Welcome

Hello, and thank you for your interest in my work.
This little booklet is my way of giving you quick access to my work on a printed medium. And while I can’t provide everyone with a fullscale printed portfolio, I hope this provides some level of tactility. This, of course, comes with some concessions. The work presented here is scaled (often dramatically). You may not be able to read the text in most of the work, but the graphics, composition, and layouts remain intact. Think of it as a bridge between the original prints and my web portfolio. Speaking of which, if you want a more interactive medium, please feel free to browse through my work on my web site: www.chrisly.info. I will often provide insight into the process that got me to my design decisions, as well as blog about other design-related topics. My web site may also contain a few works not found in this booklet. Either because the work was just a little too experimental or because it happened after the printing of this book. In any case, I hope you enjoy what I’ve provided here. Please feel free to contact me if you have any inquiries. Thanks again.

Contents
01. Advertising design p. 4 – p. 13 02. Editorial design p. 14 – p. 19 03. Web design p. 20 – p. 22 04. Resumé p. 23

Chris Lee

www.chrisly.info cleecanth@gmail.com (815) 601-2264

Unless explicitly stated, all illustrations used in the following designs were created by me (Chris Lee). All work is original and was created between 2006 and 2011.

01. Advertising design

www.chrisly.info cleecanth@gmail.com (815) 601-2264

01.

Advertising design

3

S T U D E N T L I F E AT R O C K VA L L E Y C O L L E G E

HIGHLIGHTS
Student Life is funded by your $3 per credit hour activity fee, so we feel you have the right to know what we’re doing with your money. Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges program exists to honor students for their accomplishments in academic and extracurricular activities and in the community. A yearly reception is held to honor those inducted into Who’s Who. Black History Month is a celebration held every February that highlights African-American history in the United States. Events such as food giveaways, speakers, and educational events are aimed at creating an appreciation for black culture. Women’s History Month is held every March and features a wide array of events that bring awareness, celebrate, and look to improve equality between genders. The Faculty Grant Program is a financial support system set aside for use by faculty on campus to fund a project of their choice. Faculty may apply via the Student Life home page.

CLUBS & OR GANIZATIONS
One of the easiest ways to get involved and stay involved is to join a club or organization. We currently have 35 on campus — hardly a shortage of opportunities.
 Association of Latin American Students  A Capella Club  Black Student Alliance  Bowling Club  Campus Activities Board  Circle K  Dental Hygienists’ Association  Fellowship of Catholic University Students  Future Educators Society  Gamers’ Club  Gay-Straight Alliance  Hit & Run Productions  Intervarsity Christian Fellowship  Japanese Animation Club  Latter Day Saints Student Association  Men’s Fast Pitch Softball  Model u n  Movie Club  Multicultural Club  Music Educators’ Club  Muslim Student Association  p t k Society  Psy/Soc Club  Quiz Bowl Club  Rugby Club  Shape Club  Society of Manufacturing Engineers  Spirit Squad  Stomp Squad  Student Government Association  Students in Free Enterprise  Table Tennis Club  The Valley Forge  Voices  Woman to Woman

‘BE IT.’
So you’ve come to Rock Valley, registered for classes and purchased your books. Congratulations, you’ve got the hard part done. However, if you stop at this point, you’ll be selling yourself short. This is where Student Life steps in. Student Life is a department situated in the Student Center — the heart of campus — but the word ‘department’ doesn‘t quite fit our personality. Essentially, Student Life is you. It’s your choices, your friends, and your fully realized college experience. By going to events, interacting with fellow students, and giving yourself the chance to escape the ‘parking lotclassroom-parking lot’ routine, you open yourself up to a whole set of new possibilities. Student Life is here to allow you to see those possibilities. Basically, what we’re trying to get at is that without you, there is no Student Life. So, in every way possible, we encourage you to get involved, truly experience college, and Be it.

JOIN A CLUB OR OR GANIZATION
Visit us online at www.rockvalleycollege.edu/studentlife
Joining a club or organization is as easy as stopping by our office or giving us a call (Please see the back page).

4

01. Advertising
design

I AM I AM I AM I AM

PRESIDENT, C AMPUS AC TIVITIES BOARD

CHRIS WEBB

P R E S I D E N T, M U LT I C U LT U R A L C LU B

ROBSON OLIVEIRA

DAISY R U I Z
S E C R E TARY, AL AS

ATHLETE, RVC FOOTBALL

GENE HODGE

Monday
• Music by Jason Levasseur & Free lunch 12pm; Between ERC and CLI (Atrium, if rain) • Evening Student Snacks hosted by SGA 5pm; ERC Lobby

Wednesday
• Music by Natalie Stovall & Free lunch on the lawn 11:30am; Gazebo outside S.C. and Atrium

Friday
• Blue and Gold Day

Saturday
• Homecoming tailgate, Music by Kelly Bell Band & Free lunch 11am; Near football fields • Football vs. North Dakota 1pm • Homecoming Dance 8pm-11pm; Atrium

Monday
• Music by Jason Levasseur & Free lunch 12pm; Between ERC and CLI (Atrium, if rain) • Evening Student Snacks hosted by SGA 5pm; ERC Lobby

Wednesday
• Music by Natalie Stovall & Free lunch on the lawn 11:30am; Gazebo outside S.C. and Atrium

Friday
• Blue and Gold Day

Saturday
• Homecoming tailgate, Music by Kelly Bell Band & Free lunch 11am; Near football fields • Football vs. North Dakota 1pm • Homecoming Dance 8pm-11pm; Atrium

The Final Stand
H o m e c o m i n g 2 0 0 9

September 28 to October 3

The Final Stand
H o m e c o m i n g 2 0 0 9

September 28 to October 3

01.

Advertising design

5

Welcome
to a week of enter tainment.

P r e s e n t e d b y S t u d e n t Li f e a n d CA B . S p o n s o r e d b y S GA .

Welcome Week
F l l 2009, a A ug u st 24-27

Monday

Cl ea r l y Yo u Cr y s ta l s & ‘ R ea d ’ d i s p l a y & s ig n u p s
Atrium, 10a.m.-4p.m.

Tuesday

K e v i n B oz e m a n
Free subs and chips Atrium, 12:15p.m.

‘ R ea d ’ photo sho ot
ERC, 3p.m.-5p.m.

Wednesday

Ev e n i n g s n a c k s
ERC, 5p.m.-7p.m.

Cl u b D a y , N i c k Pa g l i a r i , & car ica t ures
Between CLI and ERC (in case of rain, Atrium) 10a.m.-2p.m.

W ho’s W ho?
Win a Meg’s g iftcard Free Popcorn (ends at noon) ERC Lobby, 10a.m.-2p.m.

Thurs d ay
Free pizza Atrium, 12:15p.m.

K el l y M a c Fa r l a n d
W ho’s who g iftcard winners announced

Fr e e l u n c h
Between CLI & ERC, 11:30a.m.

Mond ay
CA B & St uden t Life pres en t

Wed nes d ay
Cl ub Day , N ick Pag liar i , & car ica t ures
Between CLI and ERC (in case of rain, moved to Atrium) 10a.m. - 2p.m.

Welcome We ek
A ug u s t 27 - 29

Clearly you Cr y s ta l s & ‘ Read ’ di s play & s ig n u p
Atrium, 10a.m. - 4p.m.

Dave Evans
Z o o t S u i t B a l l o o n
For more CAB events, be sure to be here Aug u st 24, 25, 26, & 27 for Welcome Week.

s

i s s p on s ore d by T he Cam pu s A c t i v i t ies B oard

Tues d ay
Kev i n B oz ema n
Free subs and chips Atrium, 12:15p.m.

W ho ’ s W ho ?
Free Popcorn (ends at noon) ERC Lobby, 10a.m. - 2p.m.

T h urs d ay
Kel ly MacF arla nd
Free pizza Atrium, 12:15p.m.

‘ Read ’ photo sho ot
ERC, 3p.m. - 5p.m.

Eveni ng s n ack s
ERC, 5p.m. - 7p.m.

W ho ’ s W ho g if tcard w i n ners a n nou nc e d

Welcome Week 2009

Comedy, Mu sic, Food, Giveaways, and more!
CAB i s al so looking for new members! Sig n up at Club Day on the 26th!

Sp on s ore d by SGA

P r e s e n t e d b y S t u d e n t Li f e a n d CA B . S p o n s o r e d b y S GA .

Welc ome We ek
Club Day
Between CL1 and ERC*, 10am – 2pm All of Rock Valley College’s clubs and organizations, including CAB, invite you to become a member! Stop by in between your classes to find the club that’s right for you. The department of Student Life also welcomes your involvement on campus!

Mond ay
Cl ea r l y y o u Cr y s tal s & ‘ R ea d ’ d i s p l a y & s ig n u p s
At rium, 10a.m.-4p.m.

Tues d ay
K e v i n B oz e m a n
Free subs and chips At rium, 12:15p.m.

Wed nes d ay
Cl u b D a y , N i c k Pa g l i a r i , & car ica t ures
Bet ween CLI and ERC (in ca se of rain, moved to At rium) 10a.m.-2p.m.

T h ursday
Kel l y M a c Fa r l a n d
Free pizza At rium, 12:15p.m.

Musician Nick Pagliari
Between CL1 and ERC*, 10am – 2pm Nick Pagliari’s got the twang of Nashville in his voice and the spirit of Memphis in his soul. His second full-length album Please and Thank Y follows 2007’s EP ou Safe and Sound, whose title track was featured in the movie P.S. I Love Y ou.

Who’s Who in the Library
ERC Lobby, 10am – 2pm Stop by the Library to play a quick game of Who’s Who in the Library for a chance to win a Meg’s $10 gift card! Winners will be drawn on Thursday.

Fa l l 2 0 0 9 , A u g u s t 24 - 27

‘ R ea d ’ photo sho ot
ERC, 3p.m.-5p.m.

Comedian Kelly MacF arland
and free Papa John’s pizza Student Center Atrium, 12:15pm As an experienced standup comedian, Kelly has an extensive and well-rounded resume. She has opened for Melissa Etheridge and LeAnn Rimes. Kelly has appeared on Comedy Central’s ‘Premium Blend’. Y may also recognize her from ou season one of NBC’s hit reality series, ‘The Biggest Loser’.

Winners of the Library’s Who’s Who competition announced.
$10 Meg’s giftcard to be given away

Free Popcorn

Free Lunch

ERC Lobby, 10am – noon

Between CL1 and ERC*, 1 1:30am BBQ pork sandwiches and potato salad.

Caricatures by Jeff Mandell
Between CL1 and ERC*, 10am – 2pm Jeff Mandell, an internationally known caricature artist, has been drawing professionally for over 30 years. A frequent illustrator for publications, you may see Jeff’s work adorning books, newspapers and magazines.

Comedian Kevin Bozeman

‘Read’ Photoshoot
ERC Lobby, 3pm – 5pm Have your photo taken to be featured on one of the Library’s READ posters! (Signups available in the Student Center Atrium Monday from 10am – 4pm.)

with free Subway subs and chips, Student Center Atrium, 12:15pm Kevin uses his high-energy act and knack for the obvious to give a unique perspective on traveling, dating, social and controversial issues. Kevin has appeared on Comedy Central’s “Comics Come Home” & “Premium Blend”, and was a 1999 winner of the HBO Comedy Competition.

Evening Student Welcome
ERC Lobby, 5pm – 7pm CAB invites you to stop by the ERC Lobby and grab a few snacks before your night class!

Ev e n i n g s n a c k s
ERC, 5p.m.-7p.m.

W ho’s W ho?

Win a Meg’s g if tcard Free Popcor n (end s at noon) ERC Lobby, 10a.m.-2p.m.

W ho’s W ho g if tcard w i n n er s announced

* In case of rain, all events moved to the Student Center Atrium.

P r e s e n t e d b y S t u d e n t Li f e a n d CA B . S p o n s o r e d b y S GA .

6

01. Advertising
design

MARCH 2008 EVENTS BROCHURE

CONTACT TRACY HOKANSON FOR MORE INFORMATION AT 921-4173.
ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE, 2008

ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE PRESENTS

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

EVENTS
CLOTHES LINE PROJECT
MARCH 4-6, SC FIRST FLOOR MARCH 18-20, STENSTROM CENTER A visual display will bear witness to the violence against women. During the public display, a clothesline is hung with shirts. Each shirt is decorated to represent a particular women’s experience, by the survivor herself or by someone who cares about her. The Clothes Line Project is presented by Rockford Sexual Assault Counseling.

BEAUTY THROUGH TIME DISPLAY

CONTESTS

The two contests are designed to inspire our students to be creative participants in our celebration of Women’s History Month. The winners will receive one free RVC class and will be recognized formally at the April 3 Women’s History Month wrap-up celebration. Both contests’ due date is March 24. Open to all Rock Valley College students. Specific rules are listed below.

MARCH 19, ATRIUM Several posters will be on display that show what America sought out as beautiful over time. There will be an emphasis on beauty internationally as well as information on eating disorders. We will also show short clips sponsored by the Dove campaign that further display how morphed the very definition of beauty has become in America today.

EMPOWERMENT WORKSHOP

VAGINA MONOLOGUES

FILM

The film must be no longer than 60 seconds and the subject must promote women or women’s history. Films can be submitted on VHS or DVD beginning March 1 at the RVC Information Center. For more information, call Tiffany Voyles at 921-4184.

ESSAY

Students may choose from three topics to write a 1,000 word minimum essay. Essays can be submitted beginning March 1, 2008 by e-mailing Dave Costello at d.costello@rockvalleycollege.edu. For more information, call Dave Costello at 921-4516.

MARCH 5 & 6, DOORS OPEN 6:30P, STARTS 7:00P, SC ATRIUM V-Day is a global movement to end violence against women and girls which raises funds and awareness through benefit productions of Playwright/Founder Eve Ensler’s award winning play The Vagina Monologues. 2008 marks V-Day’s 10 year anniversary. To date, the V-Day movement has raised over $50 million and educated millions about the issue of violence against women and the efforts to end it. Tickets are $5.00 and will be available at the Information Center on the main campus and the Stenstrom Center. All proceeds from the show will be donated to Rockford Sexual Assault Counseling.

MARCH 19, 1:00P, SC FIRST FLOOR Hands-on activities, group discussion, and learning will help women to feel personally validated.

PAMPER ME PRETTY/ HEALTH FAIR

MARCH 19, 12:00-2:00P, SC ATRIUM This innovative session will allow the women of RVC and the community a chance to enjoy being pampered. Representatives from Swedish American Mental Health, American Cancer Society, the Rockford YMCA, as well as the Winnebago County Health Department will be on hand to share health information regarding health issues that affect women.

MARCH 3-7, SC FIRST FLOOR TRUE BEAUTY CAMPAIGN MARCH 4-6, SC FIRST FLOOR & MARCH 18-20, STENSTROM CENTER CLOTHES LINE PROJECT MARCH 5 & 6, 6:30, SC ATRIUM, $5 TICKETS AT INFO DESK THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES

CELEBRATING THE BEAUTY OF WOMEN – A NIGHT OF ELEGANCE

APRIL 3, 5:00-9:00P, SC ATRIUM Join us as we celebrate the internal and external beauty of women with a night of inspiration, triumphs and entertainment. This night of elegance will feature the melodies of female jazz artist- Beth Ann “Red” Beal, motivational speaker and breast cancer awareness spokesperson for Cosmo Girl- Rashiya Washington, award ceremony and conclusion of “Her Story” for Women’s History Month.

MARCH 2008
FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT TRACY HOKANSON AT 921-4173, OR SEE OUR BROCHURE.

MARCH 19, SC ATRIUM BEAUTY THROUGH TIME DISPLAY MARCH 19, 1:00, SC FIRST FLOOR EMPOWERMENT WORKSHOP MARCH 19, 12:00, SC ATRIUM PAMPER ME PRETTY/ HEALTH FAIR MARCH 26, 6:30, SC ATRIUM COFFEE HOUSE APRIL 3, 5:00, SC ATRIUM CELEBRATING THE BEAUTY OF WOMEN – A NIGHT OF ELEGANCE

01.

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7

01/12-02/05.LIBRARY CLAY WALKER ART DISPLAY 01/15.4PM-7PM.ERC OPENING RECEPTION FOR CLAY WALKER 02/06.MEMORIAL HALL.7PM-9PM SOJOURNER TRUTH’S ‘AIN’T I A WOMAN!’ 02/07.ATRIUM.7PM-9PM TIM WISE ON RACE & ETHNICITY 02/10.CHICAGO.10AM-7PM HOUSE OF BLUES GOSPEL BRUNCH & DUSABLE MUSEUM TRIP. CALL 921-4173 FOR TICKETS.

02/12.ATRIUM.12PM-1PM JENA 6: A PANEL DISCUSSION 02/19.SCCE COMMONS AREA.12PM-1PM PEACE AND JUSTICE: THE WORK OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. 02/20.ATRIUM.6:30PM-9PM COFFEE HOUSE: MUSIC & SPOKEN WORD 02/27.SCCE.10AM-3PM MINORITY MALE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE
ALL EVENTS, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ARE FREE OF CHARGE

8

01. Advertising
design

PiCtures
5/3/09

APR

Big red

10am— Between CL1

Comed Josh s
m u s i C
&

APR

1 2 :1 5 p m • S

FEStiv
BALLoo
Cotton

APR

10 Between

tim ses the Joe Cam

& CARnivAL FooD

BoDy AR

April 27

April 29

April 30

PictUres On the f e s t i v a L D a y

c O M e D i a n

Big reD— 2chair 10am pm
P O P c O r n
11am-1pm

MUsicians tiM sessiOn
& the

aLexanDra
1 2 :1 5 p m

JOe caMerOn BanD

Between cL1 and erc

BaLLOOn gUy t a c O B a r 12pm & BODy art LaDy
s.c. atrium
carnivaL gaMes anD Prizes

MchaLe
BLOODm - 3Drive 9a pm
Outside erc
May 2

April 28

cOMeDian JOsh sneeD
1 2 :1 5 p m

carnivaL fOOD, POPcOrn,

cOttOn canDy
Between cL1 and erc
10am-2pm

assOrteD sanDwiches
s.c. atrium
12pm

Mayfest
with BanD hOtsaUce & D.J. 8pm-11pm

D a n c e*
SPonSored By Sga

PiCTureS on THe
P o P C o r n
11am-1pm

April 27

April 29

April 30

Big red CHair 10am—2pm
Between Cl1 and erC
April 28

FeSTival day
muSiCianS Tim SeSSion
& THe Joe Cameron Band

C o m e d i a n

alexandra
1 2 :1 5 p m

no events.
May 2

May 1

Balloon guy
&
10am-2pm

Body arT lady
Between Cl1 and erC

mCHale mayFeST
T a C 1op m B a r 2
S.C. atrium

Carnival gameS and PrizeS

Comedian JoSH Sneed
12:15pm
12pm

Carnival Food, PoPCorn,

CoTTon Candy

aSSorTed SandwiCHeS
S.C. atrium

Bloodm - 3drive 9a pm
outside erC

danCe * &d.J.
wiTH Band HoTSauCe

PiCTureS on THe
P o P C o r n
11am-1pm

April 27

April 29

April 30

8pm-11pm

Big red CHair 10am—2pm
Between Cl1 and erC
April 28

FeSTival day
muSiCianS Tim SeSSion
&THe Joe Cameron Band

C o m e d i a n

alexandra
12:15pm

no events.
May 2

May 1

Balloon guy
&

mCHale mayFeST
T a C 12pm B a r o
S.C. atrium

Body arT lady

Carnival gameS and PrizeS

Comedian JoSH Sneed
12:15pm
12pm

Carnival Food, PoPCorn,

CoTTon Candy
Between Cl1 and erC
10am-2pm

Blood drive 9am-3pm
outside erC

aSSorTed SandwiCHeS
S.C. atrium

danCe * &d.J.
wiTH Band HoTSauCe

8pm-11pm

*muST Have a STaTe or rvC i.d. To geT in. muST Be 18 or over (exCePTion For dual CrediT STudenTS).

01.

Advertising design
T U E S D AY

9

W E A R A T O G A D AY

ROVING MAGIC PICTURES WITH THE MASCOT & RVC ATHLETES
Student Center 10AM - 2PM Student Center & ERC 11AM - 3PM •

DRESS L I KE A G R E E K G O D / D E S S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

BALLOON GUY & BODY ART PICTURES WITH THE MASCOT AND RVC ATHLETES
Student Center 10AM - 2PM Student Center & ERC 11AM - 3PM •

W E A R S C H O O L C O L O R S D AY

F R I D AY

HOMECOMING GAME RV C v s E L L S W O R T H

S AT U R D AY

TAILGATE PARTY
T H U R S D AY
New Students recieve a free T-Shirt* Behind the football eld 12PM

WITH FREE FOOD & MUSICAL GUEST NICK MOTIL

DR E S S A S A G L A D I AT O R D AY

BLIZZARD OF BUCKS
Atrium 2PM - 3:15PM •

FOOTBALL GAME
Free with Student ID 3PM • Free • Atrium 9PM - 11:45PM
* With a valid Student ID. Student IDs can be picked up at the information desk

PICTURES WITH THE MASCOT AND RVC ATHLETES
Student Center 10AM - 2PM

DANCE

SPONSORED BY SGA

SPONSORED BY SGA SPONSORED BY SGA

Free

10

01.

Advertising design

Monday Be a star with Movie Makers, Atrium, 10am Tuesday Magic of Aaron, Atrium, 12:15pm Red carpet cocktail party without the cocktails!, ERC lobby, 5 pm

Wednesday Club Day, Atrium, 10 am Thursday Comedian Jay Black & free food, Atrium, 12:15pm Friday Taco Day, Atrium, 12:15pm

LIGHTS, CAMERA, HOLLY WOOD

THU
JANUARY 29
Comedian Jay Black & Free Food
Atrium, 12:15pm Here is your chance to sit back laugh and enjoy some good food.

JANUARY 30
Taco day
Atrium, 12:15pm Come and meet other students.

FRI

Come visit the CAB table at every event. That is where you can be entered to win one of two fabulous gift baskets. The more events you come to the more chances you have to win. One basket is for a night at the movies, the other is a way for you to pamper yourself like a star.
Rock Valley College 2009 Presented by CAB & Student Life. Sponsored by SGA.

For more information, call 9214173

ROCK VALLEY COLLEGE SPRING 2009 WELCOME WEEK

MON
JANUARY 26

Come be a star with Movie Makers
Atrium, 10am Make your own music video or movie clip. Each person in your group receives a DVD. There will be snacks available.

TUE
JANUARY 27

THU
JANUARY 29

Comedian Jay Black & Free Food
Atrium, 12:15pm Here is your chance to sit back laugh and enjoy some good food.

Magic of Aaron
Atrium, 12:15pm Saturday Night Live meets The World’s Greatest Magic. Enjoy lunch while being awed by Aaron’s tricks and mental abilities.

Red Carpet cocktail party without the cocktails!
ERC lobby, 5 pm Come grab a snack and enjoy a chat.

JANUARY 30

FRI

Taco day
Atrium, 12:15pm Come and meet other students.

WED
LIGHTS, CAMERA,
JANUARY 28 Club Day
Atrium, 10 am Here is your chance to shine. Come be a part if it at Club Day. Eat some snacks find out about our clubs and listen to the music of Sean McConnell who will be performing live at 12:15pm.

HOLLY WOOD

Come visit the CAB table at every event. That is where you can be entered to win one of two fabulous gift baskets. The more events you come to the more chances you have to win. One basket is for a night at the movies, the other is a way for you to pamper yourself like a star.
For more information, call 9214173 Rock Valley College 2009 Presented by CAB & Student Life. Sponsored by SGA.

01.

Advertising design

11

Rockford Register Star
SECTION

NEWSPAPER OF THE ROCK RIVER VALLEY

RRSTAR.COM

F

S U N D AY
JUNE 22, 2008

OPINIONS
Editor: Wally Haas; opinions@rrstar.com; 815-987-1359

S

J

WEEK IN REVIEW

Cease-re in Gaza begins
Guns went quiet as a six-month truce between Israel and Gaza Strip militants took effect early Thursday, but there was widespread skepticism about its ability to hold. The ceasere, which Egypt labored for months to conclude, aims to bring an end to a year of ghting that has killed seven Israelis and more than 400 Palestinians — many of them civilians — since the Islamic militant group Hamas wrested control of Gaza a year ago. It also obliges Israel to ease a punishing blockade of the coastal strip. The sanctions were designed to pressure Palestinian militants to halt their rocket and mortar re on southern Israel, but have driven ordinary Gazans even deeper into destitution and conned them to their tiny seaside territory.

Would fines sC speede save ga

Hundreds of gay couples wed
Wearing everything from T-shirts to tuxedos and lavish gowns, hundreds of same-sex couples rushed to county clerks’ ofces throughout California to obtain marriage licenses and exchange vows as last-minute legal challenges to gay marriage failed. All 58 counties began issuing licenses Tuesday after an order from the state’s highest court.

Taliban take over villages
Hundreds of Taliban ghters invaded villages just outside Afghanistan’s second-largest city Monday, forcing NATO and Afghan troops to rush in while frightened residents ed. The Taliban assault on the outskirts of Kandahar is the latest display of prowess by the militants despite a record number of U.S. and NATO troops in the country.

Gore says he’s backing Obama
Al Gore announced his endorsement of Barack Obama and promised to help the Democrat achieve what eluded him — the presidency. In a letter to be e-mailed to Obama supporters, the former vice president and Nobel Prize winner wrote, “From now through Election Day, I intend to do whatever I can to make sure he is elected president of the United States.”

Bush wants offshore drilling
For a quarter-century, drilling for oil and gas off nearly all the American coastline has been banned in part to protect tourism and to lessen the chances of beach-blackening spills. Then gasoline prices topped $4 a gallon this summer. Drivers and others began clamoring for federal lawmakers to do something about the record price of oil, much of it produced in foreign countries.

Porkchopping agenda has little effect
Despite increasing coverage, pet projects, earmarks, and pork-barrel spending runs rampant in Congress, a new study shows
By Andrew Taylor and Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Car bombing toll up to 63

02. Editorial design

The U.S. military blamed a renegade Shiite group Wednesday for a deadly car bombing in a Baghdad Shiite neighborhood and said it was seeking to reignite the sort of sectarian violence that swept the area 18 months ago. Iraqi ofcials said the death toll from the bombing rose to 63, including women and children. The Iraqi government said the horric attack Tuesday, the deadliest in Baghdad in three months, would stiffen its resolve “to defeat the terrorists and to maintain the security achievements.”

Tiger Woods out for season
Two days after a grueling U.S. Open that took him ve days and 91 holes to win, Tiger Woods said Wednesday he will have reconstructive surgery on his left knee to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament, forcing him to miss the rest of the season.

W

ASHINGTON — So much for trimming the pork. The practice of decorating legislation with billions of dollars in pet projects and federal contracts is still thriving on Capitol Hill — despite public outrage that helped ip control of
An examination of many of those earmarks by The Associated Press and two dozen newspapers participating in a project sponsored by the Associated Press Managing Editors found much greater disclosure since 2006 but no end to what has become ingrained behavior in Congress. Assisting the project were two nonprot and nonpartisan watchdog organizations — the Sunlight Foundation and Taxpayers for Common Sense. Millions of the dollars support lobbying rms that help companies, universities, local governments and others secure what critics like Republican presidential candidate John McCain call pork-barrel spending. The law forbids using federal grants to lobby, but lobbyists do charge clients fees that often equal 10 percent of the largesse. Earmark winners and their lobbyists often reward their benefactors with campaign contributions. For many members See PORK, 4F

Congress two years ago.

Celtics win 17th NBA title
The Boston Celtics rode their three All-Stars to their record 17th championship Tuesday night, blowing by the Los Angeles Lakers for a 131-92 victory in Game 6 of the NBA nals. Paul Pierce had 17 points and 10 assists and earned the nals MVP.
— Compiled from Register Star news services

More than 11,000 of those “earmarks,” worth nearly $15 billion in all, were slipped into legislation telling the government where to spend taxpayers’ money this year, keeping the issue at the center of Washington’s culture of money, inuence and politics. Now comes an electionyear encore. It’s a pay-to-play sandbox where waste and abuse often obscure the good that earmarks can do.

ONLINE Go to rrstar.com for the latest local news and updates throughout the day.

ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS LEE | ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

c Most read d Seat at the didn’t think B m saving ideac John Miller l I wonder ifn a will have the P same reacn tion. i Miller proposed increasing nes for speederso . Motorists f surely would 4 decide to T slow down if  they thought i they’d be nr than $150, or b appropriate a If the idea w n ed nationwid b barrels of oils as motorists s 2 closer to the w s If motoris put the peda they would p quences. d Miller’s id R ing laws an d nothing extra p Miller said the idea whM n passed him g e miles over th pine Road. t e Haven’t w ments whenm passed us an that person s his recklessn fulness? B “No one n l ing $350 fo o ticket,” Dav t on the blog V we’ve all go b ticket before w someone tha w simple mista i diculous to m The dudeh W in: “A $350 s c would affect L the same wa Excursion. t “Gas pric making that for his speed Lawrences Clarkson rep o realize mostA ets are the r a zealous law I members —t tions of thei B leaders — tr t coffers withs for frivolousp ects. Much c light camera b has nothing Are you telli safe for a guy open highwa on Alpine ata the limit? Noo K Penny def b idea. “We ne c thing to slow f down, and ra U just might d h are enough p a them.” Miller’s c think that so sponders mu gold bullion somewhere.a “If increa e er nes to w c ing man’ can j does not get f what will — for a gallon t so naive nots the agenda w a dustry is in h i I hear a non better than t slowing down “If we cou cent of this n d to obey the sp p many barrel r we save a da Let’s hear c thoughts and g t Wally Haas is ed of the Rockford R t e-mail address is t com. His comme found at “A Seata blogs.e-rockford. E

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OPINIONS
Editor: Wally Haas; opinions@rrstar.com; 815-987-1359
AND CHRIS LEE | ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

around the world dig into their pockasing the speedets for funds to help Myanmar’s cywhat the ‘workclone victims, the country’s ruling n hardly handle junta said Friday that such assistance their attention, from the United States could not be — how about $8 trusted.I’m not of gas? State media have previously tsaid Myanmar feared Washington to realize that was the oil infor using the cover of humanitarian aid gear. Until high to invade the country and steal its oil reserves. npartisan plan this one — I’m n. uldTaiwan per- China agreed Thursget 50 and nation’s drivers time ever to set up day for the rst peed limit, how permanent ofces in each other’s terof ls of oilas the two sides met for their ritories would ay?” formal talks in more than a derst r some of your with one of the delecade, an ofcial of d ideas. said. The agreement to set up gations the of of page editor ditorialces, which will coordinate conRegister Star. His tinuing contacts, was reached during s whaas@rrstar. talks Thursday morning in Beijing, ents can also be a spokeswoman for Taiwan’s Straits at the Table” .com/sat/ Exchange Foundation said.
— Compiled from Register Star wire services

The Bush administration disagrees strongly with a Supreme Court decision that gives suspected terrorists the right to go to federal court to seek their release from inders of the “A denite blog  e Table” detention at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. Attorney General Mimuch of a gaschael Mukasey said Friday the deepproposed by ly Loves Park. court ruling would of divided high not affect the Guantanamo trials print readers against enemy combatants, and e President Bush said he might seek a new law to keep the alleged terrorists in a U.S. prison. r d r Boy Scouts who came to each . other’s aid after a tornado that killed s four of their comrades and injured d 48 people were hailed as heroes Wally o Thursday for helping to administer Haas f rst aid and search for victims bur t in their attened campsite. Iowa ied ned $350 rather cut through downed rescue workers r whateverand dug through debris branches the ne rain be. amidwouldand lightning Wednesday was implement- camp where the 93 night to reach the de, quite a 13 to 18, had huddled for boys, ages few could through safety be saved the twister. They and started members were attending a 25 staffto drive speed limit. weeklong leadership training camp. sts continued to al to the metal, pay the conseRising water from the raging Cedar River that dea uses exist- has swamped Cedar Rapids has forced the evacuation of a nd would cost downtown hospital. Ofcials say 176 Of a to enforce. patients are of d he thought being evacuated from Mercy Medical hen a Hummer Center, including its nursing home facility. Patients startgoing about 15 ed being taken he limit on Al- to other hospitals in the region late Thursday night. The evacuation was we all had mo- continuing Friday morning. has a speeder nd we thought should pay for ness and wastePope Benedict XVI took President Bush on a rare stroll through the needs to be paylush grounds of the Vatican Gardens or a speeding on Friday, stopping at a grotto where ve commented the pontiff prays daily. Normally, g. “Come on, VIPs are received in the pope’s liot a speeding brary in the Apostolic Palace. That’s e, but why ding where Bush had his rst meeting at much for a with Benedict ake. Sounds ri- in June 2007. But in a me.” gesture of appreciation for the hearty welcome eabides chimed Bush gave him in Washington in speeding ticket April, Benedict welcomed the president and rst lady t a Smart Car Laura Bush an ay it would near St. John’s Tower in the lush Vatican Gardens. ces are already t Hummer pay d.” President Bush opened his last esummit with the European Union Gregory plied: “You with a long list of transon Tuesday do speeding tickAtlantic issues on his plate, but chief result of overamong them was the drive to halt w enforcement pursuits through inIran’s nuclear —ternational pressure and incentives. at the direcir government Bush and EU leaders were poised to rying to Iran with further nancial threaten ll the hsanctions unless it veriably susmore money  spends its projpolitical nuclear enrichment, aclike your redcording to a draft statement obtained as idea.Associated Press. by The Safety to do with it. ing me it is uny to drive on an Fresh from ay at 75, or evenhis hospitalization for tan aggressive surgery on a cancer10 miles over ous o.” brain tumor, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy announced it was “good to fended Miller’s be to do someeed home” at his family’s Cape Cod compound Monday and headed out w these people for a sail. Kennedy left the Duke aising the ticket University Medical Center in Durdo it. If there ham, N.C., on patrols to catchMonday morning and arrived at his family’s Hyannis Port compound just before noon. rebuttal: “I ome of the reust have a lot of n stashed away As individuals and aid agencies

stiffer slow Detainees have rights Court: ers, as?
WEEK IN REVIEW

Hey, dads; your children need you
Hardly a day goes by that I don’t think about my father. When Dad died in 1994 a friend who was offering words of comfort said, “At least you had 39 years with him.” It was little consolation at the time because I was thinking that I wanted at least another 39 years. I wanted him to see his grandchildren mature and become the successes they are today. I wanted my best shing partner with me when I nally bought a boat. I wanted his advice, encouragement and sense of humor in good times and Wally bad. Haas But during the last 14 years, I realize the wisdom of that friend’s words. I’ve come to treasure the years I had with my dad more than regret the years I haven’t had with him. I realize that I was blessed to have a father who cared and was there when I needed him, even in my adult years. Too many children today have absentee fathers or have never known their fathers. That leads to trouble. On this Father’s Day it seems appropriate to repeat some information I’ve received the last few years from All Pro Dads, a program run by Family First, a nonprot organization that promotes fatherhood and family. The importance of fathers in society cannot be underestimated. 90 percent of all homeless and runaway children are from fatherless homes. 71 percent of high school dropouts are from fatherless homes. The majority of teen mothers come from homes without fathers. 85 percent of all youths sitting in prisons grew up in a fatherless home. Being there is just part of the solution. What you do if you do live under the same roof as your children is another matter. All Pro Dads says you know you are a good father when you: Help your kids with their schoolwork. Take an interest in their hobbies. Show affection to your wife in front of them. Advocate that they speak to you and each other respectfully. Just enjoy being with your children. See your son or daughter come running to you when they get hurt. Have your calendar full of things to do with your children. Calmly and gently discipline your children without yelling or screaming. Tuck your children into bed at night and tell them “I love you.” Drive your kids to school in the morning. Make Saturday morning breakfast for them. Too often we look for solutions elsewhere when the answers are within us. Come on, guys, let’s be good fathers and give our children something to think about.
Wally Haas is editorial page editor of the Rockford Register Star. His e-mail address is whaas@rrstar. com.

Scouts save tornado victims

Iowa hospital evacuated

Bush meets pope at Vatican

Bush attends EU summit

Sen. Kennedy returns home

History at hand
Presidential campaigns have connections to a past Americans would like to forget
By Ted Anthony

Junta doesn’t trust U.S. aid

About this series
This latest chapter of “The Measure of a Nation,” a yearlong series of multimedia story packages about the presidency and the 2008 election as seen through the prism of the culture, explores the role history plays in the campaign — both for voters and the candidates themselves.

O

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

China, Taiwan have formal talks

ne day this past January, Mary Kim Titla’s parents left their home on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in southeastern Arizona and drove across the desert to Phoenix with a single purpose in mind — getting an up-close glimpse of a long shot named Barack Obama. With them they brought two things: handmade signs that said “Apaches for Obama” and their grandson, Titla’s nephew, a third-grader. Carefully, they told him why he was there that day. “This man,” they told the little boy, “is going to make history.” Across the republic, we’re hearing it everywhere in recent months, weeks and particularly in the days since Obama became the presumptive Democratic nominee: In America, people say, the winds of history are blowing. And many are excited. Recently, history became a buzzword. Jon Stewart mashed up clips of pundits rhapsodizing about history lessons. “Historic Choice: Obama,” trumpeted the Richmond Times-Dispatch, one of many. “Barack Obama enters the history books,” enthused CNN anchor Tony Harris. “This is one of the most signicant moments in American history,” says Francine Childs, who in July 1956, at 14, sat at a Dairy Queen window every day for 30 days until she was served ice cream at the whites-only counter. Obama is the most obvious historical gure. But he, John McCain and See HISTORY, 4F

Rockford Register Star
NEWSPAPER OF THE ROCK RIVER VALLEY RRSTAR.COM

ILLUSTRATION BY BILLY KULPA

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Rockford Register Star

Rockford Register Star

Treat Dad this weekend to food, fests, movies
See GO, 8, 16-17

Raptors QB makes most of his second chance
See Sports, 1B
ROCKFORD, ILLINOIS

FLIER FINDS HIS GROOVE, PAGE 3 MEET THE THUNDERBIRDS, PAGE 4 SEE PHOTOS FROM 2007, PAGE 8

WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE ROCK RIVER VALLEY

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‘No reason to panic’
Residents along Rock River still preparing for water.
ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

Take precautions if you’re headed out of town
Roads may be closed starting today because of flooding: In Wisconsin: There were flash flood watches Thursday night for the southern portion. Flash flooding in Grant County closed two highways and required rescues. Iowa: Interstate 80, Iowa’s busiest route, will be closed in eastern Iowa this afternoon because of rapidly rising floodwaters. Illinois: Flooding in the southeast part near the Indiana border has closed roads near Lawrenceville. Wet conditions also have caused some closures in the St. Louis and Grafton areas along the Mississippi River, which is closed to barge traffic. More on flooding, weather across the Midwest, 3A

Mixed: Sun and clouds all weekend. 2A YO U R CO M M U N I T Y

Waterfront lands country duo
Hot country duo Montgomery Gentry will be the main-stage act at On the Waterfront Aug. 29, according to international concert tour site Pollstar.com. The performers have been to Rockford at least four times for various festivals. Please see 6C

In Art Dodson’s backyard, an ornamental deer with a life preserver hung around its neck stands ready as oodwaters from the Rock River inch closer and closer to it and to the rear door of Dodson’s Ventura Boulevard home in Machesney Park. Down the street, Gerry Hull’s riverfront home is surrounded by

a foot of water. Neither Dodson nor Hull expressed concern Thursday, but the river is not expected to crest until Sunday. “We’ve been through it before,” Hull said. “No reason to panic.” But there is reason to take precautions. All boating activity has been banned on the river and some streets are closed. Please see 1C

8 0 M I L E S TO T H E G A L LO N | S CO OT E R S I N D E M A N D

Sharefest work begins Saturday
Sharefest, a volunteer effort launched last year by Heartland Community Church to spruce up three Rockford public schools, begins a two-week run Saturday. This year, the number of volunteers is up as is the number of churches involved. Please see 6C

Coffee to go; snake to stay
ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

JUNE 6, 2008

Imagine stopping in for your morning coffee at the Starbucks store, then nding a 4-foot albino Burmese python sunning itself next to your car in the parking lot. It happened Thursday at the Forest Plaza Starbucks on East State Street. Petco got the python. Please see 1C YO U R W O R L D

Roscoe may lower speed limits
Roscoe’s Village Board could move to reduce the speed limit in subdivisions to 25 mph in response to complaints by residents about speeding vehicles. Please see 3C

Court backs Gitmo appeal right
In a stinging rebuke of President Bush’s anti-terror policies, a deeply divided Supreme Court ruled Thursday that foreign detainees held for years at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba have the right to appeal to U.S. civilian courts to challenge their indenite imprisonment without charges. Please see 3A
ALAN LEÓN | ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

Over 100 at Blazer funeral
More than 100 people paid tribute to industrialist and philanthropist Cedric Blazer at his funeral service Thursday. Please see 4C

Comment on stories online
Just a reminder that you can again comment on stories on rrstar.com. Join in the conversation or nd out what others are saying. Click on any story and scroll to the bottom to get started. However, you must register. YO U R B U S I N E S S

House OKs jobless benets
The House on Thursday approved an extra three months of jobless benets for all unemployed Americans, knowing the plan’s chances are slight in the Senate and almost nonexistent at the White House. After failing to get a veto-proof two-thirds margin by three votes Wednesday, Democrats got an exact two-thirds margin Thursday with a 274-137 vote — the amount needed to overcome a threatened presidential veto. YO U R S P O R T S

Jim Phelps, owner of Phoenix Traders, gets about 80 miles per gallon of gas when riding to work in Rockford.

Cheap riding
Dan Gilbert loves his commute. The Rockford lawyer started riding the ve miles to work on a scooter this spring. He joins a national trend — the Motorcycle Industry Council says sales increased 24 percent through March, and local dealers say it’s increased more since. “I think it’s the freedom — you can go where you want, and it’s easy to park,” said Gilbert. “I feel pretty good when I’m riding, especially when I ll up my tank and it only costs me $4. ... With my commuting and driving around, I’ll be able to pay for the bike by the end of August.” Please see 11A
ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

Which size scooter is right for me?
1. 50 cc engines or less: Can go up to 35 or 40 mph, so only for small roads. Class L license needed unless they meet certain power limitations, then a regular license is OK. 2. 51 to 149 cc engines: Best for general, everyday use, they can go up to 60 mph and be used on many major roads, though not highways. Class L license needed. 3. 150 cc engines or more: For people who want a powerful bike, more like a motorcycle, and who go longer distances. Can go as fast as 70 mph. Class M license needed, the same as a motorcycle.

8 00 T2 FES AIR
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FRIDAY
JUNE 6, 2008

Mayor’s Arts Awards
Learn who took home the top honors.
PAGE 10

Seeking shelter from soaring gas prices, some are turning to a more fuel-efficient mode of transportation

Illinois gas prices Thursday
Champaign: $3.976 (low) Chicago: $4.201 (high) Rockford: $4.138 State average: $4.13
Prices, from AAA’s fuelgaugereport.com, are for a gallon of regular unleaded.

Scooters by the numbers
Miles per gallon: 55 to 120, depending on size. Cost: From $1,200 to more than $8,000, though mopeds can be cheaper. Cost to fill up: From $4 to $20 Phelps drives an automatic 150 cc Rakadak (below) and claims to get an average of 85 miles per gallon.

Illinois man tied for Open lead
PGA Tour rookie and Wineld native Kevin Streelman shot a 3-under 68 and is tied for the U.S. Open lead with Justin Hicks. Former Open champion Geoff Ogilvy is one back after Kevin an opening-round 69. Streelman With a tender left knee, Tiger Woods opened with a 1over 72. Phil Mickelson is even after a 71. Please see 1B CO M I N G S AT U R D AY

Try the Crazy Legs!
Cronies Grill goes beyond bar history with an imaginative menu.
MY LAST BITE, PAGE 3

Fewer Myrtle Beach ights
Southern Skyways has cut some of its Rockford-Myrtle Beach, S.C., ights in July and August, the latest casualty of high fuel prices. Sunday ights have been eliminated after June, though Saturday ights are still available. Please see 11A

Stocks cool off but post gains
Wall Street gave up a big early advance as the price of oil rose Thursday (up 36 cents to $136.74), with stocks closing moderately higher and demonstrating how anxious investors are about ination and the overall health of the economy. The Dow rose 57.81 to 12,141.58. The Nasdaq gained 10.34 to 2,404.35. Market report, 12A 82 pages Astrology Classified Comics Crossword
The Rockford Register Star, a GateHouse Media Inc. newspaper, © 2008

Coronado finances get good review from director
said Executive Director MiThe Coronado Performing chael Goldberg. The shortage Arts Center spent more than was covered by a city-issued it thought it would this year, line of credit. A ve-year subsidy from but it also had more shows on its plate than it rst believed. the city will help meet future The center is projected shortfalls, but the Coronado’s to end its rst nancial year fundraising arm is expected to about $159,000 in the red, be more vigorous as well. The
ROCKFORD REGISTER STAR

long-term plan for the Coronado calls for about one-third of its budget to come from donations and other contributions. “Overall, we’re right on target,” Goldberg said. Please see 1C How the top 12 shows fared in Michael Goldberg terms of audience, 1C

Your stories of Dad: Readers sent in photos of Dad in wild ties and tales of lessons he’s imparted. In GO 40 Leaders Under 40: We talk to the oldest and youngest winners to get their perspectives on the region’s future. In Business GPS trails: Riders and hikers can take advantage of new global positioning system coordinates for trails at Rock Cut State Park this summer. In Local&State

Kung fu fighting

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WINTER VISITORS’ GUIDE
WINTER 2010/2011

&
EXPLORE ARIZONA
PAGE 4

ARIZONA:

Your guide to new restaurants, fun festivals r o a r n , l and adventures to explore all over the state e r a

THINGS GS S TO DO
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WINTER VISITORS’ GUIDE

DINING G
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E X PE R IE NC E M ES A
Mesa Contemporary Arts At Mesa Arts Center One East Main | Downtown Mesa 480.644.6560 |of the MesaArtsCenter.com

North
Hottest spots

TOP

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DINING

Border
BY HOWARD SEFTEL DINING CRITIC

From the Greek Festival to Oktoberfest, the greater Phoenix area is filled with festivals in the fall, winter and spring. ktoberfest, 7 s ent: Republic reporters and editors scour calendars constantly so you don’t have to, rounding up the best in entertainment: entertainment: r big events, compelling theater productions, exciting concerts, free and cheap to-dos and so much more. Dinosaurs that NASA|Art: 50 Years of Exploration 10/30/10 - 1/23/11 2534 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale, roar and so much more! 480-994-1799, lossombreros.com. 53 N. Macdonald 35 N. Robson | Downtown Mesa Prepare for a trip into the heart of Mexico. | Downtown Mesa Among the fetching main dishes are pork in a tomatillo pumpkin-seed mole, crab|enchiladas 480.644.2230 AzMNHcom 480.644.2468 | ArizonaMuseumForYouth.com and skirt steak with poblano-chile strips. The

A R T S & C U LT U R E
WINTER VISITORS’ GUIDE

8

THINGS TO DO
THINGSTODO.AZCENTRAL.COM AZCENTRAL COM AZCENTRAL.COM

Los Sombreros

signature dish is lamb adobo in a luscious sweet/spicy ancho-chile sauce.

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El Bravo

8

Find great Mexican food at these Valley favorites
MICHAEL CHOW/THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

8338 N. Seventh St., Phoenix, 602-943-9753. You’ve eaten these Sonoran favorites before. But they probably never tasted this good. Along with exceptional tacos and enchiladas, there’s the lusty machaca burro, packed with shredded beef, eggs and onions. The chocolate chimi dessert makes it easy to linger.

ARIZONA
BY JENNIFER MCCLELLAN/THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC A

$
Don’t pass on the chorizo crepes (front) and other delicious Mexican dishes by Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza at Barrio Cafe.

Carolina’s

9
During the fall and winter, there are usually more things to do than there are days in the month. Here’s a list of 18 don’t-miss festivals and events. Phoenix
Phoenix Greek Festival
Get a taste of Greece without the price of a plane ticket at this 50th annual bash at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral. Along with Athenian chicken, spanakopita (a spinach-and-cheese pastry) and baklava, guests can try traditional Greek spirits such as ouzo, an anise-flavored liquor. There’s a village market selling such Greek goodies as chamomile and olive oil. Visitors can learn more about Greek religion, which is tied closely to the country’s culture, on a free tour of one of Arizona’s oldest and largest Greek Orthodox churches. A portion of the festival proceeds will benefit Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Details: 5-10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 10. $2, free for age 12 and younger. $5 to park at the church. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Cathedral, 1973 E. Maryland Ave., 602-264-2791, holytrinityphx.org.

1
Tradiciones

Barrio Cafe
Barrio Cafe, 2814 N. 16th St., Phoenix, 602-636-0240, barriocafe.com.

$$

Chef Silvana Salcido Esparza turns Mexican food into Mexican cuisine. Among her regional specialties are a slow-roasted pork dish called cochinita pibil, black-mole chicken and chiles en nogada, poblano peppers stuffed with chicken, nuts and fruit.

1202 E. Mohave St., Phoenix, 602-252-1503, carolinasmex.com. For more than 40 years, Carolina’s has been famous for its right-out-of-the-press flour tortillas. They’re at their best in two-handed burros like the green-chile machaca, the red-chile chicken and the Oaxaca special, filled with chorizo, beans, potatoes and cheese.

2

1602 E. Roosevelt St., Phoenix, 602-254-1719, tradicionesrestaurant.com. The food is just as festive as the setting at Pro’s Ranch Markets, from the queso fundido with chorizo to the handsome parrillada platter for two, piled high with grilled meats and homemade tortillas, with all the guacamole, vegetables, rice and beans fixings.

Pepe’s Taco Villa
2108 W. Camelback Road, Phoenix, 602-242-0379, pepestacovilla.com. So many choices, so little belly room. How can you choose among the chicken mole enchiladas (right), the beef enchiladas Suizas, the carnitas platter and the “Siberian” tacos with chicken, guacamole and sour cream? You’ll just have to make a repeat visit.

4

Los Dos Molinos

5

$

8646 S. Central Ave., Phoenix, 602-243-9113, losdosmolinosaz.com. The chef at this fiery New Mexican-style Mexican restaurant isn’t kidding when she says, “I do not know how to do ‘mild.’ ” But going down in flames was never so appealing. Spontaneously combust with green-chile beef, red-chile enchiladas and adovada pork.

Mariscos Altata

10

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San Carlos Bay

3

Los Reyes de la Torta

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5828 W. Indian School Road, Phoenix, 623-247-0731. The menu says “Orgullo Sinaloense” — the pride of Sinaloa, the coastal state south of Sonora. Great seafood justifies the boast. The steamed, aluminum-foil packet of octopus, shrimp, snails and vegetables in mushroom cream sauce is phenomenal, or try the shrimp culichi (below).

Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market
More than 700 Native American artists from around the country are featured at this 53rd annual festival. Shop for handmade artwork, including jewelry, pottery, baskets, kachina dolls, textiles and fine art and check out the musical and dance performances held in the museum’s outdoor amphitheater throughout the weekend. There’s also food for sale such as fry bread, posole stew, piki bread and Hopi stew. Details: 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, March 5 and 6, 2011. $15, $5 for students with ID, free for age 16 and younger. $24 for a twoday pass. Heard Museum, 2301 N. Central Ave., 602-252-8848, heard.org/fair.
COURTESTY OF LEE HYEOMA PHOTOGRAPHY

1901 E. McDowell Road, Phoenix, 602-340-0892.

Did you know that Mexico has more coastline than the continental United States? That’s why reeling in south-of-the-border fare is so rewarding. Hook a briny fresh-seafood cocktail, a well-stocked seven-seas stew or an authentic, Veracruz-style snapper.

$

9230 N. Seventh St., Phoenix, 602-870-2967. The food is “todo al estilo D.F.” — everything in the style of the Federal District around Mexico City. That means huaraches (thick tortillas) topped with chicken, sopes (cornmeal disks) topped with carne asada and some of the best tortas (sandwiches) in town.

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JILL RICHARDS/ THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

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Price of a three-course meal, without beverage, tax or tip, per person.

KEY $ under $20 || $ $ $20-$39 || $ $ $ $40-$60 || $ $ $ $ More than $60

MICHAEL MCNAMARA/THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

Derrick Suwaima Davis, Hopi/Choctaw, and his Living Traditions Dance Group were among the featured performers at the 51st Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market.

02.

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yOUR HOMECOMING WEEkENd CAlENdAR

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the daily eastern news’ weekly arts and entertainment magazine

OF H O M E CO M I N G WEEkENd w w w. d e n n e w s . c o m / v e r g e

PHOTO IllUSTRATION By CHRIS lEE & ERIC HIlTNER | ON THE VERGE

s atic fan Hower on ers che Panth theE 4
G PA
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Guitar duo to serenade tarble
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WHAT’S INSIdE
TAIlGATING BEFORE THE GAME

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FASHION 101
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PARAdERS GET REAdy TO ROll

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS LEE AND DAVID PENELLE | ON THE VERGE

DRINkING WITH YOuR paRENTs?
the daily eastern news’ weekly arts and entertainment magazine

paGE 2C

10.02.09

Of

w w w. d e n n e w s . c o m / v e r g e

fa m I LY

WEEkEND

styx comes to Eastern
page 5C

THE BEST OF TIMES
THINGs TO DO THIs WEEkEND

2009 KEND Y WEE FAMIL

Take a campus tour
page 4C

Where to Tailgating eat around family charleston style
page 3C page 6C

Comedy, magic converge
page 8C

pHOTO ILLusTRaTION BY CHRIs LEE | ON THE VERGE

16
“Te l l t h e t r u t h a n d d o n ’ t b e a fr a i d .”

01. Editorial
Friday
OC TOBER 2, 2009
V o lu m e 9 4 | N o. 2 9
eASTeRN IllINoIS uNIVeRSITY ChARleSToN, Ill. DeNNe WS.Com

design

EastErn nEws Ern
T H E D A I L Y
C ampus

Welcome to
uNIVERsIT Y

Family Weekend
Eastern accepting cost-curbing suggestions
Recommendations to be presented at October meeting
By Sarah Ruholl Administration Editor

“Tell the truth and don’t be afraid. ”

Infected on-campus students given option to be relocated
Healthy-student isolation set for Lawson Hall
By Sarah Jean Bresnahan Campus Editor

EastErn nEws
T H E D A I L Y

Frid a y
OC TOBER 16, 2009
V o lu m e 9 4 | N o. 3 8
eASTeRN IllINoIS uNIVeRSITY ChARleSToN, Ill. DeNNe WS.Com

Homecoming 2009

pHOTO ILLusTR aTION BY CHRIs LEE | THE DaILY EasTERN NE Ws

Keeping operating costs down is essential for the university in the current economic environment. To help Eastern keep its costs down, the university has been accepting cost containment suggestions on its Web site. The link to send suggestions can be found at eiu.edu/costcontainment.php. The link has been up since late May and will remain there indefinitely. Students can also send suggestions directly to costcontainment@eiu.edu. “We have not set a deadline,” said Derek Markley, special assistant to President Bill Perry. “There might not be a deadline.” Markley is in charge of collecting the responses. So far, around 45 suggestions have come in, but he said most of them fall into three main categories. “The three most popular are printing, such as how we can utilize PDF files instead of hard copies,” he said. “Two, we got a lot of suggestions about lighting, dimming, staggering and using more natural lighting where possible. The third concerned power overall. Computers came up a lot.” Markley said the campus contains about 10,000 computers. President Perry said keeping computer operating costs down is simple. “Shut it down at night; start it up in the morning,” he said. “And utilize the computer’s spin-down mode when it’s not in use.” Making people aware of how much money can be saved by doing this is the main goal, Markley said. “We want to show people how much power this would save and in turn how much cost,” Markley said. “It’s a lot of computers. It’s not really implementation; I’d go back to education.” Most of the suggestions are not going to become set rules, just thoughts on ways to keep costs down, Perry said. “Some of these things we can’t actually require people to do, but they’re suggestions we can make,” he said.
COST, page 7

The Centers for Disease Control suggests anyone with flu-like symptoms to isolate themselves to keep

H1N1 from spreading. Some students who live on campus have gone home to better isolate themselves. However, not all students can, and Housing and Dining Services and Health Service are teaming up to help those students who cannot go home. Mark Hudson, director of Housing and Dining, said a protocol for these situations has been set up. “If the person who is ill is in a double as a single, then they can stay

there, and we have a system worked out where they can have a buddy that brings them food,” Hudson said. An ill student who lives in the residence halls and has a roommate also has an option available. Hudson said the healthy student is given the option to live with a friend for a few days while his roommate is sick. The second floor of Lawson Hall has been designated for healthy students with sick roommates.

By the numbers
Dan Nadler, vice president for student affairs, reports the number of campus H1N1 cases.

73

Number of cases since classes have started in August

Lawson’s second floor is normally for conference guests and visiting
INFECTED, page 7

MAP grant restored
STATE

C ampus

Copyright violations on demand

Students rallied for program in Springfield Thursday Program still $15 million short of necessary funds
HOMECOMING WEEk 2009

By Erica Whelan Staff Reporter

SPRINGFIELD—The Illinois General Assembly restored $205 million toward the Monetary Award Program grant for spring 2010 Thursday. Hours before approval, student lobbyists traveled to Springfield to urge state government officials to

support the funding, which had been cut in half in July. The money will be dedicated toward assisting recipients for the spring 2010 semester, but still falls $15 million short of the $220 million needed to aid all recipients. Lawmakers will have to reconvene to determine how to provide for subsequent school terms.

k AROlINA STR ACk | THE dAIly EASTERN NE WS

MAP, page 5

Kendall Jackson, a sophomore career technology and education major, talks to state Representative Esther Golard, 6th District, about supporting Monetary Award Program grant funding on Thursday at the State Capitol building in Springfield.

HOMECOMING WEEk 2009 W

One hell of a time
Leon wins mascot competition for second year in a row
By Frank Benik Staff Reporter

Panther to
AllBy Collin Whitchurch Sports Editor

From

WHaT ’s INsIDE

Students from around campus come together during a candlelight march through campus, taking a stand against rape.

Taking back the night

NE Ws, sEC TION a

page a8

nal” Leon danced his way to number one, and friend and former Sigma Pi Cameron Chana. “I feel unbelievable,” said Jordan Cox, a juat one point, all the way up to the feet of the nior communications major. “We all worked judge’s table. Leon wasn’t the only person who performed so unbelievably hard. This one is for Camerto songs by the late King of Pop. Michael Jack- on. He was a Sigma Pi and everyone did this spORTs, sEC “Single B VERGE, sEC TION C EC son songs, and Beyonce’s song TIONLadies” for him.” The winners of the competition were all were the most popular song selections of this chosen by a panel of judges who were looking year’s competition. The RSO division winner was Epsilon Sig- for a number of things from the performers, inma Alpha who performed to the theme songs cluding creativity, strong voices, hitting stunts, of the Pink Panther and Mission Impossible, and synchronization. Having colored ribbons above while wearing removablecompleted the first Taylor Hall, the only residence hall competing, their bluemonth of their season unblemished, won first place in residence hall division. shirts. The winner of the of thedivision wasfootball members Greek Eastern the team of Kappa have one thing onwho had Frank Benik can be reached at 581team Delta and Sigma Pi their minds plenty ofas they prepare danced to the re-p.m. aerial tosses and for their 1:30 7942 or at fmbenik@eiu.edu. mix of songs such as “Don’t Stop the Music” Family Weekend showdown against From concerts to dining by Rihanna. The win capped what has been Eastern for members of the Kappa out, On the Verge has you an emotional timeKentucky — revenge.

As college students have been prevalently targeted as pirates in the past, the RIAA has appealed for a federal intervention that began holding schools responsible for controlling copyright infringement on campus this past summer. Last year, Eastern was distinBy Erica Whelan guished by the RIAA and Motion Staff Reporter Picture Association of America as The Recording Industry Associa- one of the top universities in the U.S. tion of America has launched an of- in terms of copyright violations. “It caught us off guard,” said fensive against file-sharing programs like LimeWire and Kazaa To the Delta and Sigma Pi team who dedicated their Michael Jackson jacket, hat and shoes. that enable Adam Dodge, Eastern’s information Music ofthe illegal reproduction ofCrimi- performance andofficer,the memory of their “Dangerous” and “Smooth media. security win to who at one point

Eastern students rank as one of highest for digital copyright violations

Pro
Eastern head coach Bob Spoo rememremem cobers about 10 years ago, when offensive co ordinator Roy Wittke brought in a tape of a Burlingyoung quarterback who played for Burling ton (Wis.) High School. He recalls taking a look at the tape and telling Wittke: “I don’t think we can do anything for this young man.” But Wittke convinced Spoo to give the young quarterback a shot, so Spoo signed him to a partial scholarship, and just like that, a legend was born. Tony Romo went on to become arguably the greatest footquarterback in Eastern foot startball history and is the start ing quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. He finished his career in 2002 as the school’s all-time leader in touchdown passes (85), second in passing yards (8,212), and second in both atcompletions (584) and at tempts (941). After his final season at Eastern, he won the Walter Payton

Romo’s journey to NFL stardom had twists, turns

sifted through more than 2,200 separate e-mails detailing every infringement committed on the campus network. Each notice included a list of pirated content traced back to a specific IP address ultimately used for the school to identify the offender. No legal action was taken against the university or any individuals.

COPYRIGHT, page 7

‘Super Bowl for us’

Your Family Weekend guide

By the time the dust settled at the end of the 2009 “Yell Like Hell” and “Who Wants to be a Mascot?” competitions, a few things were crystal clear: Last year’s mascot champion reigned supreme again, and some new champions had Pep rally taken the crown. The crowd was loud, location the spirit was palpaToday’s pep rally ble and everyone inside will be moved from McAfee Gymnasium the South Quad to last night yelled like, McAfee Gymnawell, hell. sium. The show began after 7 p.m. with “Yell It will still be held at 8 p.m. Like Hell” team Delta Zeta and Beta Theta Pi kicked off the festivities. Each “Yell Like Hell” team thereafter was followed by a mascot performance and a Registered Student Organization performance. Mike Leon was the winner of the “Who Wants to be a Mascot?” competition. Leon, last year’s winner, calmly strutted out to one end of the gymnasium with a suitcase to the music of “Blue Suede Shoes” and began his performance. After he took off his jacket, he walked over to the suitcase where he pulled out a replica

Award, given annually to the nation’s top player in the Football Championship Subdivision (then Division I-AA). “Obviously I made a big mistake,” Spoo said. “But I’m glad we took him. He did a great job for us.” Romo will be honored as part of the weekend Homecoming festivities at Saturday’s football game between Eastern and Tennessee Tech (1:30 p.m. at O’Brien Field). He will have his No. 17 jersey retired between the first and second quarter of the game, becoming just the fifth Panther to have his number retired. Romo and four other people who have contributed to Eastern athletics will be inducted into the Eastern Athletic Hall of Fame at 10 a.m. Saturday at a sold-out banquet. When asked if he ever envisioned Romo having the type of success he has had when he was recruiting him out of high school, Wittke was blunt about it. “No I did not,” the 14th-year offensive coordinator said. “I thought he had a very good chance to start for us and become a good player for us, but the thing about Tony is he is a self-made guy. He took the tools he had athletically and made the most of it through hard work.”
ROMO, page 10

HELL, page 5

PHOTOS COURTESy OF 2009 FOOTBAll MEdIA GUIdE

4 dAYs
until President Bill Perry’s inauguration on Nov. 9. “TELL THE TRUTH AND DON’T BE AFRAID” MONDAY | 11.5.07

page b1

University Board’s three-act Fall concert goes from being $15 to costing nothing on the day of the event.

freeing Music
SEE CAMPUS, PAGE 3 WWW.DENNEWS.COM

and your family covered this weekend.

WHAT ’S INSIdE

Orchestra asks for audience participation
PAGE 8

VS.
“TELL THE TRUTH AND DON’T BE AFRAID”

The Healthy Lifestyle series, sponsored by the Student Recreation Center, the School of Family and Consumer Sciences and the Office of Training and Development, hosts a presentation on how to create a more healthy holiday meal. SEE CAMPUS, PAGE 3 WWW.DENNEWS.COM

Holiday food faCe-off

PAGE 16

Football looks to get back on track

Your Homecoming weekend guide
SEC TION B

the DAILY EASTERN NEWS
EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, CHARLESTON
VOL. 94 | ISSUE 54

the DAILY EASTERN NEWS
EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, CHARLESTON
WEDNESDAY | 11.28.07

Volume 47, Issue 2 NEWS ENCORE SPORTS

Creating more efficient instructors
Series of ‘wholesome Professor’ workshops aim to improve faculty
By Jordan Crook RHA Reporter Physical fitness. Mental readiness. Emotional health. Scholarly preparedness. Social engagement. These are the five characteristics Mildred Pearson, director of faculty development, wants to improve in faculty members through various workshops and series as a part of the “Wholesome Professor” program. “The goal of this series is to enhance teaching and learning,” she said. This idea has drawn significant interest from the faculty. Pearson said the number of faculty members that have attended the series so far has been much higher than ever before. She said the series has consistently had an audience of between 15 and 20 people at each of the presentations this year. Pearson said she believes the reason for the high attendance is due to the slate of topics the series offers up for discussion. A topic Pearson said stood out for her in the Wholesome Professor series was the graduate mentoring program presented by assistant professor of history Jinhee Lee.
SEE CULTURE, PAGE 7

FACULTY WORKSHOPS

bringing suicide into the light

Confidentiality:
WHen iS it oK to breaK it?
Eastern’s Counseling Center’s privacy policy has clauses that allow it to break confidentiality if safety is a concern
By Stephen Di Benedetto Senior University Reporter ichole D’Antonio does not know how Judicial Affairs found out about her relapse in recovery. D’Antonio, senior English major, met with a counselor from the Counseling Center in January 2005 because of an eating disorder and confided to the counselor of a relapse. She said during her next meeting with the counselor, the counselor told her she was beyond the center’s help and she would have to sign a medical withdrawal. After a professor defended D’Antonio and met with Sandy Cox, director of the Counseling Center, Feb. 16, 2005, Judicial Affairs offered D’Antonio a behavioral contract for her eating disorder instead of a medical withdrawal on Feb. 23, 2005, which she signed. D’Antonio said Feb. 23 was the first time she ever met with Judicial Affairs, and the contract had been specifically written for her disorder the day it was offered. “I’m not sure how Judicial Affairs found out about it,” D’Antonio said of her relapse.
SEE PRIVATE, PAGE 2

VOL. 94 | ISSUE 64

INSIDE

the valley forge
The Award-Winning Student Newspaper of Rock Valley College

10 . 18 . 06

RICKY ELLIS

»SPORTS 16

CRIMINAL OR ARTIST?

»E4

GRADE DISTRIBUTION ¦ Student Majority Support New Policy

Grades to go online-only
With computer access at an all-time high, final marks will now skip the post office
BY SARAH KLENTZ
News Editor

THE NEXT LOGICAL STEP?
According to the Registrar of Rock Valley, Jake Hinton-Rivera, online-only grades are a new trend in colleges accross the country.

BEGINNING IN DECEMBER 2006, RVC students’ final grades will not be mailed to home addresses and will

only be available through Online Services, or by phone. In the next few weeks, students at RVC will be receiving a postcard notifying them that their final semester grades will not be mailed at all. These 8,000 post-

cards will be one way, along with advertisements in numerous locations around campus, students will be notified of this major change. RVC Registrar Jake Hinton-Rivera said of the change, “For the last year the Records and Registration Office has monitored the increase in usage of online continued on page 3

Money saved on Postage and other expenses.

$8k

Americans who do not use the Internet

41%

RVC Students that prefer online grades

62%

RVC Students that prefer mailed grades

38%

VOLLEYBALL ¦ Season in Trouble

STATE POLITICS ¦ Senator at RVC

N

What was shaping up to be Nationals-bound season, a clerical error has left the Lady Eagles

before losing to its shAdow
Michael PeterSon | the Daily eaStern newS

WHEN CAN CONFIDENTIALITY BE BROKEN?
According to the Counseling Center’s privacy policy, it can be broken if: • “We believe that a client presents a clear, imminent risk of serious physical or mental injury or death to her/himself or another person unless protective measures are taken.” • “We have reasonable cause to believe that a child is being abused or neglected or a vulnerable elderly individual is being subject to abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation.” • “We receive a valid court order signed by a judge.” • “We are approached by authorized federal officials for information related to national security and intelligence activities.” • “We need to seek legal advice from Eastern’s University Counsel.”

Spiked.
Sports Editor

Obama comes to campus
BY SARAH KLENTZ
News Editor

T

BY COLLIN WHITCHURCH

HIS SEASON, LIKE MANY, BEGAN with hopes for a National Championship. But for the Golden Eagles volleyball team, this National Championship chase will be different from those in the past. This one will come with a chip on their shoulder. On Thursday, Oct. 12, a news release by the Rock Valley athletic department indicated that do to an error the department had made, the volleyball team, who at

the time had a record of 10-8, would be forced to forfeit all of their matches, dropping their record to 0-18. The school has appealed this decision. In August the athletic department for every school is asked to determine the eligibility of every member of their respective teams. The department must then fill out an NJCAA online form to confirm the eligibility and send, via the Internet, the form to the NJCAA. According to the news release, the form had been continued on page 15

Possible 2008 Presidential candidate spoke to over 900 in RVC s PEC
ILLINOIS SENATOR BARACK OBAMA held his 57th Town Hall meeting in the PEC of Rock Valley College to talk to residents about the issues that concern them most on Sept. 29, 2006. Costs of college, healthcare, energy availability and cost, welfare, and the war in Iraq, were all among the topics that Obama addressed. Obama made his view on accessible education for communities a topic in which he mentioned his experience in the U.S. Senate. Obama stressed the importance of education for all people, and also the implementation of technical and trade programs for those interested or talented in such fields. “The first bill I introduced was about There are no good how to expand ac- options for cess to institutions Iraq. There like Rock Valley.” are bad Obama added, options, “But the fact is that and worse most of these bills languish in commit- options. tee digressing our ̶Barack efforts and actual- Obama ly increasing interest rates on student loans, making it more expensive for young people to attend college,” echoing the concerns of many students. The crowd was clearly full of supporters of Obama and also numerous local and state politicians were seen. The crowd began to applaud the moment he walked in the doors of the PEC, long before he was even in view for the attendees sitting low on the bleachers. Before the hour long meeting began, there was standing room only. “There are no good options for Iraq. There are bad options, and worse options.” Iraq was important to attendees, as the response continued on page 2

Chris Schafer, bassist for the local band Tailspin, plays a benefit concert at The Station on Saturday. The band raised money for Gina Giberson.

Station holds benefit concert for Giberson
Domestic abuse victim gains support from around the community
By Michael Peterson City Editor Gina Giberson thought she had alienated and lost all her friends because of her relationship, her friends said. Giberson, a 40-year-old Charleston resident who is currently hospitalized for head injuries she sustained from an attack, was involved with Jason Abernathy, 33, of Charleston. “She talked a lot about how she was scared that Jason had burned all her bridges and all her friends wouldn’t have anything else to do with her,” said Christina Mills, friend of Giberson’s. With a candlelight vigil held in her honor two weeks ago and a benefit concert hosted on Saturday, her friends continue to support her. “I tell her when I go up there to visit, ‘Gina, we are having a party for you,’ and she just smiles at me,” said Marsha Cox, another close friend of Giberson. On Oct. 16, the Charleston Police Department responded to a domestic violence report and arrested Abernathy. He has been charged with one count of aggravated battery and is currently held at the Coles County Jail. After the attack, Cox, Mills, and Kathy Cary started the Gina Giberson Benefit Fund to help pay for Giberson’s expenses.
SEE GIBERSON, PAGE 2

Student’s organization aims to increase suicide awareness at eastern

Losing one of his best friends to suicide this fall didn’t stop Jeff Melanson from stepping up to do something about it. Melanson, senior social sciences major, began the 2007 fall semester with one of his closest friends committing suipeople per 100,000 college students commit suicide every year. cide on the first Wednesday. He and his friends were devastated. NEED HELP? “I’ve seen what happens If you are feeling hopeless, experiencing mood swings, strug- afterwards to the victim’s loved gling with drug abuse or conones, and I can sympathize,” templating suicide help is avail- Melanson said. able on campus. Because he is a Student SenEIU Counceling center ate member, he had the oppor581-3413 tunity to make a difference. National Suicide Prevention Hotline Melanson planned to start (800) 273-TALK small and eventually draw suppeople per 100,000 commit suicide every year in the U.S.

10.6 7.5

By Chris Walden Student Government Reporter

port to his cause. He decided in early fall of 2007 to form a Suicide Awareness Initiative Committee in conjunction with Eastern’s Counseling Center. A Center for Disease Control and Prevention study cites suicide as the third leading cause of death among 18 to 21year-olds. Often, whenever suicide comes up in discussion, or when people talk about depression, they don’t feel comfortable talking about it, Melanson said. “It’s a sensitive issue, obviously – but our age group is under attack,” he said. “It can’t afford to be a sensitive issue any longer.”
SEE SUICIDE, PAGE 5

Research study gives away food
Free dinners given to students as part of graduate thesis study
By Jordan Crook RHA Reporter Graduate student Beth Schmidt took part in a research study Tuesday night. Her job was to eat soup, pasta and a cookie. Schmidt said when she heard about the event from dietetics graduate student Gwen Zumwalt who ran the study, it piqued her curiosity, and her appetite. “I thought it would be interesting, but I was also hungry,” Schmidt said. Schmidt was one of 44 students who was treated to a free dinner courtesy of the Pantera Restaurant in Room 1418 in Klehm Hall. As part of the study, Zumwalt said, students were split into two groups and were served by different student waiters and waitresses. Zumwalt said three of the student workers were told to constantly ask customers if they wanted food and drink refills, while the other three did not ask if students wanted more food and only sparingly asked if they wanted drink refills. Senior hospitality major Justin Nickel was one of the waiters who did not ask customers if they wanted refills. He said the point of his part of the study was to look at the rate customers asked for refills without being motivated by staff.
SEE FOOD, PAGE 2

Criminal activity absent from athletic conduct code
By Katie Anderson Campus Editor Nichole D’Antonio accused an Eastern football player of sexually assaulting her in 2003. D’Antonio said the player spent the night in her and her roomate’s room because he was afraid to get in trouble with his coaches. All three students had been drinking alcohol at a party. D’Antonio said she awoke in the night to the football player, who she wished remained unnamed, sexually assaulting her. He then silently left. For student-athletes who are charged and or found guilty of crimes, there are no set standards for consequences on the books for varying levels and types of crimes set by Eastern Athletics or the National Collegiate Athletic Association.
SEE ATHLETIC, PAGE 5

FIRST TUESDAY LECTURES ¦ Oct. 3

Droughts from Space
BY CLAYTON FERRY
Staff Writer
PHOTOS BY ERIN KIRKPATRICK ¦ Photo Editor

KaRla BRowning | ThE Daily EasTERn nEws

Justin Nickel, senior hospitality management major, serves Natalie Czyz, junior family and consumer science major, during the Pantera Restaurant research study, which examined customer’s refilling habits Tuesday night at Klehm Hall.

Mike Kelley, Asst. Prof. of Geoscience, spoke during the Oct. 3 First Tuesday lecture.

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR Mike Kelley shared the results of his summer project during the First Tuesday Lecture on Oct. 3, 2006. Applying a relatively new system of vegetation measure called

the Enhanced Vegetation Index, or EVI, he studied the dry season of August 2005 using EVI and compared it to existing indexes that have been used in the past. EVI is an enhanced version of a current vegetation index but gives continued on page 3

www. THEVALLEYFORGEONLINE .com

01.

Editorial design
Desert Ridge
Desert Ridge is the Arizona State Land Department's first master-planned community. It covers 5,700 acres along Loop 101 in northeast Phoenix.
1. Desert Ridge Marketplace 2. Musical Instrument Museum 3. CityNorth 4. Mayo Clinic Hospital 5. Pinnacle High School 6. JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort and Spa

17

Vacancies halt construction
Completions square feet 5 million 4 3 2 1 0 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Vacancy rates and construction activity typically move in opposite directions.
Vacancy percentage

Highest 26% Lowest 388,992

30%

Pinnacle Peak Rd.
Paradise Peak West Golf Course

26 22 18 14
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010*

40 th S t.

Cashman Park

Wildfire Golf Club

10
5

Dee

r Va

lley

Dr.
Tatum Blvd.

6

Source: CBRE Research *Through June 30, 2010

CHRIS LEE/THE ARIZONA REPUBLIC
101

1

3
M ay oB

Map area
51

2
CAP Can al

lvd

.

56th St.

PHOENIX

4
CHRIS LEE/THE REPUBLIC

Union Hills Dr.
Source: Arizona State Land Department

Arizona Legislative District 11
Three Democratic candidates are running in the Primary Election for District 11.
Thunderbird Rd. Shea Blvd. Scottsdale Rd. 19th Ave.
10

Don’t let the bedbugs bite
How to identify: Bedbugs are flat, reddish-brown and smaller than an apple seed.

Bedbugs have become a growing nuisance in Phoenix.

101

Camelback Rd.
17

Bedbugs are found in: 1. Bedding. 2. Headboards. 3. Bed frames. 4. Crevices and corners of mattresses. 5. Cracks. 6. Drapes. 7. Nightstands.

202

Thomas Rd. McDowell Rd.

6 2 5 4 1 7

3

Source: Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission CHRIS LEE/THE REPUBLIC
Source: Jack McClure of Chemtech Supply ILLUSTRATION BY CHRIS LEE/THE REPUBLIC 424.6 x 233.3 phx-NcBugs0707 Initial: COPY____ SLOT____

03. Web design

www.chrisly.info cleecanth@gmail.com (815) 601-2264

03.

Web design

19

www.brightarch.com

20

03.

Web design

www.riskretentionservices.com

Chris Lee
www.chrisly.info
3 Candletree Drive / Apartment 6 / Springfield, Illinois 62704 (815) 601-2264 / cleecanth@gmail.com

An award-winning, logical, visual journalist pursuing a career at an organization that appreciates the power of visual communication. Recent Experience
Phoenix, Arizona Starting as a student Under the Pulliam worker, I proved myself Fellowship program, I was indispensable. I then worked one of fifteen who had a as an outside contractor, chance to spend the summer thus beginning my career as with the 12th largest paper a freelance designer. Since in the nation. While with then, I have worked for The Republic, I mostly various companies — both worked on centerpieces and national and international information graphics. I also — creating everything art directed and designed from web sites to logos a full special section. and advertisements.

6/10 - 8/10 The Arizona Republic

9/06 - present Freelance Design

Rockford, Illinois Working as an intern in the Graphics department for the 60,000-plus circulation newspaper, I created online videos, flash applications, information graphics, maps, photo illustrations, and page layouts. With a relatively small staff, The Star was able to give me a lot of individual attention.

6/08 - 8/08 Rockford Register Star

1/05 - 12/09 Student Newspapers

Eastern Illinois University & Rock Valley College Beginning as a designer for my community college paper, I eventually became Editor in Chief. When I transferred to Eastern, I worked my way up again, finally taking the position of managing editor. At both papers I doubled as art director.

Education

12/09 Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism

Concentration in Visual Communication Eastern Illinois University / Charleston, Illinois

5/07 Associate Degree of Arts

Rock Valley College / Rockford, Illinois

Awards
Society for Collegiate Journalists (SCJ)
2008 First place, front, feature and editorial page design. Second place, inside and feature page design.

Associated Collegiate Press (ACP)
2007 Pacemaker finalist, 2006 Best in show.

Student Society for News Design (SSND)

2007 Honorable mention, non-daily designer of the year. First and third place, non-daily editorial design.

Illinois Community College Journalism Association (ICCJA)

2005 - 2007 Best Overall. 2005-2007 First place, layout and graphics.

Skills
• Adept with Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Quark, CCI Layout Champ, Avid, Final Cut, Premiere, Flash, Microsoft Office, Wordpress, Joomla, (X)HTML and CSS. • Educated in proper typographic style. • Trained in AP style and proper copy-editing practices. • Skilled in political cartooning and figure drawing. • Strong sense of color, composition and layout.

Thank you.

www.chrisly.info cleecanth@gmail.com (815) 601-2264

All work is copyright 2011, Christopher Lee.