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2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education

Republic of the Philippines Department of Education BUREAU OF SECONDARY EDUCATION rd 3 Floor, Bonifacio Bldg., DepEd Complex, Meralco Avenue Pasig City

2010 Secondary Education Curriculum Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education

HOME ECONOMICS Clothing and Textiles I

May 2010

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2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education

TABLE OF CONTENTS I. II. III.
IV.

Introduction Conceptual Framework in Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education (CP-TLE) Home Economics – Background Career Pathways in Clothing and Textiles Program and General Standards Three Stages Curriculum Framework

V. VI.

Annexes: A. The Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of the 2002 Secondary Education Curriculum (SEC): Findings and Recommendations B. C. Guide Questions for the Review of the Curriculum Suggested Rubrics

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2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education

INTRODUCTION The Context As a matter of practice, the curriculum in the Philippines is revised every ten years, but the rapid rate of change in education and the fast obsolescence of knowledge necessitate a continual revisiting and updating of the curriculum to make it responsive to emerging changes in the needs of the learner and the society. Thus, the refinement of the curriculum remains to be a work in progress. Aside from the issue of relevance, the refinement of the secondary education curriculum was guided by the need, as articulated in the Education for All Plan 2015, to streamline its content in order to improve student mastery and contribute to the attainment of functional literacy. This became a primary consideration in the design of the curriculum and the formulation of standards and the essential understandings from which the content of the curriculum was derived. The results of national and international assessments were reviewed and analyzed for their implications for teaching and learning. The findings were used to further tighten the standards and improve the delivery of the curriculum and the teaching-learning process. The results of the evaluation of the implementation of the 2002 Basic Education Curriculum were likewise considered in the review of the curriculum. The findings and recommendations (see Annex A) guided the training of teachers and the capacity-building of school heads in managing the pilot test of the curriculum in 23 secondary schools nationwide. The Process The refinement of the curriculum followed the Understanding by Design (UbD) model developed by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins.

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2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education
Essential Questions

Essential Content/ Objectives Performance (knowledge/skills) Understandings Standards Results/Outcomes Products/ Performances Assessment

Assessment Criteria/ Tools

Learning Plan

Learning Activities

Resources/ Materials

The curriculum design has the following elements: Stage 1 A. Results/Desired Outcomes, which define what students should be able to know and do at the end of the program, course, or unit of study; generally expressed in terms of overall goals, and specifically defined in terms of content and performance standards A.1. Content standards, which specify the essential knowledge (includes the most important and enduring ideas, issues, principles and concepts from the disciplines), skills and habits of mind that should be taught and learned. They answer the question, “What should students know and be able to do?” A.2. Performance standards, which express the degree or quality of proficiency that students are expected to demonstrate in relation to the content standards. They answer the question, “How well must students do their work?” or “At what level of performance would the student be appropriately qualified or certified?” 4

and content and skill acquisition Stage 3 A. local government officials. which details the instructional activities that students will go through to attain the standards A. A series of consultations with critical stakeholders: students. and the assessment criteria and the tools to measure students’ products and performances. regular high school. industry. Teachers were trained and school heads from the 23 identified pilot schools underwent capacity-building to prepare them for the management of the try-out of the curriculum. parents. which are aligned with the standards and are designed to promote attainment of desired results. which defines acceptable evidence of student’s attainment of desired results. The schools were identified based on their location (i. B. Learning Plan. Essential Understandings. Questions to guide the review of Stages 1 to 3 are provided in Annex B. Visayas. school heads. among others. and experts from the academe. 5 . which are open-ended. teachers. which are expressed in terms of knowledge and skills that teachers can use as guide in formulating their own classroom objectives Stage 2 A. Curriculum Objectives. the essential understandings. specialist high school) they offer.. the essential questions. Luzon. which are the evidence of students’ learning and a demonstration of their conceptual understanding. Essential Questions. Products and Performances.1. which are the big and enduring ideas at the heart of the discipline and which we want the children to remember even long after they leave school C. determines authentic performance tasks that the student is expected to do to demonstrate the desired understandings. were made to validate and further refine the formulation of standards.e. Workshops were conducted to draft the curriculum documents.. and defines the criteria against which the student’s performances or products shall be judged.e. Instructional Activities. write the instructional plan and develop lesson exemplars. supervisors. Assessment.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education B. provocative questions that spark thinking and further inquiry into the essential meanings and understandings D. Mindanao) and the type of program (i. the religious.

2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Meetings with school heads and classroom visits were made on a quarterly basis to monitor the try-out of the curriculum. The latter shall be offered in schools as special interest areas which children can pursue among many other career options in livelihood education. constructivism. Engineering and Science Education Program. integrative teaching) and integrates the richness of the special curricular programs (Arts. Journalism. The curriculum has the following features: 6 . and Foreign Language). A follow-through training was subsequently conducted to further equip them with the tools of supervision given the requirements of the program.. Technical-Vocational Program. What has evolved from the try-out is a core curriculum that builds on and retains the principles of the 2002 BEC (i.e. Sports. Education supervisors were later trained on providing instructional support to teachers. Results Initial feedback from the teachers has been useful in further improving the design of the curriculum. Teachers’ feedback on the lesson guides became the basis for further refinement of the standards and the other elements of the curriculum.

focuses on essential understandings • Sets high expectations (standards-based) – expressed in terms of what students should know and the quality and proficiency of the skill that they are expected to demonstrate as evidence of learning • Rich and challenging.provides for a personalized approach to developing the student’s multiple intelligences • Develops readiness and passion for work and lifelong learning SPA SPFL Tech-Voc SPS Core Curr. technical-vocational program (tech-voc) being offered on the side. special science/math (S&T). to develop the students’ multiple intelligences.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Features of the Curric ulum • Lean. special program in journalism (SPJ). SPJ S&T SPED What is being envisaged is that the core curriculum shall be implemented with special curricular programs: special program in the arts (SPA). special program in foreign language. special program in sports (SPS). 7 .

lifestyles. traits.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs) • Assess/evaluate student characteristics. attributes. skills and competencies • Compare personal qualities to characteristics of actual practitioners Purpose:  Understand complexities of chosen field  Comparatively reassess choice Environment and Market • Students are exposed to the basics of: o Environmental scanning o Micro-market analysis o Consumer analysis o Customer expectation analysis Purpose:  Give students a more market-oriented and customer-centered mindset rather than just focusing on production Process and Delivery • Processes of distinctive and field-related skills are taught to students • Students are encouraged to appreciate and understand the methods/strategies in delivery the products demanded by customers • Attitudes in the workplace are internalized 8 .

Home Management Business. Clothing and Textiles. teachers are encouraged to introduce CP-TLE Home Economics program in the classroom by highlighting/integrating the concepts and principles of personal and family life specifically on self-awareness. as well as the relation of the home to the community.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education HOME ECONOMICS Background: Home Economics is the science and art of homemaking which focuses on the family – the core/basic unit of society. 9 . namely: Foods and Food Service. Beauty Care. Home Economics (HE) offers six (6) areas of specialization. To realize this end. Handicrafts. Each specialization enables the learner to develop knowledge. responsible family membership and harmonious family relationships through exposure in an area of specialization in HE. In the Career Pathways in Technology and Livelihood Education (CP-TLE) program of the 2010 Secondary Education Curriculum. skills and attitudes needed in the day to day living. and Health Care and Support Services. Its major concern is the total well-being of the individual and the whole family.

Material Estimator. Designer. Packager. Project Planner Men’s Garment Construction (Long Pants with Continental Side and Back Welt Pocket) Sewer. Pattern Maker. Record Keeper. Entrepreneur. Entrepreneur. Packager. Entrepreneur. Pattern Maker. Hemmer. Dress/Tailor Shop Aide. Pattern Maker. Sewer. Pattern Maker. Project Planner Men’s Garment Construction (Trubenized Shirt) Sewer. Sewing Machine Troubleshooter Casual Wear Construction (Unisex Polo Shirt with Convertible Collar) Entrepreneur. Dress/Tailor Shop Aide. Packager. Pattern Maker. Aide. Project Planner Ladies Garment Construction (Blouse with Darts) Aide. Seamer. Packager. Project Planner Children’s Wear with Trimmings Entrepreneur. Aide. Sewing Machine Troubleshooter Soft Furnishing Production Aide. Project Planner. Designer. Designer. Pattern Maker. Material Estimator. Entrepreneur. Seamer. Alternator. Sewing Machine Troubleshooter Sleep Wear Construction (Pajamas: Shirt and Pants) Aide. Packager. Seamer. Pattern Maker. Dress/Tailor Shop Aide. Hemmer. Material Estimator. Project Planner Casual Wear Construction (Short Pants with Zipper Placket and Patch Pockets) Entrepreneur. Material Estimator. Pattern Maker. Sewer. Material Estimator. Project Planner Casual Wear Construction (Pleated Skirt with Side Pocket and One-Piece Skirt) Entrepreneur. Record Keeper. Designer. Record Keeper. Material Estimator.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education CAREER PATHWAYS in TECHNOLOGY AND LIVELIHOOD EDUCATION HOME ECONOMICS TECHNOLOGY CLOTHING AND TEXTILES Household Linen Production Aide. Designer. Designer. Record Keeper. Project Planner Entrepreneurial Development Entrepreneur 10 . Hemmer. Entrepreneur. Material Estimator. Sewer. Hemmer. Alternator. Designer. Entrepreneur. Designer. Sewer. Designer. Dress/Tailor Shop Aide. Pattern Maker. Project Planner Ladies Garment Construction (Blazer with Slot Pockets) Aide. Entrepreneur.

S. Industrial Education B. Clothing Technology B.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education CERTIFICATE LEVEL • • Dressmaking NC II Tailoring NC II DEGREE LEVEL • • • B.S.S. Garment Technology 11 .

managing and expanding a small business/enterprise. the environment and market. as well as the process and delivery of quality ladies and men’s garments: blouse with darts. as well as the process/production and delivery of quality products/services in order to contribute to the sustainable use of resources and to economic productivity. Standard at the Third Year Level The learner demonstrates understanding of his/her PECs. the environment and market. 12 . and children’s wear with trimmings. one piece and pleated skirt with side pocket). demonstrate understanding of applied social entrepreneurship in putting up. as well as the process and delivery of quality casual (unisex polo shirt with convertible collar. Standard at the Fourth Year Level Learners. the environment and market. as well as the process and delivery of quality household linens. Standard at the Second Year Level The learner demonstrates understanding of his/her PECs. Home Economics – Clothing and Textiles Standard at the First Year Level The learner demonstrates understanding of his/her PECs. the environment and market. individually or as a team. blazer with slot pockets. soft furnishings and pajamas (shirts and pants).2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Program Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding of his/her Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs). short pants with zipper placket and patch pocket. long pants with continental side and back welt pockets. trubenized shirt.

soft furnishings and pajamas (shirts and pants). Understanding Successful entrepreneurs continuously develop and improve PECs in sewing. the environment and market.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Home Economics – Clothing and Textiles I General Standard: The learner demonstrates understanding of his/her PECs. Criteria: • Appropriate • Effective • Practical Assessment of the plan of action based on the following criteria: • Compreh en-siveness • Appropri ate-ness of strategies in terms of addressing personal areas of development based on one’s PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength • Doability Product/ Performance Plan of action addressing one’s areas of development based on PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength 13 . Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise Interpretation Compare their PECs with those of a successful practitioner Criteria: • Objective • Focused • Conclusive Application Apply their PECs in pursuing a chosen entrepreneurial activity. Question How does one ensure success in a chosen career? Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Performance Explanation Describe their PECs focusing on strengths and developmental areas. as well as the process and delivery of quality household linens. Quarter 1 Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs): • Characteri stics • Attributes • Lifestyles • Skills • Traits Analysis and interpretation of PECs by cluster • Achievem ent • Planning • Power Performance The learner prepares a plan of action that addresses his/her areas of development based on his/ her PECs and improves further his/her areas of strength.

based on the results of PECs. Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 14 . their level of confidence as a prospective entrepreneur in sewing. Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Plausible • Sensitive Empathy Express the feelings of an entrepreneur who finds difficulty in coping with the PECs of a chosen career. Criteria: • Openminded • Objective • Sensitive Self-Knowledge Assess.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Perspective Express their thoughts from the viewpoint of a seasoned entrepreneur the importance of PECs.

Criteria: • Reliable • Accurate • Objective • Relevant • Valid Application Generate business ideas from data analysis. Assessment of the formulated business idea based on the following criteria: • Profitable • Feasible • Practical • Responsi ve to consumer needs • Innovativ e The learner demonstrates understanding of the environment and market: • Key Ideas co nsumers’ needs and wants. Seeking and responding effectively to a business opportunity are the bases for starting and maintaining a successful business venture. How does one determine the needs and wants of the target market and industry in an immediate community? How does one select an entrepreneurial activity to be pursued? Formulation of a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market. Criteria: • Appropriate • Innovative • Practical Perspective How can one respond effectively to a business opportunity? • 15 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education The learner formulates a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market The needs and wants of the target market and industry help determine the product to be produced and/or service to be offered. ex isting industry that relates with a career choice or entrepreneurial activity. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise • Coherent Interpretation: Interpret the data gathered from the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunities. and pr oduct/ service that satisfies the needs and wants of target customers Key Processes S WOT analysis O pportunity seeking and seizing Explanation: Explain the importance of the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunity. One’s choice of entrepreneurial activity is influenced by the needs and wants of consumers.

2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Express from the point of view of a business owner the importance of scanning the environment and market in generating business ideas Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Insightful Empathy Express their feelings when entrepreneurs offer the same type of business in a certain locality Criteria: • Objective • Persuasive • Sensitive • Openminded Self-Knowledge Self-assess their level of confidence in formulating business ideas Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 16 .

Criteria: • Original • Creative Application: Design household linen based on the principles in sewing. materials. Question Why do we need to understand the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing household linens? Product/ Performance Marketable original/new household linens using the appropriate sewing procedure. appearance. materials) • Application of procedure • Observance of work habits • Speed/Time   four (4) M’s (manpower. Demonstration of the process in sewing marketable household linens. price) and originality (valueadded uniqueness) Assessment of performance • Compliance with standards (tools. methods) of production in sewing 17 . Understanding Applying the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing is essential to producing marketable household linens. Criteria: • Appropriate • Creative Performance Assessment of household linens based on marketability (quality. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Scientific basis Interpretation: Show the significance of the process and delivery in sewing in producing new products. pr oject plan Performance The learner produces marketable original/new household linens following the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Stage 1: Results and Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing  proces s flow in sewing household linens such as appliance covers. equipment. pillow cases. bed covers. Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Explanation: Explain the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing. dining table covers. machine. etc.

• Clear • SelfConfidence   18 . Criteria: • Clear • Concise • Appropriate Empathy: Share their thoughts on how it feels to have gainful returns in sewing.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education  evalua tion of finished products cost of production pri cing of products  packag ing and marketing of products • Cost-beneficial Perspective: Compare and contrast the process and delivery of the different household linens. Criteria: • Profitable • Quality Self-Knowledge: Self-assess their knowledge in producing marketable household linens.

Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise Interpretation Compare their PECs with those of a successful practitioner. Understanding Successful entrepreneurs continuously develop and improve PECs in sewing. Question How does one ensure success in a chosen career? Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Performance Explanation: Describe their PECs focusing on strengths and developmental areas.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Quarter 2 Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs): • Characteri stics • Attributes • Lifestyles • Skills • Traits Analysis and interpretation of PECs by cluster • Achievem ent • Planning • Power Performance The learner prepares a plan of action that addresses his/her areas of development based on his/ her PECs and improves further his/her areas of strength. Criteria: • Appropriate • Effective • Practical Perspective Assessment of the plan of action based on the following criteria: • Compreh en-siveness • Appropri ate-ness of strategies in terms of addressing personal areas of development based on one’s PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength • Doability Product/ Performance Plan of action addressing one’s areas of development based on PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength 19 . Criteria: • Objective • Focused • Conclusive Application Apply their PECs in pursuing a chosen entrepreneurial activity.

2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Express their thoughts from the viewpoint of a seasoned entrepreneur the importance of PECs. their level of confidence as a prospective entrepreneur in sewing. Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 20 . Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Plausible • Sensitive Empathy Express the feelings of an entrepreneur who finds difficulty in coping with the PECs of a chosen career. based on the results of PECs. Criteria: • Openminded • Objective • Sensitive Self-Knowledge Assess.

Seeking and responding effectively to a business opportunity are the bases for starting and maintaining a successful business venture. How does one select an entrepreneurial activity to be pursued? Explanation: Explain the importance of the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunity. How does one determine the needs and wants of the target market and industry from a town/city? Formulation of a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market. and pr oduct/ service that satisfies the needs and wants of target customers Key Processes S WOT analysis O pportunity seeking and seizing The learner formulates a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market The needs and wants of the target market and industry help determine the product to be produced and/or service to be offered. Criteria: • Appropriate • Innovative • Practical Assessment of the formulated business idea based on the following criteria: • Profitable • Feasible • Practical • Responsi ve to consumer needs • Innovativ e How can one respond effectively to a business opportunity? • 21 . ex isting industry that relates with a career choice or entrepreneurial activity. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise • Coherent Interpretation: Interpret the data gathered from the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunities Criteria: • Reliable • Accurate • Objective • Relevant • Valid Application Generate business ideas from data analysis. One’s choice of entrepreneurial activity is influenced by the needs and wants of consumers.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education The learner demonstrates understanding of the environment and market: • Key Ideas co nsumers’ needs and wants.

2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Perspective Express from the point of view of a business owner the importance of scanning the environment and market in generating business ideas. Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Insightful Empathy Express their feelings when entrepreneurs offer the same type of business in a certain locality. Criteria: • Objective • Persuasive • Sensitive • Openminded Self-Knowledge Self-assess their level of confidence in formulating business ideas Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 22 .

Criteria: • Appropriate • Creative • Cost-beneficial Performance Assessment of soft furnishings based on marketability (quality. materials. Understanding Applying the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing is essential to producing marketable soft furnishings.  oject plan pr Performance The learner produces marketable original/new soft furnishings following the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing. throw pillows. methods) of production in sewing  evalua tion of finished 23 . etc. cushions.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Stage 1: Results and Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing  process flow in sewing soft furnishings such as curtains. materials) • Application of procedure • Observance of work habits • Speed/Time Product/ Performance Marketable original/new soft furnishings using the appropriate sewing procedure. appearance.  four (4) M’s (manpower. Criteria: • Original • Creative Application: Design soft furnishings following the process and delivery in sewing. machine. equipment. Question Why do we need to understand the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing soft furnishings? Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Explanation: Explain the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing. Demonstration of the process in sewing marketable soft furnishings. price) and originality (valueadded uniqueness) Assessment of performance • Compliance with standards (tools. draperies. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Scientific basis Interpretation: Show the significance of the process and delivery in producing new products in sewing.

Criteria: • Profitable • Quality Self-Knowledge: Self-assess their knowledge in producing marketable soft furnishings. Criteria: • Clear • Concise • Appropriate Empathy: Share their thoughts on how it feels to have gainful returns in sewing soft furnishings.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education products  cost of production pri cing of products  packag ing and marketing of products Perspective: Compare and contrast the process and delivery of the different soft furnishings. • Clear • SelfConfidence  24 .

Question How does one ensure success in a chosen career? Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Performance Explanation: Describe their PECs focusing on strengths and developmental areas. Understanding Successful entrepreneurs continuously develop and improve PECs in sewing. Criteria: • Appropriate • Effective • Practical Perspective Assessment of the plan of action based on the following criteria: • Compreh en-siveness • Appropri ate-ness of strategies in terms of addressing personal areas of development based on one’s PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength • Doability Product/ Performance Plan of action addressing one’s areas of development based on PECs and improving further one’s areas of strength 25 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Quarter 3 and 4 Stage 1: Results/Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of Personal Entrepreneurial Competencies (PECs): • Characteri stics • Attributes • Lifestyles • Skills • Traits Analysis and interpretation of PECs by cluster • Achievem ent • Planning • Power Performance The learner prepares a plan of action that addresses his/her areas of development based on his/ her PECs and improves further his/her areas of strength. Criteria: • Objective • Focused • Conclusive Application Apply their PECs in pursuing a chosen entrepreneurial activity. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise Interpretation Compare their PECs with those of a successful practitioner.

Criteria: • Openminded • Objective • Sensitive Self-Knowledge Assess. based on the results of PECs. Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Plausible • Sensitive Empathy Express the feelings of an entrepreneur who finds difficulty in coping with the PECs of a chosen career. their level of confidence as a prospective entrepreneur in sewing. Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 26 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Express their thoughts from the viewpoint of a seasoned entrepreneur the importance of PECs.

and pr oduct/ service that satisfies the needs and wants of target customers Key Processes S WOT analysis O pportunity seeking and seizing The learner formulates a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market The needs and wants of the target market and industry help determine the product to be produced and/or service to be offered. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Concise • Coherent Interpretation: Interpret the data gathered from the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunities. Criteria: • Appropriate • Innovative • Practical Assessment of the formulated business idea based on the following criteria: • Profitable • Feasible • Practical • Responsi ve to consumer needs • Innovativ e How can one respond effectively to a business opportunity? • 27 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education The learner demonstrates understanding of the environment and market: • Key Ideas co nsumers’ needs and wants. Seeking and responding effectively to a business opportunity are the bases for starting and maintaining a successful business venture. Explanation: Explain the importance of the immediate environment and market in identifying business opportunity. Criteria: • Reliable • Accurate • Objective • Relevant • Valid Application Generate business ideas from data analysis. How does one determine the needs and wants of the target market and industry from a province and country? How does one select an entrepreneurial activity to be pursued? Formulation of a business idea based on the analysis of the immediate environment and market. One’s choice of entrepreneurial activity is influenced by the needs and wants of consumers. ex isting industry that relates with a career choice or entrepreneurial activity.

2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Perspective Express from the point of view of a business owner the importance of scanning the environment and market in generating business ideas. Criteria: • Reflective • Insightful • Objective 28 . Criteria: • Objective • Persuasive • Sensitive • Openminded Self-Knowledge Self-assess their level of confidence in formulating business ideas. Criteria: • Valid • Relevant • Insightful Empathy Express their feelings when entrepreneurs offer the same type of business in a certain locality.

taking body measurements . price) and originality (valueadded uniqueness) Assessment of performance • Compliance with standards (tools.   four (4) M’s (manpower. materials.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Stage 1: Results and Outcomes Standard Essential Content The learner demonstrates understanding of basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing  proces s flow in sewing pajamas (top and pants) .assembling pr oject plan Performance The learner produces marketable original/new pajamas following the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing. marking and cutting . methods) of 29 . Understanding Applying the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing is essential to producing marketable pajamas.drafting patterns . appearance. Demonstration of the process in sewing marketable pajamas. machine. Criteria: • Appropriate • Creative • Cost-beneficial Performance Assessment of pajamas based on marketability (quality. Criteria: • Original • Creative Application: Design pajamas based on the principles in sewing. Criteria: • Clear • Comprehe nsive • Scientific basis Interpretation: Show the significance of the process and delivery in sewing in producing new products.laying out of patterns on the cloth. Question Why do we need to understand the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing pajamas? Stage 2: Assessment At the level of Understanding Explanation: Explain the basic concepts and principles underlying the process and delivery in sewing pajamas. equipment. materials) • Application of procedure • Observance of work habits • Speed/Time Product/ Performance Marketable original/new pajamas using the appropriate sewing procedure.

Criteria: • Profitable • Quality Self-Knowledge: Self-assess their knowledge in producing marketable pajamas.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education production in sewing  evalua tion of finished products cost of production pri cing of products  packag ing and marketing of products Perspective: Compare and contrast the process and delivery of the different pajama styles. • Clear • SelfConfidence   30 . Criteria: • Clear • Concise • Appropriate Empathy: Share their thoughts on how it feels to have gainful returns in sewing pajamas.

The following are the themes and patterns of school practices that emerged from the implementation of the BEC. Accordingly. supervisors and teachers. 31 . The case studies recognize that the school is a learning community where people continuously plan. and the latest in September 2004. that enable supervisors. to formulate acceptable ways of implementing the BEC.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education ANNEX A The Monitoring and Evaluation of the Implementation of the 2002 Secondary Education Curriculum: Findings and Recommendations The Bureau of Secondary Education was tasked by the Department of Education to monitor and evaluate the implementation of the new curriculum in secondary schools of the country. No marked difference in both findings was observed. the second in October 2003. provincial. but to build collaboratively constructed descriptions and interpretations of practices. observe. department heads. review and reflect on what they do in order to achieve shared goals and aspirations. the findings were compared with those obtained from quantitative data. and to solve implementation problems that emerge. the Bureau conducted case studies of twenty secondary schools. school heads. To verify their reliability. The first monitoring and evaluation of the BEC implementation was conducted in September 2002. grouped as follows:      General high schools funded fully by the national government Newly established high schools funded jointly by the national. and municipal government Science high schools Private high schools Technical-vocational high schools The purpose of the multiple case studies is not to produce an objective body of knowledge that can be generalized to all schools in the country. The findings from the case studies were based primarily on qualitative data.

The removal of the inconsistencies should be among the primary goals of the school improvement plan and the focus of instructional supervision. teachers have a positive attitude toward the integrative. There are gross inconsistencies between means and ends. department heads. while teachers believe in the importance of contextualizing or localizing the curriculum. an independent problem solver and a workoriented lifelong learner who is MakaDiyos. interactive. Moreover. Recommendations: In schools where the inconsistencies exist. the following actions may be taken: The school head should organize a committee to identify and describe the curricular. yet many of them derive lessons more from course syllabi. instructional. Across all school types. instruction is still predominantly authoritative and textbook-based. Teachers want to know more about integrated teaching. However. School heads. Makatao and Makakalikasan. supervisory. and competency lists rather than from the learners’ felt needs. assessment. Makabayan. yet lessons that they provide do not adequately address the differing needs and capabilities of the students. learning is usually recipient and reproductive. and evaluate the implementation of the action program. brain-based approaches endorsed in the BEC. 2. supervision is commonly prescriptive and directive. a creative and critical thinker. For example. monitor. There should be a school assurance team to coordinate. While they believe in the full development of the learners’ potentials. there are gross inconsistencies between the kind of learner/ graduate that the schools desire to produce and the strategies they employ. and managerial practices that do not contribute to the development of the desired learner/graduate. Focus group conversations may be conducted to clarify the school and non-school factors that reinforce the questionable practices and to develop and implement action programs to remove the inconsistencies. textbooks. except in some Science high schools. teachers do not feel confident to use the approaches because of 32 . and teachers fully agree with the BEC that the desired learner/graduate should be functionally literate. However. and assessment is focused more on judging rather than improving performance.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education 1.

They want full understanding of integrated teaching. and later expand to external benchmarking of successful practices of other schools. merely echoed what they learned. They reproduced and distributed BEC materials and coached teachers how to use them. A benchmarking study may be conducted to close the gap. The concept underlies the integrated approaches endorsed in the BEC. particularly its instructional approaches. its underlying assumptions. and subject matter organization. and evaluation. Recommendations: School heads should capitalize and reinforce the positive attitude of the teachers toward the BEC. Schools are also encouraged to prepare leaflets and flyers on the integrative approaches. presentation. “Learning as a construction process and the learner as a constructor of meaning” is among the basic concepts of the BEC. Teachers do not just need ready-made daily or weekly lesson plans.e.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education their limited knowledge to operationalize them in terms of lesson planning. Science. operational principles and approaches. practical methods and approaches and examples of long and short range plans. A handbook which explains the nature of integrated teaching.e. however. its basic concepts. yet its operationalization was observable in some classes in Mathematics. can help remove discrepancies between process and output. Some. Teachers have limited knowledge of constructivism as a learning theory. They should increase the teachers’ capability and confidence in using the approaches by providing the competencies they need. instructional materials development. inquiry or discovery approaches were being used. i. operational definition of terms. principles. and Araling Panlipunan where problem-solving. thus there are still many teachers who do not have enough knowledge about the key concepts and approaches in the BEC... Some of the school heads and teachers who returned from the BEC training seriously conducted schoolbased training. 33 . The study can start with internal benchmarking of successful practices by department or year level. A needs assessment managed by teachers themselves should be conducted to identify gaps between actual and expected competencies. underlying assumptions. Although the concept was unfamiliar to many teachers. 3. i.

both teachers and students usually shift to the local language to ensure that they understand each other. recognition and leading questions and to minimize questions that demand complex reasoning. explanations.e. The FGC shall be followed through by activities on the practical application of the theory. School documents like the yearly reports. Teachers find this difficult to achieve in English medium classes where students have poor oral. and teachers’ reports made little mention of how the concept was being applied to the teaching-learning process. English campaigns. The conversations shall be facilitated preferably. public speaking competitions and the like. lesson plans. The fall-back language is usually Taglish. As such they have resorted to various ways of increasing the English proficiency of the students like holding essay contests. however. School heads and teachers recognize the difficulties that students face in learning English as a language and at the same time using it as a medium of learning. course syllabi. critical thinkers and problem solvers. instructional and remedial programs.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Application of the concept. BEC advocates the development of creative. was very limited. lesson planning. 4. Students are having difficulties using English as learning medium. 34 . teachers are prone to resort to simple recall. which students find frustrating and even exasperating. school development and improvement plans. which students in non-Tagalog provinces are ill at ease. aural. The problem. In these classes. synthesis and evaluation. The outputs of the FGC can be additional inputs into the school’s BEC Handbook. In English medium classes. analysis. and writing skills. field tests of approaches. by the school head. Recommendations: The school head should develop a consensual understanding of “constructivist learning” among his teachers. The Handbook should be revisited regularly to keep it self-correcting and self-renewing. i. elaborations. This can be done through focus group conversations (FGC) by year level or by department. etc. demonstrations. reading.. The conversations should be backed up by extensive references on constructivist or integrative learning. however. with division supervisors or nearby university professors as resource persons and consultants. team teaching. has remained unabated.

To encourage wide participation. mentoring students from the lower levels. At the end of the semester. The participation in the project of both mentors and learners is voluntary but the school provides an incentive system to support the project. Holding regular English writing and impromptu speaking contests using criterion-referenced evaluation. From the field data. overcrowded classes that restrict interactive learning. A system of incentives is provided to both walk-in students and volunteer facilitators. prescriptive supervision that constricts teacher creativity and initiative. • • 5. Several factors constrain teachers from playing their role as facilitators of the learning process. Teachers are open to new opportunities and possibilities offered by the BEC to accelerate learning. Remedial measures are instituted and continuously evaluated for their effectiveness in producing the desired change in achievement. They are fully aware of the limitations of the traditional expository methods in facilitating the full development of the students’ potentials and are willing to learn how to be more effective facilitators of the integrative learning process. • Proficient English students from higher levels. students’ English deficiency that hinders critical discussion. Facilitators are selected on the basis of their English proficiency and are given special training on how to facilitate group learning. the school conducts frequency and error analysis of English competencies that students failed to master. emerged several factors that inhibit the teachers from playing the facilitator’s role effectively: namely.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Recommendations: Schools should consider developing and testing the effectiveness of the following measures in increasing students’ English proficiency: • Voluntary participation in English remedial sessions facilitated by volunteer students. insufficient supply of textbooks that predisposes teachers to lecture. and an examination system that 35 . however. multiple winners. Using the results of achievement tests for the previous years. not only the best. are proclaimed. the classes with the biggest number of winners are given citations.

Another emerging approach is self-directed supervision. reinforcer and facilitator. despite constraints of overcrowding. Recommendations: Use “best practices” approach by benchmarking classes. are not widespread. lowers self-esteem. and encourages conformity but not commitment. insufficient textbooks. resource linker or provider. Promising alternative supervisory approaches are emerging. still continue to be facilitative rather than directive or prescriptive in teaching. which. Mentoring is also emerging as an alternative supervisory approach although it is still in a tentative and inchoate state. They identify and address common instructional problems. that are already talking about putting up a mentors’ pool for the professional and career development of their teachers. One of these is collaborative supervision whereby groups of two or more teachers help one another to improve their teaching practices as well as discover better ways of teaching. In this practice each teacher assumes full responsibility for improving his instructional practices and promoting his professional growth. 6. Teachers find the practice threatening and disempowering. however.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education encourages authoritative teaching. and supervisory and assessment restrictions. share experiences and resources. In both above-mentioned approaches the school head participates mainly as consultant. Several promising supervisory approaches are emerging. dictation exercises. which is common among experienced and highlymotivated teachers. question-and-answer. a foreign learning medium. The most common supervisory practice is the conventional type whereby the supervisor observes a class as an expert or authority and makes on-the-spot recommendations which the teacher is expected to implement. and practice tests. It stifles initiatives and creativity. Confronted with these constraints teachers tend to fall back on traditional expository modes like lecturing. and monitor and evaluate their progress. These supervisory approaches however. adviser. In many cases the school head 36 . There are schools.

give teachers the freedom to select teaching methods. but rather benchmark them in order to adapt the practices to the needs and conditions of his school. Public school teachers are using many innovative teaching methods and materials which do not become part of our educational heritage because they are not systematically developed and properly documented. and innovative teachers. This type of research is collaborative. supervisors should help them become knowledge workers by training them in classroom-based action research. teachers’ group development for collective action should also be part of the supervisor’s responsibility. There is a need for supervisors to train teachers how to test their methods as they teach. So that teachers would not be slavishly dependent upon foreign ideas and methods. who. a practical technique for developing and confirming best practices. Mentoring of new teachers and coaching the mediocre and low performers. and staff development. Peer or collaborative supervision for teachers who can work in teams or quality circles. curriculum development. Therefore. The school head should explore the following alternatives: • • • Self-directed supervision for experienced. nonstatistical and naturalistic. A common but unpopular practice is the laissez faire type. 37 . Educational impact cannot be produced by teachers working individually but by teachers working collaboratively toward shared goals. Supervisors as instructional leaders should not only limit their functions to giving direct instructional assistance. whereby school heads. This is classroom-based action research. strongly motivated. Recommendations: With the continuing increase in supervisor-teacher ratio it would not be practical anymore to depend on the traditional supervisory approach to improve teachers’ performance. teachers claim tend to inspect and evaluate rather than improve performance. user-friendly. Many of these school heads do not observe classes. The school head should avoid copying these alternative modes. assuming that teachers know best being major in their subjects. The institutionalization of the best supervisory practices should be an important strategic goal in the School Development Plan.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education delegates the supervisory function to department heads. These necessitate putting up a pool of trained volunteer mentors.

Among these are the 8-2 plan (8 weeks of the grading period for teaching the four learning areas separately and 2 weeks for the integrated culminating activities). monitor and evaluate for several reasons: (1) lack of a common vacant period for planning the integration. however. the planned or deliberate integration (a weekly lesson plan carries two or three related objectives from the other learning areas) and incidental integration (related content and skills from other disciplines are taken up as they crop up during the development of the lesson). Moreover. Since their efficiency is assessed more by their students’ performance in division tests than by how well they have integrated their subject with other subjects. implement. and (3) lack of readily available teacherfriendly expert assistance. There are also teachers who are lukewarm toward integration because they believe that integrating other subjects would reduce the time to teach the competencies prescribed for their own subject. find the integration of the four Makabayan learning areas difficult to plan. School heads and teachers find the “laboratory of life” concept of Makabayan novel and quite interesting and have come up with some imaginative schemes to implement the concept. predispose teachers to separate-subject teaching. Recommendations: School heads should conduct consultative or brainstorming sessions with their staff to resolve problems and issues related to the implementation of “Makabayan as laboratory of life.” The four Makabayan learning areas have to be scheduled in such a way that the teachers will have time to meet and plan integrated lessons. the anxiety of not being able to cover the units expected for a grading period and the threat of division achievement tests that are text-book based. 38 . Teachers. (2) limited knowledge of the interdisciplinary.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education 7. Teachers need more knowledge and skills to operationalize Makabayan as a “Laboratory of Life”. their tendency is to give less attention to integration. Schools superintendents should also consider putting up pilot or experimental schools for the teaching of Makabayan to lessen the trial-and-error practices which confuse teachers. interactive methods.

How do students personally perceive and feel about the methods. Teachers are aware of the limitations of traditional tests and the need for alternative forms to measure 39 . Two patterns of thought emerged from the field data. It recommends that the time allotted to values education in the present curriculum should be used instead to increase the time allotment for TLE and AP. their development should not be left to chance. they identify a common teaching problem. Working as a team. two approaches are recommended. The other pattern favors the teaching of values education as a separate subject for the reason that effective teaching of values involves going through the valuing process of clarifying. Recommendations: To help resolve the issue whether values education should remain as a separate subject or as an integral part of the other subjects. simple recall. which cannot be adequately enhanced in the integrated scheme. and other forms of authentic assessment are not widely used.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education 8. Rubrics. analyzing and choosing in relation to decisions and actions. students study to the test. materials. and continue the process until they get the desired result. Hence. plan and implement a solution. and the assessment and reporting systems that are being used? The approach would make the classroom teachers active generators of experience-based knowledge and not mere passive transmitters of knowledge from some remote experts. • The values education teachers should approach the teaching of the subject as action researchers. recognition and application tests is predominant. Teachers teach to the test. The action research process would shed more light on the issue. observe and reflect on the feedback. The use of traditional assessment tools like the multiple-response. portfolios. One favors the integration of values education in all the subjects and not teaching it as a separate subject. value education should remain a separate subject. It is further argued that since values shape and guide important decisions and actions. Teachers are divided on how to teach values. i. • Values education as a separate subject in the Basic Education Curriculum today should be viewed as a case study or a focus of inquiry rather than a mandate.

Schools should also consider the use of alternative assessment tools and techniques that would provide opportunities for students to experience learning as an enjoyable. (Teachers teach as many as 300 to 400 students a day and scoring nontraditional measures like rubrics could be an ordeal. Documentary analysis showed that schools in general lack an institutionalized system of utilizing test results for diagnostic and remedial purposes. rubrics.) They are easier to prepare than the non-traditional forms like portfolios. students tend to study to the test. This culture is reinforced by supervisors who specify units to be taught and tested for each grading period and use test results more for judging rather than improving teacher and student performance. These are what everybody else is using. among which is the development of critical thinkers and problem solvers. They are easier to score. should be evaluated against the goals and objectives of the Basic Education Curriculum. Recommendations: Schools should review their present assessment practices. The teacher appraisal system and the kinds of tests used in the classroom as well as those. 40 . Teachers tend to teach to the test. and other authentic measures. While schools should double their efforts for students mastery of the basic competencies they should also never lose sight of the fact that their ultimate goal should be the development of functionally literate citizens of a democratic community.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education higher order thinking skills. discovery. construction and creation of new knowledge. reasons: • • • • • However. delighting process of inquiry. rather than as a tedious process of cramming to pass examinations. they tend to resort to the traditional forms for several compelling These are the types used in periodic and achievement examinations. in the division and national examinations. Teachers have inadequate knowledge of authentic learning and authentic assessment.

study groups. competency-based training. design and development of appropriate organizational structure and staffing. implemented. action cells. developed. 41 . monitored by the school heads. were regular patterns that cropped up in individual and group interviews. department heads and teachers. The process which has been going on for decades has not improved school performance and student achievement. 9155. and the conduct of consultative meetings. are still the same charts before R. benchmarking studies. among department heads and subject leaders. and brainstorming sessions. yet shared governance and participative leadership were clearly evident in many schools. The traditional end-of-the-year assessment. The program components should include needs analysis. characterized by achievement testing and one-shot school visits. A better alternative should be considered. To facilitate the process. should be evaluated. The involvement of ad hoc committees.A. they should make shared governance as one of the strategic goals in their educational plans.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education 10. as well.A.9155. Schools are moving toward shared governance. Recommendations: Schools should continue reinforcing their efforts toward the institutionalization of shared governance as envisioned in R. monitoring and evaluation and a reward system. task forces. Although most of the centralized organizational charts displayed in the principals’ office. to assist the school head make administrative or instructional decisions. Another promising pattern is rotational delegation of authority by the school head. The goals should be supported by a long-range program jointly designed.

issues and themes that are deemed most important for students to learn? Essential Questions • Do they center around the major understanding. and skills and habits of mind that should be taught and learned? • Are the standards attainable. and abilities? 42 . problem. interests. “How well must students do their work?” Essential Understandings • Are they the big and enduring ideas drawn from the disciplines? • Do they reflect the major problems. considering the capabilities of the target learners? Performance Standards • Do the performance standards express the criteria against which students’ performances or products shall be assessed? • Do they answer the question. issue or theme? • Do they unpack the essential understandings? • Are they relevant to students’ lives? To society? • Do they provide enough challenge or rigor? • Are they manageable: not too demanding of time or resources? • Are they suitable to the target students’ ages. principles and concepts from the disciplines. issues.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education ANNEX B Guide Questions for the Review of the Curriculum Stage 1 Content Standards • Do the content standards reflect the desired results: the most important and enduring ideas.

and content and skill acquisition? • Do they emerge naturally from the instructional activities? • Do they provide for individual or group work? Stage 3 Instructional Activities • • • • • • • Do they address one or more specific standards? Do they involve significant content and processes from the standards? Do they lead to products and performances that can be used to assess student learning? Do they promote active learning? Do the introductory activities engage and motivate students? Do the enabling activities ensure student progress toward the attainment of the standards? Are these sufficient? Do the culminating activities encompass the identified standards? Do they require students to demonstrate their learning in relation to the standards? ANNEX C 43 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education Stage 2 Assessment • Are they directly linked to standards through clearly stated criteria? • Do they provide for multiple sources of evidence to document student progress/attainment of standards? Products and Performances • Do they provide enough evidence of learning or attainment of the standard(s)? • Do they accommodate a range of multiple intelligences and learning styles? Do they permit choices? • Do they demonstrate conceptual understanding.

Speed/Time Work finished on time Work finished close to given time Work finished beyond the given time No concept of time 44 . preparation and use of materials and tools/ equipment all the time Systematic application of procedure all the time without supervision Highly selfmotivated and observes all safety precautions at all times Work finished ahead of time Skilled 4 Appropriate selection. equipment and materials Highly Skilled 5 Appropriate selection. Use of tools.motivated and observes most safety precautions most of the time Moderately Skilled 3 Appropriate selection. Safety/ Work Habits No motivation and totally disregards precaution 4. preparation and use of materials and tools/ equipment most of the time Systematic application of procedure most of the time with minimum supervision Self.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education TECHNOLOGY AND LIVELIHOOD EDUCATION (TLE) HOME ECONOMICS RUBRIC for PERFORMANCE Dimension 1. Application of procedure Never follows systematic application of procedure and highly development on supervision Needs to be motivated and does not observe safety precaution No attempt to apply procedure to project 3. preparation and use of materials and tools/ equipment some of the time Systematic application of procedure some of the time with constant supervision Self-motivated and observes sometimes some safety precautions Unskilled 2 Never selects. prepares and use appropriate materials and tools/ equipment No Attempt 1 No attempt to use tools/ equipment 2.

Materials Materials used are always available in the market Materials used are seldom available in the market Materials used are not easily available in the market 3.2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education TECHNOLOGY AND LIVELIHOOD EDUCATION HOME ECONOMICS RUBRIC for Evaluation of PRODUCTS Criteria Very Satisfactory (VS) 3 Product design is original Satisfactory (S) 2 Product design is common in the market Unsatisfactory (US) 1 Product design appears copied and stereotyped 1. Products Products appears original Products appear similar to commercial products Products appear closely to commercial products 45 . Design 2.

Design c. Price 2. Quality b. Appearance c. Materials Very pleasing color combination Very unique and very original Very indigenous and very innovative Pleasing color combination Unique and original Less pleasing combination Less unique and less original Not pleasing color combination Not unique and not original Not indigenous and not innovative Very functional and very versatile Very attractive Affordable by many Functional and versatile Attractive Affordable by some Less functional and less versatile Less attractive Affordable by few Not functional and not versatile Not attractive Not affordable Indigenous and innovative Less indigenous and less innovative 46 .2010 SECONDARY EDUCATION CURRICULUM Career Pathways – Technology and Livelihood Education TECHNOLOGY AND LIVELIHOOD EDUCATION HOME ECONOMICS RUBRIC for PROJECTS Dimension Excellent 4 Very Good 3 Good 2 Fair 1 1. Color b. Marketability a. Originality a.