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Curriculum Evaluation Manual

Revised 2011

PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE: Curriculum is a collaboratively designed and implemented system of describing the content and processes presented in the classroom; it must also provide for measuring what a student knows and is able to do as a result of the classroom experience. It is both tangible (overt and explicit) and intangible (implicit and interactive) and guides the actual day-to-day experiences of students, teachers, subject matter, and cognitive strategies within the Champaign Unit 4 School District. The curriculum process guides the educational experiences; that is, students are first introduced to knowledge and the practices by which it is acquired, and then afforded the opportunities to construct, reconstruct, and/or critique their classroom experience. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for all procedures associated with curriculum writing and curriculum evaluation. Program is a system of services, opportunities, or projects that are sequentially programmed and designed to meet the professional, academic, and/or social needs and desires of all Champaign Unit 4 students and staff. The relationship between program and curriculum should be mutually supportive. For guidance concerning program procedures and evaluation, please refer to the Program Evaluation Guide. CURRICULUM COMPONENTS PLANNED AND WRITTEN CURRICULUM: The written curriculum will reflect the following: 1. National standards as adopted by professional organizations in various subject areas 2. Federal and state mandates 3. Illinois Learning Standards 4. State mandated assessments 5. District priorities Subject-area written curriculum guides will be developed locally for all grade levels and courses in the District. The guides will be revised and presented to the Board as they rotate throughout the curriculum evaluation and adoption cycle. The guides will contain the following components: 1. Philosophy statement for a given subject area or program 2. District essential questions and enduring understandings for a subject area or program aligned with Illinois Learning Standards and assessments 3. Scope and sequence (guides) for the subject area or program 4. Representative instructional activities designed to support curriculum goals 5. Relevant differentiated strategies for teaching 6. Resources and materials. All teachers will have in their possession the Board-approved District Curriculum Guides (including electronic formats) and use the guides to develop daily lesson plans as specified by the administrator in charge. Administrators and supervisors will work with teachers to ensure consistency between curriculum design (written curriculum) and curriculum delivery (what is actually taught). All District-issued instructional publications and curricular materials developed locally, obtained from state agencies, or other publishers in the name of the District will be the property of the District. Such publications and materials will not belong to an individual teacher or administrator and will remain in the current location upon termination of employment or change in placement of an employee to whom publications have been assigned. Electronic format copies of the 1

curriculum guides, as they are developed and modified, will be available for review on the District website. Campus and District staff development plans will be designed and implemented to prepare staff members to teach the designed curriculum. TAUGHT CURRICULUM: All teachers will have a responsibility not only to contribute to the refinements of written curriculum, but also to teach the curriculum. Teachers will plan collaboratively through team time, grade level meetings, and other initiatives to ensure that all students are provided appropriate differentiated instruction and that their efforts are a part of the District Strategic Plan of quality education. The principal or other supervisors will see that optimum use is made of the curriculum guides. Curriculum coordinators, content area chairpersons, and building leaders will assist in this endeavor. Curriculum guides will serve as a framework from which a teacher will follow units of study, develop lesson plans, and use strategies to differentiate instruction in order to create a learning environment that supports equity and excellence. The guides will be used to map the logical sequence of instruction. In addition to consistent delivery of the learning objectives in the curriculum, it is expected that instruction will be based on sound teaching principles grounded in educational research. Instructional supervision will focus on the application of these principles. A systematic process will be in place for planning and providing instruction appropriate for each student and for engaging the student until learning objectives are attained. This systematic process will include: 1. Establishing a school climate that continually affirms the worth and diversity of all students. 2. Expecting that all students will perform at high levels of learning. 3. Ensuring that all students experience opportunities for personal success. 4. Having staff members, students, and parents take shared responsibility for successful student learning. 5. Developing written lesson plans that will incorporate: a. goals from the Districts written curriculum. b. measurable objective(s) that are displayed and explained to the students. c. differentiated tasks addressing diverse learning styles and abilities in order to meet the needs of all students. d. assessments that monitor student mastery of the objective(s). e. modified instruction and reteaching based on assessment data. 6. Monitoring of teachers lesson plans by supervisors. Campus and District staff development programs will include research-based best practices to provide teachers with sound instructional strategies so that subject mastery will be achieved by students at all grade levels.

TESTED CURRICULUM: The District will use the state assessments, District-wide assessments (i.e., norm- referenced, benchmark, common, diagnostic), and teacher-developed assessments to evaluate the effectiveness of the planned, written, and taught curriculum. Administrators and teachers will use assessment results to determine the status of individual student achievement, to identify and disaggregate achievement trends of students, and to modify curriculum and instruction as warranted by assessment results. Campus and District staff development plans will be designed and implemented to prepare staff members to create sound assessments and analyze assessment results to support individual student achievement, to understand achievement trends, and to modify curriculum and instruction. Grade reports will reflect student performance and the level of achievement in the written, taught and tested curriculum.

ROLES/RESPONSIBILITIES: SUPERINTENDENT: The Superintendent is responsible for the implementation of curriculum policies and reporting these activities to the Board regularly. The superintendent will: 1. Ensure equal access to quality instruction, fair treatment of all students, and equity in resources and programs. 2. Ensure that all curricula are reviewed and evaluated in a systematic way. 3. Recommend all new and revised curriculum documents and assessments to the Board for approval. 4. Ensure that the framework for a comprehensive assessment program is aligned with the written and taught curriculum. DISTRICT-LEVEL CURRICULUM STAFF: The Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and the District-level curriculum staff will: 1. Provide support to principals and teachers in their roles of planning, implementing, assessing, and monitoring the curriculum on their campuses. 2. Organize and facilitate committees to develop, review, and revise the curriculum as part of the district curriculum adoption cycle, and oversee the progress of those committees 3. Support the design and implementation of a long-range, comprehensive staff development plan to support teachers in promoting higher levels of student achievement. PRINCIPALS: Principals will direct the campus implementation of the aligned District curriculum and use the following strategies to monitor classroom implementation and promote success for all students: 1. Develop a working knowledge of the curriculum for all subjects/courses taught at the campus. 2. Review curriculum guide. 3. Review lesson plans and observe classroom instruction on a regular basis to ensure that the staff teaches the required District curriculum and uses research-based best practices. 4. Facilitate the analysis and sharing of District and state assessment data with teachers to support instruction. 5. Communicate the importance of effective curriculum and instructional practices to staff on a regular basis. 6. Conference with individual teachers, as needed, to ensure they understand how to use curriculum guides and assessment data to guide instruction. 7. Provide or facilitate campus staff development based upon identified needs. 8. Utilize the services of curriculum coordinators and support staff in curriculum implementation. 9. Facilitate the development of an annual school improvement plan, aligned with the Districts Strategic Plan, and based on student achievement assessment data and other identified campus needs. TEACHERS: As those primarily responsible for curriculum delivery, teachers will: Write lesson plans that adhere to the District curriculum guides. 1. Participate in staff development and implement research-based best practices. 2. Establish a classroom environment that continually affirms the worth of all students. 3. Communicate high expectations to all students. 4. Ensure that all students experience opportunities for success. 5. Assess student mastery of learning objectives and reteach as necessary. 4

6. 7. 8. 9.

Plan instruction based upon student strengths and needs identified from state, District, and classroom assessments. Differentiate instruction according to the needs of the individual student and the complexity of the task. Collaborate with other teachers, support staff, and/or the principal to provide differentiated interventions that accelerate and enrich student performance. Assist in writing new and revised curriculum and assessments as part of the evaluation process of the curriculum adoption cycle.

PARENTS/GUARDIANS/CITIZENS: As partners in the educational process, parents/guardians/citizens are encouraged to: 1. Support learning through students prompt and regular school attendance. 2. Provide students with the physical, social, and emotional support needed for school participation. 3. Communicate regularly with teachers and administrators. 4. Ensure that students complete and return homework. 5. Participate in student/teacher/administrator conferences. 6. Volunteer in activities and committees that support the school and District. STUDENTS: As partners in the educational process, students are expected to: 1. Attend school daily and arrive promptly. 2. Come prepared to engage in all learning activities. 3. Communicate regularly with teachers. 4. Complete and return homework on time. 5. Participate in student/teacher/administrator conferences as appropriate. 6. Investigate extra-curricular opportunities. COMMITTEES: STEERING TEAM FOR EVALUATION OF PROGRAMS: The purpose of the Steering Team for Evaluation of Programs (STEP) is to provide the Superintendent and Board with input regarding curriculum and curriculum-related programs. STEP also has program evaluation responsibilities in areas other than curriculum. STEP will be composed of campus-based and District-level professional staff. The roles of STEP with regard to the Curriculum Adoption Cycle will include: 1. Reviewing in accordance with the Six-year Cycle for Curriculum Study: a. Current placement of curricular areas on the adoption cycle; b. Training and preparation of teachers and administrators for years 1 and 2 of the evaluation process 2. Coordinating the process for evaluating the curriculum and placing the curriculum on the Curriculum Steering calendar. 3. Recommending to the Board, STEP and Curriculum Steering evaluation of the new and revised curriculum as determined by the work done during year 3 of the evaluation process. 4. Disseminating evaluation reports to intended users. 5. Maintaining files of completed program evaluations. CURRICULUM STEERING COMMITTEE: Membership should include one representative from each PreK-8 school site, curriculum area representatives from 9-12, parent representatives, District coordinators, Director(s) of Curriculum, and the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity. The role of the Curriculum Steering Committee will be to ensure 5

the consistency and equality of educational opportunities for students, and to maintain the integrity of the curricular process by reviewing and responding to: 1. Recommendations regarding proposals for new and/or modified curriculum and course pilots, including courses which are part of a school improvement plan and/or restructuring. 2. Reports on the pilot selection and process to be given at Curriculum Steering by March of the year following piloting. 3. Recommendations regarding in-cycle curriculum evaluation including review and recommendations on STEP Forms 1-4 and completion of STEP Form 5. (see evaluation forms appendix) 4. Summer writing proposals in years where money is available. 5. Recommended changes to the High School Curriculum Handbook. 6. Out-of-cycle curriculum requests. VERTICAL TEAMS: Membership includes a minimum of one teacher per building in each fundamental learning area. The Teams function under the direction of the curriculum coordinators in: 1. Reviewing state goals and standards in the fundamental learning areas, District curriculum, materials and equipment, staff development needs, and student achievement. 2. Providing support to principals and teachers in their roles of planning, implementing, assessing, and monitoring the curriculum on their campuses. 3. Ensuring articulation between grade levels and among the various subjects within the curriculum. 4. Promoting a climate which nurtures and enhances the professional growth of the staff. 5. Supporting the implementation of a staff development plan to assist teachers in promoting higher levels of student achievement. 6. Establishing and facilitating the Subject Area Curriculum Steering Committees. SUBJECT AREA CURRICULUM STEERING COMMITTEES: Membership includes at least one teacher from each PreK-8 grade level, and one teacher from each high school level. These committees function under the direction of the curriculum coordinators in: 1. Completing the training and activities necessary to complete Forms 1, 2, and 3 of the evaluation process during YEAR 1. (see evaluation forms appendix) 2. Completing Form 4 of the evaluation process as well as choosing pilot material during YEAR 2 of the adoption cycle. (see evaluation forms appendix) 3. Choosing curriculum materials and facilitating piloting based on pilot recommendation during YEAR 3 of the adoption cycle. 4. Facilitation adoption procedures and acting as building liaisons for trouble-shooting during YEAR 4 of the adoption cycle. 5. Gathering and evaluating information on adoption implementation in YEARS 5 and 6 of the adoption cycle.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION The Board supports an active program of curriculum development in order to provide currently valid instructional plans and to take advantage of improved teaching methods and materials. The educational program must be responsive to the rapid expansion of knowledge, to technological developments, and to social change. Existing programs must be continuously reviewed and reformed or revised to more effectively meet the needs of students and the expectations of the community. Curriculum evaluation provides information which helps make program decisions by identifying strengths that should be maintained or enhanced, and by identifying specific needs that should be addressed. Curriculum evaluation reports will serve to inform the Board and public about the nature of the program as well as the level of student achievement. The responsibility for curriculum development is shared by all members of the professional staff. However, recognizing that specialized training and experience, as well as sufficient time and resources, are required to keep abreast of relevant changes and promising developments, the Superintendent, administrative staff, District level curriculum staff and related committees will be responsible for the following: Identifying and evaluating trends in curriculum and sharing this knowledge with professional staff. Monitoring the operation of the instructional program and working with staff in problem areas. Providing leadership and/or counsel in District curriculum studies. GENERAL PROCEDURES FOR CURRICULUM WRITING The procedures to follow when writing or reviewing curriculum for individual courses or segments of a subject area are as follows: 1. Identify the Districts educational goals which align with the State and National Standards in each Fundamental Learning Area and/or course. 2. Review the essential questions and enduring understandings at each grade/department level by: a. Adding, deleting, clarifying, and restating as needed. b. Assuring scope and sequence by checking the preceding and succeeding grade level descriptors. 3. Specify assessment techniques to determine level of student mastery of outcomes/ descriptors. 4. Determine materials and equipment that may be used for the subject course (i.e., textbooks, supplementary materials, consumables, etc). 5. Identify instructional methods and procedures that would be appropriate for the course/subject area. 6. Define approximate time allocation for units within a course. 7. Determine staff development needs to prepare staff for successful implementation. 8. Review for sequential curriculum and evaluation procedures by: Amending curriculum in order to integrate outcomes, delete repetitions, identify gaps in sequential development, and assign high school course weight, if applicable.

Matching outcomes with standardized tests, College Readiness Standards, State and National Standards for learning, District common assessments , and District curriculum goals at each grade level whenever possible. Submitting change proposals to appropriate committees. Providing teacher in-service. Implementing the curriculum. Evaluating and reviewing the curriculum in accordance with the District Curriculum Development and Evaluation Guide. BUDGET The District budget is needs based. The budget development process will utilize appropriate planning and budgeting strategies that support the Districts curriculum philosophy, beliefs, and learning objectives. Budget development will be based upon the need to: 1. Close the achievement gap. 2. Provide professional development. 3. Fund expenditures according to federal, state, and District accountability expectations. 4. Align expenditures to support curriculum evaluation and adoption as warranted by the curricular areas position on the curriculum evaluation and adoption cycle. CURRICULUM ADOPTION AND EVALUATION CYCLE: The Six-Year Cycle for Curriculum Study provides for a review of a total subject area once in a six-year period. All levels, PreK-5, 6-8, 9-12 will be studied at one time to provide continuity and vertical articulation in planning and decision-making. This procedure assures that all aspects of a subject will be updated at a specified time. Specific building needs and concerns should be articulated during the evaluations training process conducted by the Steering Team for Evaluation of Programs (STEP) in Year 1 of evaluation. The intent of the curriculum decision-making process is to integrate building needs with the District needs. All curricula will be formally evaluated on an identified cycle to ensure: Efficient use of District resources. Informed decisions based on valid data. Program and service alignment with District goals. Effective instruction of all students. A systematic approach to evaluation of programs and services. Accountability to all stakeholders. A collaboratively developed plan for District and school improvement. The decision-making process considers the following factors: Vertical and horizontal articulation across all levels. Mandates associated with the school recognition process. Coordination and clarification with site-based decision making. Recommendations set forth in the Districts Strategic Plan for the continuation of an adoption cycle. Incorporation of all disciplines including special education, gifted, Title I, ESL/Bilingual, technology, alternative education, etc. Establishment of broad-based involvement of staff, students (at the secondary level), and parents. 8

Encouragement of grant writing to support programs. Support of integration and/or the interdisciplinary connection among the various disciplines. Correlation with District performance indicators and state standards. Reduction of politics and policies that may hinder the process. Support for providing flexible planning time for teachers who are involved in the decisionmaking process. The following continuous cycle is used to revise, improve, and keep current the Districts curriculum. On-going Tasks: The Six-Year Cycle for Curriculum Study is a continuous process of information gathering which includes the following activities each year: Research on national trends, state goals and mandates. Review and revision of current District curriculum and assessment. Analysis of District progress in respect to student achievement. Attending state and national conferences and conducting site visits as needed. In addition to on-going tasks, the following specific tasks are addressed and emphasized within the Six-Year Cycle for Curriculum Study: Year One: Completing Forms 1, 2, and 3 of Curriculum Evaluation (see evaluation forms appendix) o Completing training by Steering Team for Evaluation of Programs (STEP) (Deadline: mid-September) o Developing evaluation methods and instruments. o Distributing evaluation instruments and evaluation of other data-gathering methodology as needed Presentation Forms 1, 2, and 3 of Curriculum Evaluation delivered to Curriculum Steering Committee, prior to distribution of any surveys or completion of data-gathering, as information and discussion items (Deadline : February or March meeting of Curriculum Steering Committee) Year Two: Completing Form 4 of Curriculum Evaluation (see evaluation forms appendix) Presenting Form 4 to Curriculum Steering Committee for approval (Deadline: October meeting of Curriculum Steering Committee) and subsequent completion of STEP form 5 by Curriculum Steering Committee. Developing curriculum based on findings of evaluation process Submitting pilot course descriptions for courses new to the curriculum Reviewing curriculum materials for possible pilot: o Developing a list of preview materials to review with the Curriculum Director o Consulting with teachers for materials recommendations. Selecting pilot materials and pilot staff. Scheduling of pilots - to be ready for adoption by March of Year Three Identification of appropriate staff and professional development needed for implementation. Identification of additional summer writing needs. Year Three: 9

Monitoring pilots and staff development. o Providing support to teachers who may be able to implement some new curriculum without new material o Providing timely vertical and horizontal communication o Completing pilot evaluation instruments to determine which materials best match our curriculum needs. Presenting itemized recommendations for adoption of curriculum and curricular materials to Curriculum Steering Committee. (Deadline: February Curriculum Steering Meeting for presentation to Board at March meeting) Year Four: Monitoring adoption implementation. o Providing support to teachers. o Providing timely vertical and horizontal communication Recommending/modifying staff development opportunities. Revising curriculum guides as needed. Year Five: Monitoring adoptions and staff development activities o Providing support to teachers o Providing timely vertical and horizontal communication Providing analysis of the impact of the curriculum adoption on student performance Year Six: Monitoring adoptions and staff development activities o Providing support to teachers o Providing timely vertical and horizontal communication Providing - analysis of the impact of the curriculum adoption on student performance Making preparations for Year One by attending orientation for the Curriculum Evaluation Procedure with the Steering Team for Evaluation of Program (STEP) Informal evaluation of programs will be continuous. Formal evaluation in addition to the six-year cycle may be planned to assess portions of the curriculum. The Board of Education, Superintendent, Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity, Directors of Curriculum, and school improvement teams may also request more frequent evaluations. For example, a school may want to target a particular population and compare achievement levels before and after a particular curriculum revision. Other variables which impact student achievement and which could be considered for evaluation either by a building or the District might include: Instructional techniques Student attitudes toward learning Self-perception as it relates to achievement Allocation of time in the classroom Effect of parent involvement Effect of extra curricular student involvement Cost effectiveness

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Six-Year Cycle for Curriculum Study 2010 - 2011


PE / Health / Safety Driver Ed (Cycle Year 4)

2011 - 2012
PE / Health / Safety / Driver Ed Music / Band / Strings Art Home Economics Drama Performing Arts Consumer Ed. Business Ed. *Voc Ed. (Cycle Year 5) Science (Cycle Year 4) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 3) Math (Cycle Year 2) Social Studies (Cycle Year 1) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 6)

2012 - 2013
PE / Health / Safety / Driver Ed Music / Band / Strings Art Home Economics Drama Performing Arts Consumer Ed. Business Ed. *Voc Ed. (Cycle Year 6) Science (Cycle Year 5) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 4) Math (Cycle Year 3) Social Studies (Cycle Year 2) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 1)

2013 - 2014
PE / Health / Safety / Driver Ed Music / Band / Strings Art Home Economics Drama Performing Arts Consumer Ed. Business Ed. *Voc Ed. (Cycle Year 1) Science (Cycle Year 6) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 5) Math (Cycle Year 4) Social Studies (Cycle Year 3) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 2)

2014 - 2015
PE / Health / Safety / Driver Ed Music / Band / Strings Art Home Economics Drama Performing Arts Consumer Ed. Business Ed. *Voc Ed. (Cycle Year 2) Science (Cycle Year 1) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 6) Math (Cycle Year 5) Social Studies (Cycle Year 4) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 3)

2015 - 16
PE / Health / Safety / Driver Ed Music / Band / Strings Art Home Economics Drama Performing Arts Consumer Ed. Business Ed. *Voc Ed. (Cycle Year 3) Science (Cycle Year 2) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 1) Math (Cycle Year 6) Social Studies (Cycle Year 5) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 4)

Science (Cycle Year 3) World Languages Instructional Technology (Cycle Year 2) Math (Cycle Year 1) Social Studies (Cycle Year 6) Language Arts Reading English (Cycle Year 5)

Every six years, in the absence of changes in curriculum procedures, the cycles will repeat. NOTE: Special Education, Bilingual/ESL, and Gifted and Talented Education will parallel the same content areas and time frame as the District plan. *Vocational Education/Technology includes all vocational education courses in the vocational education strand as well as those courses listed under Industrial Technology

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GUIDELINES FOR CURRICULUM PILOTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SELECTION The Superintendent of Schools is responsible for the selection of material in accordance with the policies of the Board of Education. The authority for this function is assigned to the Curriculum Director(s), under the general supervision of the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity. Instructional materials for use in the Districts schools are selected by professionally trained staff members and appropriate administrative and supervisory personnel. Final recommendations for purchase made to the Board of Education rest with the Superintendent of Schools. A 30-day waiting period is observed between the Superintendents recommendation and Boards adoption. At the time of the Superintendents recommendation, instructional materials will be made available for public examination and comment. Selection and Evaluation of Instructional Materials The primary responsibility in selecting instructional materials is to identify those materials that best fit the needs of the Districts curriculum as related to students. The alignment is done by matching a buildings documented needs with the characteristics of the instructional materials (e.g., textbook, software, etc.). Part of this process may or may not involve a formal piloting of materials. PILOTING INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS FOR AN EXISTING COURSE Selection of instructional materials that could replace or be in addition to current materials will follow these guidelines: 1. Funds to pilot within the adoption cycle will be provided by the District in year 3 of the adoption cycle; pilots related to curriculum outside of the adoption cycle will, in most circumstances, be the responsibility of the piloting building. 2. The acquisition and return of pilot materials within the adoption cycle will occur as a result of the cooperative efforts of the Curriculum Directors, District Coordinators, and interested teachers. The acquisition and return of pilot materials outside of the adoption cycle will be the responsibility of the person(s) requesting the pilot. 3. Pilot materials may be utilized for one or two semesters. a. Out-of-Cycle Adoption Curriculum Requests Improvements and/or innovative practices such as modifications and development of curriculum materials, minor content revisions, pilot requests, and/or grant opportunities, etc., which do not alter the Districts curricula and/or restructuring/school improvement needs, may be considered for adoption outside the curriculum development cycle. These may occur as a result of building-level school improvement/restructuring activities and/or the result of a grant opportunity. i. Submit the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix PP.23-24) to the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design and the Curriculum Steering Committee for approval. Upon determination of the proposals feasibility, the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design will submit the request to the Curriculum Steering Committee and complete the Checklist for Rating a Curriculum Pilot Request (see Appendix PP. 25-26). As a result of that review, the Curriculum Steering Committee may either ask for a resubmission with further information, or approve the proposal. ii. At the conclusion of the approved pilot, person(s) piloting the materials should complete and submit to the Director of Curriculum and the Curriculum Steering Committee: 12

1. Instructional Materials Analysis form (see Appendix sample p. 29) 2. Curriculum/Course Change or Addition Request form (see Appendix pp. 3032) if recommending the pilot become a permanent addition to the curriculum. 3. If approved, purchases are the responsibility of the building. b. In-Cycle Adoption Curriculum Requests - It is the intent of the Champaign Schools to provide the necessary instructional materials to implement the curriculum. Textbook and supplementary material adoptions will be made every six years, utilizing the procedures outlined in this document i.e., a recommendation from the Adoption Committees to the Curriculum Steering Committee to the Deputy Superintendent of Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and to the Superintendent and Board of Education. i. For new courses implemented as the result of in-cycle evaluation (e.g. not an existing revised course) submit the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix pp.23-24) to the Curriculum Steering Committee for approval. If a course seeks honor point designation, requests must also include the Application for Honors Designation form (see Appendix p. 32). ii. At the conclusion of the approved pilot, person(s) piloting the materials should complete and submit to the Directors of Curriculum and the Curriculum Steering Committee: 1. Instructional Materials Analysis form (see Appendix sample p. 29 and directions below) 2. Curriculum/Course Change or Addition Request form (see Appendix pp. 30-32) if recommending that pilot materials become a permanent addition to the curriculum. Instructional Materials Analysis forms An Instructional Materials Analysis form should consider the following for each reviewed set of materials: 1. Degree to which the materials meet the documented needs of the District and buildings in the various curricular areas. 2. Degree to which materials align with the state goals, standards, benchmarks, and with the District's objectives. 3. Degree of effectiveness of the materials relative to the learner. 4. Competency and qualifications of the author(s). 5. Quality of the physical and mechanical features. 6. Appropriateness of the subject matter. The content should avoid bias and prejudice, should stress equal rights and responsibility, and should depict all social groups. 7. Appropriateness for intended grade level both of content and readability. 8. Recommendation of person(s) who piloted course materials, if applicable. In curricular areas that require a large amount of reading, it is strongly recommended that the reading level and source of that evaluation (i.e., publisher, various reading level assessment procedures, etc.) be reported.

ADDING NEW OUT-OF-CYCLE COURSES New curriculum will be instituted in the District only after careful research, study, and planning have been completed. Courses will be added to the curriculum when the need or demand is present and when resources, facilities, and teachers are available. A course is a school offering 13

taught by certified personnel in an institution recognized by the Illinois State Board of Education. A course may be classified as an elective or a requirement. In addition, at the high school level, a course should be recommended for placement within a category of the District's rank-in-class honor point system. Consideration will be given to Illinois Learning Goals and Standards, best practice in the subject area, the success of the course/program if offered in other Districts, and student interest or need. Piloting a New Out-of-Cycle Course All new courses must be piloted. A pilot course is a trial effort of one year, usually limited to a class, grade level, or building to demonstrate whether or not the course is desirable for districtwide or continued building use. When adding courses, the following procedures will apply: 1. a. Teachers, principals, coordinators, or directors will submit to the Curriculum Steering Committee a proposal using the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix pp. 24-25) of the course/program that identifies the following: essential questions and enduring understandings, a pilot time frame, texts, resources, training and equipment needed, and estimated budget to support the course/program needs. Course proposals from the campus level need Building Councils and Principals approval. District-wide proposals need appropriate directors approval. b. The Curriculum Steering Committee will review the request and complete the Checklist for Rating a Curriculum Pilot Request (see Appendix pp.25-26). c. If a course seeks honor point designation, requests must also include the Application for Honors Designation form (see Appendix p. 32). 2. The Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity or his/her designee will take proposals for new courses/programs to the Superintendent and the School Board. If approved, the course will be piloted and monitored for one year. Data will be collected, which includes program impact on student achievement. If the pilot recommendation is that the course/program and supporting pilot materials become a permanent addition to the curriculum, the evaluation data must be presented to a joint meeting of the STEP committee, Curriculum Steering Committee, and the Board for approval. A Curriculum/Course Change or Addition Request (see Appendix pp. 28-30), and an Instructional Materials Analysis form (see sample in Appendix p.27) must also be submitted. If a course seeks honor point designation, requests must also include the Application For Honors Designation form (see Appendix p. 32). At the high school level, the new course is approved for continued implementation. The appropriate coordinators/directors will write a final course description to be included in the student handbook and assign a computer number to the courses. Appropriate coordinators/directors will coordinate development of a curriculum map, budget for course materials, and provide necessary staff development before the program or course is implemented District-wide. 14

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Out-of-cycle adoptions will be formally reviewed with the curriculum in which they appear as part of the six year adoption cycle regardless of the number of years that the out-of-cycle course has been instituted.

TIMELINE FOR TEXTBOOK ADOPTION / COURSE CHANGE FOR OUT-OF-CYCLE ADOPTION Improvements and/or innovative practices which do not alter the Districts goals, outcomes, and objectives may be considered outside the curriculum development cycle. These out-of-cycle adoptions may occur as a result of building-level school improvement/restructuring activities and/or the result of a grant opportunity. Out-of-Cycle Curriculum Change Timeline Pilot Requests for New Courses: September: Two Years Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: Any individual or committee planning to pilot a new course should submit the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix pp. 23-24) for evaluation to: 1) content area chair/building leader 2) District coordinator 3) principal 4) building council *It is the responsibility of the originator of the proposal to shepherd the proposal through the above-delineated routing. Anticipating approval, draft and submit a course description for the Curriculum Handbook identifying the new course as a pilot. October: Two Years Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: The originator of the proposal should submit the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix pp. 23-24), along with the actions taken by the previous evaluators, to the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity who will then route the proposal to the following: 1) Curriculum Directors 2) Curriculum Steering Committee 3) Superintendent November-December: One and One-Half Years Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: The Superintendent will submit the final forms to the Board of Education for consideration and action no later than the April Board Meeting. The originator of a proposal to pilot may wish to submit a proposal for summer writing to the Curriculum Directors by February in anticipation of approval by the Board. August -January: One to One-Half Year Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: Pilot the course and complete the pilot evaluation as identified on the Curriculum Pilot Request form (see Appendix pp. 23-24). If anticipating a recommendation for the course to become a permanent addition to course offerings, draft and submit a course description for the Curriculum Handbook. January: One-Half Year Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: 15

At the conclusion of the approved pilot, person(s) piloting the materials should complete the following forms: a. Instructional Materials Analysis form (see Appendix sample p. 27) b. Curriculum Course Change or Addition Request form (see Appendix pp. 28-30) if recommending that pilot materials become a permanent addition to the curriculum. c. Ordering Information Spreadsheet form (see Appendix p.31) if recommending that pilot materials become a permanent addition to the curriculum. d. If necessary, complete the Application for Honors Designation form and Application for Honors Points Designation form (see Appendix p. 32) and submit these to: 1) content area chair/building leader 2) District coordinator 3) principal 4) building council *It is the responsibility of the originator of the proposal to shepherd the proposal through the above-delineated routing. February: One-Half Year Prior to Proposed New Course/Course Change Implementation: The originator of the proposal should submit the forms, along with the actions taken by the previous evaluators, to the Directors of Curriculum and Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity who will then route the proposal to the following: 1) Curriculum Steering Committee 2) Superintendent - The Superintendent will submit the final forms to the Board of Education for consideration and action no later than the March Board Meeting.

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ILLINOIS TEXTBOOK LOAN PROGRAM The Illinois State Board of Education, in accordance with Public Act 79-961 of 1975, provides textbooks on a loan basis, "free of charge," to students. In past years, beginning in 1976-77 until 2008, funds were available to purchase books for students at specific grade levels. Textbooks are allocated on the basis of one (1) book per child or a set of books when several books of a series are required at a grade level; i.e., first grade readers are usually packaged in a set of five (5), which represents one book. Each year ISBE indicates which grade levels will be honored for the textbook requests. If the State of Illinois reinstates the purchase program, the basic regulations to be followed are: 1. All textbooks, both hard and softbound, are acceptable, while consumable items and learning systems are ineligible. 2. All textbooks received by the District remain the property of the State of Illinois and must be identified (stamped) as such by the District. The District must maintain an up-to-date inventory of all state-owned textbooks. The disposal of state-owned textbooks is the responsibility of the District textbook coordinator. 3. All requests for state-funded textbooks must be received in the State office by the State determined deadline. 4. The program permits a school District to request one (1) textbook per student enrolled in the eligible grades. 5. Requested textbooks must be part of a school District's major adoption cycle and be on the state textbook listing published yearly. Due to the deadline date (State determined), any recommendations for textbooks to be requested from the State Board of Education must be given to the Deputy Superintendent and Directors of Curriculum and Instruction two months prior to the State-determined deadline date. Presentation to the Board of Education will occur one month prior to the State-determined deadline date with expected action by the Board in time for the designated deadline.

17

Challenging Instructional Materials Despite the qualifications of the persons who select the materials and the care taken to choose valuable materials for student and teacher use, occasional objections to a selection may be made by the public. 1. Citizens of the school community may register criticism of instructional materials with the Directors of Curriculum or principals, where they may obtain the Challenge of Instructional Materials form (see Appendix pp. 35-37). a. The complaint must be specific as to author, title, publisher, and when relevant, page numbers of items to which objection is being made. b. The statement shall be signed and identification given which will allow a proper reply to be made. The statement shall be filed with the Office of the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and Instruction, 703 South New Street, Champaign. The complaint shall be referred to a committee composed of: a. one senior high school teacher b. one middle school teacher c. one elementary school teacher d. one library media specialist e. one building administrator f. two parent representatives (selected by PTA Council) one Director of Curriculum g. Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity The committee may call in representative persons who might bring particular knowledge and competencies to bear on the specific complaint. The committee will be responsible for: a. reading and examining the materials referred to it as a whole, not passages out of context b. weighing strengths and weaknesses and forming opinions based on selection criteria and relevance to the curriculum as a whole and not passages out of context c. meeting to discuss the material and to prepare a report on it d. notifying complainant of the decision and sending a formal report to the Superintendent. The Superintendent forwards the formal report to the Board of Education. The material may remain in use pending a decision of the committee; however, students may be excused from using the challenged materials at parents' request. An appeal may be made to the Board of Education in the event the complainant is not satisfied with the decision of the committee and the Superintendent. No decisions in regard to the removal of any challenged instructional materials may be made without the approval of the Board of Education.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

18

Objections to Supplemental Texts for Individual Students Champaign Unit 4 provides a formal complaint procedure for citizens to use when objecting to the inclusion of particular materials in the districts general curriculum. (see Challenging Instructional Materials, p.18) Occasionally, however, individual families do not object to the general inclusion of material, but rather to their own childs use of specific supplemental texts. When that occurs, the normal procedure regarding objections is not applicable, and the guidelines outlined below will be followed. 1. Upon request from the parent, teachers will provide a list of primary reading assignments to the parents at the beginning of each semester, as well as a list of texts approved for use in the course. Two weeks after receiving the list, the parent must submit to the teacher the form, Objections to Supplemental Texts for Individual Students (see Appendix p. 38). The parent will submit the form having filled out items up to and including required signatures after the Basis portion. Upon receipt of the form, the teacher will review the districts approved text list for literature which would be similar in genre, time period, and difficulty. The teacher will then meet with the parent and student and offer up to three alternative texts from the district list. At that meeting, the rest of the form Objections to Supplemental Texts for Individual Students will be completed and signed by the parent, student, and teacher. A copy of the form will be given to the Contact Area Chair. In the case of summer reading, the summer reading assignment will be distributed to all students prior to the end of the school year. The parent must notify the principal and/or the Content Area Chair that the summer reading text is not suitable for his/her student by submitting the form, Objections to Supplemental Texts for Individual Students (see Appendix, p. 38) prior to the end of the school year. The form must be filled out up to and including the required signatures after the Basis portion. After submission of the form, the parent and student will be offered three alternative texts for summer reading. The alternative text must be agreed upon by the parent, the student, and the Contact Area Chair prior to the end of the school year. Teachers will not consider objections to texts following the beginning of any particular unit of study which includes the text in question. Students will not be excused from summer reading responsibilities, if the parent has not requested an alternative text prior to the end of the previous school year. Once the texts are approved by the parent, teachers are not required to submit individual assignments, supplemental readings, materials, quizzes, or handouts to the parent for approval. The student will be required to complete the entire unit associated with each text in the same time frame as the rest of the class. Teachers are not required to communicate with any particular parent concerning the day-today details of the content of a course beyond the contact that teacher would normally have with all parents concerning student performance or course work.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

19

SUMMER WRITING APPLICATION PROCEDURES Summer writing time is available for in-cycle adoption curriculum, pilot curriculum, and out-of cycle new curriculum. Priority will be given to in-cycle adoption curriculum. The application form is in the Appendix under Summer Writing Proposal. The following timeline needs to be taken into consideration when submitting an application: January Applications available from Directors of Curriculum February Applications due mid-February March Review of all proposals by a subcommittee of the Curriculum Steering Committee April Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and/or Superintendent presents recommended proposals to Board as an information item April Proposal initiators notified as to Board action April Summer writing positions advertised May Participants for Summer Writing selected June-August Summer Writing October Directors of Curriculum sends reminder that results of assessment plan or narrative of progress on assessment plan is due by mid-January Summer writing applicants need to continue to work to provide information on their assessment plan throughout the year following their summer writing. Assessment plans might involve rubrics, objective tests, checklists, portfolio items, etc., which can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of your project as it relates to student learning and/or instructional delivery. If the assessment component can be evaluated by the end of the first semester, the results should be submitted to the Directors of Curriculum by mid-January. If the evaluation must be ongoing throughout the academic year, a narrative summarizing the progress of the assessment/evaluation should be submitted to the Directors of Curriculum by mid-January and the final evaluation should be submitted by the end of the academic year. Projects which have, in the past, been awarded summer writing monies but do not submit the assessment component the following year will not be awarded future monies. In times of fiscal duress, summer writing projects will be limited to the subject areas that are in Years 2 and 3 of the adoption cycle. Other projects will be funded at the discretion of the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity. Routing Procedure: 1. Building principal(s) 2. Directors of Curriculum 3. Curriculum Steering Subcommittee 4. Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity 5. Superintendent 6. Board of Education

20

TIME FRAME FOR CURRICULUM DECISIONS Adoptions: State Textbook Money ...............Funding deadlines vary year-to-year 1. Approval by Curriculum Steering Committee 3 months prior to deadline. 2. Information to Board one month later 3. Action by Board two months after approval 4. Submit online to ISBE by deadline 5. Distribution list to Servicenter Adoptions: Local Money........................................................................................September to May 1. Adoption requests due to Directors of Curriculum in January 2. Materials approved by Curriculum Steering Committee in February 3. Informational item to Board in March with action in April 4. Order materials/invoice after July 1 Pilots.......................................................................................................................September to April 1. Pilot requests approved by Curriculum Steering Committee by February 2. Informational item to Board in March 3. Action by Board in April Summer Curriculum Writing.................................................................................September to April 1. Summer writing proposals submitted and reviewed in February 2. Summer writing proposals approved by Curriculum Steering Committee in March 3. Information to Board in April 4. Action by Board in April 5. Post positions in April 6. Hire and notify personnel in May 7. Prepare report of summer writing for September Board of Education meeting Publication: HS Profile Sheet...September to October 1. Update annually and send to colleges and universities with student transcripts. Each high school principal updates the previous year's sheets. Publications: SIP (School Improvement Plan)...April to November 8 1. Give necessary information to principals in April to August. 2. Individual SIPs due to Director of Curriculum in time for Board approval prior to ISBE submission. 3. Due to the Board of Education as determined by ISBE deadlines. End of the Year Report: Education to Careers.June 1 to June 30 1. Request from data processing the lst quarter and 3rd quarter student enrollment by class list and 2. Send report to ROE by due date (June 30). Textbook Inventory Lists: Elementary, Middle, and High School.January to May 1. Add new adoptions. 2. Delete replaced texts. 21

Course Changes: High School..September to December 1. Changes discussed and approved by principals and Curriculum Steering Committee by October Curriculum Steering meeting to meet next curriculum handbook deadline. 2. Tied to the curriculum handbook schedule. 3. Informational item to Board of Education in November with action in December. Publication: High School Curriculum Handbook................................................November to June 4 1. Throughout the year, areas under study under the curriculum adoption calendar prepare changes for the following year's handbook. 2. Changes are brought to the Curriculum Steering Committee after they have been reviewed and approved by principals, buildings, departments or grade levels. 3. Changes are due in October to early November to Director of Curriculum. 4. Informational item to Board in November/action in December. 5. Printed in December and distributed to the buildings after the winter holiday.

22

APPENDIX

23

CURRICULUM PILOT REQUEST


Submit to the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum and the Curriculum Steering Committee for Approval.

1. Curricular Area: ____________________________________________________________ 2. Course Title: _______________________________________________________________ 3. Course No.: ________________________________________________________________ 4. Grade Level(s): _____________________________________________________________ 5. Semester: __________________________________________________________________ 6. Building: __________________________________________________________________ 7. Name of Contact Person: _____________________________________________________ 8. Proposed Pilot Start-End Time: _________________________________________________

Centennial
Date Submitted Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council __________ __________ __________ __________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______ Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council

Central
Date Submitted _________ _________ _________ _________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______

24

Part A: Documentation of Proposed Curricular Changes

1. What is the rationale for and goals of this proposal? (Please include as much quantifiable information as is available; e.g., needs assessment, test scores, etc.) 2. What are the essential questions and enduring understandings of this pilot? 3. Describe how this curriculum will support curriculum/program initiatives (e.g., school improvement, restructuring, etc) and best practices. (Within the description, please cite specific state and national goals and alignment to curriculum maps and District Strategic Plan.) 4. What student population will be served by this proposal? (Please include an estimate of the number of students impacted by this proposal.) What specific changes will be made to the curriculum? How will these changes affect current district level curriculum and, if applicable, how will the changes more effectively deliver current District level curriculum? What are the course prerequisites (FOR NEW COURSES ONLY)? If applicable, attach an Application for Honors Level Designation form . How and when will this information be shared with other staff to be impacted by this change?

5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

10. Proposed dates for implementation:

Part C: Evaluation of Pilot Curriculum

Describe the process (formative and summative evaluation) by which you intend to assess the effectiveness of the goals set forth in this pilot (refer to Part A). Include your timeline; also include factors that you will consider as evidence of curriculum betterment and impact on student achievement. Examples of this evidence could include student grade improvement, teacher, student, and parent feedback, etc.

25

Part D: Pilot Cost Analysis Estimates

Please be specific as possible; include numbers, amounts of time, etc. wherever possible. (Please note that, in most cases, out-of-cycle adoptions will have to provide their own funding.) Number/Amount Staff: Current Staff: Additional Textbooks Supplementary Material(s) Equipment/Supplies Staff Development Summer Writing Source of Funding: (Please include and grant funds to be used and indicate grant renewability.) Maintenance Costs: Unit Cost Total

26

Application for Curriculum Pilot Proposal Rating Rubric


ADEQUATE 1. All required signatures present 2. Verification of routing submissions and approval present. 3. State and national goals, District Strategic Plan, and curriculum guides connected by narrative to proposal. 1. Clear data-driven description of population served and numbers impacted by proposal. 2. Proposed curriculum changes clearly defined and tied to impact on current curriculum. 3. Course prerequisites identified and rationale substantiated 4. Honors level application submitted with score of 20. 5. Plan for necessary information dissemination and inservicing present along with proposed dates for completion. 1. Plan for assessment process complete with timelines and list of multiple instruments which will be used to determine success of pilot clearly identified. 1. Cost analysis complete on all items. COST ANALYSIS INADEQUATE 1. One or more signatures missing. 2. All information in top box is not filled in 3. Narrative of connection to one or more required areas not present or inadequate. 1. Data either missing, unsubstantiated, or not relevant. 2. Lack of or unclear defined curriculum changes and/or unsubstantiated impact assessment 3. One or both elements missing or incomplete. 4. Score of less than 20 on application rubric 5. One or more aspects of information necessary to implementation not submitted or incomplete. 1. One or more aspects of assessment process not submitted or incomplete. (Please note that success of the pilot cannot rest solely on records of student grade performance.) 1. One or more items regarding funding not addressed. 2. Source of funding for out-ofcycle adoptions not identified.

PROCEDURE

DOCUMENTATION OF PROPOSED CURRICULAR CHANGES

EVALUATION PLAN

27

Checklist for Rating A Curriculum Pilot Request


Recommendation of Reviewer(s): Accept Resubmit

Name(s) and Title(s) of Reviewer(s): __________________________________________ __________________________________________ Directions:


This sheet should be attached to the front of the Curriculum Pilot Request form by the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity upon submission. The Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity will route the proposal to the appropriate person/committee. All items on this proposal must be checked adequate upon review using the Application for Curriculum Pilot Proposal Rating Rubric (p. 26) and the Application for Honors Level Proposal Rating Rubric (p. 35) where applicable. If any items are checked inadequate, the proposal will be returned to the originator for resubmission.

1.

Proposal states the curriculum area affected. Adequate Inadequate

Reason for Inadequate rating:

2.

Verification of routing submissions and approvals present. Adequate Inadequate

Reason for Inadequate rating:

3.

Narrative of proposal is clearly communicated and all of the following are fully developed. Part A. Documentation: Reason for Inadequate rating: Adequate Inadequate

28

Part B. Proposed Curricular Change: Reason for Inadequate rating:

Adequate

Inadequate

Part C. Assessments:

Adequate

Inadequate

Reason for Inadequate rating:

Part D. Pilot Cost Estimates: Reason for Inadequate rating:

Adequate

Inadequate

4. FOR HIGH SCHOOL APPLICATIONS ONLY Application for Honors Level Designation* Adequate Inadequate

Reason for Inadequate rating:

*Please note: Attaching taxonomy levels to essential questions and enduring understandings is imperative to upper level critical thinking demanded in any honors level curriculum guide. Even though essential questions and enduring understandings inherently employ inquiry, there must be a clear connection to the various types of upper level critical thinking involved in the curriculum design for the proposed course to receive honors level designation.

29

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS ANALYSIS


Submit to the Directors of Curriculum and the Curriculum Steering Committee.
(Other material analysis forms or additions may be submitted in lieu of this form at the discretion of the Pilot Adoption Committee)

Curricular Area___________________________________ Date ______________________ Evaluator____________________________________ Grade(s) ___________________________________ Please complete the following analysis by using the rating scale below: 1 weak; 2 adequate; 3 good; 4 superior Areas of Analysis
1. Degree to which the materials meet the documented needs of the district and buildings in the various curricular areas. Degree to which materials align with the State goals, standards, and benchmarks, and with the District objectives. Appropriateness of the scope, spiraling, and sequencing. Degree of active engagement, motivating, and challenging lessons and activities Degree of effectiveness of the materials relative to the learner. Degree of teacher support for assessment, differentiation, and materials use. Degree to which materials are student-friendly and comprehensive. Quality of physical and mechanical features.

School______________________

Publisher Rating
Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence:

Publisher Rating
Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence:

Publisher Rating
Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence: Low High 1 2 3 4 Evidence:

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

Overall rating of this program

*Note: The areas of analysis can be revised to address the specific and priority goals and components of a subject area/program. See guidelines on p.13 of the Curriculum Development and Evaluation Guide

30

The following material is recommended for adoption:

Curriculum/Course Change or Addition Request Form


This form is intended for out-of-cycle requests which have already completed a pilot year and are requesting adoption or for courses new to a curricular area during the in-cycle adoption process. Submit completed form and attachments to Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and Directors of Curriculum at the conclusion of the pilot or prior to in-cycle adoption process.

1. Curricular Area: ____________________________________________________________ 2. Course Title: _______________________________________________________________ 3. Course No.: ________________________________________________________________ 4. Grade Level(s): _____________________________________________________________ 5. Semester: __________________________________________________________________ 6. Building: __________________________________________________________________ 7. Name of Contact Person: _____________________________________________________ 8. Proposed Pilot Start-End Time: _________________________________________________

Centennial
Date Submitted Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council __________ __________ __________ __________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______ Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council

Central
Date Submitted _________ _________ _________ _________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______

31

Part A: Documentation of Proposed Curricular Changes


1. What is the rationale for and goals of this proposal? (Please include as much quantifiable information as is available; e.g., needs assessment, test scores, summative evaluation of the pilot, etc.) What are the essential questions and enduring understandings of this pilot? Describe how this program will support curriculum/program initiatives and best practices. What student population will be served by this proposal? (Please include an estimate of the number of students impacted by this proposal.) What specific changes were made to the curriculum? (Please submit documentation of those changes.) What are the course prerequisites (FOR NEW COURSES ONLY)? When and how was this change shared with other staff to be impacted by this change? Was there any staff feedback which will need to be addressed and how will these concerns be resolved? Proposed dates for implementation:

2. 3.

4.

5.

6. 7.

8.

Part C: Resources Needed for Implementation


Cost Estimates Please be specific as possible; include numbers, amounts of time, etc. wherever possible.
(For textbooks, equipment, supplemental materials, etc.)

Number/Amount Staff: Current Staff: Additional Textbooks Supplementary Material(s) Equipment/Supplies Staff Development Summer Writing

Unit Cost

Total

32

Source of Funding: (Please include and grant funds to be used and indicate grant renewability.) Maintenance Costs:

Part D: Evaluation
Describe the process by which you assessed the pilot curriculum, Please include the instruments used for the evaluation and a narrative of the results obtained from the evaluation instruments.

Part E: Attachments

To this document, please attach the following: a copy of the course curriculum guide(s) the Instructional Materials Analysis form used in the pilot (if applicable) a summative narrative describing the assessments and assessment process which will be used to analyze the effectiveness of the curricular change (If this course was piloted, this evaluation must be specifically related to the assessment/evaluation proposed on the Pilot Request form.) evaluation instruments used for determining curriculum impact on student performance If applicable, an Application for Honors Level Designation form with a committee- reviewed grade of 20. High School only: Course description for inclusion in the High School Curriculum Handbook After review and approval of this form by the Curriculum Steering Committee, out-of-cyle adoption requests will become part of the curriculum and will join the rest of the curriculum on the 6-Year Adoption Cycle. In-cycle adoption requests will be brought to Curriculum Steering as information item only.

33

APPLICATION FOR HONORS LEVEL DESIGNATION


Submit to the Directors of Curriculum and the Curriculum Steering Committee.

1. Curricular Area: ____________________________________________________________ 2. Course Title: _______________________________________________________________ 3. Course No.: ________________________________________________________________ 4. Grade Level(s): _____________________________________________________________ 5. Semester: __________________________________________________________________ 6. Building: __________________________________________________________________ 7. Name of Contact Person: _____________________________________________________ 8. Proposed Pilot Start-End Time: _________________________________________________

Centennial
Date Submitted Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council __________ __________ __________ __________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______ Content Area Chair / Building Leader District Coordinator Principal Building Council

Central
Date Submitted _________ _________ _________ _________ Date Approved _________ _________ _________ _________ Initials ______ ______ ______ ______

34

1.

Submit and clearly define the critical thinking taxonomy (eg., Bloom, Sternberg) which drives the identification of all levels of critical thinking skills used to write this course/design this curriculum. Attaching taxonomy levels to essential questions and enduring understandings is imperative to upper level critical thinking demanded in any honors level curriculum guide. Even though essential questions and enduring understandings inherently employ inquiry, there must be a clear connection to the various types of upper level critical thinking involved in the curriculum design for the proposed course to receive honors level designation. Provide the Essential Questions and Enduring Understandings required by this course/curriculum. Identify those EQs/EUs which require higher level thinking skills. (Please see Application for Honors Level Proposal Rating Rubric (p. 34) for further definition of higher level.) Of the total number of goals in the course, what percentage of the goals require only higher level critical thinking skills? Approximately what percentage of the work involved in the course will be done outside of class time? Describe the student assessment plan (formative and summative) for this course, and connect the assessment plan to the level(s) of the taxonomy listed above. Attach one example of a student assessment which will validate a Honors Level designation for this course.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services & Equity Application Approved_____ Denied_____

35

Application for Honors Level Proposal Rating Rubric


PROCEDURE 1 All required signatures not present One of three elements of description is missing 2 3 4 5 All required signatures present Taxonomy for critical thinking identified and defined; all EQs and EUs attached to levels of taxonomy; at least 80% of EQs/EUs attached to top 2 levels of taxonomy

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS AND ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS/ TAXONOMIES

One of three elements of description is incomplete

Taxonomy for critical thinking identified and defined; all EQs and EUs attached to levels of taxonomy; some but less than 40% of EQs/EUs attached to top 2 levels of taxonomy References work that will be done outside of class.

Taxonomy for critical thinking identified and defined; all EQs and EUs attached to levels of taxonomy; less than 80% but greater than 40% of EQs/EUs attached to top 2 levels of taxonomy

WORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS

Information not included

STUDENT ASSESSMENT PLAN

No assessment plan

Assessment plan present but insufficient; not clearly tied to curricular design

Assessment plan not sufficient but vague connection to honors level curricular design

Assessment plan clear but not clearly tied to honors level curricular design

Clearly defines the type of work that will be done outside of class and estimates the time that the assignment(s) will take Assessment plan complete and clearly ties to honors level curricular design

Scoring
PROCEDURE ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS AND ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS/ TAXONOMIES WORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS STUDENT ASSESSMENT PLAN

____________/5
A score of 20 will be required for honors points designation; scores of 15-19 may be returned to the applicant for refinement and the possibility of earning 20 points, but there is a possibility that a delay in completing the process would delay the pilot for one year.

____________/5

Total Score ___________

___________/5 ___________/5

36

CHALLENGE OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIAL


Submit form to the Office of the Deputy Superintendent for Curriculum Design, Educational Services and Equity and Instruction, 703 South New Street, Champaign

INITIATED BY:
(Name) (Address) (Phone)

REPRESENTING: Self: Organization or Group:


(Name)

School: MATERIALS QUESTIONED: Print Material: Author: Copyright Date: AV Material:


(Title and Type: film, video, filmstrip, record, etc.)

Title: Publisher:

Other Material:

Title: ________________________________________________________ Identify: ____________________________________________________

37

Please respond to the questions on the next page. If sufficient space is not provided, please use an additional sheet of paper. 1. To what in the material do you object (please be specific: cite pages or sections)?

2.

What value do you see in the material?

3.

What do you feel might be the influence of this material?

4.

For what age group would you recommend this material?

5.

Did you study the entire work?

Yes

No What page or section?

6.

Are you aware of the judgment of this material by critics?

7.

Are you aware of the educational purpose of using this material?

8.

What do you believe is the theme or purpose of this material?

9.

What recourse do you seek?

10. What material would you recommend in its place that would convey as valuable a picture and perspective on a society or a set of values?

(Signature of Complainant) (Policy 620R, Approved 6/13/05)

(Date)

38

Objections to Supplemental Texts for Individual Students


INITIATED BY:___________________________________________________
(Name) (Address) (Phone)

SUPPLEMENTAL TEXT FOR WHICH ALTERNATIVE IS REQUESTED: Author: ______________________________________________ Title: ________________________________________________ BASIS FOR REQUEST: (Please be as specific as possible about the reason(s) for this request.) ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ Signature of Parent ____________________________________________________ Signature of Student ___________________________________________________ Date received by teacher ________________________________________________ ALTERNATIVE TEXTS SUGGESTED: 1) ___________________________________
(Title)

____________________________
(Author)

2) ___________________________________
(Title)

____________________________
(Author)

3) ___________________________________
(Title)

____________________________
(Author)

Please circle the number of the alternative text which has been agreed to by the parent, student, and teacher and sign below. Signature of Parent ______________________________________________ Signature of Student _____________________________________________ Signature of Teacher _____________________________________________ Signature of CAC (summer reading alternative only) ___________________ Date of agreement _______________________________________________

39

Summer Writing Proposal


Submit this cover sheet and your proposal to the Director of Curriculum. Directions: On a separate sheet of paper and using the same format as below, respond to the following prompts. Please note that all projects require an assessment component; the final project requires an evaluation instrument which will be used to measure the effectiveness of the summer writing project when it is implemented into the curriculum. No summer writing will be paid until all parts of the project are submitted to the Director of Curriculum. The funding of your project will depend on the score your application receives as a result of its rating on the attached rubric. 1. Project Title 2. Focus a. State goal(s)/standard(s)/benchmark(s) addressed by your project b. Local goal(s) addressed by your project c. Rationale (e.g., data which supports need for project) 3. Project Description a. Short summary of project which is no more than two typed pages and which includes status of project in relation to adoption cycle (e.g., year 1, year 2, etc.) b. Number of students who will be impacted and projected impact on student performance c. How you will share your project and with whom 4. Expenditures a. Number of participants b. Duration of project c. Estimates cost (please note that there is a $1000 limit per course/subject area) 5. Assessment Component Plan a. Identify procedures that will serve as evidence of student learning and/or instructional delivery as a result of your project. b. Identify all curricular indicators that should be served by this assessment. *Results of assessment gathered during the subsequent academic year should be submitted to the Director of Assessment on or before: _________________ Contact Person: Building: Phone: Email: Signature of Building Principal: All applications for summer writing are due in the Office of the Directors of Curriculum by _______________________________.

40

GREAT SCHOOLS TOGETHER STRATEGIC PLAN


D. Strategic Goals, Actions and Measures I. Student Achievement and Well-Being
Goal: Foster high academic achievement, wellness and well-being among all learners in a safe, supportive environment Short-term actions A. Establish a uniform, proactive approach regarding behavior/discipline in the District that emphasizes positive models, desired behaviors, and family involvement B. Provide more in-depth solutions to recurring and serious behavior problems C. Implement a bullying prevention program D. Make procedures and criteria for identifying and serving special education and gifted students transparent to professionals and families E. Offer choices for special education and gifted students with regard to program placement, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach F. Promote engagement and active learning for all students through the use of differentiated instruction, hands-on learning, project based instruction and field trips G. Implement programs that teach students practical work and life skills H. Expand programming focusing on career and technical exploration I. Improve nutrition in breakfast and lunch programs and vending machines J. Conduct, analyze, and utilize the data from the graduating senior survey developed at the U of I Mid-term actions A. Offer foreign language as a core component by introducing foreign language instruction in K-5 and increase the number of languages offered in the middle and high schools B. Expand after-school enrichment and tutoring programs in all schools C. Introduce computer technology and research at earlier grade levels and integrate it into daily activities and lessons K-12 D. Strengthen programs for gifted and special education children E. Increase the number and variety of honors classes at middle and high school levels and establish bridge programs to enable more students to take them F. Keep students engaged over the summer with a variety of programs G. Increase the number of trained medical professionals H. Work with Public Health District to offer students their required immunizations on site I. Assist parents in obtaining foundational skills so they can assist their children J. Partner with early intervention programs to identify children most at-risk, establish transitions from the 3-5 program, and offer transition planning earlier for those graduating from high school K. Optimize class size to foster academic achievement L. Adopt an accelerated school community approach which will enhance learning for all children, by incorporating challenging activities into each class M. Establish flexible, wrap around services that promote readiness and academic success for all students
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N. O. P. Q.

Increase funding for and amount of time spent on enrichment activities at all levels Revise P.E. curriculum to focus on lifelong fitness Expand cultural and fine arts programming Provide curriculum/activities/community events for students during school holidays and in-service days R. Offer more counseling/social services for students and parents regarding post secondary educational or training options, including required testing and financial aid options Long-term actions A. Expand middle school sports programs to include 6th graders and expand sports offerings for both boys and girls at middle schools B. Offer additional early childhood and Pre-K programs C. Institute evidence-based curriculum, which teaches to students individualized abilities; assess in ways other than standardized testing D. Provide ISAT/PSAE accommodations routinely for qualified students Outcome measures Attendance rate Class size enrollment Community satisfaction Discipline referrals and suspensions English language standards Enrichment program participation Extracurricular activity participation Graduation rate Instructional time by subject Outstanding student performance (e.g. how many National Merit Scholars) Parental involvement Senior class student performance Social/emotional learning standards Student achievement (measured through multiple programs) Student participation in learning activities Student progress Student retention rate Students required to repeat classes or grades Support program effectiveness

II. Stewardship and Accountability


Goal: Align the Districts priorities and resources through a community-involved planning process implemented through focused action plans with regular progress reports Shortterm actions A. Continue to engage in a long-term strategic planning and visioning process B. Build an annual reporting process to the School Board that includes public input C. Hold bi-annual open forums for the community to participate in upcoming school year plans and assess the previous school year.
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D. Improve the Districts efforts to identify and pursue grant proposals E. Continue to institute principles of fiscal responsibility F. Actively seek private donations to build/maintain facilities Outcome measures Administrator/teacher retention Amount of donations, grants, referendum success Community satisfaction Funding allocation Grant funding Number of candidate running for school board Parental involvement Public forum involvement

III. Faculty and Staff Excellence


Goal: Retain, hire, and support highly qualified faculty and staff that reflects our student population Short-term actions A. Develop a plan to hire and retain high quality principals, faculty, and staff, with an emphasis on strong building leadership, through incentives including, but not limited to, competitive pay, good working conditions, excellent professional development, mentoring, performance bonuses, and opportunities for advancement B. Create a professional development plan emphasizing effective teaching in culturally and economically diverse environments (e.g. Madison Professional Development School Partnerships) C. Develop mechanisms to continually evaluate faculty and staff and tailor training programs based on their development needs D. Create pathways for teachers to use evidence-based methodology, support the implementation of those proven methods, and then hold staff accountable for the outcomes by creating alternative assessment methods which measure success Mid-term actions A. Partner with UIUC and Parkland to strengthen professional development and continuing education. B. Hire, support and retain qualified staff by creating excellent teaching environments. C. Improve communication between teachers and parents around individual student issues such as: transition to kindergarten or a new school, homework, test scores and grades, and behavior Long-term actions A. Support the creation of Professional Learning Communities or other communitycentered decision-making models B. Increase staff to allow for more offerings in fine arts, special education, physical education, social services, teaching support services and one medical professional in each school Outcome measures Community satisfaction
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Number of highly qualified teachers Number of teachers with masters degrees Parental involvement Teacher and staff accreditation, certificates, awards, and recognitions Teacher and staff retention rates

IV. Engagement of Parents and the Community


Goal: Effectively and efficiently engage parents and other community stakeholders resulting in strong partnerships Short-term actions A. Train Administrators District-wide on becoming effective listeners and communicators while displaying professionalism and common courtesy B. Create a central point of contact for disseminating information and for identifying, cataloging, recruiting, and maintaining community partnerships C. Recruit and coordinate volunteers to support District programs and train teachers on how to use volunteers most effectively D. Regularly coordinate meetings with the media to foster a better working relationship and understanding E. Build upon programs that are working currently in the schools (e.g., CU One-to-One Mentoring, VEYA, AVID, TALKS mentoring and social work programs, Positive Behavior Facilitation (PBF) Attendance, Truancy Education Alternative Opportunity Program, Attendance Improvement Team, Attendance Outreach Workers, Project Graduation, etc.) F. Coordinate with local realtors to provide new members of the community with timely and accurate information about the District G. Create community advisory groups in areas such as special education, equity, and discipline to report to School Board at designated times H. Take the official school board meeting on the road to different schools I. Maximize the power of the Internet by re-engineering the District Web site to improve communication between teachers and parents J. Establish more partnerships with UIUC and Parkland at academic, cultural and vocational/technical levels K. Create and participate in community advisory groups aimed at explaining terms and language revolving around Individualized Education Plans (IEP) L. Establish and maintain a consistent District presence in the community M. Increase access for disenfranchised community stakeholders by establishing an Ombudsman position N. Provide a way to get better information out to the parents and community (e.g. Family Information Center) O. Create a quick reference which includes District information for parents including key community resources Mid-term actions A. Reconstitute and foster ongoing two-way communication between community stakeholders, the administration, and the School Board making sure that the diversity of the community is represented

Adopted September 15, 2008

B. Train teachers and staff District-wide in service quality which includes communication, customer service, management style, and employee relations C. Train District-wide on soliciting and valuing parental and community involvement D. Coordinate with the Human Resources departments of local businesses to address their recruiting concerns related to Unit 4 E. With parents as partners, teach students about appropriate and inappropriate communication between students and teachers to promote awareness of sexual abuse or harassment F. Partner with local business and industry to offer non-traditional classes for credit in the workplace G. Work with Lincoln Trail Libraries to develop and publicize academic resources for students and families Outcome Measures Community acceptance Community involvement Community satisfaction District enrollment Employment rate directly out of high school Number of community partnerships Number of District volunteers Number of hits on the District Web site Number of positive media stories Parent involvement Post secondary placement directly out of high school Post-secondary enrollment

V. Diversity
Goal: Leverage the strength of our diverse population to create a rich academic and social environment in each of our schools Short-term actions A. Conduct, analyze, and utilize the data from the District climate survey B. Conduct outreach to minority community to assist the District in the attendance and retention of students C. Provide mandatory, ongoing diversity training for teachers, administrators and staff that addresses classroom climate, expectations, engagement, learning and assessment, and discipline D. Create an official office that will oversee/implement equity programs and initiatives E. Address the over-representation of minorities in special education classes F. Address the under-representation of minorities in upper level classes G. Implement curriculum and programs to embrace and promote understanding and acceptance of diverse cultures, including through art, drama, dance, clubs, and extra curricular activities Mid-term actions A. Ensure that the faculty and staff reflect the racial and cultural composition of the District
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Outcome Measures Community satisfaction Diversity of students within the individual schools Graduation and dropout rates of minorities Retention rates of students within the District Staff diversity The results of the climate surveys that the District conducts

VI. Facilities
Goal: Revitalize, build, and maintain facilities that are safe, sustainable and allow equitable access to programming across the District Short-term actions A. Develop a public input process to address capital programming needs and school sizes for all grade levels B. Hire a facilities planner and establish a capital improvement planning team to create a ten-year capital improvement plan C. Re-evaluate the existing facilities studies and reprioritize the suggested improvements based on the long-term facilities plan D. Establish an Educational Programming Team, comprised of educators, staff, facilities managers and educational programming consultants and architects, to work with the capital improvement planning team to ensure programming needs are met E. Provide a safe physical environment for learning at all schools F. Establish energy efficiency as a priority in all renovation and new construction projects G. Establish a criterion that all new construction and renovation projects be built to United States Green Building Council LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) standards H. Quantify and communicate benefits to community for establishing environmental, energy efficient, high performance buildings I. Actively apply for grant funding to offset the cost of facility upgrades J. Investigate the potential for renovation, reuse or disposition of existing buildings and work with the City to develop a procedure to ensure the best possible reuse of the property K. Explore land banking or purchasing land for new schools L. Develop a waste management plan Mid-term actions A. Develop a cost/benefit analysis tool to assess the usefulness and viability of each facility B. Work in partnership with private business, the city of Champaign, the Village of Savoy and residents to secure land for school locations that are determined based on projected community growth C. Ensure all facilities have equitable access to and incorporation of technology as appropriate to support student achievement D. Actively seek partnerships with other units of government and with private industry to share space, develop programs, fund programs and/or construct facilities
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Long-term actions A. Negotiate with surrounding school districts to define district boundaries that reflect efficient service areas Outcome measures Amount of waste disposal Community satisfaction Energy consumption Maintenance costs Measurable benchmarks from capital improvement plan Utility costs

Adopted September 15, 2008