janet A. Conser
Attorney At Law
1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
283-1200
Get The Benefits
You Deserve!
Member of the National
Organization of Social Security
Claimants’ Representatives
Over 25 Years Experience
(570) 288-2514 • Business
(570) 709-7798 • Cell
JerryBuschJr@aol.com
Each Office is Independently Owned And Operated.
Jerry Busch, Jr. Pat Busch
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE
• Experienced
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• Working for You...
• Full Service Office
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GERALD L. BUSCH REAL ESTATE, INC.
PHONE: (570) 823-2211
FAX: (570) 824-0553
INSURANCE ESTIMATES • COLLISION REPAIRS • FOREIGN & DOMESTIC • QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP
CALL
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105 WEST SAYLOR AVE.
PLAINS, PA 18702
Rick’s Body Shop Fender Benders
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Price: 100.00
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AGM Insured: S&P AA-
Standalone Credit Rating: S&P A
For more information, please contact:
The security listed above is subject to availability and market price fuctuation. This
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fnancial situation, and tax status. Certain bonds may be subject to redemption prior to
maturity. Redemption prior to maturity may have a negative impact on the yield. The
information presented here is from sources believed to be reliable, but not guaranteed
by Janney as to accuracy or completeness. 1/2012
Susan A. Whitesell
Keith R. Kleinman
AdamD. Shelp
Peter D. Shelp
Janney Montgomery Scott LLC
270 Picicc Siicci - Suiic 10S, Kingsion, PA 1S704
ò70.2SS.S140 - S00.64S.ò021
Member: NYSE · FINRA· SIPC
3.00%
YIELD TO
MATURITY
4.76%
TAXABLE EQUIVALENT
YIELD TO MATURITY FOR
MOST PA RESIDENTS IN
THE 35%TAX BRACKET
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety
/ emissions inspect-
ed and ready to go.
Sale priced at
$8,995. Trade-ins
accepted. Tag &
title processing
available with pur-
chase. Call Fran for
an appointment to
see this outstanding
SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
Medical
Receptionist/Assistant
Part time.
Benefits available.
Mail resume to:
Dr. Lombardo
576 Wyoming Ave
Kingston, PA 18704
Please include
professional
references.
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
NOW HIRING! NOW HIRING!
COCCIA COCCIA
FORD LINCOLN FORD LINCOLN
Has immediate
openings for
Class A, B, C
Technicians
Ford Certificated
Diesel Technician
Parts Counter
Personnel
We are
expending our
facility & need
experienced
applicants.
Excellent pay and
benefits are
offered.
Please apply to:
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
Coccia Ford
Lincoln
570-823-8888
rpodest@
cocciacars.com
All Applicants are
Confidential
542 Logistics/
Transportation
INDEPENDENT
CONTRACTORS
NEEDED
All shifts available.
Please visit our
office at:
777 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre
to pick up an
application today.
554 Production/
Operations
WEAVE ROOM
SUPERINTENDENT
Expanding local tex-
tile manufacturer is
looking for a full
time shift supervisor
with textile experi-
ence. 10AM-6PM.
Computer experi-
ence, organizational
skills, follow up skills
a plus. Reports
directly to manage-
ment. A compre-
hensive benefit
package, which
includes 401K.
Applications can be
obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
DUPONT
124 CENTER ST
SATURDAY,
Feb., 11, 2012
8:00-4:00
DIRECTIONS:
OFF MAIN STREET
Entire Contents
of house & garage
including furniture,
living room set,
bedroom set,
antique mantel
clock, lots of
kitchenware many
new in boxes,
Fenton, glassware,
decorative items,
loads of holiday,
some sports items,
garage items,
hand tools,
lawn & garden
and much more!
Credit Cards
Accepted!
sale by
cook & cook estate
liquidators
www.cookand-
cookestateliquida-
tors.com
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
599 SHAWNEE STREET
Sat., Feb. 11th, 10-4
Kitchen items
including table ,
chairs & hutch. End
tables, coffee
tables, Lane cedar
chest, lots of linens
and bedding. Craft
supplies and yarn.
A great sale if you
love craft and
vintage items.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
SWOYERSVILLE
165 Watkins St.
Use rear entrance Use rear entrance
Sat., February 11
10am - 3pm
Furniture, kitchen-
ware, home decor,
Xmas, books, toys,
girls clothes, jewel-
ry, movies, tv
games and gaming
systems, tools, out-
door, collectibles,
vintage and more.
Cash and carry.
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SPACE
AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
ACRES OF
PARKING
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
FLEA
MARKET
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
NEW YORK — Showtime is
about to have a whole newmean-
ing for Magic Johnson.
The story of the NBA Hall of
Famer’s rivalry and friendship
with Larry Bird is coming to
Broadwayin“Magic/Bird,” set to
open in April. The two consulted
in its production, and Johnson
can’t wait to watch their story
told.
His “Showtime” Lakers of the
1980s were a Hollywood hit, and
nowhe’s ready to see his name in
Broadway’s lights.
“I guess it’s the real Show-
time,” Johnsonsaidina phone in-
terview. “When you think about
Broadway and you think about
Larry and I being on Broadway,
it’s definitely at its highest level
and I don’t think either one of us
thought that we would be on
Broadway. If we was, we’d be
there seeing a play and not a play
about our lives.”
It’s the second in a planned se-
ries of sports-themed plays from
producers Tony Ponturo and
Fran Kirmser, the team behind
“Lombardi.” Kirmser said even
before that show’s success, they
wanted to tell the story of John-
son and Bird, who started as ri-
vals in college and finished as
Olympic teammates and long-
time friends.
“They played at such a high
competitive level and there was
equally a high level of respect be-
tween the two of them,” Kirmser
said. “That is not something that
we see all the time now and we
thought it would be exciting to
take a look and relive the rivalry
live on stage and important to
take a look at this relationshipbe-
tween the two of them.”
They reached out initially to
Johnson, who first brought his
wife, Cookie, to see “Lombardi”
before committing. Then it was
on to Bird, who, just like with the
Dream Team 20 years earlier,
wanted to first know that John-
son was on board.
“That’s normally how it usual-
ly works with us,” Johnson said.
Friendships between rivals is
nothing new in today’s NBA,
where players seem just as eager
to team up with a foe than beat
him. But the fact that Johnson
and Bird became friends was sur-
prising even to them.
Their rivalry started when
Johnson’s Michigan State team
knocked off Bird’s Indiana State
squad for the 1979 NCAA cham-
pionship. Bird, the reserved
white guy from Indiana, would
then end up in Boston, while
Johnson, outgoing, black and
made for the big city, went to the
Lakers, whohadnever beatenthe
Celtics in The NBA Finals.
They met for the champion-
ship three times as pros, with the
Lakers winning twice. But along
the way, what started as hatred
had softened, to the point that
Birdsaidhe lost some of his drive
once Johnson retired for the first
time in1991after contracting the
HIV virus.
“Larry learned that Magic was
also Earvin, so it wasn’t all show-
biz, and Magic probably learned
that Larry had a sense of humor
and personality behind that sort
of tough exterior as well,” Pontu-
rosaidof their friendship. “Some-
thing that’s lasted 30 years in this
kind of environment is a story
worth telling.”
Johnson and Bird met with the
writers and the actors portraying
them. Bird wanted assurances
the play would be true to his life
and found it to be accurate —
though Tug Coker, the actor who
portrays him, has dark hair.
But Kirmser said Coker, who
has appeared on TV in shows
such as “How I Met Your Moth-
er” and “The Office,” has the
same facial intensity as Bird. She
said both he and Kevin Daniels,
who plays Johnson, play basket-
ball and “really capture the es-
sence of these two individuals.”
“They pick up a basketball and
you believe it,” Kirmser said.
B A S K E T B A L L
From the hardwood to the Great White Way
The story of Magic Johnson
and Larry Bird will come to a
Broadway theatre in April.
By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
AP FILE PHOTO
Former NBA players Magic Johnson, right, and Larry Bird share a
laugh at a news conference before the championship game be-
tween Michigan State and North Carolina at the men’s NCAA
Final Four in 2009, in Detroit. Showtime is about to have a whole
new meaning for Magic Johnson. The story of his rivalry and
friendship with Larry Bird has been made into a play, opening in
New York in April.
C M Y K
Amazon seeks Jersey deal
Amazon.com, the world’s biggest
online retailer, is in talks to bring two
warehouses to New Jersey in a deal
that could bring 1,500 or more full-time
jobs to a state where unemployment
has hovered around 9 percent.
State Assembly Democratic Leader
Lou Greenwald, who has been involved
in the talks, told The Associated Press
Amazon is seeking a 22-month sales
tax holiday, which is opposed by some
retailers and at least one lawmaker.
Amazon has agreed to build distribu-
tion centers in Indiana, California,
Tennessee and South Carolina in ex-
change for sales tax exemptions
through 2014 or later.
Sanofi sees profits lower
Sanofi, the French drugmaker with
its vaccine division in Swiftwater, said
Wednesday that profits may drop as
much as 15 percent this year, hurt by
generic competition to its Plavix blood
thinner and Avapro hypertension drug
in the United States.
The French drugmaker reported a 13
percent increase in fourth-quarter
profit, boosted by its April acquisition
of Genzyme and higher demand for its
Lantus diabetes medicine.
Sanofi said last month that the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration ap-
proved a new plant in Framingham,
Mass., that will help Genzyme elim-
inate shortages of two of its rare-dis-
ease medicines.
More job cuts at Nokia
Nokia Corp. plans to stop assem-
bling cell phones in Europe by year-end
as it shifts production to Asia and will
cut another 4,000 jobs, its latest at-
tempts to cushion itself from stiff com-
petition in the smartphone sector.
The Finnish company said Wednes-
day it will make the cuts at three plants
in Finland, Mexico and Hungary as it
reorganizes global manufacturing oper-
ations to compete better with the Ap-
ple iPhone and handsets using Google’s
Android operating software.
Visa profits swell
Visa Inc. says its fiscal first-quarter
profit rose 16 percent to $1 billion, or
$1.49 per share. Revenue rose 14 per-
cent to $2.55
Debit card use in the U.S. rose 6
percent, down from16 percent in the
prior-year quarter. It was the first quar-
ter that new rules limiting the fees
merchants pay to accept debit cards
were in place.
I N B R I E F
$3.58 $3.17 $3.47
$4.06
07/17/08
IntPap 30.95 -.16 +4.6
JPMorgCh 38.30 +.43 +15.2
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Pfizer 21.01 -.04 -2.9
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Questar 19.67 +.19 -1.0
RadioShk 7.51 +.24 -22.7
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Raytheon 49.78 +.61 +2.9
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RockwlAut 82.04 +.70 +11.8
Rowan 36.95 +.35 +21.8
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Safeway 21.91 +.58 +4.1
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Sherwin 98.96 +.48 +10.9
SilvWhtn g 35.93 -.18 +24.1
SiriusXM 2.19 +.08 +20.3
SonyCp 19.89 +.21 +10.3
SouthnCo 44.61 +.12 -3.6
SwstAirl 9.63 -.01 +12.5
SpectraEn 31.01 -.03 +.8
SprintNex 2.41 -.04 +3.0
Sunoco 40.13 -.47 +17.6
Sysco 29.45 +.09 +.4
TECO 18.15 -.11 -5.2
Target 52.57 +.16 +2.6
TenetHlth 5.86 +.01 +14.2
Tenneco 37.20 -.59 +24.9
Tesoro 27.40 +.36 +17.3
Textron 27.07 +.71 +46.4
3M Co 87.97 +.08 +7.6
TimeWarn 38.11 +.01 +5.5
Timken 51.50 +.35 +33.0
UnilevNV 33.19 -.43 -3.4
UnionPac 114.35 -.33 +7.9
Unisys 19.35 +.83 -1.8
UPS B 76.92 -.37 +5.1
USSteel 30.94 -.73 +16.9
UtdTech 81.74 +1.46 +11.8
VarianMed 66.25 -1.25 -1.3
VectorGp 17.82 +.03 +.3
ViacomB 49.37 +.57 +8.7
WestarEn 28.54 -.21 -.8
Weyerh 20.56 +.18 +10.1
Whrlpl 70.20 -.50 +47.9
WmsCos 29.21 +.01 +8.3
Windstrm 12.40 -.04 +5.6
Wynn 114.64 +1.97 +3.8
XcelEngy 26.58 +.02 -3.8
Xerox 8.01 +.04 +.6
YumBrnds 64.44 -.41 +9.2
Mutual Funds
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrB m 15.39 +.03 +6.3
CoreOppA m 13.09 +.03 +8.3
American Cent
IncGroA m 26.14 +.07 +7.5
ValueInv 6.01 +.01 +6.4
American Funds
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BalA m 19.22 +.03 +5.5
BondA m 12.68 +.01 +1.4
CapIncBuA m50.57 +.05 +2.7
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Baron
Asset b 49.24 +.26 +7.7
BlackRock
EqDivI 19.03 +.01 +4.6
GlobAlcA m 19.42 +.03 +6.9
GlobAlcC m 18.09 +.03 +6.9
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CGM
Focus 29.98 +.24 +16.9
Mutual 27.98 +.14 +14.6
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Columbia
AcornZ 31.14 +.03 +13.0
DFA
EmMktValI 31.24 +.40 +20.3
DWS-Scudder
EnhEMFIS d 10.41 -.01 +4.4
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Davis
NYVentA m 35.16 +.06 +8.2
NYVentC m 33.92 +.06 +8.1
Dodge & Cox
Bal 72.92 +.25 +8.1
Income 13.60 +.02 +2.3
IntlStk 32.36 +.06 +10.7
Stock 111.60 +.43 +9.8
Dreyfus
TechGrA f 33.17 +.18 +11.1
Eaton Vance
HiIncOppA m 4.36 +.01 +3.9
HiIncOppB m 4.37 +.01 +3.8
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NatlMuniB m 9.92 -.01 +5.9
PAMuniA m 9.16 ... +4.1
Fidelity
AstMgr20 13.07 +.01 +2.8
Bal 19.25 +.04 +5.8
BlChGrow 47.20 +.13 +11.2
CapInc d 9.11 +.02 +5.7
Contra 72.93 +.14 +8.1
DivrIntl d 28.06 +.02 +10.0
ExpMulNat d 22.30 +.08 +7.8
Free2020 13.89 +.02 +5.9
Free2030 13.74 +.02 +7.0
GNMA 11.85 -.01 +0.4
GrowCo 91.31 +.16 +12.9
LatinAm d 55.62 ... +13.7
LowPriStk d 39.43 +.13 +10.4
Magellan 69.34 +.26 +10.1
Overseas d 29.80 +.01 +12.5
Puritan 18.83 +.04 +6.4
StratInc 11.05 +.01 +2.6
TotalBd 11.01 ... +1.2
Value 70.57 +.27 +11.2
Fidelity Advisor
ValStratT m 26.61 +.18 +14.2
Fidelity Select
Gold d 46.22 -.31 +9.4
Pharm d 13.99 -.04 +3.0
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxAdvtg 47.85 +.11 +7.6
500IdxInstl 47.86 +.12 +7.6
500IdxInv 47.85 +.12 +7.6
First Eagle
GlbA m 48.06 +.10 +6.5
FrankTemp-Frank
Fed TF A m 12.41 -.01 +2.5
FrankTemp-Franklin
CA TF A m 7.30 ... +3.0
GrowB m 46.70 +.17 +9.5
Income A m 2.17 +.01 +4.5
Income C m 2.19 +.01 +4.3
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon Z 12.55 +.04 +7.4
Discov Z 29.07 +.04 +5.8
Euro Z 20.26 +.02 +6.9
Shares Z 21.19 +.03 +6.2
FrankTemp-Templeton
GlBond A m 13.26 +.02 +7.3
GlBond C m 13.28 +.01 +7.2
GlBondAdv 13.22 +.01 +7.3
Growth A m 18.07 +.03 +10.9
GMO
QuVI 22.98 +.03 +4.2
Harbor
CapApInst 40.90 +.16 +10.8
IntlInstl d 59.29 +.07 +13.0
Hartford
CpApHLSIA 41.93 +.14 +12.7
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
YTD
Name NAV Chg %Rtn
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
52-WEEK YTD
HIGH LOW NAME TKR DIV LAST CHG %CHG
Combined Stocks
AFLAC 49.37 +.09 +14.1
AT&T Inc 30.02 -.02 -.7
AbtLab 55.57 -.14 -1.2
AMD 7.25 +.12 +34.3
Alcoa 10.67 ... +23.4
Allstate 31.00 +.16 +13.1
Altria 28.84 +.02 -2.7
AEP 39.31 -.10 -4.8
AmExp 51.64 -.49 +9.5
AmIntlGrp 27.04 +.34 +16.6
Amgen 68.06 -1.11 +6.0
Anadarko 86.82 -.39 +13.7
Apple Inc 476.68 +7.85 +17.7
AutoData 54.59 -.28 +1.1
AveryD 29.77 +.33 +3.8
Avnet 36.20 +.31 +16.4
Avon 18.11 -.09 +3.7
BP PLC 46.97 +.37 +9.9
BakrHu 49.91 -1.12 +2.6
BallardPw 1.38 +.11 +27.8
BarnesNob 13.27 -.60 -8.4
Baxter 57.07 +.05 +15.3
BerkH B 79.66 -.22 +4.4
BigLots 43.98 +.07 +16.5
BlockHR 17.16 +.02 +5.1
Boeing 75.46 +.70 +2.9
BrMySq 32.08 -.07 -9.0
Brunswick 22.59 -.60 +25.1
Buckeye 63.80 +.40 -.3
CBS B 29.73 -.17 +9.5
CMS Eng 21.76 +.09 -1.4
CSX s 21.95 -.20 +4.2
CampSp 31.87 ... -4.1
Carnival 32.00 +.21 -2.0
Caterpillar 114.04 +.23 +25.9
CenterPnt 18.89 +.02 -6.0
CntryLink 37.89 +.40 +1.9
Chevron 106.76 -.07 +.3
Cisco 20.43 +.23 +13.4
Citigrp rs 34.23 +1.16 +30.1
Clorox 68.38 -1.19 +2.7
ColgPal 91.47 -.07 -1.0
ConAgra 26.56 -.05 +.6
ConocPhil 72.25 +.33 -.9
ConEd 59.39 +.26 -4.3
ConstellEn 36.84 +.16 -7.1
Cooper Ind 60.80 -.19 +12.3
Corning 13.75 ... +5.9
CrownHold 37.21 +.20 +10.8
Cummins 119.58 +.03 +35.9
DTE 54.52 +.14 +.1
Deere 88.50 +.56 +14.4
Diebold 34.89 +.34 +16.0
Disney 41.27 +.29 +10.1
DomRescs 50.20 -.22 -5.4
Dover 65.18 +.29 +12.3
DowChm 33.95 +.09 +18.0
DryShips 2.98 +.22 +49.0
DuPont 51.65 +.04 +12.8
DukeEngy 21.38 -.10 -2.8
EMC Cp 26.33 +.18 +22.2
Eaton s 51.65 +.36 +18.7
EdisonInt 41.01 -.08 -.9
EmersonEl 52.06 +.14 +11.7
EnbrEPt s 31.57 -.12 -4.9
Energen 50.38 -.05 +.8
EngyTEq 42.00 -.05 +3.5
Entergy 68.06 -.32 -6.8
EntPrPt 49.89 -.57 +7.6
Exelon 40.21 +.18 -7.3
ExxonMbl 85.32 -.55 +.7
FMC Corp 95.10 +2.05 +10.5
Fastenal s 48.83 +.75 +12.0
FedExCp 94.48 -.24 +13.1
FirstEngy 42.94 -.30 -3.1
FootLockr 26.70 -.07 +12.0
FordM 12.84 -.04 +19.3
Gannett 15.14 +.42 +13.2
Gap 21.28 -.40 +14.7
GenDynam 71.59 +.29 +7.8
GenElec 19.24 +.06 +7.4
GenMills 39.02 -.37 -3.4
GileadSci 54.27 -.81 +32.6
GlaxoSKln 44.35 -.45 -2.8
Goodrich 125.38 -.06 +1.4
Goodyear 13.95 -.06 -1.6
Hallibrtn 37.02 +.02 +7.3
HarleyD 46.36 +.45 +19.3
HarrisCorp 42.58 +.49 +18.1
HartfdFn 20.58 +1.46 +26.6
HawaiiEl 26.11 -.21 -1.4
HeclaM 5.21 -.07 -.4
Heico s 58.85 +.27 +.7
Hess 60.46 -.72 +6.4
HewlettP 29.46 +.51 +14.4
HomeDp 45.17 -.29 +7.4
HonwllIntl 59.87 -.29 +10.2
Hormel s 29.12 +.04 -.6
Humana 85.15 -1.02 -2.8
INTL FCSt 26.51 -.27 +12.5
ITT Cp s 22.60 -.11 +16.9
ITW 56.00 +.21 +19.9
IngerRd 37.99 +.43 +24.7
IBM 192.95 +.35 +4.9
IntFlav 56.25 +.65 +7.3
Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD Name Last Chg %YTD
Stocks of Local Interest
98.01 72.26 AirProd APD 2.32 90.74 +.70 +6.5
34.37 25.39 AmWtrWks AWK .92 34.47 +.18 +8.2
51.50 36.76 Amerigas APU 3.05 43.62 +.23 -5.0
23.57 19.28 AquaAm WTR .66 22.51 +.05 +2.1
38.02 23.69 ArchDan ADM .70 30.42 +.62 +6.4
356.80 247.36 AutoZone AZO ... 349.15 -1.33 +7.4
14.95 4.92 BkofAm BAC .04 8.13 +.28 +46.2
32.32 17.10 BkNYMel BK .52 21.92 +.23 +10.1
17.49 2.23 BonTon BONT .20 5.16 -.09 +53.1
43.98 31.30 CVS Care CVS .65 43.57 +.49 +6.8
52.95 38.79 Cigna CI .04 43.35 +.11 +3.2
71.77 61.29 CocaCola KO 1.88 68.33 -.22 -2.3
27.18 19.19 Comcast CMCSA .45 27.25 +.16 +14.9
28.95 21.67 CmtyBkSy CBU 1.04 28.41 -.01 +2.2
42.50 14.61 CmtyHlt CYH ... 19.92 +.03 +14.2
42.34 29.57 CoreMark CORE .68 41.18 +.33 +4.0
64.56 39.50 EmersonEl EMR 1.60 52.06 +.14 +11.7
13.63 4.61 Entercom ETM ... 8.34 +.19 +35.6
21.02 10.25 FairchldS FCS ... 15.17 +.24 +26.0
9.55 3.81 FrontierCm FTR .75 4.26 -.04 -17.3
18.16 13.09 Genpact G .18 15.74 -.09 +5.3
13.24 7.00 HarteHnk HHS .34 9.76 -.03 +7.4
55.00 46.99 Heinz HNZ 1.92 51.87 +.05 -4.0
62.38 49.46 Hershey HSY 1.52 60.30 -.14 -2.4
39.06 30.24 Kraft KFT 1.16 38.54 +.03 +3.2
27.57 18.07 Lowes LOW .56 26.88 -.08 +5.9
91.05 66.40 M&T Bk MTB 2.80 81.71 +.34 +7.0
102.22 72.89 McDnlds MCD 2.80 100.05 -.86 -.3
24.10 17.05 NBT Bcp NBTB .80 23.13 ... +4.5
10.28 4.59 NexstarB NXST ... 8.49 +.06 +8.3
65.19 42.70 PNC PNC 1.40 60.43 -.27 +4.8
30.27 24.10 PPL Corp PPL 1.40 27.78 +.06 -5.6
17.34 6.50 PenRE PEI .60 13.90 +.14 +33.1
71.89 58.50 PepsiCo PEP 2.06 66.74 -.02 +.6
79.96 58.46 PhilipMor PM 3.08 77.88 +.28 -.8
67.72 57.56 ProctGam PG 2.10 63.64 -.06 -4.6
67.52 42.45 Prudentl PRU 1.45 60.54 +.11 +20.8
1.58 .85 RiteAid RAD ... 1.58 +.04 +25.4
17.11 10.91 SLM Cp SLM .50 15.76 -.06 +17.6
60.00 39.00 SLM pfB SLMBP 4.63 46.70 -.14 +19.7
44.65 26.83 SoUnCo SUG .60 43.23 +.08 +2.7
34.68 23.92 TJX s TJX .38 34.42 -.18 +6.6
33.53 24.07 UGI Corp UGI 1.04 27.53 -.16 -6.4
40.48 32.28 VerizonCm VZ 2.00 37.92 ... -5.5
62.63 48.31 WalMart WMT 1.46 61.62 -.07 +3.1
44.22 36.52 WeisMk WMK 1.20 43.37 +.26 +8.6
34.25 22.58 WellsFargo WFC .48 30.63 +.37 +11.1
USD per British Pound 1.5814 -.0079 -.50% 1.6353 1.6057
Canadian Dollar .9960 +.0002 +.02% .9921 .9960
USD per Euro 1.3254 +.0006 +.05% 1.4190 1.3627
Japanese Yen 77.01 +.25 +.32% 77.70 82.38
Mexican Peso 12.7066 +.0204 +.16% 12.3294 12.0150
CURRENCY CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Copper 3.91 3.87 +0.87 -1.30 -13.57
Gold 1729.30 1746.40 -0.98 +1.12 +26.71
Platinum 1668.10 1654.80 +0.80 -3.22 -10.29
Silver 33.67 34.17 -1.44 -14.48 +11.23
Palladium 715.50 708.75 +0.95 -1.65 -13.34
METALS CLOSE PVS. %CH. 6MO. 1YR.
Foreign Exchange & Metals
INVESCO
ConstellB m 21.09 +.07 +10.7
GlobEqA m 11.07 +.03 +7.7
PacGrowB m 19.82 +.22 +11.1
JPMorgan
CoreBondSelect11.89 ... +0.8
John Hancock
LifBa1 b 13.02 +.02 +6.6
LifGr1 b 12.92 +.04 +8.5
RegBankA m 13.55 +.10 +12.2
SovInvA m 16.52 +.02 +7.0
TaxFBdA m 10.27 -.01 +2.5
Lazard
EmgMkEqtI d 19.58 +.21 +16.5
Loomis Sayles
BondI 14.61 +.02 +5.2
MFS
MAInvA m 20.28 +.04 +8.6
MAInvC m 19.61 +.04 +8.5
Merger
Merger m 15.64 ... +0.3
Metropolitan West
TotRetBdI 10.51 ... +1.8
Neuberger Berman
SmCpGrInv 19.20 +.05 +8.9
Oakmark
EqIncI 28.57 ... +5.6
Oppenheimer
CapApB m 40.91 +.07 +8.9
DevMktA m 33.09 +.19 +12.9
DevMktY 32.71 +.19 +12.9
PIMCO
AllAssetI 12.22 +.03 +5.9
ComRlRStI 6.92 -.01 +5.8
HiYldIs 9.28 +.01 +4.0
LowDrIs 10.41 ... +1.5
RealRet 12.01 +.01 +2.0
TotRetA m 11.10 +.01 +2.4
TotRetAdm b 11.10 +.01 +2.4
TotRetC m 11.10 +.01 +2.3
TotRetIs 11.10 +.01 +2.5
TotRetrnD b 11.10 +.01 +2.4
TotlRetnP 11.10 +.01 +2.5
Permanent
Portfolio 49.29 -.07 +6.9
Principal
SAMConGrB m13.74+.02 +7.0
Prudential
JenMCGrA m 30.43 ... +9.5
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m 16.36 +.08 +10.0
BlendA m 18.17 +.05 +10.7
EqOppA m 14.97 +.06 +10.1
HiYieldA m 5.53 +.01 +3.9
IntlEqtyA m 5.91 +.03 +10.3
IntlValA m 19.30 +.08 +10.0
JennGrA m 20.04 +.08 +10.8
NaturResA m 51.89 +.07 +12.0
SmallCoA m 21.95 +.04 +10.3
UtilityA m 11.02 ... +1.9
ValueA m 15.24 +.05 +10.5
Putnam
GrowIncB m 13.69 +.05 +9.8
IncomeA m 6.85 +.01 +1.5
Royce
LowStkSer m 16.40 ... +14.6
OpportInv d 12.11 +.08 +17.3
ValPlSvc m 13.69 +.04 +14.1
Schwab
S&P500Sel d 21.05 +.06 +7.6
Scout
Interntl d 31.08 +.07 +11.1
T Rowe Price
BlChpGr 42.61 +.20 +10.2
CapApprec 21.87 +.04 +6.1
DivGrow 24.80 -.01 +6.3
DivrSmCap d 17.32 -.02 +12.1
EmMktStk d 32.40 +.36 +13.6
EqIndex d 36.43 +.09 +7.5
EqtyInc 24.84 +.06 +7.7
FinSer 13.41 +.08 +13.0
GrowStk 35.14 +.14 +10.4
HealthSci 36.74 -.13 +12.7
HiYield d 6.71 ... +4.2
IntlDisc d 41.67 +.29 +11.7
IntlStk d 13.69 +.04 +11.4
IntlStkAd m 13.64 +.05 +11.3
LatinAm d 46.11 +.13 +18.7
MediaTele 51.59 +.29 +10.0
MidCpGr 57.92 +.07 +9.8
NewAmGro 34.75 +.11 +9.2
NewAsia d 15.49 +.20 +11.4
NewEra 46.36 -.05 +10.2
NewHoriz 34.60 -.06 +11.5
NewIncome 9.73 +.01 +0.8
Rtmt2020 17.10 +.03 +7.5
Rtmt2030 18.00 +.05 +8.8
ShTmBond 4.84 ... +0.8
SmCpVal d 38.12 +.02 +10.6
TaxFHiYld d 11.27 ... +3.3
Value 24.63 +.06 +9.3
ValueAd b 24.39 +.06 +9.2
Thornburg
IntlValI d 27.02 +.07 +9.9
Tweedy, Browne
GlobVal d 22.85 +.01 +4.6
Vanguard
500Adml 124.54 +.31 +7.5
500Inv 124.52 +.31 +7.5
CapOp d 32.33 ... +9.6
CapVal 10.66 +.03 +15.5
Convrt d 12.88 +.03 +8.8
DevMktIdx d 9.34 +.03 +10.0
DivGr 16.08 -.05 +4.3
EnergyInv d 64.69 -.10 +7.9
EurIdxAdm d 56.95 +.08 +10.4
Explr 80.04 +.18 +12.0
GNMA 11.07 -.01 +0.3
GNMAAdml 11.07 -.01 +0.3
GlbEq 17.63 +.06 +10.8
GrowthEq 11.81 +.02 +9.5
HYCor d 5.85 ... +3.5
HYCorAdml d 5.85 ... +3.6
HltCrAdml d 56.27 -.04 +3.6
HlthCare d 133.37 -.09 +3.6
ITGradeAd 10.15 ... +2.0
InfPrtAdm 28.13 +.01 +1.5
InfPrtI 11.46 +.01 +1.5
InflaPro 14.32 +.01 +1.5
InstIdxI 123.73 +.31 +7.6
InstPlus 123.74 +.31 +7.6
InstTStPl 30.72 +.07 +8.5
IntlExpIn d 14.53 +.10 +13.3
IntlGr d 18.35 +.05 +12.2
IntlStkIdxAdm d24.32+.10 +11.4
IntlStkIdxIPls d97.28 +.42 +11.4
LTInvGr 10.37 +.03 +1.3
MidCapGr 20.92 +.05 +11.1
MidCpAdml 98.69 +.31 +10.7
MidCpIst 21.80 +.07 +10.7
MuIntAdml 14.25 -.01 +1.9
MuLtdAdml 11.20 ... +0.6
MuShtAdml 15.95 ... +0.3
PrecMtls d 22.00 -.19 +13.5
Prmcp d 66.91 -.03 +8.4
PrmcpAdml d 69.41 -.04 +8.4
PrmcpCorI d 14.44 -.01 +7.0
REITIdx d 20.95 +.02 +8.8
REITIdxAd d 89.41 +.11 +8.8
STCor 10.74 ... +1.2
STGradeAd 10.74 ... +1.2
SelValu d 19.95 +.01 +7.3
SmGthIdx 24.03 ... +11.8
SmGthIst 24.07 ... +11.8
StSmCpEq 21.01 +.04 +11.6
Star 19.97 +.04 +6.6
StratgcEq 20.53 +.05 +11.9
TgtRe2015 12.97 +.02 +5.4
TgtRe2020 23.02 +.04 +6.1
TgtRe2030 22.48 +.05 +7.5
TgtRe2035 13.53 +.04 +8.2
Tgtet2025 13.10 +.02 +6.8
TotBdAdml 11.02 ... +0.5
TotBdInst 11.02 ... +0.5
TotBdMkInv 11.02 ... +0.5
TotBdMkSig 11.02 ... +0.5
TotIntl d 14.54 +.06 +11.3
TotStIAdm 33.95 +.08 +8.5
TotStIIns 33.95 +.08 +8.5
TotStIdx 33.93 +.07 +8.4
TxMIntlAdm d10.76 +.03 +9.9
TxMSCAdm 30.34 +.05 +11.3
USGro 20.13 +.09 +11.5
USValue 10.94 +.03 +7.3
WellsI 23.47 +.02 +2.4
WellsIAdm 56.87 +.05 +2.4
Welltn 32.92 +.03 +5.0
WelltnAdm 56.86 +.06 +5.0
WndsIIAdm 48.97 +.08 +7.0
WndsrII 27.59 +.05 +7.0
Wells Fargo
DvrCpBldA f 6.91 +.02 +8.6
DOW
12,883.95
+5.75
NASDAQ
2,915.86
+11.78
S&P 500
1,349.96
+2.91
RUSSELL 2000
828.39
+1.02
6-MO T-BILLS
.10%
...
10-YR T-NOTE
1.99%
+.01
CRUDE OIL
$98.71
+.30
p p n n p p q q
p p p p p p p p
NATURAL GAS
$2.45
-.02
BUSINESS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012
timesleader.com
It seems that the
higher the altitude,
the crazier they come.
According to a re-
port by the British
newspaper The Tele-
graph, Felix Baum-
gartner is planning to go skydiving …
25 miles up. It will take him a full 10
minutes to fall to Earth, at which time
he will be traveling at a speed of close
to 700 mph (faster than the speed of
sound), and be exposed to temper-
atures of nearly -100F.
Baumgartner will be carried aloft by
a modified weather balloon and will
wear a pressurized space suit to avoid
having his blood boiled in the ultra-
low pressure, low-temperature envi-
ronment, which, unlike falling from
space, is a danger that he seems un-
willing to confront.
This won’t be the first time someone
has jumped from space. Col. Joseph
Kittinger, a U.S. Air Force test pilot,
jumped from a balloon at a height of
more than 100,000 feet, hitting 614
mph on his way down. He survived,
which makes Baumgartner’s plan
seem only marginally less crazy.
Red Bull is sponsoring Baumgartn-
er’s jump and has set up a page, red-
bullstratos.com, to provide informa-
tion on
the mis-
sion.
The
“sport”
of orbi-
tal skydiving has
been increasingly fea-
tured in science fic-
tion, although once people who, like
Baumgartner and Kittinger, want to
see what it’s like to re-enter the atmo-
sphere hear that the real thing is ac-
tually possible, who knows what will
happen.
The fact that Baumgartner is actual-
ly being sponsored by a company to
perform this stunt is interesting. The
fact that there are actually people will-
ing to do it is slightly disturbing. For-
tunately, it’s relatively difficult to ob-
tain a balloon or aircraft that can ac-
tually reach that altitude, and the
equipment required to survive the fall
doesn’t come cheap either.
That could soon change, however.
With commercial sub-orbital flights
beginning quite soon (next year, if Ri-
chard Branson’s Virgin Galactic Space-
shipTwo keeps up its string of success-
ful test flights), and the relatively in-
expensive ticket cost (a “mere”
$200,000, as opposed to the millions it
used to cost), we may be poised to ush-
er in a newage of high-speed, high-alti-
tude travel … perhaps we’ll usher in a
new age of people jumping out of per-
fectly good spacecraft.
The cutting edge of crazy: Orbital skydiving
TECH TALK
N I C K D E L O R E N Z O
Baumgartner
WASHINGTON —
Squeezed by a tight job mar-
ket, young Americans have
suffered bigger income loss-
es than other age groups and
are less likely to be employed
than at any time since World
War II.
An analysis by the PewRe-
search Center, released to-
day, details the impact of the
recent recession on the atti-
tudes of a generationof most-
ly 20- and 30-somethings.
With government data
showing record gaps in em-
ployment between young
and old, a Pew survey found
that 41 percent of Americans
believe that younger adults
have been hit harder than
any other group, compared
with29 percent who say mid-
dle-aged Americans and 24
percent who point to seniors
65 and older.
Among young adults ages
18 to 34, only a third rated
their financial situation as
“excellent” or “good,” com-
pared with 54 percent for se-
niors age 65 and over. In
2004, before the recession
began, about half of both
young and older adults rated
their own financial situation
highly.
“Young workers are on the
bottom of the ladder, and
during a recession like we’ve
had, it’s often hard for them
to hold on,” said Kim Parker,
associate director of Pew’s
Social & Demographic
Trends project. Parker noted
that despite the challenges,
young adults were upbeat
about the future: Only 9 per-
cent said they didn’t think
they wouldever have enough
money to live the life they
want, a share unchanged
from before the recession. In
contrast, 28 percent of adults
35andolder didn’t anticipate
making enough in the future.
Jobs gap hits young
Workers in 20s, 30s suffer
bigger income losses than
other age groups.
By HOPE YEN
Associated Press
EDWARDSVILLE– Former custom-
ers of the Redner’s Warehouse Market
in the flood-damaged Mark Plaza have
moved on, but not very far.
Edwardsville resident and former
Redner’s shopper Cathy Wozniak has
taken her business to nearby Price
Chopper at the West Side Mall.
“We’ve been coming here since they
closed in the fall,” she said.
After learning of the permanent clo-
sure Wozniak added, “It looks like
we’ll be coming here a bit longer now.”
The Price Chopper store has taken
on its fair share of former Redner’s cus-
tomers after September flooding
caused severe water damage to both
the store and the stock inside.
“I’ve been shopping here ever
since,” said Renee Jones of Edwards-
ville.
Jones said she is a casual shopper
who doesn’t necessarily notice a differ-
ent between the two stores, but said
she preferred Redner’s.
“I was just so used to going there
and seeing the same people,” she said.
Some of those faces are now seen at
Redner’s in Pittston, after former em-
ployees at the Edwardsville location
were offered jobs there.
It’s uncertain how many Redner’s
shoppers have followed.
Had roles been reversed and it was
the Pittston location that closed down,
a shopper there said a trip to Edwards-
ville would be out of the question.
“We wouldn’t go that far for our gro-
ceries,” said Dupont resident Tom
Walsh.
“You’d like to (stay loyal),” he said.
“But convenience has just as much to
do with it.”
Though Redner’s has closed its
store there, some businesses have cho-
sen to rebuild at Mark Plaza. Seafood
chain Long John Silver’s has already
reopened and Kmart is preparing to re-
open in the spring.
A Redner’s spokesman said Tuesday
the regional market chain may look for
an alternative location in the Edwards-
ville area, but has not yet identified a
site.
Area Redner’s shoppers weigh options
By JOE DOLINSKY
Times Leader intern
CVS EARNINGS HEALTHY
AP PHOTO
A
sign at a CVS Pharmacy welcomes Express Script Customers at a store in Indi-
anapolis. CVS Caremark says its fourth-quarter earnings climbed nearly 4 per-
cent, as the drugstore operator’s pharmacy services revenue swelled because of a
long-term contract and new business. The company’s mail order prescription fulfill-
ment center in Hanover Township employs about 400.
C M Y K
PAGE 8B THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
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Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 33/26
Average 35/20
Record High 59 in 1925
Record Low -15 in 1934
Yesterday 35
Month to date 237
Year to date 3211
Last year to date 3970
Normal year to date 3878
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was below 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.01”
Month to date 0.01”
Normal month to date 0.63”
Year to date 1.91”
Normal year to date 3.00”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 4.85 -0.34 22.0
Towanda 3.06 -0.20 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.81 -0.28 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 39-46. Lows: 21-24. Sunny and mild
conditions today. Clear skies tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 46-49. Lows: 27-32. Sunny and mild
conditions today. Clear skies tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 36-42. Lows: 21-30. Mostly sunny
skies today. Mostly clear skies.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 46-47. Lows: 27-29. Sunny and mild
conditions today. Clear skies tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 44-47. Lows: 21-33. Sunny and mild
conditions today. Clear skies tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 27/13/.00 33/18/sn 31/20/c
Atlanta 58/42/.00 55/37/s 58/39/pc
Baltimore 40/31/.03 46/26/s 49/30/pc
Boston 37/22/.00 46/29/s 47/28/s
Buffalo 29/19/.00 36/30/s 36/15/sn
Charlotte 53/30/.00 55/32/s 58/36/pc
Chicago 36/27/.00 39/29/s 32/20/sf
Cleveland 31/29/.00 38/26/s 37/18/sn
Dallas 46/41/.00 56/41/pc 56/35/sh
Denver 26/10/.00 42/18/pc 40/20/s
Detroit 36/22/.00 41/27/s 37/16/sn
Honolulu 75/65/.00 75/66/s 78/70/s
Houston 62/48/.00 65/47/c 65/46/c
Indianapolis 36/30/.06 39/26/s 39/20/sn
Las Vegas 68/50/.00 66/46/s 67/44/s
Los Angeles 73/53/.00 76/53/s 70/53/s
Miami 75/70/.00 77/68/sh 79/68/sh
Milwaukee 33/20/.00 39/28/s 29/15/c
Minneapolis 32/12/.00 38/7/pc 15/4/pc
Myrtle Beach 61/37/.00 55/36/s 60/46/pc
Nashville 47/39/.01 47/29/pc 54/28/sh
New Orleans 65/54/.00 61/47/pc 63/49/c
Norfolk 52/36/.11 49/29/s 56/40/pc
Oklahoma City 38/32/.00 53/36/c 48/24/pc
Omaha 28/15/.00 34/11/s 20/5/s
Orlando 79/57/.00 73/55/pc 78/60/c
Phoenix 73/54/.00 73/49/s 75/48/s
Pittsburgh 34/30/.06 36/24/s 37/18/c
Portland, Ore. 45/38/.12 54/39/pc 50/37/r
St. Louis 36/32/.04 42/32/s 39/17/pc
Salt Lake City 43/32/.00 45/29/pc 47/29/pc
San Antonio 59/43/.00 60/49/sh 58/47/sh
San Diego 67/53/.00 71/52/s 70/51/s
San Francisco 56/48/.00 61/47/s 60/47/pc
Seattle 50/41/.08 57/43/r 51/38/r
Tampa 78/58/.00 72/58/pc 75/61/c
Tucson 68/51/.00 69/43/s 71/44/s
Washington, DC 43/37/.06 46/32/s 50/31/s
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 30/21/.00 35/15/pc 24/12/pc
Baghdad 64/54/.00 65/45/s 68/48/s
Beijing 36/10/.00 34/18/pc 32/22/s
Berlin 25/14/.00 26/4/sn 18/2/pc
Buenos Aires 88/72/.00 78/59/s 80/60/s
Dublin 39/37/.00 47/41/r 49/39/r
Frankfurt 27/18/.00 30/11/sn 27/9/pc
Hong Kong 55/52/.00 61/61/c 65/64/r
Jerusalem 50/38/.00 54/40/s 54/40/pc
London 34/28/.00 35/30/pc 37/30/sn
Mexico City 68/46/.00 64/46/pc 61/43/r
Montreal 28/7/.00 30/23/c 34/-2/sn
Moscow 10/-9/.00 5/-7/c 2/-9/c
Paris 30/19/.00 32/20/pc 33/17/pc
Rio de Janeiro 88/73/.00 92/74/t 85/73/t
Riyadh 79/52/.00 82/55/s 82/56/pc
Rome 48/36/.00 47/30/s 43/32/rs
San Juan 82/72/.37 82/72/sh 82/73/sh
Tokyo 50/39/.00 44/31/pc 46/33/s
Warsaw 21/10/.00 15/-4/pc 10/-1/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
47/29
Reading
45/25
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
42/21
43/21
Harrisburg
42/26
Atlantic City
49/27
New York City
47/32
Syracuse
41/24
Pottsville
41/24
Albany
41/25
Binghamton
Towanda
40/22
42/21
State College
38/24
Poughkeepsie
46/24
56/41
39/29
42/18
57/38
38/7
76/53
65/48
45/23
42/22
57/43
47/32
41/27
55/37
77/68
65/47
75/66
40/33
33/18
46/32
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 7:06a 5:30p
Tomorrow 7:05a 5:31p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 7:57p 7:39a
Tomorrow 9:09p 8:10a
Last New First Full
Feb. 14 Feb. 21 Feb. 29 March 8
The sunshine will
last all day
today and
skies will
remain clear
tonight.
Temperatures
will continue
to trend a
little above
average
through Friday
up until the
time a stong
cold front
arrives early
Saturday. A coat-
ing of snow is
possible at this
time.
Temperatures
will hold in the
20s, then
tumble down
through the
teens Saturday
night. An arctic
cold front will
graze the
area on
Sunday with
flurries to
reinforce the
cold heading
into Monday.
Starting
Tuesday,
temperatures
will once again
trend above
normal.
- Tom Clark
NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers will fall over portions of southern Texas, while more showers extend
across New Mexico into the Texas panhandle and western Oklahoma. A few snow showers will fall
over the mountains of northern New mexico into central Colorado. There will be a few rain and snow
showers over Washington as a storm system passes to the northwest.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Heating Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Sunny, breezy
FRIDAY
Mostly
sunny
42°
25°
SUNDAY
Partly
sunny,
flurries
24°
10°
MONDAY
Partly
sunny
34°
15°
TUESDAY
Cloudy
40°
25°
WEDNESDAY
Cloudy
40°
25°
SATURDAY
A snow
shower,
then sun
25°
24°
40
°
25
°
C M Y K
Life S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012
timesleader.com
If the twentysomething guy from the
mailroom, your local waiter and hipster
music moguls all seem to be sporting the
same haircut — trimmed buzz-cut short
on the sides, left long on the top and
swept back from the forehead — it’s not
your imagination.
It’s “Boardwalk Empire.” Or, more pre-
cisely, it’s a throwback haircut from Pro-
hibition-era America, reintroduced in all
its dapper disheveled-ness by Michael
Pitt’s James “Jimmy” Darmody character
on the Martin Scorsese HBO series.
Darmody met with an untimely end on
last month’s Season 2 finale, but those
who ply the tonsorial trade report that
the show helped make the retro-flavored
’do the coif du jour among millennial
males.
“It’s been a popular cut for a good nine
months to a year now,” says J.P. Mastey,
founder of the Baxter Finley Barber &
Shop on La Cienega Boulevard.
“It started getting popular here around
the middle of the (show’s) first season. A
lot of guys will kind of know who the
character is even if they don’t know his
name.” But, Mastey says, “We know ex-
actly who they’re talking about.”
Supercuts’ senior artistic director Mel-
anie Ash has noticed the same thing over
the last year and a half.
“Most places around the country, the
style is slightly less exaggerated,” Ash
says. “Andthe more severe James Darmo-
dy lookis one we’re seeingstronger inour
major metropolitan areas where there’s a
little more high fashion. ... (Men in) Los
Angeles, New York and Miami seem to
MCT PHOTO
Michael Pitt, who plays James ‘Jimmy’
Darmody on the Martin Scorsese HBO
series ‘Boardwalk Empire,’ is credited
with starting a trend in men’s hairstyles.
HBO show
sparks edgy
new hairstyle
By ADAMTSCHORN
Los Angeles Times
If you’re thinking about trying out the
latest trend in men’s hairstyles, here are a
few pointers from the experts on how to
do the ’do:
What should I ask for? Some folks refer to
it as an undercut. Others call it the Jimmy,
the Darmody or the Michael Pitt. J.P. Mas-
tey, who owns the Baxter Finley Barber &
Shop, says requests even include “the hair-
cut like the young guy with the limp on that
old-timey HBO series.” Although most bar-
bers and stylists will probably know what
you’re talking about, Supercuts senior artis-
tic director Melanie Ash offers a concise
description: “Ask for a cut that’s shorter
through the sides, clippered up all the way,
disconnected and left with length through
the top.” Or take in a photo of the style.
How do I take care of it? The experts agree
that using some sort of hair product is key,
especially if the hair on top of the head is
left as long — and swept back as dramat-
ically — as that of Pitt’s character. The cut’s
creator, Francesca Paris, uses American
Crew’s Grooming Cream to keep Jimmy
Darmody’s hair in place.
How often should I come back? The rate at
which hair grows varies from person to
person (and even season to season, accord-
ing to Mastey), but most men make a return
clip trip every three to four weeks. A guy
opting for the more extreme version of the
Darmody — with the sides clipped quite
short — should expect to darken the door-
step of his barbershop about every two
weeks.
What if I don’t have the head (or hair) to
carry it off? Michael Pitt could carry off the
Darmody coif because it was specifically
designed for him based on the men’s hair-
styles in vogue in the 1920s. But if your
noggin doesn’t make you a natural, a skilled
stylist can still help you achieve a Prohib-
ition-era vibe. “I can taper up the sides to
give it a 1920s look, part it on the side and
put a little bit of product in it,” Mastey says.
“You’re going to look like maybe you could
be a character on ‘Boardwalk Empire,’ but it
just won’t be Jimmy Darmody.” Even being
completely bald isn’t a barrier. “I’ve been
designing wigs for Yourhairx, a company
that makes wigs for people who have alope-
cia or been through chemotherapy,” said
Paris, whose former husband, Joseph Paris,
founded the company. “I’ve designed a
couple wigs where I cut them really close on
the side and have them long on the top.”
MAKING THE CUT
See HAIRSTYLE, Page 3C
S
ymbolized by every-
thing from paper
hearts and cardboard
cupids to decadent choco-
lates and diamond rings,
love, in all its forms, will get
its official due once again on
Tuesday.
Valentine’s Day is still a holiday
for the ages, withschool childrenex-
changing cards, candy and small
toys and older folks feeling the eu-
phoria of newlove or the comfort of
oldlove. But, somewouldsay, Valen-
tine’s Day, and even the whole ap-
proach to love, just isn’t what it used
to be.
Remember, for example, good
old-fashioned courtship? Before
text-messaging and social network-
ing came along and changed the
game for everyone? Has it killed real
romance? What else has changed
when it comes to matters of the
heart in a modern world? And how
does the whole experience of Valen-
tine’s Day adjust itself as we age?
A day to celebrate friendship
Classmates at Wyoming Valley
Montessori School in Kingston ex-
pressed excitement about the up-
coming holiday, and not just be-
cause it will mean paper Valentines
to trade and talk about.
“It’s about friends,” Kevin McNul-
ty, 8, said. “It’s a day where you ex-
press yourself to your friends, for
your friends.”
Remedy Allport, 7, agrees.
“I feel like it’s just a day where you
can be friends with everyone,” she
said.
“It is about love and friends, but
family, too,” Julia Godfrey, 6, added.
She and 4-year-old Olivia Corcoran
both noted the same objects of affec-
tion: “Mommy and daddy.”
Each student at the school will
give a card to each classmate and re-
SARA POKORNY/THE TIMES LEADER
Margaret Craig and Jack Granahan are the ‘newest in love’
at the Kingston Senior Center.
Frank Warunek and Carolyn Tavella were childhood friends
and are now later-in-life sweethearts.
‘He corrupted me,’ Betty Lee Frusciante joked of 20-year-
sweetheart Hugh Rolf.
Trusty Valentine’s Day
speaks to all aspects of love
By SARA POKORNY spokorny@timesleader.com
See AGES, Page 2C
"I got peace-sign tat-
toos for my Valentines."
Eliana Parra, 6
"It is about love and
friends, but family, too."
Julia Godfrey, 6
"It’s about friends. It’s a
day where you express
yourself to your friends,
for your friends."
Kevin McNulty, 8
Emma Horsley, 6, said
she is bringing candy in
for her class.
And "Mommy and daddy."
Olivia Corcoran, 4
"I feel like it’s just a day
where you can be
friends with everyone."
Remedy Allport, 7
C M Y K
PAGE 2C THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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p
ceive one in return. These days,
the cards usually come with bo-
nuses.
Though chocolates are nice, as
Emma Horsley, 6, who is bring-
ing candy in for her class, will at-
test, Valentine treats are taking a
different direction.
“I got peace-signtattoos for my
Valentines,” Eliana Parra, 6, said.
Susan Bartoli, a teacher at
Montgomery Avenue Elemen-
tary School in Exeter, said candy
treats have fallen by the wayside
in the past couple of years.
“The kids are much more into
giving things like pencils and
stickers now,” she said. “Though
to them it’s really just about
showing friends they care.”
Dating in the digital age
What about those well past the
age of trading multiple Valen-
tines and into the age where one
is all that matters?
Alove connection is a love con-
nection is a love connection, but
sophisticated technology has
dramaticallychangedtheprocess
of making one.
“When you look at face-to-face
interactions andcontent of actual
communication, social network-
ing has driven it down,” Dan
Kimbrough, assistant professor
of communications at Misericor-
dia University, said. “We’re at a
point now where 140 characters
is enough to get a point across to
someone.”
The problem with such com-
munication is the loss of context,
whichis a hindrance tobuildinga
romantic relationship.
“If I text someone or write on
their Facebook and they’re in a
badmoodwhenthey readit, they
might think I’m being offensive
or mean or rude,” Kimbrough
said. “When you’re face to face
you get all the visual, non-verbal
cues that get the real point
across.”
But social networkingcanhave
its perks, too.
“The etiquette rule in dating is
basically to make each other
comfortable,” John Mellon, an
etiquette workshopinstructor for
the Guaranteed Placement Pro-
gramat Misericordia, said. “This
is easier to do now. A person can
know details about an individual
immediately, making a first date
more comfortable because a per-
son already has a set of questions
in their mind that they want to
discuss.”
It also helps in the case of a
date that has gone great.
“Once a person has a date they
enjoyedthey don’t have towait to
call,” Mellon said, “They can just
text or talk online. Youcanessen-
tially continue a date for another
two hours after it’s ended.”
But what about pursuing
someone through total non-ver-
bal communication? It might be
easier to shoot a Facebook mess-
age or text a prospective date’s
way, but is it good form?
“A phone call would certainly
be best,” Mellon said, “but in
these times it’s absolutely social-
ly acceptable to ask someone out
on a date through text or mess-
aging online.”
A second shot at love
Youarenever toooldtolove, or
to find new love. Several volun-
teers at the Senior Center in
Kingston have discovered this.
Many were married at one point,
lost their former spouses through
divorce or death, and came to
find love again.
Betty Lee Frusciante, 77, and
Hugh Rolf, 79, both of Swoyers-
ville, have been together for the
past 20 years, having met at a sin-
gles dance at the American Le-
gion in Wilkes-Barre.
“We sang together at the
Woodlands for 15 years,” Frus-
ciante said. “He corrupted me.”
“She was so shy,” Rolf said,
“but I got her uponstagethat one
time, and that was it.”
Margaret Craig and Jack Gra-
nahan, both 80 and of Swoyers-
ville, are the “newest in love,” as
friend Carolyn Tavella, 67, of
Plains Township put it. They
moved in together in September
after Granahan was forced to
move from his Forty Fort home
due to flooding.
“She offered me a spot at her
place when I moved out, and I
never moved back in,” Granahan
said.
For some folks in their twilight
years, modern love is like the old
days all over again.
Tavella and Frank Warunek,
72, of Dupont are self-proclaimed
soulmates who dated at a young-
er age, married other people and
eventually got back together
through a phone call from Waru-
nek on Tavella’s 50th birthday.
“I couldn’t believe it was him,
the man I first met when I was
13,” Tavella said. “I’m so happy
that he’s back in my life.”
The lively crew hangs out to-
gether at the senior center, where
all were more than happy to dis-
cuss their relationships.
Looking back from their first
major commitments to those
that exist today, each had advice
for the younger generation.
“It’s all about respect for one
another,” Craig said.
“You learn to keep your mouth
shut,” Rolf joked. “You also learn
that you need to have a sense of
humor and to let some argu-
ments pass by, as they aren’t real-
ly important.”
“You learn that you can’t
changea person, not really,” Frus-
ciante said, then jokingly added,
“You simply tolerate them.”
Each couple seemed to agree
on a crucial mindset guaranteed
to keep a relationship fresh and
an individual happy.
“Age is a frame of mind, which
is one of my favorite sayings,”
Rolf said.
“Soif I findmymind, I’ll let you
know how old I am.”
No romance necessary
“No matter how you look at it,
Valentine’s Day is a day to show
you care,” Sarah Clarke, 45, of
Scranton, said. “I don’t care if it’s
to your mom, your boyfriend,
your dog. It’s a fun little holiday
that requires nothingmore thana
box of chocolates and an ‘I love
you.’ ”
“You don’t even have to be at-
tached,” Melinda Gensel, 41, of
Scranton said.
“When I was younger and sin-
gle, my girlfriends andI wouldgo
out that night together and cele-
brate who we were and what we
had in life. We didn’t need a boy-
friend.”
“You love who you love, and
that’s it,” Clarke said. “You
should be showing people that
every day, of course, but why not
add a card or some flowers to re-
ally get the point across?”
AGES
Continued from Page 1C
SUBMITTED PHOTO
‘We’re at a point now where 140 characters is enough to get a
point across to someone,’ says Dan Kimbrough, assistant profes-
sor of communications at Misericordia University.
Etiquette expert John Mellon
sees positives and negatives to
social media as regards love.
“Once a person has a date they
enjoyed they don’t have to wait to call.
They can just text or talk online. You
can essentially continue a date for
another two hours after it’s ended.”
Dr. John Mellon, etiquette workshop instructor for the Guaranteed
Placement Program at Misericordia
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 3C
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prefer more of an extreme look,
where it’s much shorter through
the sides and longer and more
artsy on top.”
The style perfectly suited
Pitt’s character — and for good
reason, says the cut’s creator,
Francesca Paris, who is in
charge of hair at “Boardwalk
Empire.”
For the character of Jimmy
Darmody, “I wanted to create
something that was a little edgy,
sexy and a powerful look, and
when I was researching men’s
hairstyles of the day, I noticed
that the popular style was short-
er on the sides and longer on the
top,” Paris said. “I wanted him
to have a James Cagney-esque
look about him. But Michael
(Pitt) has a natural boyish qual-
ity to his look, and his hair is nat-
urally wavy, and wavy hair tends
to project a softer demeanor. So
I immediately knew I’d have to
straighten his hair to toughen
his image.”
Mastey and Ash give the show
— and Pitt’s character — props
for bringing the style to the pub-
lic consciousness, but they, and
other industry observers, say
other factors also are at work.
One is the current pop-culture
embrace of all things 1920s and
’30s, as exemplifiedinfilms such
as “The Artist” and “Hugo” and
fashion for spring.
Another is simply where men
happen to be in the pendulum
swing of personal grooming. “I
think part of the appeal is that
for the last couple of years we’ve
really been seeing a trend to-
ward longer lengths and a little
more of a scruffier look,” Ash
says.
“And this is a very tailored, ex-
act cut. It’s very clean and sharp,
so it’s a nice change.”
It’s not a coif every guy can
pull off. “You’ve got to have the
head shape and hairline for that
(cut),” Mastey says. “If your hair
is receding it’s not the same
look, and you won’t be able to
slick it back the way (Pitt)
does.”
When twentysomething Kim
Jong Un stepped into the lime-
light as NorthKorea’s ruler a few
days before the new year, it was
hard not to notice his haircut:
The sides were clipped short
and the longer hair on top was
slicked back a bit, and according
to published reports, the barber-
shops of Pyongyang are abuzz
withrequests for what the North
Koreans are calling the “youth”
or “ambition” hairstyle.
Then again, perhaps they’re
all just fans of “Boardwalk Em-
pire.”
HAIRSTYLE
Continued from Page 1C
C M Y K
PAGE 4C THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publi-
cation, your information must
be typed or computer-generat-
ed. Include your child’s name,
age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grand-
parents’ names and their towns
of residence, any siblings and
their ages.
Don’t forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
We cannot return photos
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photos and all publicity photos.
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GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Zoey Marie Backley, daughter of
Robin Lee Backley and Edward
Hower, Ashley, is celebrating her
third birthday today, Feb. 9. Zoey
is a granddaughter of Tracy
Backley and the late Charles
Backley, Nanticoke, and Cathe-
rine Hower, Ashley. She is a
great-granddaughter of Nancy
Gist, Nanticoke. Zoey has two
sisters, Makeinzy Backley and
Hailey Karvaski.
Zoey M. Backley
Brayden Francis Bond, son of
Brian and Deanna Andreoli
Bond, Philadelphia, is celebrating
his first birthday today, Feb. 9.
Brayden is a grandson of Eleanor
Andreoli and the late Valentino
(Tino) Andreoli, Wilkes-Barre,
and Frank and Doreen Bond,
Philadelphia.
Brayden F. Bond
Sadie Marie Fuller, daughter of
Robert and Donna Fuller, Hanov-
er Township, celebrated her
eighth birthday Feb. 3. Sadie is a
granddaughter of MaryAnn
Shanahan, Wilkes-Barre, and
Kathleen and William Dobson,
Hanover Township. She has a
brother, Robert Fuller.
Sadie M. Fuller
Mary Ann Stout, daughter of
Alan and Stephanie Stout, Ed-
wardsville, is celebrating her fifth
birthday today, Feb. 9. Mary Ann
is a granddaughter of John and
Mary Ann Chernesky, Kingston,
and Wayne and Ruth Meese,
Wilkes-Barre. She has a brother,
A.J., 2.
Mary Ann Stout
Morgan McKenna Hermanofski,
daughter of Rodney and Stacy
Hermanofski, is celebrating her
seventh birthday today, Feb. 9.
Morgan is a granddaughter of
Bill and Ellen Yarmel and Walter
and Diane Cooper, all of Orange-
ville, and Corinne Hermanofski,
Nanticoke. She is a great-grand-
daughter of Helen Cooper, Or-
angeville, and Eleanor English,
Berwick. Morgan has a sister,
Ashlyn, 3.
Morgan M. Hermanofski
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IMPORTANT NOTICE TOALLDAMA
TRASH CUSTOMERS
Due to the overwhelming positive response by DAMA solid waste and recycling
customers in the adoption of single-stream recycling, and to help manage the
increased volume of recyclable materials generated as a result of this innovative
collection method, effective the week of February 20, 2012, we will change the
collection of recycling from every other week to a weekly collection. The recycling
format will remain single-stream, however, you will now be able to place all of
your recycling to include paper, glass, plastic and metal cans, curbside in the same
container for collection every week. This change should help ease the burden on
both our customers and the DAMA solid waste division staff, and allow the program
to operate more effciently. During the month of January alone, DAMA collected
approximately 25,000 bags of trash and 144 tons of recycling from our residents.
Please remember the following program guidelines:
• Trash & Recycling must be placed curbside by 6:00 AM on the day of your
collection. Trash must be placed in bags, no loose garbage.
• There is a two bag, or two standard 33 gallon containers, limit on trash.
Additional trash must have extra bag stickers. Please place recycling curbside in
open containers or clear plastic bags.
• Coal & wood ashes must be bagged or boxed, and marked “ashes”, as these are
removed at no charge to our residents and do not count against your bag limit.
Thank you for your patience and support of this program,
The Board of Directors and Staff of the Dallas Area Municipal Authority
The Dallas High School PTSO Steering Committee, in conjunc-
tion with the Guidance Department, recently announced two up-
coming events for the months of February and March. Faculty and
support staff will be treated to a Valentine’s Day appreciation
breakfast on Tuesday. The Blue Chip Animal Rescue Collection
Drive will be held March 5-9. For more information, or to participa-
te in the events, contact Robyn Jones, school counselor, at 674-
7217. Committee members, from left, first row, are PTSO parents
Laura Harrison, Barbara Goode and Deanna Habib. Second row:
Jones; Bonnie Stachnik, Laura Stearns and Maryann Fannick,
PTSO parents; and Jeffrey Shaffer, principal.
Dallas High School PTSO announces upcoming events
Thirty members of the Meyers Speech and Debate team recently competed at the Catholic Forensic League of Scranton Tournament held
at West Scranton. Twelve team members brought home trophies from the tournament. The team was led by sophomore Michelle Chavez in
congress. Freshman Emily Welles placed third in the same event. In varsity extemporaneous speaking, sophomore Emmalie Langan finished
third. Sophomores Christa Franckiewicz and Melanie Maskowski took third place in varsity public forum debating. In novice public forum
debate, sophomores John Jones and Anna Macko placed third. Eighth-grader Jillian Kopec finished third in novice dramatic performance
and eighth-graders Betsy Macko and Bailey McDaniel earned third place in novice dramatic duo. Sophomore Kierstan Poplawski took sixth
place in declamation. In novice original oratory, sophomore Samantha Middleton placed sixth. The team was assisted in coaching and judging
by Meyers alumni, Joe Borland, John Monahan, Ron Woznock, Sara Solomon and Gabby Richards. At the tournament, from left, first row, are
Ben Manarski, Florence Kwok, Tom Lovecchio, Will Amesbury, Eilish Hoban, Betsy Macko, Bailey McDaniel, Megan Welles, Christa Franckiewicz
and Melanie Maskowski. Second row: Kierstan Poplawski, Emily Cook, Julia Kerr, John Jones, Alexis Brown, Samantha Middleton, Anna
Macko, Joe Franckiewicz and Tallion Staudenmeier. Third row: Jillian Kopec, James Langan, Emmalie Langan, Frances Kwok, Olivia Richards,
Aria Mason, Emily Welles, Michelle Chavez and Victoria Kwok. Also participating were Morgan Prince and Marissa Prince.
Meyers Speech and Debate team compete in Catholic Forensic League of Scranton Tournament
Several students from St. Jude School in Mountain Top recently
entered the Pennsylvania Alliance for Geographic Education poster
contest. Students in kindergarten through fifth grades were invited
to participate. They were challenged to create a poster entitled
‘Pennsylvania Geography-An Adventure in Your Community.’ Edward
Patrick, second grade, was awarded the Grand Prize and his poster
will be printed on folders for the PA Alliance Geography Education
organization. He will also receive a one-year subscription to National
Geographic for Kids. All students received Certificates of Excellence
from the Alliance. Additional winners, from left, first row: Natalie
Hunsinger, kindergarten winner, and Carly Glaser, Avery Chepolis and
Jack Novelli, all honorable mention in the kindergarten category.
Second row: Gabby Shideler, honorable mention in second grade;
Patrick; Jimmy Lavan, third-grade winner; and Vincent DeMarco,
honorable mention in third grade.
St. Jude School students enter geography poster contest
Nine students at MMI Preparatory School, Freeland, earned awards in
the American Mathematics Competition 8 (AMC 8) sponsored by the
Mathematical Association of America. The competition is a 25-question,
40-minute, multiple-choice examination in junior high and middle
school mathematics. Problems are designed to challenge students and
to offer problem-solving experiences beyond those provided in most
junior high school mathematics classes. Students are not allowed to use
calculators. Four students earned or tied for first-place awards, Ryan
Touey, first place; Charles Bower, tied for first place; Jay Solgama, tied
for first place; and Sarah Moyer, tied for first place. Ali Aijaz and Brian
Galbiati placed second. Christopher Tessitore and Niklas Byriel tied for
third place. Susan Moyer is the math instructor and adviser for students
participating in the AMC 8 competition at MMI. Award-winning students,
from left, first row, are Aijaz, Dana Carrato, Touey and Byriel. Second
row: Bower, Solgama, Sarah Moyer, Tessitore and Galbiati.
MMI Prep students awarded in mathematics competition
Misericordia University students active in the Scholars in Service to
Pennsylvania (SISPA) program organized the event, ‘Leave Your Mark on
MU,’ in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day and to symbolize special
needs acceptance and awareness. Students traced one of their hands
into one of 26 patches on the handmade quilt that already contained the
outlines of hands from people who receive services from the Wyoming
Valley Children’s Association and the Arc of Luzerne County. The quilt,
featuring 52 handprints, was donated to the Misericordia University
Office of Campus Ministry and was hung in the main office in the Banks
Student Life Center to serve as a constant symbol of acceptance and
awareness for guests and members of the campus community. With the
quilt, from left: Amanda Sutton, Kingston; Gina Grant, National Park, N.J.;
and Amanda Tomaselli, Trucksville; and Jeff Salvatore, Mullica Hill, N.J.
Misericordia students organize event in honor of MLK Day
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 5C
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Mon-Fri 10-5, Thurs 10-7, Sat 10-3
Valentine’s
Day
Sale
Coughlin High School
Class of 1959 will meet 6 p.m. Feb.
16 at Andy Perugino’s Restau-
rant, 258 Charles St., Luzerne.
All class members and spouses
are invited.
G.A.R. Memorial High School
Class of 1951 will meet 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday at Theo’s Metro, 596
Mercer Ave., Kingston. All class-
mates, spouses and friends are
invited. Call Gil at 824-9425, or
Marilyn at 288-3102 for reserva-
tions.
Lake-Lehman Band
Alumni members will meet 6:30
p.m. Feb. 23 at Grotto Pizza,
Harveys Lake. Anyone who was
in the band under John Mi-
liauskas is invited. Members
interested in planning the re-
union are invited to attend. Class
members are needed to contact
band members. An open house
is planned for 1-5- p.m. June 16 at
the Lake-Lehman High School.
Donations to cover costs can be
sent to Lake-Lehman Band
Alumni, Virginia Piatt Ide, 65
Boyle Road, Dallas, Pa. 18612.
Contact Ginny Piatt Ide at 639-
2587 or gmide@yahoo.com, or
Mary Beth Duffy Tomko at tom-
ko5@comcast.net.
Meyers High School
Class of 1961 is holding a luncheon
get together 1 p.m. Feb. 21 at
Hops and Barley Restaurant,
Main Street, Luzerne. All class
members, spouses and friends
are invited.
Plymouth High School
Class of 1956 reunion planning
committee will meet 6 p.m.
Tuesday at Grotto Pizza, Ed-
wardsville. Plans for the 56th
anniversary reunion to be held in
August will be discussed. All
classmates are welcome.
REUNIONS
Editor’s Note: To have your an-
nouncement published in this
column please submit the informa-
tion to Reunions, The Times Lead-
er, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
1871 1. E-mail submissions must be
sent to people@timesleader.com.
Please type “Reunion News” in the
subject line. The deadline is each
Monday for all copy.
Ryan White, Royersford, and Ian
McAllister,
Springbrook
Township, Penn
State Wilkes-
Barre survey-
ing engineer-
ing students,
received
awards in the
area of student
papers at the
Pennsylvania
Society of
Land Sur-
veyors Annual
Conference.
White, a junior,
received a
third-place
honor for his
paper, “Geoidal Undulation:
Concepts & Creation.” McAllister,
a senior, received a second-place
honor for his paper “A Sim-
ulation Study in the Precision
Criterion for the 2011 ALTA-ACSM
Land Title Survey Standards,”
co-authored with Dr. Charles
Ghilani, Penn State Wilkes-
Barre professor of surveying
engineering.
Paige Bronsburg, West Wyom-
ing, was inducted as a mem-
ber of the Phi Theta Kappa
Honor Society at the Fashion
Institute of Technology, State
University of New York. She
was also named to the
Dean’s List for the fall se-
mester. Bronsburg is major-
ing in international market-
ing with a minor in econom-
ics. She is a 2009 graduate
of Wyoming Area Secondary
Center and the daughter of
Mark and Nancy Bronsburg.
Erik Cannon, Dallas, has been
recognized as a student-
athlete at Lafayette College
through the Student-Athlete
Academic Honor Roll. Honors
are awarded for a grade
point average of 3.4 and
above and outstanding ath-
letic participation. Cannon is
a defender on the soccer
team and a second year
bio-chemistry major.
NAMES AND FACES
White
McAllister
Today
HANOVER TWP.: Our Lady of
Czestochowa Society of the
Exaltation of the Holy Cross
Church, 420 Main Road, 12:30
p.m. for benediction followed by
a meeting at 1 p.m. in the church
hall. Regina Kotchiek will pre-
side. Connie Hartman and Ann
Hopiak are the hostesses. Tick-
ets will be available for the Nite
at the Races to be held 6 p.m.
Saturday in the church hall.
Wednesday
MOUNTAIN TOP: Crestwood
Middle School PTA, 6:30 p.m. in
the school library. Date changed
due to Valentine’s Day. All par-
ents, guardians and grandpar-
ents are encouraged to attend.
For more information contact
Brenda Anderson at 814-8831.
MEETINGS
All third-grade students in Back Mountain area schools were re-
cently given a copy of a dictionary by the Dallas Rotary Club. The
club’s dictionary project committee, chaired by Rotarian Bill Nafus,
distributed more than 400 books to Dallas and Lake-Lehman stu-
dents. Third-grade teachers at Wycallis Elementary School, Dallas,
welcomed the Rotarians and thanked them for their dedication to
literacy and education. Some of the participants, from left, first row,
are Haley Vesek, Zachary Pokrinchak, Raquel Spengle, Carissa Speck
and Kareem Morsy. Second row: Rotarians Ann Marie Konek; Ken
Chapple, club president; and Nafus.
Back Mountain third-graders receive dictionaries
C M Y K
PAGE 6C THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ARTIST, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:05PM, 2:35PM, 5:05PM, 7:35PM, 10:05PM
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2012) (3D) (G)
12:00PM, 2:15PM, 4:30PM, 7:00PM, 9:20PM
BIG MIRACLE (DIGITAL) (PG)
1:20PM, 4:00PM, 7:05PM, 9:45PM
CHRONICLE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:55AM, 2:05PM, 4:15PM, 6:25PM, 8:35PM,
10:45PM
CONTRABAND (DIGITAL) (R)
12:50PM, 3:35PM, 4:55PM, 6:15PM, 7:35PM,
9:00PM, 10:50PM
DESCENDANTS, THE (DIGITAL) (R)
1:45PM, 4:35PM, 7:20PM, 10:30PM
EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:35PM, 3:30PM, 6:55PM, 9:50PM
GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO, THE (2011)
(DIGITAL) (R)
3:15PM, 6:45PM, 10:20PM
GREY, THE (2012) (DIGITAL) (R)
1:40PM, 4:40PM, 7:45PM, 10:40PM
HAYWIRE (DIGITAL) (R)
9:15PM
HUGO (3D) (PG)
1:10PM, 4:05PM, 7:00PM, 9:55PM
JOYFUL NOISE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
4:15PM, 10:35PM
MAN ON A LEDGE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:00PM, 2:30PM, 5:00PM, 7:50PM, 10;25PM
MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE GHOST PROTOCOL
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:50AM
ONE FOR THE MONEY (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 2:25PM, 4:45PM, 7:10PM, 9:30PM
RED TAILS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:55PM, 4:25PM, 7:25PM, 10:15PM
SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF
SHADOWS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:15PM, 7:15PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (3D) (R)
4:10PM, 6:30PM, 8:45PM, 11:00PM
UNDERWORLD AWAKENING (DIGITAL) (R)
1:50PM
WOMAN IN BLACK, THE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:10PM, 1:25PM, 2:40PM, 3:55PM, 5:10PM,
6:25PM, 7:40PM, 8:55PM, 10:10PM
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
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SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Götterdämmerung LIVE
Saturday, February 11 at 12:00pm only
LA PHIL LIVE Dudamel Conducts Mahler
Saturday, February 18 at 5:00pm only
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Saturday, February 25 at 12:55pm only
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Thursday, March 1 at 7:00pm only
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Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
*Chronicle - PG13 - 95 min.
(1:00), (3:30), 7:20, 9:40
*The Woman In Black - PG13 - 105 min.
(12:50), (3:10), 7:10, 9:30
*Big Miracle - PG - 115 min.
(12:50), (3:15), 7:10, 9:40
One For The Money - PG13 - 100 min.
(12:40), (2:50), 7:20, 9:30
The Iron Lady - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:00), (3:40), 7:30, 10:00
Man On A Ledge - PG13 - 115 min.
(1:10), (3:40), 7:30, 10:10
The Descendants - R - 125 min.
(12:50), (3:40), 7:15, 9:50
The Artist - PG13 - 110 min.
(12:50), (3:10), 7:20, 9:40
The Grey - R - 130 min.
(12:40), (3:20), 7:15, 10:00
The Grey in D-Box - R - 130 min.
(12:40), (3:20), 7:15, 10:00
Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close
PG13 - 140 min.
(12:30), (3:30), 7:00, 9:50
Red Tails - PG13 - 130 min.
(12:45), (3:40), 7:00, 9:45
***Underworld Awakening in 3D -
R - 100 min.
(1:20), (3:40), 7:30, 9:50
***Beauty and the Beast in 3D -
G - 95 min.
(12:30), (2:40), (4:45), 7:00, 9:10
Contraband - R - 120 min.
7:00, 9:30
Alvin and the Chipmunks:
Chipwrecked - G - 95 min
(12:30), (2:40), (4:50)
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Inside
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Wipeout (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Grey’s Anatomy “If/
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(:02) Private Practice
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News (:35)
Nightline

Leave-
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Leave-
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Good
Times
Good
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3’s Com-
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pany
All in the
Family
All in the
Family
News-
watch 16
Seinfeld
(TVG)
Sanford &
Son
Sanford &
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6
Judge
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Evening
News
The
Insider (N)
Entertain-
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Big Bang
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(:31) Rob
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(CC) (TV14)
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Access
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Letterman
<
News Nightly
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Jay Leno
F
30 Rock
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The Vampire Diaries
(N) (CC) (TV14)
The Secret Circle
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Always
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PBS NewsHour (N)
(CC)
State of Pennsyl-
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Judge Nealon: Heart
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Homegrown Con-
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Paid Program Friends
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Love-Ray-
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How I Met

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#
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(:31) Rob
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News Letterman
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King of
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King of
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How I Met How I Met Without a Trace (CC)
(TVPG)
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(TVPG)
The 10
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(TV14)
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(CC)
+
Family
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Family
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Two and
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PIX News at Ten
Jodi Applegate. (N)
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AMC
CSI: Miami “Inside
Out” (CC) (TV14)
CSI: Miami (CC)
(TV14)
The Natural (PG, ‘84) ››› Robert Redford, Robert Duvall,
Glenn Close. A flawed baseball hero gets a new chance. (CC)
The Natural (PG,
‘84) ››› (CC)
AP
River Monsters:
Unhooked (TVPG)
Finding Bigfoot: Fur-
ther Evidence
Call of
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Call of
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Snake Man of Appa-
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American Stuffers (N)
(TV14)
Call of
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Call of
Wildman
ARTS
The First 48 “Torn;
Gun Crazy” (TV14)
The First 48 (CC)
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The First 48 (CC) The First 48 (CC)
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Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report
(N)
The Facebook
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Inside Facebook
Steve Jobs: Billion
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John King, USA (N) Erin Burnett Out-
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Chap-
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Daily
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Son of the Mask (PG, ‘05) › Jamie Ken-
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I Just Want My Pants
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My Wife
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My Wife
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George
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George
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That ’70s
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OVAT
Emma (5:30) (PG, ‘96) ››› Gwyneth Pal-
trow, Jeremy Northam, Toni Collette.
The Hotel New Hampshire (R, ‘84) ›› Jodie Fos-
ter. New Englander and odd clan run Vienna hotel.
The Hotel New Hampshire
(R, ‘84) ›› Jodie Foster.
SPD
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Pimp My
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Am.
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Pimp My
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Pimp My
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SPIKE
Jail (CC)
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Face Off “Return to
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King of
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King of
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Seinfeld
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Big Bang
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Conan (N) (TV14)
TCM
Lies My Father Told Me (PG, ‘75) ›››
Jeffrey Lynas, Yossi Yadin. Premiere.
The Professionals (PG-13, ‘66) ›››
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The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
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TLC
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David Blaine: What Is
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NY Ink “Give and
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NY Ink “Boiling
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David Blaine: Street
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NBA Tip-Off (N) (Live)
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NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks.
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NBA Basketball Denver Nug-
gets at Los Angeles Clippers.
TOON
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King of
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King of
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Man v.
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No Reservations
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M*A*S*H
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Home
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Home
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Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
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mond
King of
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King of
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USA
NCIS Posthumous
accusation. (TVPG)
NCIS Biohazard iso-
lation. (TVPG)
NCIS “Twilight” (CC)
(TVPG)
NCIS “Kill Ari” (CC)
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Termi-
nator 3
SHO
The Extra
Man
(4:30)
Casino Jack (R, ‘10) ›› Kevin Spacey.
iTV. Jack Abramoff amasses wealth and
power before his fall. (CC)
Brooklyn Boheme (‘11) iTV
Premiere.
Shameless Fiona
deals with conse-
quences. (CC) (TVMA)
Inside
Comedy
(TVMA)
Beach
Heat:
Miami (N)
STARZ
Tron: Legacy (4:45)
(PG, ‘10) ›› (CC)
Secretariat (6:55) (PG, ‘10) ››› Diane
Lane, John Malkovich, Dylan Walsh. (CC)
Death at a Funeral (R, ‘10)
›› Keith David. (CC)
Priest (10:40) (PG-13, ‘11) ››
Paul Bettany. (CC)
TMC
The Sum of All Fears (5:55) (PG-13,
‘02) ››› Ben Affleck. Jack Ryan fights
terrorists planning a nuclear attack.
Fair Game (PG-13, ‘10) ››› Naomi
Watts, Sean Penn. Premiere. Valerie
Plame is revealed as a CIA agent. (CC)
The Company Men (R, ‘10)
››› Ben Affleck, Chris Cooper,
Kevin Costner. (CC)
Dirty
Love
(11:45)
6 a.m. 22 ‘The Daily Buzz’ (TVG)
6 a.m. FNC ‘FOX and Friends’ (N)
7 a.m. 3, 22 ‘CBS This Morning’
New England Patriots coach Bill
Belichick. (N)
7 a.m. 56 ‘Morning News with
Webster and Nancy’
7 a.m. 16 ‘Good Morning America’
Nicole ‘Snooki’ Polizzi and Jenni
‘JWoww’ Farley; chefs Emeril
Lagasse and Mario Batali. (N)
7 a.m. 28 ‘Today’ Affordable Val-
entine’s trips; Super Bowl drinks;
hot topics. (N)
7 a.m. CNN ‘Starting Point’ (N)
8 a.m. 56 ‘Better’ Hair trends;
cold and flu etiquette; wedding
rings. (N) (TVPG)
9 a.m. 3, 22 ‘Anderson’ Entertain-
er Madonna. (N) (TVG)
9 a.m. 16 ‘Live! With Kelly’ Mi-
chelle Williams; Nicole ‘Snooki’
Polizzi and Jenni ‘Jwoww’ Farley;
co-host Peter Facinelli. (N)
(TVPG)
9 a.m. 28 ‘Today’ (N)
9 a.m. 53 ‘Dr. Phil’ Parents fear
their violent 16-year-old twins.
(N) (TV14)
9 a.m. FNC ‘America’s Newsroom’
(N)
10 a.m. 16 ‘The Ellen DeGeneres
Show’ Michelle Obama; Daniel
Radcliffe; teacher Sara Ferguson.
(N) (TVG)
10 a.m. 53 ‘The Steve Wilkos
Show’ Parents fear that the
mother’s ex-boyfriend molested
their 3-year-old. (N) (TV14)
11 a.m. 56 ‘Maury’ A man learns
that his brother may be the
father of his baby. (N) (TV14)
11 a.m. 16 ‘The View’ Actress Lisa
Kudrow; actor Steve Van Zandt.
(N) (TV14)
TV TALK
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 7C
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: I was
recently diagnosed
as gluten intolerant.
My question is, when
dining at a restau-
rant, while everyone
else is eating the
bread that is served,
is it acceptable to discreetly take a
few gluten-free crackers from my
purse and snack on them so I’m not
starving while waiting for dinner?
My husband thought it was inap-
propriate, so I didn’t take them. I did
ask the waiter if he had gluten-free
bread or crackers, but he didn’t. I
have many medical issues. I try to
eat only what is healthy for me and
thought providing my own crackers
was a minor deal. What do you think?
— Gluten Intolerant in Florida
Dear G.I.: Gluten intolerance can
cause serious digestive issues. Your
husband may have had a bad day
when he criticized you, because I see
nothing wrong with someone on a
restricted diet taking emergency ra-
tions in case a restaurant can’t accom-
modate his or her special needs.
Gluten intolerance has gone un-
diagnosed in many people, but in
recent years food manufacturers have
created many products that are safe
for them. Accommodating a customer
who is gluten intolerant shouldn’t be
an insurmountable problem if the res-
taurant is asked in advance.
Dear Abby: I was standing in front of
a restaurant with my mother-in-law
and a group of relatives when she
“felt up” my back and backside. We
were facing the others when she put
her hand around my back, first side-
ways and then all around until she
got down to my rear end. It felt like
she was searching for something, but
the weather was warm and my blouse
was very thin, so I couldn’t have hid-
den anything. When she reached my
behind, she pressed her thumb hard
on my hipbone and rubbed in a circu-
lar motion.
I feel extremely violated because
her hand should not be anywhere
near that region. My husband says I
misinterpreted what she did, but he
has no explanation. I think her behav-
ior was incestuous! When she visits,
she also insists on sleeping in the
master bedroom. Am I overreacting?
— Violated in Southern California
Dear “Violated”: Unless your moth-
er-in-law insists on sleeping between
you and her son when she comes to
visit, I do think you’re overreacting.
What she did was give you a back
rub. In most families, a gesture like
that is one of affection. Lighten up!
Dear Abby: I’m planning my son’s
bar mitzvah, and my ex-husband
hasn’t lifted a finger to help me. I
received two small checks for his por-
tion of the guests who will attend.
My question is, should I put his
name on the invitation? Or do I just
put my name on it since I’m the one
hosting and putting the party togeth-
er? I want to do the right thing, but I
also want it made clear that I did the
planning myself.
— Mitzvah Mama in New York
Dear Mitzvah Mama: Be benevolent.
For the sake of your child, include
your ex-husband’s name on the invita-
tion. It isn’t necessary to omit it so
that you can get the credit. All you
need to do is confide in one “yenta”
that your son’s father is a “schnorrer”
and word will get around. Trust me.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Dietary restrictions force woman to fend for herself or go hungry
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently re-
quested — poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You
think you are explaining yourself
well. What you can’t account for
is the level of distraction that
others encounter. Your patience
will be required.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You’ll
do all you can to maintain an
appealing atmosphere. You won’t
let anyone encroach on your
space, freedom and peace, and
you’ll protect those you love
from invasion, as well.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Movement is essential to your
growth process. As you physi-
cally move through your envi-
ronment, you mentally move
through obstacles, troubles, fear
and anything else holding you
back.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). The
one who catches you off guard
also captures your interest,
attention and affection. You may
find yourself thinking of this per-
son well into the evening.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Life is like
rock climbing. When you know
you have a strong measure of
security in your connection with
the rock, it is easier for you to
swing out and savor an adven-
turous piece of sky.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You have
a gift for making people cooper-
ate, even when they think the
task at hand is tedious. You help
everyone see the benefit to liv-
ing in an orderly, cheerful and
efficient manner.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Anyone
who’s achieved greatness knows
that a lot of effort, forethought,
insight, planning and practice go
into turning the ordinary into the
extraordinary.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You can
stroke a person’s ego without
doing what the person is asking
you to do. You have a clever way
of dealing with the one who is
notoriously hard to manage.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You’ll wonder at the curious
turnarounds of the day. For
instance, enjoyment turns out
to be more work than working.
You’re determined to make the
best of things.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
You’ll be in the mood to initiate
the action. Small won’t count.
Sweeping, grand gestures will
go over well, if only because not
many people have the guts to
make such a strong statement.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
love it when an idea comes
together, and right now you’re
working on one. That stated, it’s
the practical moves you make
now that will bring you the most
satisfaction.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Arguments will shake up the day,
and the future will seem uncer-
tain. Your powers of empathy
will be tested, and you’ll come
through. If anyone can find a
compromise, you can!
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Feb. 9). You
have a killer instinct for business.
You’ll make more money for
doing the same amount of work.
A turn of events in March may
be hard to assimilate at first,
but ultimately it’s what allows
your heart to be most fulfilled.
You love a mystery, and the one
in your own family tree will be
riveting. Aries and Virgo people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 4, 25, 2, 15 and 30.
F U N N I E S THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 1D
MARKETPLACE
412 Autos for Sale
380 Travel
412 Autos for Sale
380 Travel
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
Proposed Amendments to Air Quality Regulations
(25 Pa. Code Chapters 121, 129 and 130)
Flexible Packaging Printing Presses, Offset Lithograph-
ic Printing Presses, Letterpress Printing Presses and
Adhesives, Sealants, Primers and Solvents
The Environmental Quality Board (Board) will hold three public
hearings for the purpose of accepting comments on the pro-
posed rulemaking to amend 25 Pa. Code Chapters 121, 129 and
130 (relating to general provisions; standards for sources; and
standards for products) to add requirements for the control of
emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from flexible
packaging printing presses, offset lithographic printing presses,
letterpress printing presses and adhesives, sealants, primers
and solvents.
The proposed amendments to Chapter 129 will apply to the
owner and operator of a flexible packaging printing press, offset
lithographic printing press, or letterpress printing press, if the
total actual VOC emissions from all flexible packaging printing
presses, offset lithographic printing presses, or letterpress print-
ing presses, including related cleaning activities, at the facility
are equal to or greater than 15 pounds (6.8 kilograms) per day
or 2.7 tons per 12-month rolling period, before consideration of
controls or if an individual heatset web offset lithographic print-
ing press, an individual heatset web letterpress printing press or
flexographic printing press has potential emissions from the
dryer, before consideration of add-on controls, of at least 25
tons per year of VOC from inks, coatings, adhesives or a combi-
nation of these materials.
The proposed rulemaking would amend § 129.51(a) (relating to
general) to extend its coverage to the owner and operator of a
flexible packaging printing press, offset lithographic printing
press or letterpress printing press, or combination of these
press types, covered by this proposed rulemaking and provide
an alternative method for the owner and operator of an affected
facility to achieve compliance with air emission limits.
The proposed rulemaking would amend § 129.67 (relating to
graphic arts systems) to provide for the proposed requirements
that would apply to the owner and operator of a flexible packag-
ing printing press under § 129.67a (relating to control of VOC
emissions from flexible packaging printing presses).
The proposed rulemaking would add §§ 129.67a and 129.67b
(relating to control of VOC emissions from offset lithographic
printing presses and letterpress printing presses) to establish
VOC content limit, add-on control and work practice standard
requirements for the owner and operator of an affected flexible
packaging printing press, offset lithographic printing press or let-
terpress printing press, or a combination of these press types in
this Commonwealth to reduce VOC emissions from the use and
application of inks, coatings, adhesives, fountain solutions and
cleaning materials.
The proposed rulemaking would amend § 121.1 (relating to defi-
nitions) to add 17 new terms and definitions and revise the defi-
nition of two existing terms. The proposed rulemaking would
also include amendments to the recently promulgated regula-
tions for adhesives, sealants, primers and solvents in Chapters
129 and 130 (40 Pa. B. 7340, December 25, 2010) to clarify the
applicability of the requirements of §§ 129.77 and 130.703 (relat-
ing to control of emissions from the use or application of adhe-
sives, sealants, primers and solvents; and exemptions and
exceptions) to the adhesives used or applied on or with the print-
ing presses proposed for regulation under this rulemaking.
The proposed rulemaking, if published as a final-form regulation
in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, will be submitted to the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency as a revision to the State Implementa-
tion Plan.
Public Hearings
The hearings will be held as follows:
March 14, 2012 Department of Environmental Protection
1 p.m. Southwest Regional Office
Upper Allegheny Conference Room
400 Waterfront Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15222
March 15, 2012 Department of Environmental Protection
1 p.m. Southeast Regional Office
Delaware River Conference Room
2 East Main Street
Norristown, PA 19401
March 16, 2012 Department of Environmental Protection
1 p.m. Rachel Carson State Office Building
Conference Room 105
400 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17105
Persons wishing to present testimony at a hearing are request-
ed to contact the Environmental Quality Board, P.O. Box 8477,
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8477, (717) 787-4526 at least 1 week in
advance of the hearing to reserve a time to present testimony.
Oral testimony is limited to 10 minutes for each witness. Wit-
nesses are requested to submit three written copies of their oral
testimony to the hearing chairperson at the hearing. Organiza-
tions are limited to designating one witness to present testimo-
ny on their behalf at each hearing.
Persons in need of accommodations as provided for in the
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 should contact the Board
at (717) 787-4526 or through the Pennsylvania AT&T Relay Ser-
vice at (800) 654-5984 (TDD users) or (800) 654-5988 (voice
users) to discuss how the Board can best accommodate their
needs.
Written Comments
Interested persons are invited to submit comments, suggestions
or objections regarding the proposed rulemaking to the Environ-
mental Quality Board, P.O. Box 8477, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8477
(express mail: Rachel Carson State Office Building, 16th Floor,
400 Market Street, Harrisburg, PA 17101-2301). Comments sub-
mitted by facsimile will not be accepted. Comments, sugges-
tions or objections must be received by the Board by April 16,
2012. Interested persons may also submit a summary of their
comments to the Board. The summary may not exceed one
page in length and must also be received by April 16, 2012. The
one-page summary will be provided to each member of the
Board in the agenda packet distributed prior to the meeting at
which the final regulation will be considered.
Electronic Comments
Comments may be submitted electronically to the Board at Reg-
Comments@pa.gov and must be received by the Board by April
16, 2012. A subject heading of the proposal and a return name
and address must be included in each transmission. If the
sender does not receive an acknowledgement of electronic
comments within 2 working days, the comments should be
retransmitted to ensure receipt.
Copies of the Proposed Rulemaking
The full text of the proposed rulemaking will be published in the
February 11, 2012, issue of the Pennsylvania Bulletin and will be
available electronically at http://www.pabulletin.com as well as
on the Department of Environmental Protection’s website at
http://www.depweb.state.pa.us (DEP Search/Keyword: “Public
Participation”; select “Public Participation Center”; then choose
“Proposals Currently Open for Comment”). Copies of the pro-
posal will also be available from Connie Hartlaub, Department of
Environmental Protection, Bureau of Air Quality, Rachel Carson
State Office Building, 12th floor, 400 Market Street, P.O. Box
8468, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8468, by email at chartlaub@pa.gov
or by phone at (717) 787-9495.
MICHAEL KRANCER
Chairperson
PUBLIC NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the
Luzerne County Emergency Planning
Committee (LEPC) will hold a public meet-
ing on Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at 4:00
p.m. in the Luzerne County Emergency
Management Agency Building located at
185 Water Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsyl-
vania for the following purpose:
To transact business as may
properly come before the meeting or
any adjournment thereof.
The County of Luzerne does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color,
national origin, sex, religion, age, disability
or familial status in employment or the pro-
vision of services.
The Luzerne County Emergency
Management Agency Building is a facility
accessible to persons with disabilities. If
special accommodations are required,
please notify the Luzerne County Commis-
sioners by calling (570) 825-1500 or TDD
(570) 825-1860 or fax (570) 825-9343.
Stephen Bekanich
Coordinator
Emergency Management Agency
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Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
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570-466-1743
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135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
LINE UP
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LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN
THAT Letters Testa-
mentary have been
issued in the Estate
of Samuel A. Sorber,
late of theTownship
of Hanover, Luzerne
County Pennsylvan-
ia, who died January
14, 2012. All per-
sons indebted to
said Estate are
required to make
payment and those
having claims or
demands are to
present the same to
the Executrix, Ruth
M. Sorber, c/o
ROBERT V.
DAVISON, ESQUIRE,
NEW BRIDGE
CENTER, SUITE 216,
480 PIERCE
STREET, KINGSTON,
PA ,18704.
135 Legals/
Public Notices
SOUTH TAMAQUA
COAL POCKETS,
Inc.
Pursuant to the Sur-
face Mining Conser-
vation and Recla-
mation and Clean
Streams Law notice
hereby is given that
South Tamaqua
Coal Pockets, Inc.
804 West Penn
Pike, Tamaqua, PA
18252 has made
application to the
Pennsylvania
Department of Envi-
ronmental Protec-
tion for renewing its
existing surface
coal permit. The
surface coal current
permit # 40020201
was issued on July
5, 2002 and will
expire on July 5,
2012. This renewal
contains no revi-
sions to the existing
operation. There
will be no direct dis-
charge to a receiv-
ing stream. The
operation is located
in Hazle Township,
Luzerne County and
is known as the
Yorktown Operation.
The operation can
be located by meas-
uring 8.0” north and
16.5” west from the
bottom right hand
corner of the Hazle-
ton, PA 7.5 minute
quadrangle map.
A copy of the
renewal application
is available for pub-
lic review at the
Department of Envi-
ronmental Protec-
tion, Pottsville Dis-
trict Office, 5 West
Laurel Boulevard,
Pottsville, PA 17901-
2454. Written
objections to the
transfer of this per-
mit may be submit-
ted to: Department
of Environmental
Protection Field
Operations – Mining
& Reclamation c/o
District Mining Man-
ager, 5 West Laurel
Boulevard,
Pottsville, PA 17901-
2454. Objections
must be submitted
no later than March
26, 2012. Objec-
tions are to include
the objector’s
name, address,
telephone number
and a brief state-
ment as to the
nature of the objec-
tion.
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LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN, pursuant to
Act 93 of 1998, that
the Finance
Committee of West
Side Career and
Technology Center
will hold a special
meeting for the sole
purpose of review-
ing a proposed
budget for fiscal
year 2013 on Thurs-
day, February 23,
2012, at 6:00 p.m.
in the library of the
school, 75 Evans
St., Pringle Bor-
ough, Luzerne
County, PA. If you
are a person with a
disability and desire
to attend this meet-
ing and require an
auxiliary aid, serv-
ice, or other
accommodation,
please contact the
Office of the Admin-
istrative Director to
determine how the
school can best
serve your needs.
Elaine Pallone,
Secretary
135 Legals/
Public Notices
WATER
WITHDRAWAL
FROM
TUNKHANNOCK
CREEK
Mark Manglaviti &
Scott Kresge Notice
of Application –
Mark Manglaviti &
Scott Kresge With-
drawal from
Tunkhannock Creek,
SRBC Pending No.
2012-013, Tunkhan-
nock Township,
Wyoming County,
PA. Notice is hereby
given that on Janu-
ary 30, 2012 Mark
Manglaviti & Scott
Kresge, PO Box
249, Lake Winola,
PA., kresge2003
@aol.com, 570-836-
8815, filed an appli-
cation (SRBC Pend-
ing No. 2012-013)
with the Susquehan-
na River Basin Com-
mission (SRBC) for
a surface water
withdrawal. The
Mark Manglaviti &
Scott Kresge appli-
cation proposes to
withdraw up to
999,999 gallons per
day (gpd) from
Tunkhannock Creek
at a location on
property owned by
Mark Manglaviti &
Scott Kresge, tax
ID: 26-057.0-100-
00-00-00, approxi-
mately 4,750 feet
northeast of the
intersection of SR
0006 and SR 0092
in Tunkhannock
Township, Wyoming
County, Pennsylva-
nia for use in drilling
and development of
natural gas wells
and related proj-
ects. Comments
related to this SRBC
application should
be submitted to the
attention of Andrew
D. Dehoff; Manager,
Project Review,
Susquehanna River
Basin Commission,
1721 North Front
Street, Harrisburg,
PA 17102-2391,
telephone: 717-
238-0423, ext. 221,
fax: 717-909-0468,
e-mail: project_
comments@srbc.net
Comments also may
be submitted on
SRBC’s website
through the Water
Resources Portal at
http://www.srbc.net
/wrp/. Please
include the above
SRBC pending appli-
cation number on
any correspon
dence.
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Active couple
longs to be
blessed with your
newborn to cher-
ish and educate in
our loving home.
EXPENSES PAID
Please call
Kim & Chris
888-942-9899
ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Joyfilled home,
endless love,
security awaits.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
Expenses Paid
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Friday, February
17th Mardi Gras
Cajun
Celebration
Genetti’s WB
featuring
M-80. Be there
bridezella.net
SINGING VALENTINES
Feb. 14th
Call 570-709-3716
W-B BARBERSHOP
HARMONY SOCIETY
150 Special Notices
COOKS PHARMACY
OF SHAVERTOWN
Is looking for
people who
have had
sports related
knee injuries
for a study to try a
new product
called WilloMD, a
mini computer to
help with knee
pain. Free of
charge.
Interested? Please call
570-675-1191
Ask for Meagan
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly,
814-237-7900
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
WORK WANTED
Experienced in
homecare. I will
work in your home
taking care of your
loved one. Person-
al care, meal
preparation & light
housekeeping pro-
vided. References,
background check
also provided.
Salary negotiable.
570-836-9726 or
cell 570-594-4165
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
BROADWAY SHOWS
• Evita,
•Mamma Mia,
•Jesus Christ
Superstar,
•Sister Act,
•War Horse,
•Book of
Mormon,
•Jersey Boys,
Wicked,
•Phantom of the
Opera
•Other Desert
Cities
Tickets & Bus
1-800-432-8069
SUNDAY IN
PHILADELPHIA
MARCH 11, 2012
Brunch @
The Waterworks,
a National Historic
Landmark
Van Gogh Exhibit
@ Philadelphia
Museum of Art
For more details
call
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
570-655-3420
Anne.Cameo
@verizon.net
380 Travel
CRUISE of a
LIFETIME!
CELEBRITY CRUISE
LINE’S Newest Ship
SILHOUETTE
12 night
Caribbean
Cruise
from NJ -
no airfare
needed!
ONLY
$1329/PP, TWIN
includes all taxes &
fees
March 29 -
April 10, 2012
Subject to Availability
300 Market St.,
Kingston, Pa 18704
570-288-TRiP
(288-8747)
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $700. OBO
570-674-2920
HAWK 2011 UTILITY ATV
NEW!! Full size
adult ATV. Strong 4
stroke motor. CVT
fully automatic
transmission with
reverse. Electric
start. Front & rear
luggage racks.
Long travel suspen-
sion. Disc brakes.
Dual stage head
lights. Perfect for
hunters & trail rid-
ers alike. BRAND NEW
& READY TO RIDE.
$1,695 takes it
away.
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
POLARIS`03
330 MAGNUM
Shaft ride system.
True 4x4. Mossy
oak camo. Cover
included. $3,000
negotiable. Call
570-477-3129
YAMAHA `07
RHINO 450.
GREEN, 6 ft. snow
plow, winch, mud
bottommounts,
moose utility push
tube, windshield,
hard top, gauges,
side mirrors, doors,
80 hours run time.
Like new. $6,999.
570-477-2342
To place your
ad call...829-7130
409 Autos under
$5000
‘00 VOLKSWAGEN GTI
2 door hatchback,
1.8 turbo, 5 speed
transmission, AC
power steering and
windows, moon
roof, new brakes,
tires, timing belt,
water pump and
battery. Black on
black. 116,000 miles
$4,500
570-823-3114
DODGE `86 RAM VAN
98,000 miles. Good
running condition.
$1,500
(570) 287-8766
FORD `95 F150
4x4. 6 cylinder.
Automatic. 8 ft.
modified flat bed.
90k miles. Runs
great. $4,900
(570) 675-5046
Call after 6:00 p.m.
GMC ‘99 YUKON
4 WD, 115,600 mi.
runs 100%, fully
loaded. Vehicle
comes complete
w/power wheel
chair lift in rear.
$3400 OBO
570-299-5920
409 Autos under
$5000
LINCOLN `88 MARK VII
Approx. 132,000
miles. To date I have
done repairs & pre-
ventative mainte-
nance. In the
amount of approx.
$4,500, Not includ-
ing tires. There is
approx. 20 Sq. In. of
surface rust on
entire car. I would
be happy to
describe any or all
repairs. All repair
done by certified
garage.
FINAL REDUCTION
$3,200
570-282-2579
SUZUKI ‘06
SWIFT RENO
4 cylinder. Automat-
ic. 4 door. $4,800
(570) 709-5677
(570) 819-3140
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
VW `87 GOLF
Excellent runner
with constant serv-
icing & necessary
preventative main-
tenance. Repair
invoices available.
Approx 98,131
miles. Good condi-
tion, new inspec-
tion. $2,300. Call
570-282-2579
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `06 TL
4 Door 3.2 VTEC 6
Cylinder engine
Auto with slapstick.
Navigation system.
57k miles. Black
with Camel Leather
interior. Heated
Seats. Sun Roof,
Excellent condition.
Satellite Radio, Fully
loaded. $18,000.
570-814-2501
ACURA `06 TL
White Diamond
80K original miles,
1 Owner, Garage
Kept, Camel Lea-
ther Interior, 3.2L /
6 Cylinder, 5-Speed
Automatic,
Front/Rear & Side
Airbags, ABS Nav-
igation System, 8-
Speaker Surround
System, DVD /CD
/AM/FM/ Cass-
ette, XM Satellite
Radio, Power &
Heated Front Seats,
Power Door Locks
& Windows, Power
Moonroof, 4 Snow
Tires Included!....
And Much, Much,
More!
Car runs and looks
beautiful
$16,500 Firm
Call 239-8461
ACURA 06 TSX
Leather.
Moonroof.
$9,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
AUDI `96 QUATTRO
A6 station wagon.
143k miles. 3rd row
seating. $2,800 or
best offer. Call
570-861-0202
CADILLAC ‘00 DTS
Tan, satellite
radio, leather,
moon roof, loaded
excellent
condition. 137k
miles. $6000.
570-814-2809
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 55,000 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$16,500
570-881-2775
CHEVY `97 ASTROVAN
Beautiful, 4 door.
Power steering &
brakes. 8 cylinder.
Excellent condition.
$3,000. Negotiable.
570-762-3504
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 5,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell
REDUCED!
$39,500 FIRM
570-299-9370
CHEVY`10 CAMARO
SS2. Fully load, V8,
jewel red with white
stripes on hood &
trunk, list price is
$34,500, Selling for
$29,900. Call
570-406-1974
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVY 08 IMPALA LTZ
Metallic gray, sun-
roof, leather, Bose
Satellite with CD
radio, heated seats,
traction control, fully
loaded. Remote
Start. 50k miles.
$16,995 or trade.
(570) 639-5329
CHRYSLER `06 300
4 door sedan in per-
fect condition. Full
service records. All
luxury options and
features. 25.5 MPG.
$12,800. Call
570-371-1615
GEO `93 PRIZM
91,000 miles. Looks
& runs like new.
$2,300 or best
offer, please call
570-702-6023
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER ‘04
SEBRING CONVERTIBLE
Silver, 2nd owner
clean title. Very
clean inside &
outside. Auto,
Power mirrors,
windows. CD
player, cruise,
central console
heated power
mirrors. 69,000
miles. $5900.
570-991-5558
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
Travel
380
CALL
829.7130
TO
ADVERTISE
PAGE 2D THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
WEEKEND WEEKEND SPECIAL SPECIAL
$13.49 $13.49 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Present coupon upon ordering.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
Bankruptcy $595
Guaranteed LowFees
www.BkyLaw.net
Atty Kurlancheek
825-5252 W-B
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
310 Attorney
Services
ESTATE PLANNING
/ADMINISTRATION
Real Estate &
Civil Litigation
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING
4 door, alloys,
seafoam blue.
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
07 HYUNDAI SONATA
GLS, navy blue,
auto, alloys
07 CHRYSLER 300
LTD, AWD, silver,
grey leather
06 VW PASSAT 3.6
silver, black
leather, sunroof,
66k miles
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
06 DODGE STRATUS
SXT, red
05 CHRYSLER 300C
TOURING, black,
gray, leather
05 DODGE NEON SXT,
red, 4 cyl, auto
05 CHEVY IMPALA LS
burgundy, tan
leather, sunroof
05 VW NEW JETTA
gray, auto, 4 cyl
05 CHEVY MALIBU
MAXX, white, grey
leather, sunroof
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL,
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 SAAB 9-3, silver,
auto, sunroof
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
01 VW JETTA GLS,
green, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 PLYMOUTH NEON
purple, 4 door,
auto
98 MAZDA MILLENIA
green
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS, black
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 KIA SPORTAGE
black, 4 cylinder
auto, 2WD
07 CHRYSLER PACIFICA
LS blue (AWD)
07 Chrysler Aspen
LTD, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
07 DODGE DURANGO
SLT, blue, 3rd seat
4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT, blue
grey leather, 7
pax mini van
06 PONTIAC TURRANT
black/black
leather, sunroof,
AWD
06 MITSUBISHI
ENDEAVOR XLS,
AWD, blue auto, V6
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4 dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
05 FORD EXPLORER XLT
blue, 3rd seat,
4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
05 FORD F150 XLT,
extra cab, truck,
black, V8, 4x4
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
GLS, burgundy,
auto (AWD)
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER, sil-
ver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO RT
red, 2 tone
leather imterior,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT, 4
door, green, tan,
leather, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR LX
green 4 door, 7
pax mini van
02 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE, Sage, sun
roof, autop, 4x4
02 CHEVY 2500 HD
reg. cab. pickup
truck, green,
auto, 4x4
01 FORD RANGER XLT
X-CAB, red, auto,
V6, 4x4
01 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT XLT, gold,
sunroof, 2 door,
4x4
01 F150 SUPERCREW
XLT, green, 4 door,
V8, 4x4 truck
00 GMC SIERRA SLE,
extra cab, pewter
silver, V8, 4x4,
truck
00 CHEVY BLAZER LT
black & brown,
brown leather 4x4
99 ISUZI VEHIACROSS
black, auto,
2 door AWD
98 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
SE, silver, V6, 4x4
96 CHEVY BLAZER,
black 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
LEXUS `01 ES 300
80,000 miles,
excellent condi-
tion, all options.
Recently serv-
iced. New tires.
$9,300.
570-388-6669
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER ‘08 SEBRING
Leather. Heated
seats. DVD Player.
$10,450
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
‘11 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA 3950
miles. Factory War-
ranty. New Condi-
tion. $17,699
‘10 DODGE CARAVAN
SXT 32K. Silver-
Black. Power slides.
Factory warranty.
$16,799
‘09 JEEP LIBERY
LIMITED Power sun-
roof. Only 18K. Fac-
tory Warranty.
$19,499
‘09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$11,699
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS Only 18K! One
Owner - Estate
Sale. Factory War-
ranty. $11,999
‘08 SUBARU
Special Edition
42K. 5 speed. AWD.
Factory warranty.
$12,799
‘08 CHEVY IMPALA
LS 4 door, only
37K! 5 Yr. 100K fac-
tory warranty
$11,299
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
One owner. Just
traded. 65K.
$12,799
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
Rear air, 62k
$8199
‘05 SUZUKI VERONA
LX Auto. 64K. Fac-
tory warranty.
$4,999
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,599
‘99 JEEP LARADO
LTD Leather. 75K
$4,699
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
HONDA ‘ 04
Civic LX Sedan
PRICE REDUCTION
Fully loaded, gas
stingy 4 cylinder,
1.7 liter engine, well
maintained, very
good condition,
driven less than
10.1 k miles per
year. $7995
570-855-0095
Boat? Car? Truck?
Motorcycle? Air-
plane? Whatever it
is, sell it with a
Classified ad.
570-829-7130
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘00 ACCENT
4 cylinder. 5
speed. Sharp
economy car!
$2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HYUNDAI 04 ELANTRA
Only 52K miles,
cruise, power win-
dows & locks.
$8,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
412 Autos for Sale
HYUNDAI ‘06
ELANTRA
Tan, 4 door,
clean title, 4
cylinder, auto,
115k miles.
Power windows,
& keyless entry,
CD player,
cruise, central
console heated
power mirrors.
$3900
570-991-5558
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
LINCOLN 06
Town Car Limited
Fully loaded.
50,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$14,900.
(570) 814-4926
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCURY 2008
GRAND MARQUIS LS
23,000 original
miles, all power,
leather interior.
NADA book value
$17,975. Priced for
quick sale to settle
estate. $15,950, or
best offer. Car is in
mint condition.
570-735-4760
570-954-1257
NISSAN `08 XTERRA
Grey, Mint condition.
35K miles. New, all-
season tires. Sirius
radio. 2 sets of
mats, including
cargo mats.
$18,400. Call
570-822-3494 or
570-498-0977
OLDSMOBILE `97
CUTLASS SUPREME
Museum kept, never
driven, last Cutlass
off the GM line. Crim-
son red with black
leather interior. Every
available option in-
cluding sunroof. Per-
fect condition. 300
original miles.
$21,900 or best offer.
Call 570-650-0278
PONTIAC `04 VIBE
White. New manual
transmission &
clutch. Front wheel
drive. 165k highway
miles. Great on gas.
Good condition,
runs well. $3,000 or
best offer
570-331-4777
PONTIAC 08 VIBE
Low miles. AWD.
$12,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PORSCHE `85 944
Low mileage,
110,000 miles, 5
speed, 2 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, power
windows, power
mirrors, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
leather interior, rear
defroster, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $8,000.
(570) 817-1803
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
TOYOTA ‘09 COROLLA S
Auto. 4 Cylinder.
$12,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
412 Autos for Sale
VOLVO `95 940
STATION WAGON
Looks and runs like
new. Sun roof, CD
loader, all power.
98,000 miles,
$2,950. OBO
570-702-6023
VOLVO 850 ‘95
WAGON
Runs good, air,
automatic, fair
shape. $1,800.
347-693-4156
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES ‘76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY ’77 CORVETTE
Red & red, all
original. No hits,
restoration. Rides
and looks new.
Exceptionally clean.
A/c, pb, ps, pw, 51K
$14,900 OBO
570-563-5056
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
FORD ‘28 MODEL A
Sport Coupe.
Rumble Seat.
Professionally
Restored. Ford Blue
with tan canvas
top. $15,225
570-339-1552
after 5:00pm
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘89 2500
SCOTTSDALE
Pickup Truck with
insulated refrigerat-
ed box, cooling unit.
5 speed, rebuilt 8
cylinder. $2,500.
Box only an option.
570-333-4827
FORD `90 TRUCK
17’ box. Excellent
running condition.
Very Clean. $4,300.
Call 570-287-1246
GMC ‘98 SIERRA 3500
4WD Stake Side,
350 V8, Auto.
75,000 miles on
current engine. 12'
wood bed, body,
tires, interior good.
Excellent running
condition. New
generator, starter,
battery. Just tuned
and inspected.
$6,900.
Call 570-656-1080
439 Motorcycles
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
NIGHTTRAIN
New rear tire. Very
good condition. 23K
miles. $8,500. Call
570-510-1429
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY
DAVIDSON ‘01
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 Dyna Wide Glide
Excellent condition -
garage kept! Gold-
en Anniversary - sil-
ver/black. New
Tires. Extras.
19,000 miles.
Must Sell!
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
HONDA ‘84
XL200R
8,000 original miles,
excellent condition.
$1,000.
570-379-3713
MOTO GUZZI `03
1,100 cc. 1,900
miles. Full dress.
Shaft driven. Garage
kept. Excellent condi-
tion. $6000. Health
Problems. Call
570-654-7863
POLARIS ‘00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
FOREST RIVER ‘10
SURVEYOR 234T
24’ Travel trailer.
Sleeps 7, two
queen beds, tinted
windows, 17’
awning, fridge,
microwave,
oven/range, sofa
bed, water heater.
A/C, one slide out,
smoke free, only
$14,995.
570-868-6426
SUNLINE SOLARIS `91
25’ travel trailer A/C.
Bunk beds. New
fridge & hot water
heater. Excellent
condition. $3,900.
570-466-4995
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22” rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8’
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$5,500 or best offer
570-823-8196
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘03
SILVERADO
4x4. Extra clean.
Local new truck
trade! $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 05
SILVERADO
2WD. Extra cab.
Highway miles.
Like new! $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY ‘10
EQUINOX LT
Moonroof. Alloys.
1 Owner. $18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY 99
SILVERADO 4X4
Auto. V8. Bargain
price! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHRYSLER 02
TOWN & COUNTRY
V6. Like new!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE 05 RAM 1500
Quad Cab SLT,
alloys & CD play-
er. $16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
DODGE 07 CALIBER
R/T. AWD. Alloys.
$14,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00 EXPLORER
XLT. CD. Power
seats. Extra
Clean! $2,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD 06 ESCAPE XLT
4x4. Sunroof. Like
new. $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$10,750. Call
570-474-6028
HONDA ‘09 CRV LX
AWD. 1 owner.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
HYUNDAI ‘06
SANTE FE LTD
Leather. Moon-
roof. One owner.
$11,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
JEEP ‘06 WRANGLER
Only 29K miles!
$15,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
JEEP ‘07 GRAND
CHEROKEE
4WD & Alloys.
$14,750
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP 98 CHEROKEE
SPORT
2 door. 4x4. 6
cylinder. Auto.
Like new! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MERCURY ‘03 MOUN-
TAINEER
LUXURY EDITION
Red & silver, One
owner, garage kept,
well maintained.
Loaded with too
many options to list!
68,000 miles.
Asking $11,200.
570-239-8389
NISSAN 09 ROGUE SL
Leather. Moon-
roof. Alloys.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $8,995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
RANGE ROVER
‘07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
SUBARU `03 BAJA
Sport Utility 4 door
pickup. 68K. AWD. 4
cylinder. 2.5 Litre
engine. 165hp. Bed-
liner & cover. Pre-
mium Sound.
$10,700. Call
570-474-9321 or
570-690-4877
SUZUKI `03 XL-7
85K. 4x4. Auto.
Nice, clean interior.
Runs good. New
battery & brakes. All
power. CD. $6,800
570-762-8034
570-696-5444
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TOYOTA 02 TACOMA
4WD. SR5. TRD.
V-6. $10,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA 06 4 RUNNER
Moonroof. Alloys.
CD Player.
$16,900
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
TOYOTA 09 RAV 4
Only 13K miles!
Remote Starter.
$18,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
WANTED
Good
Used
Cars &
Trucks.
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
Call V&G
Anytime
574-1275
503 Accounting/
Finance
BOOKKEEPER
Part time leading to
full time. Duties:
Š P&L & BS Account
reconciliation
Š AR / AP posting
Journal entries
Š Processing payroll
and quarterly tax
Š Experience with
QuickBooks, Word
and Excel a plus
Compensation com-
mensurate with
experience
e-mail resume to
btime60@gmail.com
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ASSISTANT PROPERTY
MANAGER
Position available in
Edwardsville multi-
family housing com-
munity. This is a full
time position, M-F
8:00AM to 4:30PM.
Applicants should
possess proven
management expe-
rience. Subsidized
housing experience
helpful. Must be
dependable, well-
organized, detailed
orientated, capable
of working inde-
pendently, & have
the ability to per-
form multiple tasks.
Computer experi-
ence required.
Medical & vacation
benefits available.
Please send
resume and salary
requirements to
9 Beverly Drive,
Edwardsville, PA
18704 or email
eagleridge01@
comcast.net
EOE
DR’S ASSISTANT/
SECRETARY
Seeking an ener-
getic, motivated,
goal-oriented indi-
vidual for immediate
position in a busy,
natural healthcare
setting. People and
computer skills a
MUST. Interested
parties can fax
resumes to:
570-477-3572
Medical
Receptionist/Assistant
Part time.
Benefits available.
Mail resume to:
Dr. Lombardo
576 Wyoming Ave
Kingston, PA 18704
Please include
professional
references.
522 Education/
Training
CHILD CARE
Forty Fort Child
Care Center is now
hiring ASSISTANT
PRE-K TEACHER.
Full Time & Benefits.
PART TIME AIDE.
College students
encouraged to
apply. Email resumes
to: bloomearlyed@
yahoo.com
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Experienced
Delivery Driver
Must know Wilkes-
Barre Area well.
Experienced
Saute Cook
Please apply at:
Frank’s Pizzeria
198 S Main St
Wilkes-Barre
570 822-2168
After 2
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
DATA/ PHONE /SOUND
Our Client is hiring
experienced techni-
cians to install
phones, fiber optics,
data and sound sys-
tems. Customers
include hospitals,
schools, churches
and businesses.
Must interpret blue-
prints, troubleshoot
wiring and read
schematics. Will use
hand tools, laptop,
and climb ladders.
Full time 8am-
4:30pm. Must have
clean driving record.
Contact Harvis
570-542-5330 with
questions or send
resume to:
jobs.harvis@
gmail.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HV HVAC/R AC/R
WWW.RITE-TEMP.COM
Visit our website
for job postings.
NOW HIRING! NOW HIRING!
COCCIA COCCIA
FORD LINCOLN FORD LINCOLN
Has immediate
openings for
Š Class A, B, C
Technicians
Š Ford Certificated
Diesel Technician
Š Parts Counter
Personnel
We are
expending our
facility & need
experienced
applicants.
Excellent pay and
benefits are
offered.
Please apply to:
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
Coccia Ford
Lincoln
570-823-8888
rpodest@
cocciacars.com
All Applicants are
Confidential
536 IT/Software
Development
IT SPECIALIST
WNEP-TV in Moosic,
PA has an opening
for an IT specialist
with knowledge of
IP/Network based
systems, routers,
scripting, etc.
We offer a competi-
tive salary & dynam-
ic work environ-
ment.
See details on
our website:
wnep.com
EOE
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 3D
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at
delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000
financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety Pkg.,
Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PW, PDL, CD, Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy
Glass, Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless
Entry, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,
FORD REBATE.............1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE.......500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....1,250
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP......195
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . .786
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
NEW FORDFIESTA SE NEW FORDFIESTA
FORD REBATE.............1,000
FMCC REBATE..............500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . .686
ALL NEW
FORDFOCUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500
down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
24
Mos.
ALL NEW
FORDFOCUS SE
Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain Air
Bags, PL, PW, 16” Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
Instrument Cluster, Message Center, Keyless
Entry, AC, Pwr. Side Mirrors, Fog Lamps, MyKey
Automatic, Air, Pwr. Mirrors, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. Door Locks,
CD, Remote Keyless Entry, Advance Trac with Electronic
Stability Control, Side Curtains
FORD REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee,
and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
FORD REBATE.............1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE....1,000
FMCC REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....1,250
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.....445
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.......871
Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, PW, PL,
Safety Pkg., 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Side Impact Air Bags, Keyless Entry,
Message Center, Pwr. Seat,
Remote Keyless Entry, Pwr.
Door Locks, Anti-Theft
Sys., Side Curtain
Air Bags, Side
Impact Air
Bags, CD, Air,
Message
Center,
MyKey
FORD REBATE...............1,000
FMCC REBATE.................500
OFF LEASE REBATE...........500
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP.....391
Auto., Air, CD, Pwr. Mirrors, Advanced Trac with Electronic Stability
Control, Cruise, PDL, Side Curtains, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
15” Alum. Wheels,
Tilt Wheel
FORD REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE........500
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP......70
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP......76
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/13/12.
24
Mos.
FORD REBATE..............1,500
FORD BONUS REBATE....1,000
FMCC REBATE................500
OFF LEASE REBATE.....1,250
FORD REGIONAL DISCOUNT OFF MSRP...1,445
COCCIA DISCOUNT OFF MSRP. . . .1,186
24
Mos.
Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt, PW, PL, Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side
Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad, Message Center,
PAGE 4D THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
VALLEY’S VALLEY’S
GOT’EM GOT’EM
2008 FORD RANGER
SUPERCAB XLT w/CAP
2006 GMC CANYON SL
REGULAR CAB 4WD
2004 CHEVROLET EXPRESS
USV SERVICE BODY
2007 FORD RANGER
SUPERCAB 4WD
2008 CHEVROLET EXPRESS
12 PASSENGER VAN
2007 FORD F-150 XLT
SUPERCAB 4X4
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 4WD EXTENDED CAB
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD
2008 GMC SIERRA
1500 EXTENDED CAB SLT 4X4
2004 CHEVROLET C4500 DURAMAX
DIESEL REGULAR CAB DUMP TRUCK
2007 CHEVROLET 5500 4X4 DURAMAX
DIESEL CREW CAB DUMP TRUCK
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 REGULAR CAB 4WD
2008 CHEVROLET COLORADO
CREW CAB LT 4WD
2007 GMC SIERRA SLE
EXTENDED CAB 4WD
2009 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD
2007 GMC SIERRA
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
2012 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
2500 HD REGULAR CAB 4X4
2007 GMC SIERRA
1500 REGULAR CAB
2009 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB Z71
FEATURI NG
EXIT 170B OFF I-81 TO EXIT 1. BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH LIGHT. JUST BELOW WYOMING VALLEY MALL.
VALLEY
CHEVROLET
KEN WALLACE S
*Prices plus tax & tags. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Select pictures for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors.
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-7:00pm; Sat. 8:30-5:00pm
2008 FORD F250 SUPER DUTY POWER
STROKE DIESEL LARIAT CREW CAB
$
37,675
*
#12299A, Powerstroke
Diesel, Leather,
Navigation, Running
Boards, Alloys, Power
Options, Tinted Windows
ONLY
39K
MILES
$
25,590
*
#12398A, V8,
Automatic, Air, Cruise,
PW, PDL, Chrome Grill
$
15,800
*
#Z2638, 4.3L V6,
Automatic, Air, Alloys,
Tinted Windows, GM
Cargo Management
Sysltem w/Tool Box &
Material Racks
ONLY
31K
MILES
$
29,999
*
#12211A, 6.0L V8,
Automatic, Air, Suspension
Pkg., PW, PDL, Cruise,
Towing Pkg., Steel Wheels
6” Chrome
Steps
$
24,900
*
#12311A, 4.8L V8,
Automatic, Stabilitrak, Keyless
Entry, Air, PW, PDL, Towing
Pkg., AM/FM CD, Bedliner
ONLY
34K
MILES
$
23,852
*
#12288A, 5.3L V8,
Automatic, Air, PW, PDL,
Cruise, Alloy Wheels,
Running Boards, Low Miles
$
24,895
*
#12152A, 5.3L V8, Automatic,
Stabilitrak, Air, PW, PDL, Cruise,
Towing Pkg., Tilt, Alloy Wheels,
35K Miles
Cap
$
23,958
*
#Z2517, 5.3L V8, Automatic,
Rear Park Assist, Autotrac
Transfer Case, PDL, PW, Remote
Start, 1-Owner, Low Miles
$
18,999
*
#Z2619, 3.7L Automatic, Air,
PW, PDL, Cruise, Tilt, AM/
FM/MP3, OnStar, 43K Miles
1-Owner
$
20,999
*
#Z2417, 4.8L V8, Automatic,
Air, PW, PDL, OnStar, Tilt,
Bedliner, Towing Package,
Alloy Wheels
ONLY
39K
MILES
$
26,900
*
#11908A, V8, Automatic,
Air, PW, PDL, Cruise, OnStar,
Power Seats, Towing Pkg.,
Alloy Wheels
$
53,900
*
#Z2635, 6.6L
Duramax
Diesel Allison,
Automatic,
12’ Dump Body,
Air, Cruise,
AM/FM Stereo
ONLY
19K
MILES
#Z2637, Duramax
6600 Diesel,
6 Speed Manual Trans.,
Rear Locking
Differential,
Cruise Control,
Hi-Back Bucket Seats
ONLY
35K
MILES
$
24,500
*
#11999A, V8, Automatic,
Air, Keyless Start, PW, PDL,
Alloy Wheels, 1 Owner
$
22,485
*
#12356A, 5.3L V8,
Automatic, Air, PW, PDL,
Heated Mirrors, EZ Tailgate
Pkg., HD Trailering Pkg.
1-Owner
$
22,999
*
#Z2410, 4.8L V8, Automatic, Air,
XM Satellite Radio, Towing Pkg.,
Folding Rear Seat, Locking Rear
Differential, Deep Tinted Glass,
Trailering Pkg.
ONLY
35K
MILES
$
19,999
*
#12026B, V8, Automatic,
Air, PW, PDL, Running
Boards, Cruise, Tilt
1-Owner
ONLY
33K
MILES
$
15,999
*
#12321B, 6.0L V8,
4 Speed HD Automatic,
Air, Dual Rear Wheels,
Cloth Seats,
Camper Style
Exterior Mirrors
1-Owner
$
19,900
*
#Z2480, 6.0L V8, Automatic,
Air, Stabilitrak, Cruise,
Auxillary Rear Heater,
Only 44K Miles, 1-Owner
$
17,987
*
#12069A, 6 Cyl., Automatic,
Air, Fog Lamps, Rear Jump
Seats, CD/MP3, PW, PDL
1-Owner
ONLY
47K
MILES
$
14,999
*
#Z2582, 3.5L, Automatic, Air,
PW, PDL, Alum. Wheels, CD,
Bedliner, Fog Lamps,
Only 42K Miles
1-Owner
Sunroof
$
19,870
*
#12245B, V6,
Automatic, Air, PW,
PDL, AM/FM MP3,
Running Boards,
Alloy Wheels
ONLY
25K
MILES
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 EXTENDED CAB 4WD
#11935A, V8, Automatic, Air,
Towing Pkg., Alloy Wheels,
Hard Tonneau Cover
ONLY
28K
MILES
1-Owner
$
19,999
*
2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
1500 CREW CAB LTZ 4X4
$
34,900
*
#Z2648, V8, Automatic,
Air, PW, PDL, Power Seat,
Leather, Heated Seats,
Tubes, Electric Rear
Window, Bedliner, Alloy
Wheels, 1 Owner
Z71 Appearance
Package
$
28,999
*
Visit us 24/7
www.valleychevrolet.com
821-2772 • 1-800-444-7172
601 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Scan
From
Mobile
Device
For More
Specials
Leather
1-Owner
1-Owner
1-Owner
ONLY
90
MILES
1-Owner
1-Owner
1-Owner
1-Owner
1-Owner
ONLY
3K
MILES
Original MSRP When New $47,655
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 5D
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 29
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
Mericle Construction, Inc. seeks a full time
experienced crawler drill operator. Applicant
shall have minimum 5 years site work experi-
ence and be knowledgeable with an Ingersoll
Rand ECM-720, ECM-660 & Atlas Copco F9
drill rig. Applicant will also be expected to
assist with blast hole layout & operate other
equipment as needed.
Salary commensurate with experience for
this local, year-round career opportunity with
full benefit package.
DRILL
OPERATOR
Submit resume or application to:
Mericle Construction, Inc.
100 Baltimore Dr., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
or via Email: hr@mericle.com or
download application at www.mericle.com
Multi-Plastics
Extrusions
Multi-Plastics Extrusions, a leader in the plastics extrusions field,
has several great opportunities for qualified individuals to
become a part of its expanding Maintenance Team.
The following positions are currently available:
Maintenance Mechanic / Electrician
Qualified individuals must have and be able to perform the following
duties:
- A working knowledge of electrical and mechanical equipment
preferably associated with plastic sheet extrusion.
- Safely perform a wide range of duties, relating to installation,
troubleshooting, repair, unscheduled maintenance and preven-
tive maintenance of plastic extrusion equipment with minimal
supervision.
- Locate and diagnose failures, replace defective components and
maintain facility related systems and equipment.
- Conduct troubleshooting of complex equipment and systems.
Evaluate system performance and recommend improvements to
maintenance program and system design.
Applicants should have a Trade School Certificate and 4 years expe-
rience in a maintenance manufacturing environment.
Maintenance Intern
Qualified individuals will be responsible for the following duties:
- General mechanical installation of equipment related to the
sheet extrusion facility under the direction and guidance of expe-
rienced maintenance personnel.
- General maintenance of the facilities and grounds as directed by
the Maintenance Supervisor.
Applicants must be familiar with working in a manufacturing environ-
ment, be able to communicate effectively, and work safely in a fast-
paced environment.
Multi-Plastics Extrusions provides a safe working environment,
excellent compensation opportunities, and a competitive benefits
package including medical, dental, vision, and 401k.
Qualified applicants can fax or e-mail their resumes to:
Multi-Plastics Extrusions
600 Dietrich Avenue
Hazleton, PA 18201
Fax: 570-450-1684
E-mail: resume@multi-plastics.com
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPER
General cleaning,
laundry & babysit-
ting. Experience a
plus. Non-smoker.
Must have car &
references. Dallas
Area. Replies to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2925
15 N. Main St,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
Student School Van
Drivers wanted.
Call Jim at
570-589-9181
or Rick at
570-582-1457.
LOOKING TO GROW
DRIVERS WANTED!
CDL Class A
Regional and
OTR Routes
Home daily
Benefit package
includes:
paid holiday and
vacation; health,
vision, and dental
coverage.
Candidates must
be 23 years of
age with at least
2 years tractor
trailer experience.
Drivers paid by
percentage.
Applications can
be filled out online
at www.cds
transportation.com
or emailed to
jmantik@cds
transportation.com
or you can apply
in person at
CDS
Transportation
Jerilyn Mantik
One Passan Drive
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-654-6738
INDEPENDENT
CONTRACTORS
NEEDED
All shifts available.
Please visit our
office at:
777 S. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre
to pick up an
application today.
VALET DRIVER
Full time & Part time
Monday-Friday
8-4:30
570-855-9593
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
548 Medical/Health
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT/SCHEDULER
for In-Home Care
EXPERIENCE PREFERRED
COMPUTER SKILLS
Email resume:
comfortkeeper
swb@gmail.com
CAREGIVERS
Looking for com-
passionate people
to work with elderly
in their homes.
Personal care and
transportation
required.
All Shifts available.
Call: 570-338-2681
EXPERIENCED COOK
Full time.
Work independently,
flexible hours.
PER DIEM LPN AND
RSA’S NEEDED.
No phone calls.
Apply in person.
TIFFANY COURT
700 NORTHAMPTON ST
KINGSTON, PA
EXPERIENCED HOME
HEALTH RN
Full/Part time cover-
ing Luzerne & Lack-
awanna counties.
Also currently hiring
CNAs & HHAs. Call
Jessica at 570-451-
3050 for an immedi-
ate interview. EOE
Village at
Greenbriar
Assisted
Living
PERSONAL CARE
AIDES - PART TIME
All Shifts
PART TIME COOK
APPLY WITHIN:
4252 Memorial
Highway
Dallas, PA 18612
548 Medical/Health
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANT
Excellent starting
rate. Flexible
hours. Good work-
ing environment.
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains/Pittston area!
Excellent opportuni-
ty! Send resume to:
PO Box 153
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
Physical/Occupational
Therapists
CareGivers America
Home Health Ser-
vices has Full Time
openings for
PT’s & OT’s. Join
our expanding ther-
apy team and learn
to translate Evi-
dence-Based Ther-
apy into practice!
Company car pro-
vided. Resumes to
rjacobs@caregivers
america.com
551 Other
JANITOR/CLEANING
CREW
10-12 hrs per week
Days are flexible
BACK-ROOM STOCK
CLERK
10-12 hrs per week
Tue & Fri 7am-12pm
DELI CLERK
15 -20 hrs per week
Nights & weekends
a must.
No calls, apply in
person.
PLYMOUTH
HOMETOWN MARKET
500 W. MAIN ST.
PLYMOUTH, PA.
18651
HOT JOBS
Customer Service,
Telemarketing,
Help Desk,
Desktop Engineers,
Sr Manager of
Deployment Svcs,
Forklift, Warehouse,
Picking/Packing,
Carpenters&Helpers
Warehouse Director,
Marketing Analyst,
Business Developer,
Machine Operators,
CNC Programmers,
General Labors &
Welders
Top $ & Benefits
Email Resume to:
Corey.Rupp@
expresspros.com
or 570.208.7000
554 Production/
Operations
MANUFACTURING
POSITION
A well-established
local manufacturer
is looking for full
time 2nd shift
employees. Hours
are 2-10PM. Must
have valid drivers
license. A compre-
hensive benefit
package, which
includes 401K.
Applications can be
obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
TOOLMAKER
Full time 2nd shift
position. Ability to
use all shop tools
and machines,
experience in set-
up and operating
CNC equipment a
plus. Job requires
working to close
tolerances and from
prints.
Excellent salary and
benefits package.
Submit resume to:
MICHAEL HOLCOMB,
DIAMOND
MANUFACTURING
COMPANY,
P. O. BOX 4174
WYOMING, PA
18644
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
USM
AEROSTRUCTURES
CORP HAS IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS FOR:
CNC PROGRAMMER
MINIMUM 5+ YEARS
EXPERIENCE.
Experience with
mastercam
software is a must!
Degree is preferred
but not required.
send resume via
email: r.delvalle@
usmaero.net
554 Production/
Operations
WEAVE ROOM
SUPERINTENDENT
Expanding local tex-
tile manufacturer is
looking for a full time
shift supervisor with
textile experience.
10AM-6PM. Com-
puter experience,
organizational skills,
follow up skills a
plus. Reports direct-
ly to management.
A comprehensive
benefit package,
which includes
401K.
Applications can be
obtained at:
American Silk Mills
75 Stark Street
Plains, PA 18705
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
*INDEPENDENT SALES
REPRESENTATIVE*
A local, highly rep-
utable company is
looking for an Inde-
pendent Sales Rep-
resentative for the
Dallas/Wilkes-Barre
area. Applicants
must possess
excellent customer
service and com-
munication skills.
Previous experi-
ence in advertising
sales a plus. Part
time & Full time
opportunities exist.
PLEASE CALL
570-579-4300
OR EMAIL FRED@
LOOKATOURMENU.COM
SALES OPPORTUNITY
DelBaso Ford is now
accepting applica-
tions for Sales Posi-
tions. We are look-
ing for an energetic,
self-motivated indi-
vidual to join our
award winning
organization.
Apply in person to:
249 Market Street
Kingston
Email: PatandDans
@aol.com or
Call 570-288-4501
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN – PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
“I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.”
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
LIQUOR LICENSE
FOR SALE. Luzerne
County. $23,000.
570-574-7363
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
MOSS COLLECTOR
who owns/or has
access to large
tract (s), private
woodlands. Must
I.D. moss & eco-
harvest in bulk, dry
& deliver to Hones-
dale. 570-253-4704
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
BASEBALL CARDS
Philadelphia Phillies
130 cards $10. Must
sell moving out of
state. 570-313-
5213/ 570-313-5214
COIN SET United
mint Presidential $1
set with proof set, 4
coins each set $15.
Belt buckle US with
eagle + 2 rifles.
Tiffany Studio NY
BC235 $15. Wall
clock with spindles,
gold design on
glass, 13 x28, excel-
lent working $80.
570-574-0271
COINS. 3-V nickels
1894-V, 1909-V,
1911-V $60.
570-287-4135
DIE CAST Hess
3003 mini patrol $8.
01 mini racer trans-
port $8. & 04 mini
tanker $8. Sunoco
‘96 tow truck with
plow $10. Mobil 95
tow truck $10. Ertle
‘92 True value dia-
mond tanker bank
$10. Exxon humble
tanker 2nd edition
$10. & tanker $10.
Racing champion
Citgo #21 Elliot
Sadler $10. Racing
Champion STP
Richard Petty $5.
matchbox trans-
porter Bill Elliot $10.
570-639-1653
HESS TRUCKS new
in boxes 2000-2008
$50.-$100.
570-675-4383
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
RANGE kenmore
gas like brand new
$175. 570-793-0811.
WASHER & DRYER
WHIRLPOOL 4
Years old.
$5. Needs to go!
moving, excellent
condition.
570-814-4035
WASHER, Amana
commercial quality,
12 cycles, stainless
steel tub. $150.
570-675-2750
WASHER/DRYER
Kenmore Elite.
White. FRONT
LOAD. Like new.
Electric dryer.
Storage drawer
on bottom
of each.
$800 for both
570-261-5120
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
BASINETT Simplicity
Pooh Bear $60.
Graco Pack N Play
$70. Both like new.
570-822-7576
712 Baby Items
BABY SWING, Fish-
er Price Rainforest,
with music, lights,
mobile, $25. Pack &
play, Evenflo, light
blue/yellow with
removable bassinet.
$20. 570-855-9221
CAR SEAT, for baby,
in good condition.
$15. 570-823-2267
CARSEAT good con-
dition $20.
570-675-4383
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
DRESS PANTS black
size 8 & gray dress
shirt/tie size 8
$12.for set. Black
dress pants with
gray dress shirt/tie
and reversible vest
size 10 $20. for set
5 pair boy’s fleece
pants size 8 $2.
each dark colors 2
pair boys size 2
snow boots. $9.
each. 825-2927
PURSE, Gucci tote
style, $325. Ladies
leather jacket size xl
$100. call 288-4451
SUITS 3 mens, 42
reg pants 36x29,
good condition $15.
New wool coat 42
reg new $15. 6 pair
mens dress slacks
36x29 $5. each.
570-824-5460
WOMEN’S CLOTH-
ING size 14, 3 pair
slacks & 2 skirts $
10. Size large 10
tops & 1 skirt $20.
Size medium 8 Tops
$10. Men’s Clothing-
size large & X-large,
camouflaged coat
plus 18 other items
$20. 474-6028
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
WEB CAM for com-
puters, camera for
sending pictures of
yourself or family
members on the
internet $100.
570-474-6028
732 Exercise
Equipment
ELLIPTICAL Proform
500 L E like new,
includes a compati-
ble music port for
iPod®, built-in
speakers, a Cool
Aire™ Workout Fan,
12 built-in workouts.
$300. 788-4090
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
COAL STOVE origi-
nal Pittston 1929
very good condition,
green/beige $200.
570-328-8666
DURAFLAME
HEATER with flames
& remote, $100.
570-288-4451
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BAKER’S RACK
green metal with 2
wicker baskets for
storage. Excellent
condition, asking
$75. Large living
room lamps (2)
brass base with
cream colored
shade, brand new
asking $30 each or
$50 for pair.
570-239-6011.
BED, queen size
sleigh style, pine
comes with 2
matching night-
stands $375.
570-288-4451
BEDROOM SET 5
piece, oak, like new
$550. 822-5460
BEDROOM SET
queen cherry sleigh
bed, 2 dressers,
complete 2 night
stands $900.
570-477-6011
BRAND NEW
P-TOP QUEEN
MATTRESS SET!!
Still in bags! $150!!
MUST SELL!!
Call Steve @
280-9628!!
COUCH & LOVE-
SEAT, white material
good condition.
FREE. 902-5598
DINING ROOM SET,
all matching, 9
pieces, table, 5
chairs, buffet, china
cabinet, wall mirror,
great condition
$450. 474-6947
DINING ROOM SET:
oval table, 6 chairs,
hutch, excellent
condition $ 595.
obo 570-675-2009
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
LIFT CHAIR by
Pride, like new
$500. 824-0999
LOVE SEAT, gray,
good condition $80.
570-822-3410
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $159
Full sets: $179
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
VANITY with mirror
& 2 glass shelves.
Excellent condition.
$35. Baby walker,
hardly used $25.
570-735-6527.
744 Furniture &
Accessories
VANITY/makeup
with chair, 40”lx
30”h, Bombay Fur-
niture Co., dark
wood, good condi-
tion $40. Double
door module O’Sulli-
van 2’lx25 1/2”w,
good condition 2
pieces, medium
color $10. each.
570-868-5066
DUPONT
124 CENTER ST
SATURDAY,
Feb., 11, 2012
8:00-4:00
DIRECTIONS:
OFF MAIN STREET
Entire Contents
of house & garage
including furniture,
living room set,
bedroom set,
antique mantel
clock, lots of
kitchenware many
new in boxes,
Fenton, glassware,
decorative items,
loads of holiday,
some sports items,
garage items,
hand tools,
lawn & garden
and much more!
Credit Cards
Accepted!
sale by
cook & cook estate
liquidators
www.cookand-
cookestateliquida-
tors.com
To place your
ad call...829-7130
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
599 SHAWNEE STREET
Sat., Feb. 11th, 10-4
Kitchen items
including table,
chairs & hutch.
End tables, coffee
tables, Lane cedar
chest, lots of linens
and bedding. Craft
supplies and yarn.
A great sale if you
love craft and
vintage items.
SWOYERSVILLE
165 Watkins St.
Use rear entrance Use rear entrance
Sat., February 11
10am - 3pm
Furniture, kitchen-
ware, home decor,
Xmas, books, toys,
girls clothes, jewel-
ry, movies, tv
games and gaming
systems, tools, out-
door, collectibles,
vintage and more.
Cash and carry.
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SPACE
AVAILABLE
INSIDE & OUT
ACRES OF
PARKING
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
FLEA
MARKET
750 Jewelry
ENGAGEMENT
RING 1/2ct. diamond
beautiful twisted
rope design in 14kt.
Yellow gold setting
with 1/2 ct. oval dia-
mond stone, size 7.
has appraisal for
$2200. Sell $850
570-883-0412
VALENTINES DAY
is just around the
corner. Are you
looking for that
special gift for the
man or women in
your life or just a
friend? We have
gold, gold filled,
silver, rings,
necklaces,
watches, trinkets
for both men &
women so why not
come in & see us?
OPEN ON
VALENTINE’S
DAY!
Visit us as 134 Rt.
11, Larksville or call
570-855-7197
Bring this ad &
we will give you
an extra 10% off
your purchase
of $50 or more.
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
RIDING MOWER
John Deere 38” cut,
14.5 hp, good condi-
tion $500.822-9059
756 Medical
Equipment
BATHTUB TRANS-
FER BENCH by
Drive Medical.Max
350 lbs., new, never
used. $50.824-7015
HOSPITAL BED
electric, FREE.
570-675-4680.
INCONTINENT sup-
plies, diapers, pads,
all sizes & types $5.
per pack. Walker
with wheels $5.
Quad cane $10.
Electric hospital bed
$150. Forest green
lift chair $150. 287-
1436 or 287-8476
PERFIT INCONTI-
NENCE Underwear
Size X-L, 14 per
package for $5.
570-288-9940
POWER CHAIR
Jazzy Select,
$500. WALKER with
wheels $45.
570-829-2411
758 Miscellaneous
WANTED
ALL JUNK CARS
& TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DRAFTING TABLE
Hamilton-Economy
wood & steel, excel-
lent condition, Foot-
stool, stool & old
drafting tools includ-
ed $150.
570-854-9739
FIREPLACE WOOD
HOLDER/CARRIER,
BRASS $50.
570-829-5542
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private party
merchandise only
for items totaling
$1,000 or less. All
items must be
priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No ads
for ticket sales
accepted. Pet ads
accepted if FREE
ad must state
FREE.
One Submission per
month per
household.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
HUMIDIFIER Honey-
well digital, almost
new $50. Booster
cables 12’ 6 gauge
professional heavy
duty new $40.
570-675-4383
RECORDS LPs,
78s, 45s, 60s, 70s,
80s & 90’s. $1.
each. Religious
rosary, handmade
$5. 570-829-2411
REVERE WARE,
clean, shiny & very
good condition. 16
pieces all $10. each.
CORELLE Butterfly
gold, clean & excel-
lent condition, 111
pieces, .30cents to
41. each. Details
570-639-1653
RIMS: Honda 4 pair
15” will fit any
model Accord,
Civic, &Del-Sol.
Brand new. Asking
$200. 570-239-6011
SNOW BLOWER,
MTD gas powered,
runs good $60.
Craftsman 6.5 hp
woodchipper $275.
Snap-On 3/4”drive
torque wrench with
case $325. Tailgate
95-04 Chevy S-10
pickup no rust $75.
Edelbrock aluminum
4bbl intake manifold
aluminum valve cov-
ers also aluminum
air cleaner fits small
block Chevy all for
$150 after 3pm
570-655-3197
VACUUM CLEANER
The Garry with
attachments, 4
extra bags $70.
570-824-0999
WATER DISPENSER
G.E. both hot & cold
water, floor model,
holds 5 or 3 gallon
bottles, like new
$60. Sewing
machine Singer in
cabinet, buttonholer
& 18 discs for vari-
ous patterns $50.
570-474-6028
WEIGHTS BARS -
bench $20; hand
lawn mower $10;
child’s skis, $10;
lamp shades $1-5.
570-868-6732.
762 Musical
Instruments
PIANO Kranich-
Bach with bench,
light oak, very good
condition. Beautiful
tone. $600.
570-822-2887
776 Sporting Goods
BACK PACK
Academy Broad-
way, almost new
14x24, navy nylon &
leather $50.
570-675-4383
JACKET AND BIBS.
For hunting, large,
camo orange. $50.
570-829-5542
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19” Toshiba con-
vertor & antenna
$35. Call Bill
570-825-8256
TV 21” Zenith with
remote FREE.
570-714-4410
TV Sanyo 32”
square, about 5
years old, analog
ports in front,
remote included.
DVD player Toshiba
with remote & ana-
log cables, 3 years
old. Both excellent
condition, no dam-
age. Both items
together $150/
OBO. 570-262-7075
TV Sharp 32” with
stand digital box &
remotes works
great $50.
570-902-5598
784 Tools
SNOWTHROWER,
Snapper, 2 stage
with electric start.
works good. $250.
570-388-2137
786 Toys & Games
DOLL CPK mint in
box $25.
570-288-4451
SHUFFLEBOARD
TABLE. 43”x72”,
wood, heavy.
Accessories includ-
ed. You disassem-
ble. $100 OBO. 570-
675-8459
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
SPEAKERS -
JVC, floor standing,
$50.
570-829-5542
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BASEBALL CARDS WANTED
Pre 1975. Call 856-
571-3618 or email
trebor_crane@yahoo
.com to let me know
what you have. Top
prices paid and
I PAY CASH!
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
PAYING TOP DOLLAR
for Your Gold,
Silver, Scrap Jew-
elry, Sterling Flat-
ware, Diamonds,
Old High School
Rings, Foreign &
American Paper
Money & Coins.
WE WILL BEAT
PRICES!
We Buy Tin and
Iron Toys, Vintage
Coke Machines,
Vintage Brass,
Cash Registers,
Old Costume
Jewelry, Slot
Machines, Lionel
Trains & Antique
Firearms.
IF YOU THINK IT’S
OLD BRING IT IN,
WE WILL GIVE
YOU A PRICE.
COME SEE US AT
134 RTE. 11,
Larksville
570-855-7197
570-328-3428
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am - 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
Feb. 8: $1,746.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CAT FREE - Spayed,
front de-claw, shots
up to date. 8 year
old tortoise shell
calico. Very loving &
devoted to adult
companion (s). Pre-
vious owner passed
away. Does not like
other animals.
570-885-4962.
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
CATS: 1 tiger & 1
black, free to a
good home, 2
years old, fully
trained. 570-200-
5977 call/text.
KITTENS, FREE,
friendly, people
kids/cats ok. Liter
box trained. Urgent
transport.299-7146
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
BOXER PUPPIES
3 male & 1 female
purebred puppies.
No papers. Shots &
dewormed. Tails
docked & dew
claws removed.
$600 each.
570-885-3431
CORGI PUPS
Pembroke. Males &
Females. Shots &
wormed. Reds &
Tri’s. $400-$495.
Ready to go. Pic-
tures available.
570-799-0192
DOBERMAN PUPPIES
3 males left. Black
& rust. Ready to
go! $500 each.
570-542-7532
DOG free to good
home Pomeranian
11 1/2 months old,
male, free cage.
570-779-1093
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
GOLDEN RETRIEVER
PUPS
ACA registered with
Pedigrees. Vet
checked, wormed.
1st shots. $600
Ready NOW!
570-336-6162
Poms, Yorkies, Mal-
tese, Husky, Rot-
ties, Golden,
Dachshund, Poodle,
Chihuahua, Labs &
Shitzus.
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
835 Pets-
Miscellaneous
SLIDER TURTLES 2
red earS, 7” & 5” in.
Tank included. In
need of new home.
570-899-6026
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
PAGE 6D THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
566 Sales/Business
Development
548 Medical/Health
566 Sales/Business
Development
548 Medical/Health
566 Sales/Business
Development
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
554 Production/
Operations
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
554 Production/
Operations
468 Auto Parts
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
468 Auto Parts
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
2
8
1
9
0
1
290 Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre • 570-301-2277
NEPA’s PREMIER PRE-OWNED
AUTO DEALERSHIP IS SEEKING AN
AUTO SALES
EXECUTIVE
EARN THE TOP COMPENSATION YOU DESERVE
• Superior Pay Plan
• Paid Benefts Pkg.
• Paid Vacation
• Aggressive Advertising Budget
• Huge, Constantly
Replenished Inventory
• 5 Day Work Week
• Excellent Working Conditions
• Modern Facility
• High Traffc Location
FAX RESUME: 570-824-1599
EMAIL RESUME: jbaloga@nationwidecarsales.net
AMERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
JOIN AWINNINGTEAM
Customer Service Supervisor
Vector Security, Inc this region’s most respected
name in the security alarm industry is expanding
its Customer Service Team. If you thrive on
helping people and if you want to make a differ-
ence at work, then we are the work place that you
are looking for!
We offer full time positions with an exceptional
benefit package:
Our qualifications for joining this winning team
include good oral and written communication
skills, above average computer skills, answering
escalated customer calls. Qualified candidates
MUST be flexible and have prior supervisory
experience in a call center environment. Bi-lin-
gual in Spanish a plus. A complete background
check and drug screen is required.
Send cover letter and resume to:
HR Manager
Vector Security
23 Casey Avenue; Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Fax: 970-6232
Email: wbjobs@vectorsecurity.com
EOE
• Competitive Wages
• Medical and Dental
• Prescription Plan
• Paid Training
• Disability
• Tuition Reimbursement
• 401K with Company Matching
Dynamically growing Sheet Metal &
Assembly Manufacturer has immediate
multiple openings on all three shifts
for the following positions:
• Welding
• Press Brake
• Spot Welding
• Assembly
• General Laborer
Looking for Skilled Machine Workers
Excellent wages & benefits
MANUFACTURING
FULL TIME
Apply in Person At:
1170 Lower Demunds Road
Dallas, PA 18612
A Drug-Free Workplace
CNAs
Certified Nurse Assistants
Do you enjoy helping others?
Would you like a career in healthcare?
We are looking for
Full & Part Time 3-11 & 11-7
CNAs to provide quality care
For our residents
All Shifts Available!
Call 877-339-6999 x1
Email Jobs@horizonhrs.com
Apply in person 395 Middle Road
Nanticoke
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm • Happy Trails!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ASHLEY
3 bedroom, 1 bath 2
story in good loca-
tion. Fenced yard
with 2 car detached
garage. Large attic
for storage. Gas
heat. $79,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
ASHLEY-
REDUCED
Delightfully pleas-
ant. This home has
been totally remod-
eled, a great buy
for your money.
New modern
kitchen with all
appliances, living
room and dining
room have new
hardwood floors.
Nice size 3 bed-
rooms. 1 car
garage. Be sure to
see these values.
MLS 11-2890
$65,000
Call Theresa
Eileen R. Melone
Real estate
570-821-7022
AVOCA
314 Packer St.
Remodeled 3 bed-
room with 2 baths,
master bedroom
and laundry on 1st
floor. New siding
and shingles. New
kitchen. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3174
$99,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
AVOCA
30 Costello Circle
Fine Line construc-
tion. 4 bedroom 2.5
bath Colonial. Great
floor plan, master
bedroom, walk in
closet. 2 car
garage, fenced in
yard. 2 driveways,
above ground pool
For additional info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3162
$248,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
AVOCA
Renovated 3 bed-
room, 2 story on
corner lot. New roof
& windows. New
kitchen, carpeting &
paint. Hardwood
floors, gas fireplace
& garage. All appli-
ances included. A
MUST SEE. $119,000.
570-457-1538
Leave Message
Line up a place to live
in classified!
BACK MOUNTAIN
133 Frangorma Dr
Bright & open floor
plan. 6 year old 2
story. 9' ceiling 1st
floor. Custom
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Family Room
with 14' ceiling &
fireplace. Conve-
nient Back Mt. loca-
tion. MLS# 12-127
$344,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 ¾ bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search featured
homes in Tunkhan-
nock. $275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear
Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets, family room
with fireplace, cus-
tom built wine cellar.
A MUST SEE!
MLS#11-4136
$299,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
Enjoy the exclusive
privacy of this 61
acre, 3 bedroom, 2
bath home with
vaulted ceilings and
open floor plan. Ele-
gant formal living
room, large airy
family room and
dining room and
gorgeous 3 season
room opening to
large deck with hot
tub. Modern eat in
kitchen with island,
gas fireplace,
upstairs and wood
burning stove
downstairs. This
stunning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back
and savor
the view
MLS 11-3462
$443,900
Sandy Rovinski
Ext. 26
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
1360 Lower
Demunds Rd.
A grand entrance
leads you to this
stunning Craftsman
style home on 11+
acres complete with
pond, stream &
rolling meadows.
This dramatic home
is in pristine condi-
tion. The 2 story
great room with
stone fireplace &
warm wood walls is
one of the focal
points of this home.
Offers modern
kitchen/baths, for-
mal dining room &
family room.
Recently built 3 car
garage with guest
quarters above is a
plus. You’ll spend
many hours on the
large wrap around
porch this Fall,
Spring & Summer
overlooking your
estate. Rarely does
a home like this
come on the mar-
ket. MLS# 11-1741.
$499,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
DALLAS
8 Lackawanna Ave
Central Location. 4-
5 bedroom bi-level.
Gas heat. 2 baths.
Oversized 2 car
garage. Corner lot.
MLS 11-4372
$140,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
138 White Birch Ln
Charming two story
on nice lot features,
living room, dining
room with hard-
woods, modern Oak
kitchen, first floor
family room, 4 large
bedrooms, 2 full & 2
half baths. Deck
overlooking level
rear yard. 2 car
garage. Gas heat,
Central air. (11-3115)
$310,000
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
DALLAS
3 bedroom brick
Cape Cod, with 2
baths, on a corner
lot near
Dallas Schools,
with easy access
to shopping.
MLS# 12-12
$125,000
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
DALLAS
620 Meadows
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
at Newberry Estate
- tennis, golf &
swimming are yours
to enjoy & relax.
Spacious condo at a
great price. Possi-
bilities for 3rd bed-
room and bath on
lower level. Pets
welcome at Mead-
ows. MLS#12-18
$ 149,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
DALLAS
Charming 2 bed-
room Cape Cod in
Franklin Township.
L-shaped living
room with hard-
wood floors, eat in
kitchen & private
driveway.
$119,900
MLS#11-3255
Call Joe moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
Four bedroom
Colonial with hard-
wood floors in for-
mal dining and living
room. Modern eat
in kitchen, finished
basement with 24”
x 30” recreation
room. Deck, hot tub
and ceiling fans.
MLS#11-4504
$229,900
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
NEW PRICE!
56 Wyoming Ave
Well maintained 4
bed, 2 bath home
located on large .85
acre lot. Features
open floor plan,
heated 3 season
room with hot tub,
1st floor laundry, 2
car garage and
much more. 11-3641
Motivated Seller!
$179,500
Call Jim Banos
COLDWELL
BANKER RUNDLE
REAL ESTATE
570-991-1883
DURYEA
Cute 2 story, 2 bed-
room 1 bath home.
$15,000
570-780-0324
570-947-3575
HANOVER TWP
Modern 3 bedroom.
1 1/2 bath. Driveway.
Gas heat. Lease. No
pets. No smoking.
$750 + utilities. Call
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
NEWBERRY ESTATE
ORCHARD EAST
Two bedroom
condo, 2nd floor.
Living/dining room
combination. 1,200
square feet of easy
living. Two bal-
conies, one car
garage nearby.
Security system,
cedar closet, use of
in ground pool.
$109,000
MLS#11-4031
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
PRICE
REDUCED
Charming 4 bed-
room, 3 bath
home situated on
1 1/4 acre on a
private setting.
Close to schools
and shopping. Liv-
ing room with
beautiful stone
fireplace and built
ins. Hardwood
floors throughout.
Master suite on
1st floor. Kitchen
has cherry cabi-
nets with tile
floors. Screened
porch. Detached
2 car garage.
$335,000
For appointment
570-690-0752
DALLAS
Newberry Estates
Condo with archi-
tect designed interi-
or on 3 floors.
Large, well equipped
tiled kitchen with
separate breakfast
room, den with fire-
place-brick & gran-
ite hearth. Open floor
plan in living/dining
area. 3 or 4 bed-
rooms, 3.5 baths.
Lower level has den
or 4th bedroom with
family room & bath.
Recently sided;
attached 2-car
garage, walk-out
lower level, decks
on 1st & 2nd floor;
pets accepted
(must be approved
by condo associa-
tion). Country Club
amenities included
& private pool for
Meadows residents.
MLS 12-203
$269,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
DUPONT
167 Center St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath2 story
home with
garage and
driveway.
Newer kitchen
and bath. For
more info and
phot os visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3561
Price reduced
$64,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
DURYEA
314 Edward St
Wonderful neigh-
borhood, 4 bed-
room, 10 year old
home has it all!.
Extra room on first
floor, great for
mother in law suite
or rec room. Mod-
ern oak kitchen,
living room, central
air, in ground pool,
fenced yard, att-
ached 2 car garage.
Great home! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3732. $239,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
3 Bedroom 1.5 bath
ranch with new win-
dows hardwood
floors finished base-
ment 2 car garage
and a finished base-
ment. MLS 11-3610
$154,900
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
DURYEA
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level. If
you’re looking for a
Ranch, don’t miss
this one. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$159,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
REDUCED
548 Green St.
Are you renting??
The monthly mort-
gage on this house
could be under
$500 for qualified
buyers. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, 1st
floor laundry. Off
street parking,
deep lot, low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3983
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$315,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
EDWARDSVILLE
192 Hillside Ave
Nice income prop-
erty conveniently
located. Property
has many upgrades
including all new
replacement win-
dows, very well
maintained. All units
occupied, separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit:www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3283. $89,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EDWARDSVILLE
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$52,000
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY FEB., 12TH
1:00 PM TO 2:30
263 Lawrence St
Recently updated,
this 4 bedroom
home offers modern
kitchen with Oak
cabinets, 2 baths,
deck with a beautiful
view of the Valley,
fenced in yard and
finished lower level.
All appliances
included. A must
see. MLS #11-4434
$ 92,000
Call Christina @
(570) 714-9235
EXETER
1021 Wyoming Ave
2 unit duplex, 2nd
floor tenant occu-
pied, 1st floor unoc-
cupied, great rental
potential. Separate
entrances to units,
one gas furnace,
new electrical with
separate meters for
each unit. The 1st
floor apartment
when rented out
generated $550 per
month. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4247. $52,000
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
EXETER
44 Orchard St.
3 bedroom, 1.5
bath single,
modern kitchen
with appliances,
sunroom, hard-
wood floors on
1st and 2nd
floor. Gas heat,
large yard, OSP.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1866
$137,999
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
EXETER
908 Primrose Court
Move right into this
newer 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Townhome
with many
upgrades including
hardwood floors
throughout and tiled
bathrooms. Lovely
oak cabinets in the
kitchen, central air,
fenced in yard, nice
quiet neighborhood.
MLS 11-2446
$123,000
Call Don Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
EXETER
Nice size four
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
EXETER REDUCED
128 JEAN ST.
Nice bi-level home
on quiet street.
Updated exterior.
Large family room,
extra deep lot. 2
car garage,
enclosed rear
porch and covered
patio. For more
information and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-2850
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
FORTY-FORT
167 Slocum St
Completely renovat-
ed 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath. New high effi-
ciency gas warm air
furnace with central
a/c. All new plumb-
ing & wiring. New
siding, windows,
doors, roof, insula-
tion, carpeting, dry-
wall & tile. New
kitchen with stain-
less stove, fridge &
dishwasher. New
baths. 1st floor
washer/dryer hook-
up. 50’x150’ lot.
$139,900.
Call 570-954-8825
gckar1@yahoo.com
HANOVER
Great multi-family
home. Fully rented
double block offers
large updated
rooms, 3 bedrooms
each side. Nice
location. MLS 11-
4390 $129,900
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HANOVER TWP.
27 Spring St
Great home. Great
location. Great con-
dition. Great Price.
MLS#11-4370
$54,900
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. COnvenient
location. To settle
estate. Reduced to
$34,900
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
577 Nanticoke St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 story
home in quiet
neighborhood. This
home features an
enclosed patio with
hot tub, enclosed
front porch, walk up
floored attic with
electric. 2 coal
stoves and much
more. All measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 10-4645.
$80,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
HARDING
3 bedroom, 1.5 bath
raised Ranch on 1
acre. Home boasts
a gas fireplace in
living room, tradi-
tional fireplace in
finished basement.
Central A/C, 2.5 car
garage, covered
deck, out of flood
zone. $179,900. Call
570-388-4244/388-
2773 after 6PM
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
94 Ferry Road
Nice vinyl sided 2
story situated on a
great corner fenced
lot in Hanover Twp.
2 bedrooms, 2
modern baths,
additional finished
space in basement
for 2 more bed-
rooms or office/
playrooms.
Attached 2 car
garage connected
by a 9x20 breeze-
way which could be
a great entertaining
area! Above ground
pool, gas fireplace,
gas heat, newer
roof and “All Dri”
system installed in
basement. MLS #11-
626. $119,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
JENKINS TWP.
21 Spring St.
2 or 3 bedroom, 1.5
bath home. Large
fenced yard with
shed, 50x200’ lot. 3
off street
parking spaces.
By Owner
$99,900
570-825-9867
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
95 Pulaski St.
Large home on nice
sized lot. Newer
windows, walk up
attic. 3 bedrooms,
nice room sizes,
walk out basement.
Great price you
could move right in.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-4554
$39,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good con-
dition with 3 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath,
eat-in kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced yard
& new gas heat.
REDUCED TO
$39,900
Call Ruth Smith
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 7D
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
Double block with
both sides having
nice secluded yards
and decks. Close to
area schools. Wood
floors just redone on
owners side. Won-
derful opportunity to
live in one side and
rent the other side
to help pay your
mortgage!
MLS#11-4537
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-322-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
Fantastic view from
the deck and patio
of this 4 bedroom,
2.5 bath vinyl sided
2 story home. Four
years young with so
many extras. A
dream home!
MLS# 11-2429
$299,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
HANOVER TWP.
REDUCED
5 Raymond Drive
Practically new 8
year old Bi-level
with 4 bedrooms, 1
and 3/4 baths,
garage, fenced
yard, private dead
end street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3422
$175,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
HANOVER
Multi-family. large 3
unit building, beauti-
fully updated apart-
ments. Two 3 bed-
room apartments &
one efficiency
apartment. Great
location also offers
street parking. This
is a must see.
$139,900. MLS 11-
4389. Call/text for
Details Donna Cain
570-947-3824
HANOVER TWP.
* NEW LISTING! *
3-story home with 4
car garage. Hard-
wood floors, sun
parlor with magnifi-
cent leaded glass
windows, 4 bed-
rooms, eat-in
kitchen with pantry,
formal dining room,
gas heat.
MLS #11-4133
$84,500
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
HARDING
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$78,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home with
4 bedrooms and
large rooms. Nice
old woodwork,
staircase, etc. Extra
lot for parking off
Kenley St.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$99,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
JENKINS TWP
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms,
1 Bath, Finished
Walk-Out
Basement, Single
Car Garage
Nice corner lot
$59,500
Call Vince
570-332-8792
JENKINS TWP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$89,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise Drive
PRICED TO SELL!
This 4 bedroom has
2 car garage with
extra driveway,
central air, veranda
over garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and wet
bar. Sunroom
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
4 Orchard St.
3 bedroom starter
home with 1 bath on
quiet street.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-254
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
$389,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space
throughout, enjoy
the privacy of deck
& patio with fenced
yard. MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
Kingston
3 bedroom bi-level
with two modern,
full baths & one 3/4
bath. Living room
with fireplace and
skylights, built in
china cabinets in
dining room. Lower
level family room
with fireplace and
wet bar. Large
foyer with fireplace.
MLS#11-3064
$289,500
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
58 S. Welles Ave
Large charmer had
been extensively
renovated in the last
few years. Tons of
closets, walk-up
attic & a lower level
bonus recreation
room. Great loca-
tion, just a short
walk to Kirby Park.
MLS 11-3386
$129,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
68 Bennett St
Great duplex on
nice street. Many
upgrades including
modern kitchens
and baths, plus ceil-
ing fans. Both units
occupied,separate
utilities. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-3284. $74,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
KINGSTON
806 Nandy Drive
Unique 3 bedroom
home perfect for
entertaining! Living
room with fireplace
and skylights. Din-
ing room with built-
in china cabinets.
Lower level family
room with fireplace
and wetbar. Private
rear yard within-
ground pool and
multiple decks.
MLS#11-3064
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
A Classy Move-in
Ready 5 bed-
room, with recent
updates including
flooring, bathroom,
recessed lighting &
many new widows.
Woodburner on
brick hearth, eat in
kitchen, formal
dining room. Good
room sizes, fenced
yard, patio, private
driveway, walking
distance to park,
shopping, public
transportation,
restaurants, etc.
MLS #11-4283
$132,900.
Call Pat today @
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
570-287-1196
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
Large double, great
older home with all
modern updates.
Pantry, kitchen, liv-
ing room, formal
dining room, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
Collect $1300 rent
from other side.
$195,000
570-288-4203
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Use your income
tax rebate for a
downpayment on
this great home
with modern
kitchen with granite
counters, 2 large
bedrooms,
attached garage,
full basement could
be finished, sun
porch overlooks
great semi private
yard. A great house
in a great location!
Come see it!
. For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$119,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
This charming 3
story has plenty of
potential and is
within 1 block of
Wyoming Ave. Put
in your own finish-
ing touches. Priced
to sell! MLS 12-48
$ 34,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON TWP
573 Carverton Rd
Privacy & serenity!
This 40 acre estate
features living room
with fireplace &
hardwood floor;
family room with
vaulted ceiling &
fireplace; 1st floor
master bedroom &
bath with jetted tub
& stall shower; pan-
elled den; dining
room with stone
floor & skylight; 3
additional bedrooms
& 2 baths. Central
Air, 3 outbuildings.
$725,000.
MLS 11-4056
Call Nancy Judd
Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
Well maintained one
owner home locat-
ed near schools &
shopping. Home
features 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
eat-in kitchen, living
room, dining room &
foyer, with ductless
air conditioning on
the first floor. 2-car
detached garage
and basement
ready to be finished.
All appliances are
included along with
the first floor laun-
dry. MLS#11-97
$129,000
Everett Davis
(570) 417-8733
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
RARE OPPORTUNITY!
This one you can’t
match for overall
charm, utilization
and value. The
beautifully carpeted,
gas fireplace living
room makes you
want to sit down
and relax. The din-
ing room opens to a
Florida room with a
gas fireplace. There
is a modern kitchen
and 2 modern bath-
rooms. Three spa-
cious bedrooms on
the second floor
with a walkup attic.
Completely finished
basement with wet
bar! The home fea-
tures many
upgrades including
windows, roof, land-
scaping and drive-
way. Also a one car
detached garage
and gazebo. Great
Kingston location
with low taxes and
located near school
and shopping.
MLS#11-4552
$172,900
Everett Davis
(570) 417-8733
LAFLIN
13 Fordham Road
Totally remodeled
custom brick ranch
in Oakwood Park.
This home features
an open floor plan
with hardwood
floors, 2 fireplaces,
kitchen, formal living
& dining rooms,
family room, 4 bed-
rooms, 4 baths,
office with private
entrance, laundry
room on first floor,
tons of closets and
storage areas,
walk-up attic, great
finished basement
with fireplace, built-
in grill, in-ground
pool, cabana with
half bath, an over-
sized 2-car garage
& a security system.
Renovations include
new: windows, gas
furnace, central air,
electrical service,
hardwood floors,
Berber carpeting,
freshly painted,
updated bathrooms
& much, much,
more. Laflin Road to
Fordham Road, on
right. $399,700
Call Donna
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LAFLIN
24 Fordham Road
Lovely cedar shingle
sided home on large
corner lot in a great
development. 4 bed-
room, 2 1/2 baths, 1st
floor family room, fin-
ished lower level.
Hardwood floors
throughout, huge liv-
ing room & family
room. 1st floor laun-
dry room & office,
gas heat, nice deck,
above ground pool, 2
car garage. 11-3497
$295,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
LAKE NUANGOLA
Lance Street
Very comfortable
2 bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $119,000
Call Kathie
MLS # 11-2899
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
LARKSVILLE
10 E. Second St.
Property in nice
neighborhood.
Includes 4 room
apartment over
garage.
MLS 12-253
$79,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
LUZERNE
330 Charles St.
Very nice 2 bed-
room home in
move in condi-
tion with updat-
ed kitchen and
baths. Nice yard
with shed and
potential off
street parking.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3525
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
LUZERNE
459 Bennett St.
Very nice 5 bed-
room, 2 story home
in nice area of
Luzerne. Off street
parking for 4 cars.
1st floor master
bedroom & laundry.
Replacement win-
dows on 2nd floor.
5 year young full
bath. Modern
kitchen w/breakfast
bar, oak cabinets.
Basement always
DRY! All measure-
ments approximate
MLS11-3745
$122,900
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MOOSIC
15 EMERSON DRIVE
GLENMAURA
Beautiful brick-
faced 4 bedroom
Colonial. Spacious,
open floor plan. Tile
floors, fireplace,
two car garage.
MLS# 12-295
$350,000
Call Stacey Lauer
570-262-1158
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
MOSCOW
331 Gudz Road
Private country
living, with easy
access to inter-
state. Relax and
enjoy this comfort-
able A-Frame
home. Jacuzzi,
large deck & gor-
geous pond. Great
for entertaining
inside and out. For
more photos and
info visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3285
$249,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
MOUNTAIN TOP
33 Valley View Drive
3 Bedroom, 1.5
Bath, 2 car garage,
new roof & hot
water heater, above
ground heated pool,
finished basement.
$210,000
Contact Melissa at
570-430-8263
MOUNTAIN TOP
803 Aspen Drive
Brand new carpet in
lower level family
room! Hardwood on
1st floor dining
room, living room,
bedrooms & hall!
Large rear deck.
Master bedroom
opens to deck! Pri-
vate rear yard!
Basement door
opens to garage.
MLS #11-2282
$192,000
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAINTOP
29 Valley View Dr.
MOTIVATED SELLER
Raised ranch on
corner lot. Spacious
two car garage.
Modern kitchen &
bath, tile floors.
Energy efficient
Ceramic Heat.
MLS#11-2500
$174,900
Call Julio Caprari:
570-592-3966
MOUNTAINTOP
VACANT LAND
333 OAKMONT LANE
1.15 acre, level lot,
#254, on
cul-de-sac, in
Laurel Lakes.
Underground elec-
tric, phone & cable.
Ready for your new
home in 2012!
MLS# 11-4465
$39,900
Call Christine Kane
570-714-9231
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Needs work, but
columns, moldings,
and leaded glass
windows are intact.
MLS #12-133
$42,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is “high
and dry”, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$104,900
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
NANTICOKE
414 Grove Street E
Remodeled 2 story
with new oil furnace,
windows, electric
kitchen, bath, door,
flooring, paint. OSP.
Seller will pay 1st
year property tax.
MLS#11-2760
$85,500
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
NANTICOKE
East Noble Street
Nice two family on
the east side. Gas
heat. Detached 2
car garage. Afford-
able @ $69,500.
Call Jim for details
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E. CO.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
906 Homes for Sale
NEWPORT TWP.
Five bedroom
Contemporary has
a vaulted ceiling in
living room with
fireplace.
Hardwood floors in
dining & living
rooms. 1st floor
master bedroom
with walk in closet.
Lower level family
room. Deck,
garage, separate
laundry.
$257,500
MLS#12-170
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
NOXEN
PRICED TO SELL -
Brick ranch with
large living room, 3
bedrooms, sun
room, deck, full
basement, sheds
and garage on 0.54
acres in Noxen.
$135,000.
Jeannie Brady
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
PITTSON
NEW PRICE
8 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms & bath, eat-in
kitchen, formal din-
ing room, new win-
dows, gas heat.
MLS # 11-4369
$74,500
Call Donna
570-613-9080
PITTSTON
10 Garfield St.
Looking for a
Ranch???
Check out this
double wide
with attached 2
car garage on a
permanent foun-
dation. Large
master bedroom
suite with large
living room, fam-
ily room with
fireplace, 2 full
baths, laundry
room, formal
dining room,
vaulted ceilings
throughout and
MORE!
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-2463
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PITTSTON
168 Mill St.
Large 3 bedroom
home with 2 full
baths. 7 rooms on
nice lot with above
ground pool. 1 car
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3894
$82,000
Tom Salvaggio
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
20 NEW STREET
NEW, NEW LISTING
Attractive Bi-level
with 2 bedrooms
and room for anoth-
er. 2 full baths, gas
forced air heat,
ventless gas fire-
place & sauna.
Move in condition,
$123,000
MLS 12-193
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
A lot of house for
the money. Corner
home with lots of
space. 9 rooms, 2
1/2 baths, a bonus
room of 42’ x 24’.
This home is conve-
niently located near
major highways, air-
port and shopping.
Two car detached
garage and nice
yard.
$75,500
MLS# 10-4350
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1 bath.
This house was
loved and you can
tell. Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb appeal.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$79,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PITTSTON TWP
FOR SALE: $257,500
LUXURY TOWNHOME
New construction:
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath, large entry
with cathedral
ceiling, upstairs
laundry. Oak
kitchen cabinetry,
granite counters
& stainless steel
whirlpool appli-
ances. Open floor
plan is great for
entertaining.
Upgrades include
hardwood floors &
gas fireplace. Two
walk-in closets &
master suite with
private bath fea-
tures cherry/
granite double
vanity, jetted tub.
Attached garage,
full basement, a
great location;
minutes to I-81 &
Turnpike off 315,
7.5 miles north of
Mohegan Sun.
READY FOR OCCUPANCY
Call Susan at
877-442-8439
PITTSTON TWP.
BY OWNER
459 Broad St.
3 bedroom 1 bath
attractive home in
great location,
hardwood floors
100x144 lot
asking $109,900
570.970.0650
jtdproperties.com
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
10 Norman St.
Brick 2 story home
with 4 bedrooms, 3
baths, large family
room with fireplace.
Lower level rec
room, large drive-
way for plenty of
parking. Just off the
by-pass with easy
access to all major
highways. For more
info and photos
visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2887
$164,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON TWP.
REDUCED
38 Frothingham St.
Four square home
with loads of poten-
tial and needs
updating but is
priced to reflect its
condition. Nice
neighborhood.
Check it out. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 11-3403
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
1610 Westminster
Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own personal
retreat, small pond
in front of yard, pri-
vate setting only
minutes from every-
thing. Log cabin
chalet with 3 bed-
rooms, loft, stone
fireplace, hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with bonus
room. Lots to see.
Watch the snow fall
in your own “cabin
in the woods.”
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
2 bedroom, 2.5
bath. Luxury 1,950
sq ft end unit
Townhome in
sought after River
Ridge. Gas heat,
A/C, Hardwood &
wall to wall. Mar-
ble tile master bath
with jetted tub &
separate shower.
$189,500
Call 570-285-5119
PLAINS
41 Bank Street
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
situated on a large
lot on a quiet street
with off street park-
ing. Move-in condi-
tion. Don't miss this
one! MLS #11-4055
REDUCED!
$64,500
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
PLAINS
46-48 Helen St
Well maintained
double block on
quiet street, great
nei ghbor hood.
Perfect home for
you with one side
paying most of
your mortgage, or
would make a
good investment,
with separate utili-
ties & great rents.
Vinyl replacement
windows, vinyl alu-
minum siding, walk
up large attic from
one side, lower
front & rear porch-
es, with two rear
upper enclosed
porches. $119,900
Call Ronnie
570-262-4838
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
of Times Leader
readers read
the Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
91
%
What Do
You Have
To Sell
Today?
*2008 Pulse Research
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNLL NNNNL NLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LE LE LE E LE LLE EEE DER DD .
timesleader.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
PAGE 8D THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$144,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
PLAINS
REDUCED REDUCED
74 W. Carey St.
Affordable home
with 1 bedroom,
large living room,
stackable washer
& dryer, eat in
kitchen. Yard
with shed.
Low taxes.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4068
$34,900 $34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
74 Mack Street
Modern 3 bedroom,
1 1/2 baths with a 1
car garage and
fenced yard. Combi-
nation living room/
dinning room with
hardwood floors.
Modern kitchen with
Corian counter tops
and tiled back-
splash. Modern tiled
bath. First floor
bonus family rooms.
New carpeting
throughout. Finished
lower level with 1/2
bath. Shed included.
MLS 11-4241
Reduced $109,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
PLYMOUTH
1 Willow St.
Attractive bi-level
on corner lot with
private fenced in
yard. 3-4 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. Fin-
ished lower level,
office and
laundry room
MLS 11-2674
$99,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PLYMOUTH
Recently remodeled
single family home
with 1st & 2nd floor
baths, modern
kitchen, large family
room with hard-
wood floors.
$70,000
MLS # 10-4618
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
PRINGLE
234 UNION ST
Previously a double
block converted
into one very
roomy, totally
remodeled single
family home. New
carpeting & flooring
throughout. 2
updated full baths,
one in master suite.
Nicely level fenced
yard with very large
deck & patio fort
entertaining. Zoned
commercial.
$131,900
MLS 11-3575
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
PRICE REDUCED
$425,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
4 Genoa Lane
There is much
attention to detail in
this magnificent 2
story, 4 bedroom, 2
full bath all brick
home on double
corner lot. Large
family room with
brick fireplace, all
oak kitchen with
breakfast area,
master suite, solid
oak staircase to
name a few.
MLS #11-3268
$525,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-07770
SHAVERTOWN
Enjoy the quiet life in
this spacious 3 bed-
room home on dou-
ble lot. Features
hardwood floor in
dining room, cov-
ered patio, over-
sized 2 car garage,
family room with
fireplace & finished,
walk out basement
with another fire-
place. MLS# 11-1873
$160,000
Michael Slacktish
570-760-4961
Signature Properties
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level yard
with shed. Large
sunr oom/ l aundr y
addition. Lower
level family room
with wood stove.
MLS #11-4178
$163,700
Call
Christrine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SHAVERTOWN
If you’re looking for
country living with
peace and quiet and
beautiful mountain
views, this is the
home for you! Only
minutes from town,
featuring large eat-
in kitchen, formal
dining room & living
room, all with hard-
wood floors. There
are three bedrooms
and a laundry in
addition to two full
baths. Master bath
skylight. Gas heat.
Central Air. $300 lot
rent/month and that
includes water,
sewer and garbage
removal.
MLS#10-4421
$65,000
EVERETT DAVIS
417-8733
SHAVERTOWN
* NEW LISTING! *
Great space in this
2-story coveted
Dallas neighbor-
hood! Lots of oak on
1st floor, door, mold-
ings, kitchen,
beams; finished
basement, 3-sea-
son room, bonus
room on 2nd floor
with computer nook.
4 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, 2 half baths,
office on 1st floor,
dual heat/air units.
MLS#11-4064
$349,900
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
1128 Bethel Hill Rd
A dollhouse in his-
toric Patterson
Grove Campground
with country charm.
Many recent
updates. Cute as
can be. Patterson
Grove on web
www.patterson
grove.com
11-4376
$27,000
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
SHICKSHINNY
408 Cragle Hill Rd.
This is a very well
kept Ranch home
on 6 acres, central
air, rear patio and 1
car garage. This is
a 3 parcel listing.
MLS 11-4273
$157,900
Jackie Roman
570-288-0770
Ext. 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber St.
Nice Ranch home,
great neighbor-
hood.
MLS 11-3365
$109,000
Call David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SWOYERSVILLE
120 Barber Street
Nice ranch home!
Great neighbor-
hood. MLS#11-3365
$109,000
(570) 885-6731
(570) 288-0770
CROSSIN REAL ESTATE
SWOYERSVILLE
20 Maple Drive
An immaculate 4
bedroom split level
situated on a .37
acre manicured lot
in a quiet neighbor-
hood. Features
include a Florida
room with wet bar &
breakfast area, spa-
cious eat-in kitchen
with sliders to deck/
patio, formal living
room, dining room,
family room, central
a/c, & 2 car garage.
Many amenities.
Don't miss this one!
MLS #11-1374
$ 229,900
Call Debra at
570-714-9251
SWOYERSVILLE
51-53 Milbre St
Nice home. A tenant
would help pay the
mortgage or use as
an investment prop-
erty or convert to a
single family. Great
location, worth your
consideration. Full
attic, walk out base-
ment by bilco doors.
Bathrooms are on
the first floor.
MLS 12-298
$99,500
Call Betty at
Century 21
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
ext 3559
or 570-714-6127
SWOYERSVILLE
60 Watkins St
Home features 4
bedrooms, a mas-
ter bedroom on 1st
floor with large walk
in closet, ceiling
fans, screened
porch, sunroom and
workshop. New 200
amp service, interi-
or paint & laundry
area in basement.
MLS#12-128
$105,000
Call Al Clemonts
570-371-9381
Smith Hourigan Group
570-714-6119
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
“New Listing”!
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
home on double lot.
One car garage,
two 3 season
porches, security
system & attic just
insulated.
MLS #12-31
$90,000.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
SWOYERSVILLE
NEW PRICE
$196,500
Luxurious End Townhouse
3 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, Cathedral
ceilings, hardwood
floors, gas heat,
Central Air, master
bath with whirlpool
tub & shower, lovely
landscaped fenced
yard, 1 car garage.
Great Location.
MLS#11-3533
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
SWOYERSVILLE
OUT OF FLOOD
ZONE
Estate. Nice brick
front ranch home on
a corner lot. 1 car
attached garage,
circle driveway,
central air. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 full bath
with 2 showers, Full
basement with
brand new water
proofing system
that includes a war-
ranty. Great loca-
tion. MLS 11-2127
$108,500
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
SWOYERSVILLE
Meticulous two-
story home with
double lot and 2-car
garage. Eat-in
kitchen with laundry
area; first floor tiled
full bath, nicely car-
peted living/dining
rooms; three bed-
rooms on second
floor, gas heat,
recently roofed,
great starter home
for you. Move in and
enjoy not paying
rent. MLS#11-3400
REDUCED TO
$99,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
TRUCKSVILLE
Well maintained 3
bedroom, 2 bath
double wide in nice
neighborhood.
Many updates.
Landscaped &
fenced yard with
pool, large deck &
koi pond! $99,700
MLS#11-2253
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
906 Homes for Sale
W. NANTICOKE
71 George Ave.
Nice house with
lots of potential.
Priced right. Great
for handy young
couple. Close to
just about every-
thing. Out of
flood zone.
MLS 12-195
$76,000
Call Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WEST PITTSTON
611 Dennison St.,
High & Dry! Lovely
three bedroom, two
bath bi-level offers
plenty of closet
space, tiled kitchen
& lower level floors,
security system and
very economical
gas heat. Lower
level has family
room, laundry area
and office or fourth
bedroom. This
home was NOT
FLOODED! MLS#12-8
$144,500
Karen Bernardi
283-9100 x31
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique property.
Well maintained - 2
story 10 year old set
on 3.56 acres. Pri-
vacy galore, pole
barn 30x56 heated
for storage of
equipment, cars or
boats. A must see
property. GEO Ther-
mal Heating Sys-
tem.Only 10 minutes
from interstate 81 &
15 minutes to turn-
pike. MLS#11-3617
$249,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
4 bedroom home
features a great
yard with over 2
acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldn’t
want to miss out.
There is a pond at
the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$64,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
WEST PITTSTON
220 Linden St.
Large 2 story
home with 3
bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths.
Detached
garage,
inground pool.
Home needs
work on the fi
rst floor, 2nd is i
n very good
conditi on.
Kitchen cabi-
nets ready to be
reinstalled. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-78
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
WEST PITTSTON
313 Race St.
This home needs
someone to rebuild
the former finished
basement and 1st
floor. Being sold as
is. 2nd floor is
move in ready.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-255
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
REDUCED
18 Atlantic Ave.
Large 2 story home
with 2 baths,
attached garage.
Being sold as-is.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-4475
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
WEST WYOMING
550 Johnson St.
Nicely landscaped
corner lot sur-
rounds this brick
front Colonial in
desirable neighbor-
hood. This home
features a spacious
eat in kitchen, 4
bedrooms, 4 baths
including Master
bedroom with mas-
ter bath. 1st floor
laundry and finished
lower level. Enjoy
entertaining under
the covered patio
with hot tub, rear
deck for BBQ’s and
an above ground
pool. Economical
gas heat only $1224
per yr. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-157
$254,860
Call Michele
Reap
570-905-2336
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
FRONT VIEW
REAR VIEW
BEAUTIFUL BRICK,
SLATE, MARBLE & WOOD
HOUSE. MUST BE SEEN
TO BE APPRECIATED.
2 bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths. Great kit-
chen with new
stainless steel app-
liances & custom
cabinets with center
island. Dining room
with stone fireplace
& marble floor.
Hardwood floors in
living room, which
also has stone walls
& eight arched win-
dows. Hand carved
wooden staircase
leads to Master
Bedroom Suite with
large closet & large
second bedroom &
bath. Middle level
with custom pool
room. Lower level
has 1/2 bath, bar &
built in stone & glass
hutches. Two new
self-feed rice coal
stoves keep heating
bills to less than
$400 a year! New
roof with lifetime
guarantee, privacy
fence, and 12’
above ground pool
with composite
deck. New 2 story,
1 car garage, & a
long driveway for
plenty of parking.
$199,000, firm.
Showings will be
held weekends for
prequalified buyers
only, please.
Call 570-233-7235
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
Why pay rent when
you can own this 1/2
double? 3 bed-
rooms. Eat in
kitchen. New roof
installed 12/11.
$49,900
MLS# 10-2780
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WEST WYOMING
WHY PAY RENT?
Nice half double
with eat in kitchen,
nice yard, shed and
off street parking.
$49,900
MLS # 11-1910
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WHITE HAVEN
28 S. Woodhaven Dr
Beautiful 4 bedroom
home. Peaceful sur-
roundings. Lake
view. 11-1253.
$179,000
Darcy J. Gollhardt,
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
WILKES-BARRE
$42,900
272 Stanton Street
7 rooms, 3 bed-
rooms, eat-in kit-
chen, 1 1/2 baths.
Laundry room with
washer & dryer, eat
in kitchen includes
refrigerator, stove,
& dishwasher, built
in A/C unit, fenced in
yard, security sys-
tem. MLS #11-4532
GO TO THE TOP...
CALL JANE KOPP
JANE KOPP
REAL ESTATE
570-288-7481
WILKES-BARRE
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with newer
laminate floors,
vaulted ceiling, 2
large bedrooms.
Finished lower level
with 1/2 bath and
laundry room. Large
family room built in
garage, and wood
pellet stove. No
sign, alarm system.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3290
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
1400 North
Washington St
Nice 2 story in need
of some TLC with
low taxes, near the
casino. Roof is 5
years young. Newer
water heater
(installed '09),
replacement win-
dows throughout,
100 AMP electric,
tiled bath, wall-to-
wall carpeting entire
1st floor. $49,900.
11-4455.
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WILKES-BARRE
260 Brown Street
Move right into this
3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath in very good
condition with mod-
ern kitchen and
bathrooms and a 3
season sunroom off
of the kitchen.
MLS 11-4244
$64,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
298 Lehigh Street
Lovely 2 story with
new roof, furnace,
water heater, new
cabinets and appli-
ances. Whole house
newly insulated.
Nice deck and
fenced-in yard. Call
Chris at 570-885-
0900 for additional
info or to tour.
MLS 11-4505
$82,000
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
Just on the market
this 2 story offers a
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
1st floor laundry
plus 2/3 bedrooms
On 2nd floor.
Affordably priced at
$ 27,900.00
MLS 12-50
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
WILKES-BARRE
Large, stately brick
home in Historic Dis-
trict. Large eat-in
kitchen, dining room
2 fireplaces, 5 full
baths & 2 half baths.
Huge master with
office. Large 3rd
floor bedroom. 2
story attic. Custom
woodwork & hard-
wood floors. Leaded
glass, large closets
with built-ins. Needs
some updates. With
large income apt.
with separate
entrance.
Call for
appointment.
ASKING $300,000
Call 570-706-5917
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Lot 39 Mayock St.
9' ceilings through-
out 1st floor, granite
countertops in
kitchen. Very bright.
1st floor master
bedroom & bath.
Not yet assessed.
End unit. Modular
construction.
MLS #10-3180
$179,500
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
WILKES-BARRE
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath home, with 3
season porch and
detached 1 car
garage. Good
starter home in
well established
neighborhood.
Family owned for
many years.
MLS#11-4464
$65,000
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
WILKES-BARRE
Nice home, great
price. 3 bedrooms, 1
bath, wood floors,
off street parking,
Approx 1312sq ft.
Currently rented out
for $550 monthly,
no lease. Keep it as
an investment or
make this your new
home. MLS 11-3207
$46,000
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
32 Wilson St
No need for flood or
mine subsidence
insurance. 2 story, 3
bedroom, 1 bath
home in a safe,
quiet neighborhood.
Aluminum siding.
Corner, 105’x50’ lot.
Fenced in yard.
Appraised at
$57,000. Serious
inquiries only. Call
570-826-1458
for appointment
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Pine Ridge Estates
Nicely maintained in
move-in condition!
Hardwood floors in
living room, dining
room & family
room. 4 bedrooms,
2 1/2 baths. Securi-
ty system, central
air, gas heat! Nice
room sizes!
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
WILKES-BARRE
South
3 bedroom, 2 story,
with brick & stucco
siding. Beautiful
hardwood floors.
Semi-modern
kitchen. Finished
basement with fire-
place. Covered
back porch. Priced
to sell. $79,900.
MLS 11-2987
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
WILKES-BARRE
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$65,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WILKES-BARRE
Want to live in the
city? Look at this
home! Well kept and
clean two-story in
this desirable Wilkes
Barre neighbor-
hood. Hardwood
flooring, great size,
eat-in oak kitchen
with all appliances &
first floor laundry.
Open floor plan on
first floor with living/
dining area. Modern
baths & three large
bedrooms. Plus
bonus twin bunk
beds built-in. Well
insulated-gas heat,
fenced yard, off-
street parking.
MLS#11-2659
REDUCED TO
$79,000
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
WILKES-BARRE
Nice home located
on a quiet street. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath
well kept & ready
for new owner. MLS
12-73. $55,000.
Call/text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
Come take a look at
this value. 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bath. Sit
back & relax on the
rear deck of your
new home. MLS 12-
75. $42,500. Call/
text for Details.
Donna Cain
570-947-3824
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Price reduced to
$43,000, below mar-
ket value! Modern
kitchen & bath,
enclosed rear patio.
Nice, clean and well
maintained; family
room can be con-
verted to a 3rd bed-
room. Just move
right in! MLS#11-3652
$43,000
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Cozy (2) unit home
with parking for (3)
vehicles. Enclosed
rear fenced-in yard,
shed, washer &
dryer, refrigerator
included. Nice clean
units! Home can be
converted back to a
single family home.
MLS#11-4047
$49,900
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
WYOMING
1702 W. Eighth St.
1 story Ranch with
100x200 lot, paved
driveway, new
energy star
replacement win-
dows. Excellent
starter home. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-2912
NEW PRICE
$84, 500
Fred Mecadon
570-817-5792
WYOMING
40 Fifth st
Very nice 2 family,
one side move in
the other rented
separate utilities, 6
rooms each side
plus 1/2 bath
upstairs each side.
Wonderful neigh-
borhood plus short
walking distance to
Wyoming Avenue.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
11-4027. $124,900
Call Nancy Bohn
570-237-0752
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PAGE 9D
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
Each apartment features:
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*income restrictions apply
For seniors age 62+ or disabled according to social security guidelines
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; • Laundry on site;
• Activities! •Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
for Move In
Specials.
570-288-9019
1 & 2 BR
Apts
2 & 3 BR
Townhomes
Wilkeswood
Apartments
www.liveatwilkeswood.com
570-822-2711
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
EDWARDSVILLE
89-91 Hillside St.
Out of the flood
plain, this double
has potential.
Newer roof and
some windows
have been
replaced. Property
includes a large
extra lot.
MLS 11-3463
$87,000
Call Roger Nenni
Ext. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
5770-288-0770
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit property.
Lots of off street
parking and bonus 2
car garage. All units
are rented. Great
income with low
maintenance.
$139,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
FORTY FORT
1012 Wyoming Ave.
SUPER LOCATION
Needs work. Priced
to sell. Great for
your small business
or offices. Very high
traffic count. Prop-
erty is being sold IN
AS IS CONDITION.
Inspections for buy-
ers information only.
Property needs
rehab.
MLS 11-4267
$84,900
Roger Nenni
570-288-0770
Ext. 32
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
JENKINS TWP.
1334 Main St.
1 story, 2,600
sq. ft. commePr-
cial building,
masonry con-
struction with
offices and
warehousing.
Central air,
alarm system
and parking.
Great for con-
tractors or
anyone with
office/storage
needs. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3156
$84,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
KINGSTON
584 Wyoming Ave.
M MOTIV OTIVA ATED TED S SELLER ELLER! !
Three large offices
along with a recep-
tion area with built-
in secretarial/para-
legal work stations;
a large conference
room with built-in
bookshelves, kitch-
enette and bath-
room. Lower level
has 7 offices, 2
bathrooms, plenty
of storage. HIGHLY
visible location,
off-street park-
ing. Why rent
office space?
Use part of building
& rent space- share
expenses and build
equity. MLS#11-995
REDUCED TO
$399,000
Judy Rice
570-714-9230
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
KINGSTON
64-66 Dorrance St.
3 units, off street
parking with some
updated Carpets
and paint. $1500/
month income from
long time tenants.
W/d hookups on
site. MLS 11-3517
$109,900
Call Jay A.
Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LAFLIN
33 Market St.
Commercial/resi-
dential property
featuring Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, newly
remodeled bath-
room, in good con-
dition. Commercial
opportunity for
office in attached
building. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3450
Reduced
$159,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
414 Front St.
Move right into this
modern office build-
ing featuring 4
offices, receptionist
office, large confer-
ence room, modern
kitchen, storage
room, full base-
ment, central air,
handicap access. 2
car garage and 5
additional off street
parking spaces.
This property is also
available for lease.
Lease price is
$675/mo + $675
security deposit.
Tenant pays all
utilities. Sells for
$89,900
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
5 Mountains
Realty
42 N. Main St.
Shickshinny, PA
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church
St.
Great 2 family in
move in condi-
tion on both
sides, Separate
utilities, 6
rooms each. 3
car detached
garage in super
neighborhood.
Walking dis-
tance to col-
lege. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$123,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
NANTICOKE
PENDING
406-408 Front St.
4,400 SF commer-
cial building with
storefront and living
space on the 2nd
floor. This building
can be used for
commercial appli-
cations or convert it
into a double block.
Property being sold
“AS IS”.
MLS 11-4271
$40,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
166 Vine St.
Nice three family
home in good loca-
tion, fully occupied.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-220
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
Rear 49 James St.
Two 2 bedroom
apartments, fully
rented with sepa-
rate utilities on a
quiet street. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-219
$39,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
SALE OR LEASE
PRICE REDUCED
Modern office build-
ing, parking for 12
cars. Will remodel
to suit tenant.
$1800/mo or pur-
chase for
$449,000
MLS 11-751
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
GARAGE
Swoyersville
Four-bay garage
with attached 725SF
office, also large
garage now used for
storage. Presently
being used as auto
sales, repair and
storage. Property
has security fence
and exterior lighting.
One acre lot. MLS #
10-2413 $215,000
Louise Laine
570-283-9100 x20
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
379-381 Sixth St.
Perfect first home
for you with one
side paying most of
your mortgage.
Would also make a
nice investment
with all separate
utilities and nice
rents. Large fenced
yard, priced to sell.
Don’t wait too long.
Call today to
schedule a tour.
MLS 11-1453
REDUCED!!
$84,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSS REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$179,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
35 Tannery St
Two properties in
one! House comes
with additional a
joining lot (approx
40 x 75) with poten-
tial to build or park
10-15 cars. Would
make great profes-
sional space. New
roof in 2010.
$49,900. 11-4379.
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$169,900
Call Charlie
VM 101
912 Lots & Acreage
BEAR CREEK
38 Wedgewood Dr.
Laurelbrook Estates
Lot featuring 3.22
acres with great
privacy on cul-de-
sac. Has been perc
tested and has
underground utili-
ties. 4 miles to PA
Turnpike entrance.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-114
$64,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
COURTDALE
175’x130’ sloping lot
with some trees.
Public sewer, water,
gas. $9,500. To set-
tle Estate. 570-287-
5775 or 332-1048
DALLAS
$135,000
SPECTACULAR
WATER VIEW!
2 acres overlooking
Huntsville
Reservoir. Building
site cleared but
much of woodlands
preserved. Perc &
site prep done.
MLS # 11-2550.
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Four Star
McCabe Realty
570-674-9950
HARDING
Mt. Zion Road
One acre lot just
before Oberdorfer
Road. Great place
to build your
dream home
MLS 11-3521
$29,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
To place your
ad call...829-7130
LAFLIN
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
FORGET THE
GROUNDHOG,
SPRING IS ON ITS
WAY! BUILD NOW!
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 11-3411
$34,900
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAND FOR SALE
24 ACRES
Wyoming Co, NY
Bennington Twp.
Cotton Hill Rd.
ASKING $32,000
1-814-392-6548
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
912 Lots & Acreage
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
SHAVERTOWN LAND
Harford Ave.
4 buildable residen-
tial lots for sale indi-
vidually or take all
4! Buyer to confirm
water and sewer
with zoning officer.
Directions: R. on
E. Franklin, R. on
Lawn to L. on
Harford.
$22,500 per lot
Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY
ASHLEY PARK
Double wide home.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. 3 season
deck & carport,
new appliances,
many upgrades,
near Rts 81, 309 &
Hanover Industrial
Park $54,500.
Serious Calls Only.
(570) 826-0887
PITTSTON TWP.
95 Redman
2 bedroom. Vinyl
siding, shingled
roof. Clean. NEEDS
NO WORK. Minutes
from I81 & Turnpike.
Excellent Condition.
$19,900.
570-851-6128 or
610-767-9456
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
ŠShort or long term
ŠExcellent
Neighborhood
ŠPrivate Tenant
Parking
Š$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED 1
BEDROOM APARTMENT
ŠShort or long term
ŠExcellent
Neighborhood
ŠPrivate Tenant
Parking
Š$600 includes all
utilities. No pets.
570-822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
ASHLEY
Available Now
1st floor, 2 bedroom.
Off street parking.
Washer dryer
hookup. Appliances.
Bus stop at the
door. Water Includ-
ed.$575 + utilities &
security. No pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
Available Now
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. Off street
parking. Washer
dryer hookup. Appli-
ances. Bus stop at
the door. Water
Included.$575 + util-
ities & security. No
pets.
TRADEMARK
REALTY GROUP
570-954-1992
ASHLEY
We Care about the
place you call home,
& we want you to
care about it too!!
2 & 3 bedrooms,
reserved parking.
Short block to bus
stop. $650 & 725
rent includes heat/
water/sewer &
trash. Application,
references, back-
ground check,
smoke free, pet
free, lease + securi-
ty. Call Terry
570-824-1022
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, first
floor, large modern
eat in kitchen with
appliances, bath,
carpeting, ample
parking, $495.
570-696-1866
DALLAS
Modern 1st floor, 1
bedroom with all
appliances. Off
street parking. No
pets. $550 per
month + utilities.
570-639-1462
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUMORE
Two bedroom 1
bathroom apart-
ment on Apple St.
$600/month + utili-
ties. Available 1/15.
(570) 815-5334
DUPONT
Totally renovated 6
room apartment with
balcony. Partially fur-
nished. Brand new
fridge / electric
range & electric
washer/ dryer. along
with new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting /
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 2
bedroom + large
attic loft bedroom,
1.5 bath, partially fin-
ished basement.
Lots of closet space.
Easy access to I-81,
airport & casino, off
street parking. No
smoking. $750 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-762-8265
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
DURYEA
1 bedroom apart-
ment + den in con-
verted school. 10 ft.
ceilings, open plan
Living Room, Dining
area & modern
Kitchen, all appli-
ances, mini-blinds,
neutral colors, hard-
wood floors, laun-
dry, off-street park-
ing. $675. Call
570-451-1982
EDWARDSVILLE
2 bedroom with
basement for stor-
age. Private ent-
rance with rear
yard. All new appli-
ances included.
Washer/dryer, sew-
er included. Pets
considered. $425/
month + 1 month
security.
Call 570-606-7884
between 9am &
9pm or Call
570-256-7837
before 9am &
after 9pm
EXETER
2 bedroom, modern
kitchen and bath,
Includes OSP
stove, fridge, heat,
water, sewer.
No Pets. $650.
570-693-1294
EXETER
4 large rooms, 2nd
floor. 1 block from
the Avenue. Range,
fridge, heat/hot
water furnished.
Very clean. Quiet
neighborhood. W/w,
w/d hookup, attic
and rear porch
$675/mo + security
570-574-1276 (C)
570-288-4860
FORTY FORT
1 & 2 BEDROOM APTS
Very nice, clean,
great neighbor-
hood, hardwood
floors, a/c, washer
/dryer with newer
appliances, stor-
age, 1st/last/securi-
ty with one year
lease. References
required. $650-
$695 + utilities.
Water/sewer by
owner, no pets,
non-smoking.
Call 202-997-9185
for appointment
FORTY FORT
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
gas heat, nice
kitchen & bath, new
flooring, optional
garage. Wash-
er/dryer included
$ 6 8 5 / m o n t h .
Call after 6 p.m.
570-220-6533
FORTY FORT
51 Dana Street
2 bedroom, 1st
floor. Heat &
1 car garage.
$650/month, 1st &
security required.
Application &
credit check
570-885-5146
FORTY FORT
Available March 1
2nd floor, spacious,
well maintained, 2
bedroom, 2 bath, in
convenient nice
neighborhood.
Large living/dining
area, large eat in
kitchen with w/d
hookup. Front
porch, screened
back porch. Great
closet/storage
space,w/w carpet-
ing, central air, off
street parking.
$900/month plus
utilities. Call 570-
510-4778 from
9am-5pm for an
appointment.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
WYOMING
AVE
AMERICA
REALTY
OFFERING:
Clean, modern,
efficient, first
floor, appli-
ances, laundry,
parking.
STAFFED PRO-
F E S S I O N A L
MANAGEMENT
NO PETS/
S M O K I N G
$465 + UTILI-
TIES/2 YEARS.
288-1422
FORTY FORT
Wyoming Ave.
Single level rear
house (directly
behind owners),
approximately 1100
sq ft. 1 car off
street parking, 2
bedrooms, 1 bath,
plenty of storage,
quiet place, washer
/dryer/fridge/stove,
no pets or smoking,
owner pays water,
$600/mo + security
deposit.
570-592-7921
HANOVER TWP.
TOWNHOUSE
2 bedrooms, cherry
hardwood floors,
stainless appli-
ances, European
tile kitchen & bath.
Parking, A/C, cathe-
dral ceilings, fire-
place, balcony
$790/month.
Call 570-650-0278
HUDSON
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove,
washer/dryer hook-
up, full basement,
no pets. $625/mon-
th, water & sewer
paid, security.
570-829-5378
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
3rd floor, 1 bed-
room. All utilities
included. Refrigera-
tor & stove. No
pets. Available
now. $600 month.
Call
570-362-0942
KINGSTON
1 bedroom. Avail-
able now. $425 +
security & electric.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
109 N. Thomas Ave
Efficiency with sep-
arate kitchen. Mod-
ern. Heat, garbage
& hot water includ-
ed. $475, lease,
security.
570-474-5023
KINGSTON
1st floor. Large 2
bedroom. Remod-
eled. Stove refriger-
ator. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $675 Heat
included. Call
570-814-0843 or
570-696-3090
KINGSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, wall to wall,
refrigerator & stove,
heat & hot water.
Off-street parking.
No pets. No smok-
ing. $550/month, +
security & refer-
ences .
570-288-3119
KINGSTON
40 Pierce Street
1st floor. 2 bed-
room. Heat, hot and
cold water, trash
included. $725/mo.
Cats considered.
Call (570) 474-5023
KINGSTON
705 Nandy Drive
Modern, clean 2
bedroom, all appli-
ances, central air,
& off-street parking,
No pets / Non-
Smoking $660/
month + utilities
570-696-3915
KINGSTON
Awsome 2 bedroom
apartments! New
appliances, wash-
er/dryer on site,
garage parking, no
pets. 2nd floor -
$925 & 1st floor -
$1,075. Heat, water,
& sewer included.
Call 570-417-2049
KINGSTON
BUTLER ST.
3 bedrooms, pantry
w/eat in kitchen. All
appliances. 2.5
baths, separate tub
showers. No pets
or smoking.
$1500/mo plus
security & utilities.
Call 570-288-4203
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted, security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $715.
570-287-0900
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled, 3
bedroom 1/2 double
with carpet, paint,
1.5 bath, washer/
dryer hook up, gas
heat, $700 + utilities.
Call 570-814-0843
or 570-696-3090
LARKSVILLE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
$725, with discount.
All new hardwood
floors and tile. New
cabinets/bathroom.
Dishwasher, garb-
age disposal. Wash-
er/dryer hook-up.
Off street parking.
Facebook us at
BOVO Rentals
570-328-9984
MCADOO
Newly constructed
1 & 2 bedroom 2nd
floor apartments.
Modern kitchen:
stainless steel
appliances, granite
countertops. Pri-
vate laundry. Off
street parking. No
pets. Includes heat,
water, garbage &
sewer. References
& security deposit
required. $850
Call (570) 929-2843
for appointment
MOOSIC
4 rooms. 2nd floor.
Heat, water &
sewer included.
$695 + security &
references. Call
570-457-7854
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 bedroom with full
kitchen. Remodeled
recently, first floor,
ample parking. Hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
On Rt 309 - close
to all amenities! No
pets. Non smoking.
$560/month + secu-
rity & references.
570-239-3827
NANTICOKE
603 HANOVER ST
2nd floor, 1
bedroom. No pets.
$500 + security,
utilities & lease.
Photos available.
570-542-5330
NANTICOKE
East State Street
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. Mod-
ern kitchen & bath-
rooms. All appli-
ances. Ample stor-
age. Some utilities
included. $475 &
$585 per month.
Call (570) 239-2741
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
apartment.
221 Pine St.
$520/month, sewer
& garbage included,
security deposit
required. Call
610-393-7884
NANTICOKE
Ready Immediately!
Spacious 2nd floor
non smoking, 2
bedroom. W/w car-
peting, all appli-
ances incl. w/d.
Electric heat. Tons
of storage, off
street parking. Yard
and porch.
$480/mo, 1 month
security, refer-
ences. Water and
sewage incl. tenant
pays other utilities
570-650-3358
PITTSTON
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, 1 bathroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, pets
negotiable. $525/
month, water and
sewer paid,
security and lease
required. Call after
4pm. 570-237-6277
PITTSTON
3 bedroom, 2 sec-
ond floor. Includes
fridge, range,
sewer, trash, wash-
er & dryer hook up.
$575 + security
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
PITTSTON
3 room, wall to wall
carpet, appliances
washer/dryer hook-
up, includes all utili-
ties except electric.
No pets
$500/month +
security
Call 570-655-1606
PITTSTON
South Main Street
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
includes heat, stove
& refrigerator,
washer/dryer hook-
up, sewer, front &
back porches,
fenced yard & pri-
vate parking. Lawn
maintained. No
Pets. $675/month
570-654-2257
PLAINS
1st floor. Modern 2
bedroom. Kitchen
with appliances. All
new carpet. Conve-
nient location. No
smoking. No pets.
$550 + utilities.
570-714-9234
PLYMOUTH
2nd floor, 2 bed-
rooms, washer/dry-
er hookup, with
stove & refrigerator.
No pets. Refer-
ences required.
$500/month + sec-
urity + heat & lights.
570-779-4903
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PLYMOUTH
Large 1 bedroom
apartment. Newly
painted. Includes
heat, water, sewer,
fridge & range.
$500 + security.
Call Bernie
888-244-2714
SHAVERTOWN
2 bedroom, private
setting with pond.
1.5 baths. Ultra
modern kitchen
with appliances,
dishwasher &
microwave includ-
ed. Plenty of closet
& storage. Wash-
er/dryer hook up.
Private drive.
$1,100/month.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Security deposit
required.
Call 570-760-2362
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom. 2nd
floor. $500
plus utilities
570-299-5471
WEST PITTSTON
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room kitchen, living
room, bath, and
attic storage.
Refrigerator and
stove provided.
Heat, water, and
sewer included.
Quiet neighbor-
hood, out of flood
zone. No pets.
$540/month
lease, 1st., security
deposit, and refer-
ences required.
570-466-1545
WEST PITTSTON
HIGH AND DRY
Spacious 1 bedroom
apartment, 2nd floor.
Recently renovated.
Sewer & appliances
included. Off street
parking. Security.
No pets.
$500/month +
utilities & gas heat.
570-586-0417
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,400.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WEST WYOMING
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room apartment.
All appliances.
Washer/ dryer. Off
street parking. No
pets. $525 + utili-
ties, security &
references. Call
570-954-2972
WEST WYOMING
429 West 8th Street
New 2 bedroom
with off street park-
ing, private patio,
washer/dryer, stove
included. No pets.
$575/mos + security
Sewer & garbage
included other utili-
ties by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE /
KINGSTON
Efficiencies, 1 & 2
bedrooms. Includes
all utilities, parking,
laundry. No pets.
From $390 to $675.
Lease, security
& references.
570-970-0847
WILKES-BARRE
/SOUTH
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
refrigerator & stove
provided, washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking. Heat
included. $525/
month, + security.
Call 570-718-0331
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
1.5 bedroom, 1 bath,
refrigerator & stove
provided, no pets, .
Heat & water paid.
$560/month + secu-
rity deposit.
Call 570-829-1598
WILKES-BARRE
102 Westminster St
3 bedroom. $650 +
security. Section 8
welcome. Call
570-287-1349 or
570-817-1605
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
PAGE 10D THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
944 Commercial
Properties
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Porches, decks
& steps
All types of residen-
tial remodeling.
Kitchens & baths.
Specializing in Win-
dows & Vinyl Siding.
Solar light tunnels.
30 years experi-
ence. BBB. PA025042
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-287-1982
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
See Us At
The
Home
Show
March
2, 3 & 4th
at the
Kingston
Armory
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1030 Carpet
Cleaning
Alan & Linda’s
Carpet and/or
Chair Cleaning
2 FOR $39
570-826-7035
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
C&C Masonry
and Concrete.
Absolutely free
estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-766-1114
570-346-4103
PA084504
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-606-7489
570-735-8551
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings and
painting. Free esti-
mates. Licensed &
Insured. 328-1230
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1132 Handyman
Services
RUSSELL’S
Property & Lawn
Mai ntenance
LICENSED & INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
All types of interior
and exterior home
& business repairs
570-406-3339
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
HAUL ALL
HAULING &
PAINTING SERVICES.
Free Estimates.
570-332-5946
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
FREE SCRAP
METAL REMOVAL
Services include:
general hauling,
attics, basements,
garages, and
estate clean out.
Call Ray’s Recy-
cling
570-735-2399
Mike’s $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
570-826-1883
VERY CHEAP
JUNK REMOVAL!
Licensed,
Insured & Bonded.
Will beat any price,
guaranteed! Free
Estimates. Over
10,000 served.
570-693-3932
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, Haz-
ard tree removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot clearing, Stone/
Soil delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
AWESOME INTERIORS
Quality Interior &
Exterior Painting.
Owner Present
on Every Job.
Satisfaction Guar-
anteed.
36 Years Exp.
570-885-3614
FREE ESTIMATES
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Prices starting at
$100/room.
570-762-6889
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1228 Plumbing &
Heating
NEED FLOOD REPAIRS?
Boilers, Furnaces,
Air. 0% Interest 6
months.
570-736-HVAC
(4822)
1252 Roofing &
Siding
GIVENS
CONSTRUCTION
New roofs and
repairs. Shingles,
rubber, slate, metal
roofs, terracotta,
and many others.
Licensed and Ins.
Free estimates
570-239-8534
PA 010925
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour Emer-
gency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
WINTER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1276 Snow
Removal
SNOW
PLOWING
ŠCommercial
ŠIndustrial
ŠResidential
ŠDRIVEWAYS
ŠSIDEWALKS
ŠSALTING
VITO & GINO’S
570-574-1275
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
264 Academy St
1.5 bedrooms,
newly renovated
building. Washer &
dryer available.
$600/per month
includes heat, hot
water and parking.
570-328-9896
570-855-4744
WILKES-BARRE
A spotless living
room, dining room,
kitchen, 2 bedroom,
bath, yard, base-
ment, off street
parking. Irving
Place. $430 + utili-
ties. 570-266-5336
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. FRANKLIN ST.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio & 1 bed-
room apts. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors electronically
locked. Studio -
$450. 1 bedroom -
$550. Water &
sewer paid. One
month/security de-
posit. Call
570-793-6377 or
570-208-9301 after
9:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Clean, 2 bedroom,
duplex. Stove, hook-
ups, parking, yard.
No pets/no smoking
$475 + utilities.
Call 570-868-4444
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
WILKES-BARRE
Modern, 1st floor
apartment. 2 bed-
room, 1.5 baths, off-
street parking. No
pets, no smokers.
Security & credit/
background check
required. $550/
month + utilities.
570-881-4078
WILKES-BARRE
Short Term OK!
Studio near Wilkes.
Furniture available.
Lease till June or
August. $450. All
utilities included.
570-826-1934
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
1 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath, laundry room.
$800. All appliances
& utilities except
electric included.
Call 570-574-3065
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
WILKES-BARRE
SOUTH WELLES ST.
Available February
2 bedroom, 2nd
floor. New paint &
carpet, enclosed
porch. Heat, hot
water, sewer &
garbage included.
$625 + security.
Section 8 Welcome.
570-589-9767
WILKES-BARRE
TWO BEDROOM UNIT
For lease, available
immediately, 1 bath-
room, refrigerator &
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, 2nd floor.
$500 per month +
utilities, references,
security & back-
ground check
570-735-4074
Leave message
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 bedroom
water included
Š2 bedroom
water included
Š2 bedroom
single family
Š6 bedroom
large half double
HANOVER
Š2 bedroom
NANTICOKE
Š2 bedroom
large, water
included
PITTSTON
ŠLarge 1
bedroom water
included
KINGSTON
Š3 Bedroom Half
Double
LUZERNE
Š2 bedroom
water included
OLD FORGE
Š2 bedroom
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Quiet neighborhood.
Apartment near
Mohegan Sun, Mall
& Arena. 1 bed-
room, living room,
kitchen & bath.
Recently remod-
eled. New Stove,
washer, dryer &
fridge. included.
Heat, hot water,
sewer & recycling
fees included. Off
street parking. $600
/mo. + security. Ref-
erences, credit &
background checks
required.
Call 570-861-2264
WYOMING
1 bedroom 2nd floor
at $625/month. Off
street parking. Non
smoking. No pets.
Bonus walk up attic
with tons of stor-
age. Heat, water,
garbage, sewer
included. 1 month
security, credit
check & references.
1 year lease.
Please call Donna
570-613-9080
WYOMING
Completely refur-
bished, 2nd floor, 2
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove, no
pets. $600/month,
1 month security.
Heat & hot water
included.
570-693-2254 or
570-262-3003
WYOMING
Large 2 bedroom,
1st floor, lease,
security, section 8
accepted. Handicap
accessible, $695 +
electric. All other
utilities included.
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
WYOMING
Updated 1 bedroom.
New Wall to wall
carpet. Appliances
furnished. Coin op
laundry. $550. Heat,
water & sewer
included. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
3800 SF, will divide
Office / Retail
Call 570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
EXETER
OFFICE/
STOREFRONT
1079 WYOMING AVE.,
available immedi-
ately, utilities pro-
vided. $300/month
with security
deposit. Call
570-693-2804
for an appointment
GARAGES
1200 sq. ft. garage
zoned for
commercial $400
per month.
ALSO 1200 SQ.FT.
WITH LIFT $700
MONTH
(570) 814-8876
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
LUZERNE
125 Main Street
Office or Retail
Space available
with over 2,000 sq.
ft. plus attached
garage. High
traffic area. $650/
month + utilities.
Call 570-331-3600
OFFICE SPACE
PLAINS
Total space 30,000
sf. Build to suit. Per-
fect for Doctors
suite, day care, etc.
High visibility. Lots of
parking. Rent starting
$10/sf. MLS 11-4200
Call Nancy or Holly
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PITTSTON
Main St. 1350 sq. ft.
building. Formerly
an appliance store.
$750/mo.
570-654-1243
PLAINS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY
1,500 SQ.FT.
1350 River Road
Excellent location
for small business
or office. Will re-
model to suit tenant.
Call 570-760-3714
or 570-237-5664
RETAIL BUILDING
WILKES-BARRE TWP
12,000 sf. Route
309. Exit 165 off I81.
570-823-1719
315 PLAZA
1750 sf former
Physician Office.
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
WILKES-BARRE
GREAT BUSINESS
OPPORTUNITY
1,500 square foot
available for rent.
Restaurant with
some equipment.
Excellent street vis-
ibility at the Hazle &
Park Triangle. Also,
Middle East Bakery
for sale or rent.
call Pete for details
at 570-301-8200
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
RETAIL LEASE
Available
Immediately.
High traffic volume
& great visibility on
Wilkes-Barre Blvd.
1900 sq. ft., in
Wilkes Plaza, with
plenty of parking.
$2,000 / monthly.
Call Terry Eckert
LEWITH &FREEMAN
570-760-6007
Wilkes-Barre/
Plains Twp.
WAREHOUSE
Laird St. Complex,
Will divide for multi-
ple tenants. Rea-
sonable rates. Easy
Interstate access.
Lease 132,500
sq.ft., 12 loading
docks, 30 ft ceilings,
sprinkler, acres of
parking. Offices
Available
570-655-9732
ext. 312
WYOMING
72’ x 200’ VACANT
COMMERCIAL LOT
233 Wyoming Ave,
Rt. 11 (1/4 mile from
proposed Walmart)
For Sale or lease.
$96,000.
570-388-6669
947 Garages
PLAINS
1 1/2 car garage.
$125 month
570-714-9234
WEST PITTSTON
4 locking garages/
storage units for
rent. 9’x11’. $55/
month. No electric.
Call 570-357-1138
950 Half Doubles
ALDEN / NANTICOKE
3 Bedrooms. Gas
Heat. Hookups.
Parking. Large yard.
No Pets. $519 + utili-
ties Security $300
570-824-8786
ASHLEY
2 bedroom apart-
ment, Carey’s
Patch, completely
remodeled. Appli-
ances included with
washer & dryer.
Full yard &
off street parking.
No smoking. $650.
Call Will at
570-417-5186
EXETER
Recently remodeled
4-5 bedroom half
double with large
rooms. Off street
parking. Yard. $800
+ utilities. Call
570-299-7103
Line up a place to live
in classified!
FORTY FORT
3 bedroom, excel-
lent condition, great
location. Off street
parking. Storage
basement. Washer/
dryer included.
$650 + utilities.
By application.
570-954-0505
HANOVER TWP.
221 Boland Ave
1 bedroom.
$325+utilities
Call Mark at
(570) 899-2835
(917) 345-9060
HANOVER TWP.
$650/month, 2 bed-
room, 1 bath, living
dining room & eat
in kitchen. Appli-
ances, washer/dry-
er hook up. Off
street parking. Wat-
er, sewer & recy-
clables included.
Security, references
& credit check. No
pets. 570-824-3223
KINGSTON
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, new wall to
wall carpeting,
freshly painted, par-
tial A/C, gas heat,
large fenced in
yard, walking dis-
tance to Kingston
Corners. All appli-
ances, off-street
parking, no pets.
$675/month, plus
utilities, & 2 months
security.
Application &
references.
Call 570-639-4907
LARKSVILLE
3 bedrooms, all
appliances, gas
heat. Includes sew-
er & garbage. Off-
street parking, no
pets. $625/month +
utilities, 1st, last &
security.
NO SECTION 8
570-762-7650
MINERS MILLS
Section W-B. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath. No
pets. $215 per week
(all utilities included)
References, Lease
& Security deposit
(570) 881-7864
950 Half Doubles
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
A/C. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
“Must See!”
$850 + utilities,
lease & security. NO
PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
PLYMOUTH
122 Willow St.
Very clean and
comfortable ½ dou-
ble for rent. Large,
level fenced yard.
Quiet neighborhood.
Rental application,
verification of
employment / income
& credit check
required. Tenant is
responsible for all
utilities except
sewer. Call today for
your private show-
ing MLS 12-426
$550/ month plus
security deposit
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Walter Belchick
606-2600 ext. 301
WANAMIE
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
stove provided,
washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, $575/
month, plus utilities.
Section 8 OK
Call 610-393-7884
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
Nice 3 bedroom
with eat in kitchen &
walk up attic. Walk-
ing distance to
school & parks.
$700/month + utili-
ties & 1 month secu-
rity. (570) 793-9449
950 Half Doubles
WYOMING
Newly remodeled 3
bedrooms, refriger-
ator & stove provid-
ed, no pets, w/w
carpeting, $800/
month, plus utilities,
& $1,000 security
deposit.
Call 570-693-2804
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
Private, 3 bedroom
ranch, patio, porch,
appliances, work
shop. $830 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-522-0084
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR
Well maintained
ranch style condo
features living room
with cathedral ceil-
ing, oak kitchen,
dining room with
vaulted ceiling, 2
bedrooms and 2 3/4
baths, master bed-
room with walk in
closet. HOA fees
included. $1,000 per
month + utilities.
MLS#11-4063.
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
DORRANCE TWP.
STAIRVILLE ROAD
4 bedrooms, 1.5
bathrooms, en-
closed front porch.
Stove, washer /
dryer hook-up, off-
street parking, pos-
itively no pets.
$1,000/per month, +
utilities, & 1 month
security, + 1/2 month
fuel security. Refer-
ences & credit
check required. 2.5
miles from I-81.
(570) 868-3633
after 2:00 p.m.
DRUMS
SAND SPRINGS
Golf Community
Luxurious 1900 sq.
feet Townhouse.
Modern kitchen, 3
bedrooms, 2 1/2
baths, 1 stall
garage. 3 minutes
to interstates 81 &
80. $1400 + utilities.
Call 570-582-4575
953Houses for Rent
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedrooms, 2
baths, all appli-
ances, hardwood
floors, washer/dryer
on premises, single
car attached gar-
age. No pets.
$925/month + secu-
rity. Water, sewer
& garbage paid.
Call 570-855-2687
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, large living
room, dining room
family room,
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer /
dryer hookup.
New w/w carpet &
freshly painted.
Large yard &
screened porch.
Water, sewer,
garbage & snow
plowing included.
No pets. Non
smoking. Security
deposit, refer-
ences & credit
check required.
$1,100/per month
+ utilities.
570-709-6678
KINGSTON
A spotless 4 bed-
room, 1 ½ bath cape
on Dawes Ave;
Fenced yard, base-
ment, Off-street
parking. $685 + utili-
ties. Call
570-266-5336
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$900 + electric only
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
953Houses for Rent
NANTICOKE
RENTAL-SINGLE
FAMILY HOME
202 East Union St.,
Very spacious single
family home for
rent. 3/4 bedrooms,
kitchen with break-
fast room, dining
room, living room,
3-season porch.
Range, refrigerator,
dishwasher, washer
& dryer provided.
Note: there is no
yard and garage is
for owner’s use
only. No pets of any
kind. No smoking.
Applicant to provide
proof of income and
is responsible for
cost of credit check.
MLS#12-357 $600
per month plus
security deposit.
Tenant is responsi-
ble for all utilities
except sewer.
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Walter Belchick
696-2600 ext. 301
PLAINS Miners Mills
½ double with 3
bedrooms, & 1 bath.
Security deposit
required. No pets.
Utilities by tenant.
$600/month
Call Dave Gula
570-696-5435
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
SHICKSHINNY
2 bedroom ranch in
country, Mountain
Road. $650/
month, + utilities, &
security deposit.
Call 570-864-2238
SWOYERSVILLE
124 Perrin St
2 bedroom single.
Gas heat. New
appliances including
washer & dryer.
Shed. No pets. $675
+ utilities, security,
lease, references &
background check.
Call 570-406-1353
953Houses for Rent
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
SWOYERSVILLE
Renovated 2 bed-
room mobile home
with central air, new
carpeting, modern
kitchen with all
appliances, nice
neighborhood,
fenced yard and off
street parking. No
pets. Security &
lease. $495 + all util-
ities. 570-690-3086
WEST PITTSTON
2 bed, 2 bath ranch
with new kitchen &
beautiful river view.
Appliances included
$1,200/mos + utili-
ties. MLS# 11-4275
570-696-3801
Call Margy
570-696-0891
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family
house, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, large living
& dining rooms, ex-
tra room, eat-in-kit-
chen, finished attic.
Backyard & drive-
way. Washer/ dryer
hookup. $750/
month + utilities, 1
month security.
Call 609-356-8416
WILKES-BARRE
Large 1 family
house, 4 bedrooms,
2 baths, large living
& dining rooms, ex-
tra room, eat-in-kit-
chen, finished attic.
Backyard & drive-
way. Washer/dryer
hookup. $750/
month + utilities, +
1 month security.
Call 609-356-8416
WILKES-BARRE
One 4 bedroom
$740
One 3 Bedroom
$625
One 2 bedroom
$580
Plus all utilities Ref-
erences & security.
No pets.
570-766-1881
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE TWP
TOWNHOUSE. 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
behind VA hospital
in Summit Place.
Kitchen appliances,
parking. $800/mo +
utilities. Call Annie
570-497-6060
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $340.
Efficiency at $450
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
FLORIDA
Boca Raton
Available March/April
Beautiful 5 room
home with Pool.
Fully furnished. On
canal lot. $600
weekly. If interest-
ed, write to:
120 Wagner St.
Moosic, PA 18507
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
Findthe
perfect
friend.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LLLE LE LE E LLE LE LLE EE DER DD .
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