-No.

1
THE HISTORY, DEVELOPMENT AND ART OF PLAYING THE BOOGIE WOOGIE STYLE
Shows You How to Use

Boogie WooDie Bass Figures Boogie Woogle Treble Variations Walking Bass
Authentic Examples

As Recorded By Famous Artists

Of Boogie Woogie

v..
FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc.
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AVE., CHICAGO

Music is a Universal Language
«««
It means more in our lives than any of us realize and its power would be better understood if for a given period we were to hear

NO MUSIC.,Never before has music had so large an audience as it has today. The radio is bringing it to hundreds of thousands who are experiencing a source of joy in the opportunity of hearing the most artistic and the more simple IN CONTRAST.This in itself is gradually developing our judgment. The joy of hearing has aroused a curiosity and desire for PERSONAL PERFORMANCE and in the last analysis, the real joy in music comes from withinPERFORMING.Many who have the intense desire to play a musical instrument have discouraged the thought because of' the belief thotit requires unusual talent to reach a satisfying goalthat it is a long' and tedious task. This is not so today, for wideawake teachers are not adhering to outdated methods but recognize that progressiveness in general has developed a SPEEDAGE -an AGE OF RESULTS-ACTION. Modem methods have been written which give students thorough training but in an interesting manner that makes study and' practise real fun. The POWER OF MUSIC is yet undeveloped and every one should exercise the opportunities at his command to enrich his life by PLAYING as well as USTENING.

..i

BOOGIE WOOGIE PIANO STYLES No. 1
By

SHARON

PEASE

INTRODUCTION
It was just "ragtime" back in the post-world war days. Later they called it "jazz." In 1934 "swing" became the thing. Today there is increasing popular interest in the style of music known as "boogie woogie." Ragtime, jazz, and swing each contributed materially to the progress of American dance music and I niche in the music field and that it will leave its feel that boogie woogie, too, is destined for a permanent

mark as a purely American development, not only on dance music but on more serious music as well. Already numerous "classical" musicians of my acquaintance have accepted boogie woogie. They realize, as do I. that the Negro playing this peculiar style has a,chieved something actually creative. Many see in the simple harmonic structure of boogie woogie, with its unlimited possibilities of variations, the starting point of a much needed trend toward individualized, contrapuntal music, a conclusion to which I also subscribe. Today, America is boogie woogie conscious. Dance bands throughout the land are featuring it. Dozens of phonograph records are being issued, featuring boogie woogie artists. I have found it a most interesting style myself, and must confess I derive unusual enjoyment playing it. It is a pleasure to introduce the author of this book, Sharon Pease, who plays, teaches, and writes about the piano. Because of his years of association with leading pianists, his vast knowledge of piano styles, and his natural flare for research and thoroughness, he is probably the best qualified musician today to write a work of this kind. It is a volume, in my opinion, which should be in the library of every lover of American music. My own copy always will be handy.

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Copyright 1940

FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, INC.
Chicago, Ill.
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2

Boogie W oogie and Modem Dance Piano
Each year, a leading music trade paper conducts a poll in many of these players have in their bag of tricks numerous ideas which have been gleaned from boogie woogie. However, there are few on the entire list who could be classed as "strict" boogie woogie pianists; that is, those who play only boogie woogie or make that style their chief stock in trade. player and student 1. Bob Zurke 2. Jess Stacy 3. Count Basie This would indicate that we might consider boogie woogie one of the "sweets" of music. For example, eat one-fourth bar, it would and would if you were to of a rich candy taste delicious leave a Recent re' in the order

which musician readers may vote for the dance musicians whom they consider best on their respective instruments. suits, in the piano department, shown in the accompanying list: Every may favor some pianist who is not included many would in this list and probably relist the players

arrange the listing to conform with their personal opinion. concensus basis. However, as it is, it does rep' resent the general dance pianists and shows the nation's leading on that Each artist named is an in' dividualist with a style quite his own. The process of de' velopment in each case would be a story in itself, for therein is represented practice many hours of to' and the piecing

4. Te~dy Wilson 5. Fletcher Henderson

probably

desire for more. But were you to eat a half-dozen candy bars at one time, the result would be sickening. There "sweets" in music, are other such as

6. Eddy Duchin

7. Joe Sullivan
8. Earl Hines 9. Fats Waller 10. Duke Ellington 11. Bob Kitsis 12. Mary Lou Williams

trills and arpeggios. They are fine effects unless overdone, in which event they become most monotonous. In like manner, the too a piano style, in which same ideas are repeated often, listener. becomes tiring Therefore,

gether of numerous ideas from various sources. An important factor in the of piano general development

to the to be a

13. Albert Ammons 14. Art Tatum 15. Pete Johnson 16. Joe Bushkin 17. Freddie Slack 18. Willie Smith ,19. Tommy Linehan 20. Billy Kyle 21. James P. Johnson 22. Milton Raskin 23. Meade Lux Lewis 24. Howard Smith 25. Bill Miller

styles has been the twelve-bar blues. Most piano players have their own version of playing the blues and out many have worked favorite with. of their

successful and entertaining pianist, one should constantly strive for those two elements illusive of all but essential

ideas while experimenting

good music, variety trast.

and con'

new phases of these versions. During the past few years, the fascinating, rhythmic type of piano playing currently W oogie" known as "Boogie

The purpose of this volume is not to make strict "Boogie Woogie" acquaint pianists; rather, to

readers with this in'

has become increasingly popular among musicians and has also become an important fluence in the development style of panyinglist the pianists inof

teresting phase of piano playing in the hope that it will add variety to their style. The author hopes every pianist will get as much enjoyment out of playing the examples a., he did in preparing them.

piano styles. A study of the whose names appear in the accom-

will disclose that

1. Down Beat. January 1940.

Origin of Boogie W oogie
To find the origin of boogie woogie (or any other present day music) one must go back to the days of the primitive savage. For just as the art of human speech has developed from grunts and whinings, so music has developed from the howls through which the savage expressed feelings of happiness, pain, sorrow, and hate. Such basic expressions of emotion are to be found in many of the dumb animals; for example, the staccato, joyous bark of the dog upon seeing his master, or his whine of dis, comfort, or growl of anger. At the very bottom of the process of musical development are the howls of the savage; shrill, piercing, and with indefinite pitch. The first step beyond thiswa:s the achievement of a single musical figure reiterated over and over. Examples of such figures may be found today among the savages inhabiting isolated dis' tricts, as yet uninfluenced by the education and culture of civil, ized people. An example is quoted by a traveler from Tonga' taboo, the following figure being repeated over and over: 1

s

Notice the similarity of this figure to various boogie woogie bass figures appearing later in this book. A name closely associated with the term "Boogie W oogie" is that of the late Clarence (Pinetop) Smith, an Alabama-born Negro who drifted into Chicago during the summer of 1928. Later that year he made the recording of his composition "Pine' top's Boogie Woogie" (Vocalion #1245) which did much to popularize the style. While Smith was the creator of this composition, he did not create the boogie woogie style. The song-writer, Richard M. Jones, recalls/ a tall, powerfully built Negro named Stavin Chain, who played boogie in cheap dance halls in and around Donaldsville, at Bayou la Fouche, Louisiana, while workmen were busy constructing the Texas and Pacific railroad in 1904. Jelly R~lI Morton, noted Negro pianist and composer, rememberst hearing the boogie style many times as a child, and recalls at that time it was known as "honky-tonk." Tony Catalano, prominent white trumpet player and veteran of twenty-three seasons on Mississippi River boats, once told the author he heard the boogie in New Orleans when he first visited that city in 1907. During the early years of Tony's career on the boats he employed many colored piano players including Charlie Mills and Fate Marable. He explained, "It was hard to keep white piano players on the job, for in those days part of their duty was doubling on the calliope, and they didn't like the idea of getting wet from the steam it expelled. This didn't bother the colored boys for with it came the opportunity to travel and earn, what was to them, big money. This was one of the ways in which Negro music moved northward." Pinetop Smith, however, deservedly rates the laurels so many musicians and jazz critics have posthumously bestowed upon

him. He made only eight records, all on Vocalion. His piano work on "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie," "Pinetop's Blues," and "Jump Steady Blues," proves definitely that he WaS master of the boogie style as no other pianist has been until the advent of Meade Lux Lewis, Albert Ammons, and Pete Johnson in recent years. Charles Delaunay, brilliant French writer and scholar, lists Pinetop in his "Hot Discography" as having made several records with a blues-singer named "Lindberg" on the Bluebird label.f but this is incorrect, as the "Pinetop" who played with Lindberg on these particular sides is said by Bluebird officials to be Aaron Sparks. The latter sides were recorded in 1936, seven years after Pinetop Smith's death. Pinetop was the innocent victim of a stray bullet during a brawl in a musty dance hall on Chicago's northwest side. Jack Teagarden, the trombonist; Muggsy Spanier, the trumpeter; Dave Dexter, Associate Editor of Down Beat magazine, and I recently visited his grave in Restvale Cemetery, located a few miles southwest of Chicago. During the thirty minutes it required the aged caretaker to locate the wooden stake which designates the weed-strewn grave, he told me that our party was the first to visit it since Pinetop's burial in 1929. There is no monument of marble to mark his resting place. Yet Pinetop has an unseen monument-s-one beyond the reach of money-his con' tribution to American music. Along with Pinetop, several other pianists acquired a boogie technique in the 1920·s. Some recorded; some did not. In the group of other noted boogie artists who even today have never received recognition are Cripple Clarence Lofton, Cow-Cow Davenport, Blind LeRoy Garnett, Montana Taylor, Charles Spand, Rufus Perryman, who also is known as "Speckled Red," Will Ezell, Ray Barrow, Bob Call, Everett Johnson, the Yancey Brothers, (Jim and Alonzo.) Hersal Thomas, Jimmy Flowers, Lemuel Fowler, Jimmy Blythe, and Romeo Nelson. Some of these are dead now. Some still are playing boogie woogie. Perhaps the day will soon be here when their talents will be recognized as have those of Lewis, Ammons, and Johnson. Also deserving mention for their modern boogie work are Cleo Brown, Tommy Linehan, Jack Gardner, Jay McShann, Joe Bushkin, Freddie Slack, Milton Raskin, Mel Henke, Howard Smith, Julia Lee, Bob Laine, Gladys Palmer, Rozelle Claxton, Joshua Altheimer, Floyd Bean, Honey Hill, Fats Waller, Bob Zurke, Joe Sullivan, and Jess Stacy. All in this latter classification are doing well, from a professional standpoint, today. There are many other musicians who play boogie woogie for their own pleasure. Teddy Wilson, for example, enjoys playing it in the privacy of his home, but makes no attempt to use it commercially. Pinetop Smith occupies a place in the history of boogie woogie similar to that held by W. C. Handy in the history of the blues. Handy was the first to codify that style and set it down on paper. He is rightfully known as the "Father of the Blues," although he did not actually create the style. Like all folk music, neither boogie woogie nor the blues was created by anyone individual. Seemingly, both styles developed from the tribal music of the African savage.

1. Parry, C. Hubert H., Evolution and Co., N.Y. 1925 Page 49.

of

the Art of Music. D. Appleton Down Beat.

3. Martin, Sidney, "How the Boogie Page 5.

Down Beat. July 1938

2. Spencer, Onah L., "Boogie W oogie July 1939 Page 22.

4. Delaunay, Charles, Hot Discography. Hot Jazz. Paris, 1938 Page 35'

slave life spoke its melancholy. There are substantial arguments on both sides but why probe deeper? Just rejoice in the fact that both do exist today. Music is divided into two basic parts. 1925 Page 49. They are alike in that they are both built on a twelve-bar theme with identical harmonic structure. At this stage of development. the harmonizing of several tones. Goldberg. one year before the Mayflower landed at Plymouth Rock} The music of these first slaves was probably no further advanced than single tone figures such as the one described on page ~. Many songs voiced the certainty of freedom in a future life. Parry. As music is frequently the child of sorrow. Tin Pan Alley. NJ.Boogie W oogie Versus the Blues Did air exist before life? Or did life and air begin together? Nobody knows and. pounding. few care. pure unalloyed rhythmic music is still found in parts of the uncivilized world. Quinn Boden Co. melody being secondary. whereas. In the days before the Civil War. They began to imitate the Negro and the new music he was fashioning. it is natural that in many plantation songs. or in the honky tonks=-bcogie woogie and the blues were born. however. 2. which involved movement such as dancing. boogie woogie is expressive of an exuberance of spirit. The melodic part has no set regularity of impulse. Ibid. This is proved by the fact that at the present time. 1. The important thing is that both have been vital factors in the development of American songs and dance music. sub-dominant. and hence a change in their music. It is definitely linked with the pulse. The music of their white masters. furthermore. Whereas. The very soul of boogie woogie lies in the constant reiteration of a fast moving bass. Rahway.. Let us analyze the similarities and differences of boogie woogie and the blues. and preceded the style known as the blues. of the An of Music. but has change of pitch such as vocal utterances. rhythmic and melodic. and represents action auch as the dance. Thus began the Negro influence on our American music which has gradually gained momentum and left its mark on all characteristically American music from the minstrel to jazz and swing. The slaves readily adapted them' selves to our harmonic ideas. Appleton 3. Isaac. and sowing. N. Immediately the music of the Negro and the white man began to react upon each other. reaping. walking. 1930 Page 20.. They are unalike in the style of bass used. The blues may be played using a variety of bass styles including a modern swing bass as shown below. while consisting chiefly of religious songs and simple English folk music. 1 Savages combined singing with their daily activities. Ellolution and Co.I In boogie woogie the rhythm predominates. C. To support the theory that the blues preceded boogie woogie. we know that the first slaves were delivered in Virginia in 1619. They sang the hymns of the white man in their own simple wav. This simple rhythmic treatment in turn reacted upon the white man's musical efforts. many interesting facts to be learned by reviewing the principal factors supporting both sides of the question. This would indicate that the blues preceded boogie woogie.. closely linked to the drumming of the savages.Y. and the melodies more carefree. reshaping them to conform rhythmically to the structure of their tribal dances. . Example: The rhythmic part is usually monopitch. and dominant. page 7. Somewhere in the south-in the cotton fields. This would indicate that boogie woogie is more With the freeing of the slaves came an emotional change. for the blues express the emotion of sadness and disillusionment. and the supernatural. I have presented the arguments for both sides and you can form your own . religion. savage music leaned more toward the rhythmic than the melodic.conclusions as to which is the older. Which came first really doesn't make any difference. along the levees. in the blues the melody is the more important factor. Likewise. D. involved harmony. There are. Folk music is illustrative of the life of the people and ex' pressive of their emotions. there is no particular point in proving that boogie woogie preceded the blues or vice versa. The rhythms were faster and more excited.. in' volving the tonic. In general the Negro music of this period reflected the feeling of a race in bondage. Hubert H. there was a close connection between Negro music.

IMPORTANT On the following pages will be found biographical sketches of Meade Lux Lewis. writer. definitely proving that musical opinion changes rapidly. did an about face and accepted it in 1939. Albert Ammons. sponsored by the New Masses magazine and arranged by John Hammond. Lewis. comprised of Meade Lux Lewis and Albert Ammons. both from Chicago.The Boogie W oogie Trio The Boogie Woogie Trio. The concert was presented at New York's famous and staid Carnegie Hall and was a smash success. but to use wisely the material presented. Following the concert a job was secured for him at Nick's Tavern. when he arranged for Meade to take part in a Rhythm Concert at the Imperial Theater in New York. Here too. Pete and Joe played a week at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Ammons. The boys were definitely in. There will also be found authentic examples of their . Joe Turner. The stunt was so successful that it was repeated a few days later at the Brunswick Recording Studios. it is well to read carefully the "Suggestions for Practice" (page 14) and to become thoroughly familiar with the examples on pages 15 to 40.Meanwhile. the boys of the Boogie Woogie Trio suffered many hardships and were forced to do all types of work for a livelihood. four of the leading exponents of the boogie woogie style. After a successful run of nine months at Cafe Society. and Mary Lou Williams. Nevertheless. all present for one common purpose-to hear the Boogie W oogie Trio. Johnson. they continued as faithful missionaries of this invigorating style. in Green' wich Village. recordings on which members of the trio worked became best sellers. Sister Rosetta Tharpe. Mitchell's Christian Singers. The same public which rejected boogie woogie in 1936 and again in 1938. lower Manhattan. Johnson. Alexander. THE AUTHOR . Apparently they were not ready for boogie woogie. and Pete Johnson from Kansas City. The three men had journeyed to New York to take part. who had tried a similar experiment back in May 1936. Joe Turner. Then as a climax. and the late Tommy Ladnier. Here. Hammond. and critic. then vice. Meade's work clicked with visiting musicians. ion #4606. came into existence on the night of December 23. but the public-that was a different story. and soon Meade was released and returned to Chicago. in a concert of Negro music. before progressing to the more complex works of these artists. three grand pianos were pushed out on the stage. then returned to Kansas City. The results of this three-decker can be heard on Vocal. and Johnson each in turn played their variations of boogie woogie individually. It is called "Boogie Woogie Prayer" and is in two parts. the trio opened an engagement at the smart new Cafe Society. Sidney Bechet. found a spot for Pete Johnson and his singing partner. and music history was made when the boys played boogie woogie collectively on three keyboards. Pete Johnson. Johnson was a guest on We The People program and Columbia's Sunday Night Dance Hour.president of Music Corporation of America. in New York's Famous Door. Hammond had a hand in an' other experiment. where they worked for two months before returning to New York. James P. the trio moved to the fancy new Panther Room of the Sherman Hotel in Chicago. Again. young New York music patron. In the meantime. visiting motion picture stars. and working musicians rubbed elbows. The audience was made up largely of musicians who accepted with enthusiasm his boogie woogie offerings. Again the public was not ready for boogie woogie. Willard Alexander. It will be interesting to look over these biographies and examples. Other artists in the All-Negro cast included Count Basie and members of his orchestra. as late as June 1938. the most sophisticated New Yorkers. and Turner were all due for a disappointment for the date lasted only one week. All this has been very gratifying to Hammond."rea' tions copied with their permission from phonograph recordings. A few nights after the Carnegie Hall Concert. 1938. During this engagement Lewis and Ammons made guest appearances on Benny Goodman's Camel Caravan and on the Columbia Broadcasting System's Saturday Night Swing Club.

then a member of the band. Later. Together they worked out many ideas in the development of their boogie woogie styles. was the first indication that the public was ready for boogie woogie. Meade's first professional work was playing house parties." Lewis had no piano of his own so was forced to practice at neighbors. Louis and whose name he has forgotten. a rotund and genial Chicagoan. Now he is collecting dividends." Such interest. friends. on Prairie Avenue. kept the boogie woogie style alive during its darkest days-days when millions In 1936 Meade cut the solo recording of his composition "Yancey Special" (Decca #819) which was destined to bring him world fame. Meade soon discovered the Ammons' piano and also that Albert. It was this constant search for a piano that was responsible for his meeting with Albert Ammons and the start of their long association. or wherever he could find an instrument. A recording was made and the band started using the tune on broadcasts. On the opposite page is a chorus of Meade's "Bear Cat Crawl" as he plays it. and the fact that the record was a best seller. play a tune called the "Fives. both profited by a short association with the more experienced Clarence (Pinetop) Smith. It happened that the Lewis' and Ammons' households moved into the same building. Dean Kincaide. copied the number from the record and arranged an orchestration featuring Bob Zurke at the piano. Today Meade is rated by many critics and musicians as the number one exponent of boogie woogie. who then was tops among Chicago's exponents of the style. Through those dark years Meade stuck with his guns and refused to compromise. Certainly he deserves all the tribute he receives. One can't help but feel that here is an idealist. Meade was born in 1905.6 MEADE LUX LEWIS The term boogie woogie is virtually synonymous with the name of Meade Lux Lewis. who had drifted in from St. It was this record that struck the fancy of the boys in Bob Crosby's Orchestra. was equally interested in playing." . Many patrons began asking to hear it often they didn't know of Americans were gliding about sedately on the dance floors to the "sweet" music of the post-swing era. who was two years younger. a scholar of the old "pure jazz" school whose personal integrity and devotion to principle has few equals in American popular music. The bass figure is one of the simplest of his large repertoire and should be taken at a tempo slightly faster than the more complicated figures. but described it as something "new." and "Solitude Blues. Meade. for both owe their existence to each other. Later he worked at various niteries around Chicago as soloist and with small combinations. Other of Meade's compositions include "Honky Tonk Train. He became interested in the piano while in his early teens when he heard a man. the title." "Whistlin' Blues.

"....l!! ~•.. -.=11:::=:11 I · · · I ~ .1 r ~ .J I ·· ..:::-- -. •______ •. ~ < ~ t..i I < ~ ------· · 4i: "'--' ~.' . tt._ - l.s.. .... 1T f'l -. · .. · · ---=--- . .- . - ~ \ I f'l ~ I _.>- c- · '· .. tt· . _1' • "J I"--"!! • ~.. -___ - · · · · >. •. >- >- >- · · · ~ ..J · · ~ .--. I l \ fl ~ 1>- >I · · · t1'- • I · · · · ""I •• ft· · · .._.. 1 ..460B.J · ._ _"'t .. ft.>- .J fl t... III "'"j_ . ~ if· •. === ~ . • >>. and Copyright -iJ owner of the Composer 48117 .. . ft· .Bear Cat Crawl By Meade Lux As played Lewis by the Composer on Vocation Record No..l ~I ~~t.~ I · •• • 11- ~ Reproduced with permission . --# . . ~ 1'1'- fl [>- · · · · ~ >- >- · · · · · · ~ -~ ·_!I! · · · · >.1>- · · · ·~ .. "q.j · · · .~ ft· .J 1>-____ r- · · · .- . 4i • · · · · .. ~· #.. ..... · · · -~. 7 ..

Jimmy Hoskins. he is not typed to that style alone. It was during this period that "Albert Ammons and his Rhythm Kings" cut four sides for Decca. #8227). Albert learned a great deal during the year he was with this unit. The results are rhythm in capital letters. Albert played solo piano and worked with small combinations in many south side niteries. usually these exceptions are in slower tempos. Included in these sides was Ammons' famous "Boogie Woogie Stomp" (Decca #749). Ammons is a native of Chicago. and I visited Albert at the It Club. Note that the bass is played in straight eighth notes. spent many hours teaching him. Ike Perkins. Albert strikes the keys solidly with every ounce of strength in his powerful body. including Pleasure Inn. Albert has long been associated with Meade Lux Lewis and they worked out many of their ideas together.8 ALBERT AMMONS The second member of the Boogie W oogie Trio is Albert Ammons. "I just seemed to love music from the first day I can remember. The personnel for this date was Israel Crosby. (Okeh. The Banks' Orchestra folded in 1934." He learned his first pieces on a player . trumpet. when Barbee decided to forsake the piano and front the band. More recently in New York. Club De Lisa. drums. Next came three years with Louis P. tenth bass with plenty of modern treble. who really appreciated his efforts. Bill Depew. In contrast to Meade's lighter. He soon discovered that he possessed a good "ear" for music and was successful in copying some ideas from "Hersal Blues" and "Suitcase Blues. While it is this pounding. despite the general similarity. earned his first professional money playing house parties. by playing rolls over and over and marking the keys with a pencil. artistic touch. During the four years that preceded the Carnegie Hall Concert. alto and clarinet. yet. Albert plays the majority of his boogie selections in this fashion but occasionally uses dotted eighths and sixteenths. then all . like Lewis and many other of today's ace Negro pianists. literally. for Barbee who was one of the pioneers of the swing type bass. Through these years he acquired a following among musicians that accompanied him from place to place. were present. As previously mentioned. and Dalbert Bright. an excellent example of his solid boogie style. On the opposite page is a chorus of his composition "Shout For Joy" as recorded on Vocalion #4608. He was in a rare groove that morning. during which time they worked a theater tour and various Chicago south side cafes.piano. His first job as an orchestra pianist was with Willie Barbee's Serenaders. clean. and the entire room "rocked" figuratively. stirring rhythmic effect that has made him the favorite boogie woogie pianist of many musicians. Ammons. Albert recorded for Blue Note and Vocalion. bass. He was bern there in 1907 and bays. playing with such exuberance of spirit that the piano rocked. and the It Club. Of course he did his best work when these musicians. there are subtle differences." piano solos recorded by Hersal Thomas. and Bob Zurke.members of Bob Crosby's orchestra. I recall one occasion in particular when Gil Rodin. These differences result largely from the manner in which they strike the keys. and Club Eldorado. Bob Haggart. For a time he had a small band of his own and played engagements at Pevan's 29 Club. Banks and his Chester' field Orchestra. guitar. the Big House. He also plays solid. . It is only natural that their styles should be somewhat alike. Guy Kelly.

.. ~ ~ :t ::..I ~ . .~.::: .Shout For Joy By Albert As played by t he Composer 9 Ammons onVocation Record No. I:::::' ~ -:. ~ 1 1 ~ ... 41 • . ~ . .. .4608. >~ I • • 'l >- • • .t~ • :::::....::::.. I fj ~ ~ >- :::::.... • I ~ ~ ... 1 _l • • I • . ~ . 1 .. ... ::: = 11 · · fj ...:4 :::::.. . ta9t7 . ft . . ~ • 1 :: :.::::. I \ 1 I r · · ":J.!: .. 1 ..... ...::::. .~~ 8 "it with per rniss ion of the Composer owner._ -. fl ~ U 1 :\ :::::..t -J:: r---.. ~ tJ -------- · · fl U ._ J . r ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ I: ... ~ ~ 4 ~ ~ 11 .::::. ._.. " ~~ :::::._ -- I \ · · -r ft- <:» - Reproduced - it~"J:~~ ._ :~ . "4 ~ r ~ . it and Copyright ~~. • j fl ~ >r ~ "1 .... ~ . . _l 1 . " . .=i ~ ~ -= .

" Stolid. Pete still can't figure why he's getting paid so much for doing the thing he likes most. to "dig the doings of Pete and Joe. crawfish. "Slamfoot" Brown. and Lewis "Good. Willard Alexander. He also cut a series of solo sides for a private company. dimly lighted room. Bennie Moten. Solo Art. Johnson IS Pete had as an assistant a good looking young Negro named Joe Turner. he would order a jigger of gin. for together they secured the previously mentioned New York 1938 date for Pete and Joe. in New York. Pete comes by his love for music quite naturally his uncle. Booty" Johnson. With both hands pumping the keys and his right foot beat' ing a solid tatoo on the floor. it was a different story back in his home town where he played nightly in a smoke-filled. ." They did (then manager of Benny Goodman). His style is more like Ammons' than Lewis' for it stresses rhythm." It was here that Pete got his early training. That was on Kansas City's colorful Twelfth Street. Most of them played in the post-World War days at a disreputable spot on Kansas City's Independence Avenue called the "Backbiters' Club. however. was a prominent musician. Johnson was a hard worker . Pete's teachers included Stacey La Guardia. but Pete loves music especially the boogie style. each becoming more involved with complex ideas. so famous that on :\ visit to audition Count Basie. and drink from huge half-gallon jugs of beer while they listened to Pete pound out boogie woogie. "Roll 'em Pete let 'em jump for joy. whose backwoodsy blues shouting is stili regarded by many as tops in America today. Cab Calloway and a host of other jazz immortals got their first push to fame. enthusiastic members of the Sunset audience might be heard to shout. Though Pete has only recently found a spot in the limelight of national music circles. Anytime from the tenth chorus on. a favorite among musicians. Like Lewis and Ammons. It was in the Sunset Club where members of his own race and a few white musicians went nightly to eat ribs. and humble." a chorus of which will be found on the next page. Thus Johnson found a name for his composition "Roll 'Em Pete. gulp it down. Duke Ellington as far back as 1937 called Pete "My favorite keyboard artist. Together. it was not unusual for Pete to play fifty consecutive choruses of the boogie.not that the three dollars a night pay plus what he could get in the kitty was conducive to such." In addition to his recording work with the Boogie W oogie Trio and Joe Turner. and then settle down before a badly scarred upright piano for some fancy keyboard work. quiet. Nello Edgar. where Andy Kirk.10 PETE JOHNSON Pete Johnson is the least publicized of the Boogie W oogie Trio. Like Ammons. Count Basie. Pete and Joe became famous throughout the Kansas City area. and greens. Nor did they forget. and John Hammond were advised and both were impressed. Charles Johnson. he not only plays good boogie with a seemingly inexhaustible wealth of ideas. In ability. chittlings. He banged around playing house parties and odd jobs for a decade preceding his work at the Sunset. Often discouraged. he ranks with the best of today's great boogie woogie artists. It was Hammond who later arranged for them to take part in the Carnegie Hall Concert. Pete has made several discs with the Harry James' Trio. but does an equally efficient job on blues and swing tunes.

• ~ u ~ ~ ~ ~ ...!: ~ I. • ~ ~ ~ . 11 ._II_ l l ~ ~ v . ~ .:::::: . • ~ .> I. . • . II.... "ir · · 4 4 ~ . 7 ~ ~ .> I... · (· • ~ • ~ • • ~ • ~ • ~ • ~ • • • • • • • fl U l 1+" • '.. I •· · 48917 - - Reproduced - :i ~ ~ ~ • owner. . .::::: .:: :4j "7 ~ .. • .> I.. I f'l tJ ~ fl .. • ~ .....- -~ . - - ~ -A --- ft- ~ ~ ~ I ft· . I.. • II.. •• 1+.::: ~ ::.. • I.s: ~ :j .= . . ...• 4 "4 .Roll 'Etn Pete By Pete Johnson As played by the Composer on Vocalion Record No... 1 . 4J ~ 4 ) Iu 1 • I J fl I. ~ 'I V ~ "4 "4 • ft· ~..::::. ~ - - . . . ~ . · · •~4 fl U :j 4'" ~ "4 . - .4607. "it- with permission of the Composer and Copyright . = II... • II.j....f~ • "t • 1 ~~..> I.. • ~ . ... ~ • I~ .::::. • . .

in' eluding Goodman. have made her attractive offers to become full. complete symphony scores as wen as hit songs of the moment. fine technique. the result of a severe fall. Holder's band. some of her best known compositions being "Roll 'Em. At seven she was considered a child prodigy and her presence was in great demand for public appearances." "Walkin' written in collaboration with the author. . She answers their musical questions personally by letter. Mary Lou with her solid style of piano playing. During a tour of the Keith Orpheum circuit she married John Williams. On the opposite page is an example of Mary Lou's boogie woogie style in her composition "Overhand. has augmented the style with some of the artistic little tricks that have long made her blues style a favorite among musicians. not only through her work as a featured soloist but by her contribution of many fine swing arrangements. she amazed audiences with her ability to play. and Mary Lou often got together with Pete Johnson for double piano sessions. She has also scored arrangements for Benny Goodman. and ten years' experience in dance music. Mary Lou thought she would never play again when her arm was broken in three places. Mary Lou has consistently contributed a great deal to the success of Kirk's band. had many Mary Lou is quiet. The organization made its headquarters in Kansas City. Gene Krupa. Fortified with a thorough musical schooling. Now she not only plays boogie woogie like a veteran but through application of her wide knowledge of harmony. Kirk's Clouds of Joy had smooth sailing from then on. Vaudeville called her and she joined the act of Seymour and Jeanette as pianist. It is no secret that more than one big name leader. where she was born in 1910. from memory. In 1931 both Mary Lou and John joined the band as regular members." both woogie field. She began the study of piano when five years old. time arranger. including concerts at the University of Pittsburgh. heard them play and took th~m to New York to work a Brunswick recording date. Louis Armstrong. That was in Pittsburgh. As a composer she also has gained wide recognition. As an outstanding feminine leader of her race." and also "Toadie Toddle" and "Ghost of Love. and which she still considers her home town. After two settings the fractures healed perfectly and she again resumed musical studies which continued until her graduation from high school as an honor student. and Red Norvo. They left the theater in 1927 to form a dance orchestra in Memphis." and Swingin'. Casa Loma. Gifted with a remarkable ear. preferring to free lance. Andy Kirk. Bob Crosby.12 MARY LOU WILLIAMS Mary Lou Williams is a virtual newcomer in the boogie good laughs at the expense of the music critics who did not detect that a woman was at the keyboard on those early Kirk recordings. she mastered the style in a hurry. she is idolized by thousands of colored girl pianists throughout the nation. for she first began playing the style in 1936." "Froggy Bottom. who had taken over T." "Camel Hop. and modest. unaffected. She has rejected them all. saxophonist with the act." "Little Joe From Chicago.

- _. 1" .. __ • . . .Overhand (New FFOggy Bottom) By Mary Lou Williams As played ~t)~ ~ 13 by the Composer on Decca Record No. . . :._ __•__••_••_._.> . "'" I -. "4 > j'" 1": . "'I fl I tJ . .. - .· ~ ~ . fl ~ ~ ~) t I~: .._••_.. .> .._•••••••••••• _. . .: .. > .. ... > -.-. Composer .: •••••• _.> ~~ . ::._. . - . . . > . > . __••• _••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• : •• 11 fl I ~ ~ ~~._ _••_••••• _••_.. ---.-: . . > > . ~:Iir •. "'" •• > > I li4tJ ~ (q)"t '" 1": .:. . I . and Copyright _ owner. . I I · · •• . .- .. _.- ~_. f • : ~t)~. > .781... '" . ••• ••• .. • .- _. : . > > . ~ _.. "4 • t I · · · · ~.J" '---"'- · · - .. . •• permission of the . · .. 1": 4" j"" I :til' . .._j1.... ~ .-- ~ . > ~ I .. .__. •. - «:» Reproducedwith .. > .> -..

By experimenting at various tempos. and Williams compositions patterns and noting carefully the structure of the treble therein. and F). these examples woogie bass figures can be created in almost unlimited numbers. figures in make excellent preparatory exercises. When these ideas usually played in the keys wherein the least number of black keys (C. therefore. boogie more complex patterns. Exponents of the style usually have several "standard" addition to some of their own invention. and Mary Lou Williams. the treble ideas of these artists. However. a matter of taste. G. it might be well to remember that the left hand should become so automatic that it operates without conscious thought. I have written the examples in this fashion. and should be thoroughly mastered before progressing to the examples of Meade Lux Lewis. This is entirely like best. This can best be attained by practicing with the left hand alone. thus leaving the mind free to create right hand patterns. repeat these same examples applying some of with treble ideas of your own.14 Because of the vast number of possible combinations. are encountered boogie woogie is After mastering the Lewis. the effect you . you are in for some good "kicks. as either is correct. beginning at slow tempo and gradually increasing the speed. especially in the faster tempos. As mentioned before. Albert Ammons. Pete Johnson." For those who haven't had a great deal of experience in playing boogie woogie. Johnson. For this reason I have written all the following examples in the key of C. some prefer the use of straight eighth notes. you can determine In the following examples. Because of the more simplified fingering. Ammons. At this point you should also begin experimenting start developing. I have purposely simplified the treble part to provide adequate development of the left hand. The majority of boogie woogie pianists prefer to play the bass figures in dotted eighth and sixteenth notes. yet insuring a degree of practice in the division of thought needed to play The damper pedal should not be used in playing boogie woogie.

chords measure ten may are the above represents the basic chords form. C "lick" in measures be changed one and two. F ninth and G ninth the use of a two chord in measure To any of the C major often used to replace is sometimes to G seventh may be added the sixth and G seventh (A). C Major (CEG) 5. · · F Seventh (FAC E~) fl J ~ 7. · · fl \u I 4. The F seventh to permit the 9th (D). F Seventh (FAC E~) 6.Basic Form of Boogie Woogie fI t. C Major (CEG) 8. F Seventh (FAC E~) 11. C Major (CEG) 12.J 1. l 10. the minor seventh chords. C Major (CEG) · · While structure. G Seventh (GB D F) j \ · · fl I ~ I t. An addition in the second measure of all three gives the effect changed of a thirteenth the F seventh to C major with or C seventh nine. C M a jor (CEG) 9.8 817 .. innumerable changes may be made in harmonic (B~). 3. or harmony chord. For the same reason to correspond measure the F seventh t. C Major (CEG) F Seventh (FAC E~) C Major (CEG) 15 J I ~ t J 2.

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+t.~)- · · I'V /'1}' . . . ~._ · ·'"' ~ -~ ...... · .. - . ~ ~ -.... .. • ~ .i8 33 fl ~ < . ..• i~ ~ U917 . ~ ~ -. 2 . fl I -tJ I ...-..- .- . .~"... ~#·ff·· . 41- fl j ~ .. 4 ... .. .. # ...... .... ... -r: . ~~ . · · . . ~ 1'2 I u . ...... .. ~.. •• ~ .»: --- 4t" ...... .._.._' - ... ~ ~ 3 \~) . ...t-'-..-- I u · · ... v- ~ ~ <::« . ..'V ~ . .'" ..__)' u -. ~..._. ..... ~ . .. ft .. ~ <i:» .. I .. ~" . . ~ · ~ .. . ~ ~ ~ '---' ~ .... - ~.- . .. . I ~ <:» v- · · ~ ~ . fl I ~ ... . ~.._. '. -:.~... 3 2 1 . ~ ~.. - rr: . ...~"''-· ~ • . ++... 2 1 ~... ~ <. ~........ ~ . ~ --~ ~ . 5 ..'" - ..STYLE No. ~ . . ... ~ . ..'" --~ · · .. ~ ~ - ._........ v- rr: -. fl '1 j • . ~. ....

../- t · ~... ..... 1'f ~ -'-. fl ... · .......... · · ~ 0--- -.. \'V- ~ ~ <c:> - · - ~ -... <s:> . ~# . v- 4t. . ...... ~ ~ -..... ~. . 11' .34 STYLE No.. '11- . ~ ..- · · .. "--" :J..._..__.__. . fl I ~ · ~ "--" ".. ~ <c:»: .. 1 . - .19 fl I -u 1 I · V" -"--"- ~ ~ .. . . '11- .. .. :i# •.~ · · · ....~#...... ~~ .. · - ..- · - I.. · · . ~ 0--- . . 1 ..

. ~. . ~ <c:»: · ~ ~ · · •• • 1"- ·• ·<c..~~1t .....· 4 1 ..· ~ ~..." ·- f} tJ ~ ... ~ ~ -' "'--" I . . 1ii · .4t ._. .. .. ~ ~ <c.. ... ~ _l .t .... . <c:»: · ~ ttJ < · · -'--"- -- ~ '--" · . · · .. ~ -'--" I fl ~ .~~~ ... 3 t 1 :. ~ ~ <:»: j · · •• • 1"- .. ·• · ~ . . jl · · ~......4t~ .... ...~~ •.~#. - .STYLE No.. ~ . - -. iT ~ -::» ~ VI/ · 4t... . ~ #? 1) 1) · . ~#Y' .. . I.20 35 fl u · ·~.. 1'1' I ~.4 - ""4'- ••• -:.t 1) . ~~ ... . -~ ~ '--" · · .. '"r <:»: ++1 I ~~ - · . .> ".~~ .· -:J.. 2 - ·• .. - .»: ~. ~ ~ ~.- ~. · . . f} II tJ . - 1 . v- . . 1 1 ~. . • .~# ..

·--... .... t) -. ·" · · • ' \lfl • ~...j.'_' ~ 'V-- :....21 fJ j ~ ~ ~ I '\'V- . .__....__... .. •• • iT .... * ~ ~ '-" ... ~ . =~ -. l· · .~# .... ---:.. -' ~ -7/ ..__.__...36 STYLE No.. . ~ .. · -...... fJ t) · .. _.-... -..__.. ...... · .__.. ·"'. .j.../ I · · .. · • \1" . .__...-." ...\~-.t. • .. ..-" ......J #.to -.-- ~ ~... .-- ~ I I\~J- ..•• fl j ~ ~ · '_'. 48917 ..t~ ..J#""" ·~ ~ "--' I j \ · · . 1 .__.

. ~ fl ~ ~ ~ · -'--"--F· .. . #. 3 2 ~. I ~i '--" v- ·I I · · "4 • '41- · . '#.... . ~ .-w ''1'- .. ~ c:J" I . .STYLE No. • TT -:.... ~ · · 4·~ 43917 . ~ . * .• · · ~'1i #.· · · II · .~ ... --'--"-#. 4'~ 4'4 --1·. ~ 1 . __ ~ a s l~ .-w · --• ~ _.. . fl j ~ tJ .. ..--. --w~ •• • · ~ . ~'. ~... 5 5 2 3 . --# •...4'4 ..:! .. .. .. ~ · #. "" ~ '--"-- \'1JW' . ... · .. <:» I .. 4·'4 · · rr 2 '1J I . --'----" I · · ••• · "" · ~ -tf- . 22 fl ~tJ 37 · · . 1 #~ .. ~ < \ j I ~ 1 ''I tJ -__-# . ~. "I ••• · 1fW" .._. #... . fl jtJ ~ · •• • I -'--"-- -v-- · .. . · · .. ~ -.. .

fI' ...· v- . · · ~ <c:> .. · v -'--'" I · · . 11'- . f1 I tJ v- -'--"'- / '\ · · 4J...... ... - T . ..... =it.. .~#..... ... .. . ~ <::» · ~ ~ '--'" · · . .. . · .t #. · · ~ -'--'" - . · .. v- . .. ~ .. fI' ~ '--'" '1. -· v- .. · ~. .... -.. . .. 1'" ... .. ~# . · · ~I '--'" ... ~ f} ~ <c:> t ~ --- v- ...STYLE No. ... .. ... 23 f1 I tJ v- · . ~ tt'.. 4J ..

~--... ...- . " ~ ~ -____. . f} j ~ ~ -____. . r ... .. .. ~ -~ .. #. ...-.. 1 ~.. ..~ .~-.~.· · -:....#... • • -. #..-" "V- · ~ -____.... ·tt- ... ~. ~"!. ~-____.. ~ · -____. ..--..... ~=. #. --. ... v- ". ~.. ~ .j..· -- f} I ~ ~ · · I ~.. 1 ~ '--' . I.... v- · .·4J.- · · .......... ~ ~ '"'____.· ~ fI I U ..-. 1it..24 39 fI ~~ · · • 2 1 2 2 1 1 .. - ~.. . ... ~. ..... . ~ ~ ____. tt . .-..- )...- · · . . . -____.. . . . ... \. ff- · • 1917 .STYLE No. ff- ...

. ~ ..."..~ ~ ~ "-/ .... fl ~ @._..~ :~ . ._. ~ #. · · · I fl ~ ~ t. • • • 1'1' .:. .. · · ~ .. - . ~ "'.. j · · . ·4:#.25 fj ~ ~ ~ · . ~.. '4' 4 .__. -. - .• :#. .._... Il . . ~ -........"..- j · · · ••• . . ..- " .._"-/• · ...... ~ • ~ #11 . · · ••• 11 · · ••• · ~ <:> I v- . ~"-/ I I @.• ~~ 5 5 1 3 3 (#). . --- . '4' ..:... • •• ~ ... .J "1)- 2 · · #....~~~ 48917 . · · •• • ~ ---..I v- .. ~ . .. ~ . ...J · · ~.. . · ••• 'If ~ --- .. ·4:#":~...~ ~ -'--" ~ ~ ..... .... ...... · · -· · :. ~# . :t . .... •.. ..-/ I ~ ~!.i.... v ~ <c:»: ... ~# .. ~ - "..·~ .. . ~ .... . • • f'l r1 I t.. . v ~ '-'" I '"11 .. .. tr . ~~ ... · · •... II .:t . ~ . ... . • 4 .....40 STYLE No.:..... ~ ~.....

:l «J n (G~) J I DJ IF ftr . Because of the simplified fingering involved. 600 and Commodore No.E ~~ -t.and "Gin }Iill Blues.#F ~ --F B MAJOR A MAJOR II 2: J #3. Deserving of special mention are Joe Sullivan's compositions.fe-f d. J II 2: CUrtrIc} Irlrfr+tfll tt Downward in walking bass In a like manner work out the walking bass for the following major scales.fl. Walking Bass (The Missing Link) 41.. J J #J J I." Decca No.2 J eJ ~• r II-.: r¥r·fr:.10098. ¥J. 1170.~. \ of pianists prefer to use the fourth on the black " 48817 . tJ: 3 - J tid F I-.. Upward in walking bass * #~ ~ tJ: . 1710.~.J #3 D~ MAJOR j II II . "Just Strolling.. 31-32. All of the exercises following should also be practiced one octave lower than wrtttene PREPARATORY EXERCISES C MAJOR SCALE 4 J J J IJ J Upward in walking bass J II J J J IF • _~ G MAJOR SCALE r . and by the Bob Crosby Orchestra (Bob Zurke at the piano) on Decca No._ ~. 1670 and No.~ r ~ II ct rf rt rtl rimPntr?l ..Many instances could be cited wherein this style of bass has been used. "Walking bass" might well be called the missing link between boogie woogie and the hlues." recorded by the composer on Decca No.j 2: fi3 J I J #J MAJOR IF F II 2: J #J ~J J 1#3 .~ II 2: &J d 3 ~J I ~J ~J J ~F I ~F m MAJOR A~ MAJOR r j F ~ II ~ 3 E~ MAJOR j d I ~J J F I'F II * t):JJJ&JIJ The majority b 3~J II 9: J J J bJ I J finger on the lower note of octaVtlS which occur F MAJOR rrr keys. walking bass is applicable to all chords and all keys.' BluebirdNo.Fats Waller has used the style on many of his recordings including his "Alligator Crawl. D MAJOR E MAJOR Downward in walking bass . Mary Lou Williams employed it in the Andy Kirk Orchestra's recording of her composition "Little Joe from Chicago. ~ • J].

~tr in modern usag-e it is common- to as a major with the added . G MAJOR 6th ItJJ. 3g iI ~o ~o" ~d] G MAJOR (Chordal Tones GBD ) II!): § I rf Walking BassGfor . Walking one measure 0f Walking Bass for one measure of C Major ~ ~tf F for two measures H of C Major 6th.) .42 Chromatic scale upward in walking bass."J~" ~ of G ~ . Major ~ of each of the Bass for. B MAJOR F# (my MAJOR (BD#F#) (F#A#C#)(GbBbDb) ~§ DI. of a <econdar-y seventh chord..1 EI. ~ lr-fr. C EI.CEI.m) 6th AI.1~J. MAJOR (EI. G BI.fn t! F ~ 6th. FAI. one measure of Major . MAJOR (DI. MAJOR (EI. 6th G M· ajor .-ljJJ. Walking Bass 7J= ~.j1~J. Wa lking Bass for two measures ~ ~ 6th. D MAJOR 6th A MAJOR 6th E MAJOR 6th (DF#AB) (AC#EF#) (EG#BC#) follow- F# (GI. MAJOR (BI.) Wtt C MAJOR 6th (Chordal Tones C EGA) . • ~ ~ rJ rh:ll1 MAJOR (F A c) In a like manner work out the walking D MAJOR A MAJOR (DF#A) (AC#E) bass for one measure E MAJOR (EG#B) of each of the following major chords. However.) MAJOR 6th F#A#C#D# Gl.F) 6th EI.jJ. ~ ~.GmC) 6th BI. m MAJOR (mFAl.DF) #~ftH F AI. • (Chordal Tones GB DE) f): i' IrJr-frZCEIie-frtctEEIE"f-rotrYrt" and two measures B MAJOR 6th (B D# F#G#) In a like manner work out the walking bass for one measure ing Major 6th chords. MAJOR (AI. C MAJOR (Chordal Tones C E G ) t): ! IJ a J un Walking Bass for one measure of C Major. MAJOR 6th (ni n FG) F MAJOR 6th (FA C D) MIF * Harmonically ly referred 48917 this chord will often chord constitute an inversion sixth. MAJOR (AI.) ~~tf BI.mmEI.

. j 13 C· £ ~r'll1. II In a like manner work out the walking bass for one measure of each of the following chords. J~J"". (DF#AC) (EG#BD) (mmmF~) (B D#F#A) (nA#C#E) 2: #tf D~ 7th (D~F A~C~) II #11 A~ 7th (A~CE~m) ..1 t.. C 7th (CEGB~) with added 6th (A) 2: ~~""I ..__. for better voice pr-og-r-esston. Style No..2 r d· • dr--II~j-""_~j J. I. .E r' • Style No.. = J.-I!.1 j J_.. J j ].I I I #~#D ~~f B~ 7th (B~Z> F A~) II 2: II~tJ II "tn E~ 7th (E~G B~D~) F 7th (FACE~) I btl I ~H II !zD II In playing the walking bass for two measures of a 7th chord.43 C 7th (Chordal Tones C E G B~) 2: ~ IIJ.. j J..1 Style No. the 6th is usually included in either the upward or downward walk.2 G' 7th ~C~Ordal Tones GBDF) 2' I I r' t • j' r rf r f II No.2. ~~ II Walking Bass for one measure of G 7th Style • Walking Bass for one measure of C 7th Style No. A 7th D 7th E 7th B 7th F#(G~) 7th (AC# EG) . !: II . J I ~j' t rJ J * Note the use of chromatics . Walking Bass for two measures of C 7th Style No.1 and Style No. or both.: ~J.

L"f D 7th rEc'!1 rfc-fr'f A 7th Style No.. II 2 L" f c' W j' f c' f: I r f r £ c' f r' f I r'w (B) ...) II In a like manner work out the walking bass for each of the following chords._ (Ae#EG) with added 6th 9: #Ufb E 7th lUfr) (e#) II ftU£3 B 7th ----- --.__. and diminished chords.t1J1<eJ added 6th II (G) F -------- II (D) B~ 7th (B~DF A~) with II Ill§) 7th (F AeE~) with added 6th !D<el II With a knowledge of chord"spelling"the skill acquired through these exercises will enable the player to use walking bass 'on minor..t 411<'e) (F.2 (D F .. augmented...1 and Style No... 481117 .. Style No..Walking Bass for two measures of G7th Style No..2 j.1 ·G 7th (GBDF) with added 6th (E) ~I)J) 2: ... II (G#) 2: (EGfBD) with added 6th .i~ F# 7th (FlA#e#E) m 7th (mB~D~F~) I f §!td~ (BDtFlA) II #"@ D~ 7th I with added 6th i!Jtlel added 6th II 9: with added 6th with added 6th (D#) (E~) n#@ bla@ I iD(leJ added 6th II (F) "ttr~ E~ 7th (m F A~m) with (m) 4fu:<~e) D~) with added 6th II (e) A~ 7th (A~eE~G~) with (E~G ~ .. altered..Ae) with added 6th """-.

46 Application of Walking Bass Definite rules for the application of walking bass would be impractical. Avoid long jumps and. A perusal of these examples will reveal the object which is to weave upward and downward through the notes of. . was developed by self taught musicians who depended entirely upon their "ears!' On the following pages are examples of applied walking bass. make the bass melody pleasing to the ear. The style is very flexible and the "bass walks" may be done in many different ways. This style.like those who developed the style. like boogie woogie. using chromatics and passing tones to improve voicing. the chord.

. 0 G 6th f .46 Application of walk ing bas'S to a twelve measure theme from the Composition.!II!! DI C 7th lio "i .--"... 0 • . . .... h. :::::>- '" 11 • . :::::>- 0 = .... .."I 0 ...•. with small hands may omit top nota.. ~ A :::::>0 - G6th t - li. If • :> I 0 e. 11' -'-'- ... bll 0 "i' which · · G 6th = 11 l1~o #~ 0 To #T •• \tt) . Symbol 2.8917 D 7th (~. i~ (q)i '" 0 . ""! • > · · 1.J =. ..!! >0 >- :::::>0 11.. . bi . 4' = .-.. -.. li • = . tJ~ !6th..101 D 7th ~ A aug 7th (~~ 7th 1 G 6th (q)•• #tJi A#dim .. 0 0 .._)1 D(I ) - 0 tt::1 i. 11 • - · · flu ~ C 7th L . ~ -. "i.. >- li. marking . 2 lie "4' :> I 0 - . Players 4. 0 •• . ..:T (qjt · · flu ~ G 6th . 11 • .i denotes the chordon wa lk ing' bass is built. FLINGING A WRING-DING By Sharon Pease "I 1 1111 C 7th G 7th 1i • flu :::::>- =..L- 11 • VlI • ~ ... "i0 #"40 .. . i 0 >- 1 >- j · · ~ .:: "'I -o "'II • #~ ===r 0 #~ 0 4 (q~)l · · ::....

. b7J • ::> - v- = fi ... • · ._. 'it '. · · 11· i.J.--. .= :> i.. . ..'(~)18 · .. " I_ •• · · · .j • =... #~ . .. :> . · · 10 ....= ~ '11 • . · I'1 • ill • • G 6th ·· · · . 1 :> . . • > · · II! 4t ~q'q)J · · 4891'7 D 7th '" G 6th (q) •• 11 • VlI • 4.. · · . . G (q)lI • · ·- G 7th = "iI....:: 11 • .G G 6th · · = i. ·· G 6th '11 • -I .C. -. :> ~. :> \ eJ < J tt :: A aug 7th ( )-e- #~ ·1 G 6th (q)i • #ttJ A. IIJ. 4iJ · · ~~ / C ·· · '(\J). :> -• "i -.bi · · · :> • :> ~ ..47 Fur-ther development of the treble by use of a "lick" throughout the first eight measures.. · qt~ "'I :> r· ill • . :> I'" -. · · -.~. ::>::> -. :> ill • -.. · · ~ = 11 • ~~. · '.--.. ::> :> :> ~~ . . · "t..J.. ~.. ::> - · · · · -iI • . II~ ::> ~> tJ · · ...c. 4 >- 'i... =i • #~ .. ::> oj • iii C 7th -· .. . .~ 11 • ~~ . !l f'lJ. · · C 7th :> ~ . .dim I · · fI~ D 7th D 7th -..r .r:. ... II 11 • li . ...#~ ... = = 11. ... ::> :> . I ::> ::> G 6th - · · · · ·q"__:. #.. . (\J)-:____ ..111 .. 112 :. . >- -• "4 .--.. ::> .

= = "i. . C 7th III i· -I -~ ~ . I 'l~ < I • · · . ... . #-- •• \It.. C 7th -= ~ i •• . = 11· lEI ~. bi .. ... "4.. .. L >- b... . .!! G 6th i. . :> _... ~ :~ . "1- ~~ 4J . . •• >- iii 11 • - 111· • ~ ... tt. - ~i.. >- - ... "i • · · =• 11 ~~.48 Introducing the Dixieland uLilt flJif eJ · · •• G 7th >- . .... . . 12 1'1 .. .• J' Ioi" . • .. r • >.. • 1 - i.. >tt . =t . • . 1 .. •• . 4 >- >- t D 7th A aug 7th (#)~ D 7th I G 6th #H:t A'dim · •• >- li. . • . #~ . _!I G 6th i. ~ - . >- . - #•.. 1 r ~ -. • ~ G 6th 111· b.... . . . II I~·M_ G 6th · = 11· 11 • . #4· · · 111. !I .!! I I . t ~~D)1 · · 48917 D 7th (~) . = 11 • 11 • . >I li. C7th >- >- - · · li. (~5 •• >- i. . . = = ~~ ..... = 11 • bi . . ~I~ ~ ... ~. >r r G 6th r . ~ >- .. -.I r - .

Icclaimed the leading authority on the subject.25 IN U.f!'lfltltfl 1!&U. ~~rg~~~I:~~I:~ . analyzes the clements of BOOGIE WOOGIE so completely and thoroughly that you will be Ible to compose your own BOOGIE WOOGIE seledions. BOOGIE WOOGIE COMPOSITIONS In B008'E "'008'E PlIlNO SlYLES No.2 PRICE $1. The perfeGtt. INC.hows rou how easllr BOOGIE arran"emenfs mar be appll_ 'fo popular fallorlfes.xt booll for the student-the teacher. FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER. A.2 Shows you the ProFessionalusc of ANTECEDENTS AND CONSEQUENT PHRASES BELL CHORDS RHYTHM PAmRNS AND PRINCIPLES RIFFS AT FAST TEMPO ENDINGS HARMONIC VARIATIONS SINGLE TONE MELODIES THIRDS • INVERTED THIRDS INTERLARDS TREMOLOS • TRILLS MINOR BOOGtE . SHARON PEASE..the profess'ona' p'arer.2. BOOGIE WOOGIE PIANO STYLES No. S. BOOGIE WOOGIE PIANO STYLES No.'l011111.

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