United States Africa Command Public Affairs Office 13 February 2012

Please find attached news clips for February 13, 2012, along with upcoming events of interest and UN News Service briefs. Of interest in today¶s clips: Libya demands Niger hand over Muammar Qadhafi's son who is on house arrest in the neighboring nation after he warned in a television interview that his homeland was facing a new uprising. Democratic Republic of Congo President Joseph Kabila's chief adviser has been killed in a plane crash, along with a co-pilot, near Bukavu. In Nigeria: A man suspected of masterminding the deadly bombing of a Nigerian church on Christmas Day has been recaptured, Nigeria authorities have said. In Guinea: Guinean court filed charges against an army colonel for his alleged role in mass rapes and killings after security forces opened fire on protesters in 2009. Zambia delighted in winning their first Africa Cup of Nations title by beating tournament favorites Ivory Coast on penalties in a dramatic 8-7 victory.

U.S. Africa Command Public Affairs Please send questions or comments to: publicaffairs@usafricom.mil 421-2687 (+49-711-729-2687) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------Top News related to U.S. Africa Command and Africa Saadi Gaddafi warns of uprising in Libya: TV (Reuters) http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/10/us-libya-saadi-idUSTRE8191QK20120210 February 10, 2012 By Marie-Louise Gumuchian and Ali Shuaib (Reuters) - Muammar Gaddafi's son Saadi warned on Friday of an imminent uprising in Libya, saying he was in regular contact with people in the country who were unhappy with the authorities put in place after the ousting and killing of his father. DR Congo president's aide killed in crash (Al Jazeera)
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http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2012/02/201221214315141185.html February 12, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Democratic Republic of Congo President Joseph Kabila's chief adviser has been killed in a plane crash, along with a co-pilot, near the eastern town of Bukavu, an interior ministry official said. Libya demands Niger hand over Gaddafi's son (Al Jazeera) http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2012/02/2012212105530677812.html February 12, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Libya has demanded Niger hand over one of Muammar Gaddafi's sons who is under house arrest in the neighbouring nation after he warned in a television interview that his homeland was facing a new uprising. Africa Cup of Nations: Zambia win dramatic shoot-out (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/16999874 February 12, 2012 By Alistair Magowan Zambia delighted in winning their first Africa Cup of Nations title by beating tournament favourites Ivory Coast on penalties. Nigeria recaptures Boko Haram 'Christmas Day bomber' (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16988371 February 10, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author A man suspected of masterminding the deadly bombing of a Nigerian church on Christmas Day has been recaptured, Nigeria authorities have said. Egypt strike to mark Mubarak overthrow 'fails' (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-16994374 February 11, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Calls by Egyptian activists for a day of strikes and civil disobedience to mark the first anniversary of President Hosni Mubarak's overthrow appear to have very little impact. Africa: Acid Test for Democracy in Africa As 12 Nations Braced for Elections (allAfrica) http://allafrica.com/stories/201202110136.html February 11, 2012 By Ciugu Mwagiru Nairobi ² As world attention remains riveted on the US political campaigns and their implications for the Obama presidency, many may forget that in Africa there will be major tests for democracy this year. Guinean military official charged in 2009 killings, rapes of protesters (CNN)
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http://edition.cnn.com/2012/02/11/world/africa/guinea-mass-rape/index.html?hpt=iaf_c2 February 11,2012 By Sarah Jones CNN) -- A Guinean court has filed charges against an army colonel for his alleged role in mass rapes and killings after security forces opened fire on protesters in 2009. Sudan army says seizes rebel-held area in border state (AlertNet) http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/sudan-army-says-seizes-rebel-held-area-in-borderstate/ February 11, 2012 By Khalid Abdelaziz; and Ulf Laessing KHARTOUM, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Sudan's armed forces said on Saturday they had seized an area held by rebels after a battle lasting two days in the border state of Blue Nile where fighting has been raging for five months. Mali sets April deadline to quell rebellion (AlertNet) http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/mali-sets-april-deadline-to-quell-rebellion/ February 11, 2012 By Tiemoko Diallo, Mark John, and Alessandra Rizzo BAMAKO, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Mali is determined to quell a heavily armed Tuareg rebellion in its north before an election scheduled for April, the defence minister said on Saturday. Dempsey Discusses Issues With Egypt¶s Defense Leaders (Defense.gov) http://www.defense.gov//News/NewsArticle.aspx?ID=67154 February 11, 2012 By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press Service CAIRO, Feb. 11, 2012 ± The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff met here today with Egypt¶s top defense officials to discuss a wide range of issues related to the long-standing security relationship between the two countries, said Marine Corps Col. Dave Lapan, the chairman¶s spokesman. Zambia v Ivory Coast (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/16999874 February 11, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Zambia and Ivory Coast both have the luxury of heading into Sunday's Africa Cup of Nations final with no suspensions and fully-fit squads. ### ------------------------------------------------------------------------------UN News Service Africa Briefs http://www.un.org/apps/news/region.asp?Region=AFRICA
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(Full Articles on UN Website) Libya: UN calls for justice after killings of displaced persons 10 February ± The United Nations political mission for Libya today voiced serious concern over the killing of seven internally displaced persons (IDPs), including three children and two women, and urged authorities to investigate the crime and bring those responsible to justice. UN welcomes charges against army colonel over mass rapes in Guinea 10 February ± A senior United Nations official welcomed today the news that a Guinean court has filed charges against an army colonel accused of being responsible for mass rapes that occurred during a pro-democracy protest in the country¶s capital in 2009. Ban urges Sudan and South Sudan to make compromises on unresolved disputes 10 February ± Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today voiced concern over the lack of progress in talks to resolve post-independence issues between Sudan and South Sudan, as well as the possibility of an escalation in tensions after unilateral decisions taken by the two governments over their oil dispute. UN-backed report warns of dangers of increasing electronic waste in West Africa 10 February ± West Africa is facing a significant increase in waste generated by electronic equipment which poses mounting health and environmental risks, according to a United Nations report released today. At least 11 Somalis perish in latest Gulf of Aden boat tragedy, UN reports 10 February ± At least 11 people have drowned and another 34 are missing in the latest boat tragedy in the Gulf of Aden, the United Nations refugee agency reported today. ### New on www.africom.mil U.S., Malian Military Medics Train to Save Lives http://www.africom.mil/getArticle.asp?art=7618&lang=0 February 10, 2012 By Sergeant Mark A. Henderson 128th MPAD, Utah Army National Guard MOPTI, Mali, ² Soldiers of the 807th Medical Deployment Support Command, Fort Douglas, Utah, joined with their Malian medical defense forces counterparts for the start of Atlas Accord12 in Mopti, Mali, February 7-15, 2012. ### -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------U.S. Africa Command Public Affairs Office  +49(0)711-729-2687  AFRICOM-PAO@usafricom.mil

FULLTEXT Saadi Gaddafi warns of uprising in Libya: TV (Reuters) http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/10/us-libya-saadi-idUSTRE8191QK20120210 February 10, 2012 By Marie-Louise Gumuchian and Ali Shuaib (Reuters) - Muammar Gaddafi's son Saadi warned on Friday of an imminent uprising in Libya, saying he was in regular contact with people in the country who were unhappy with the authorities put in place after the ousting and killing of his father. Speaking to Al-Arabiya television by phone - the first time he has spoken publicly in months - Saadi said he wanted to return to Libya "at any minute" after escaping across the border to Niger when National Transitional Council forces captured the capital Tripoli in August. He said he was in contact from Niger with the army, the militias, the NTC and other members of the Gaddafi family. It was impossible to verify where he was calling from as the station showed only an old still picture of Saadi as a backdrop to his words. "First of all, it is not going to be an uprising limited to some areas. It will cover all the regions of the Jamahiriya and this uprising does exist and I am following and witnessing this as it grows bigger by the day," he said, referring to Libya. "There will be a great uprising in the south, in the east, in the centre and in the west. All the regions of Libya will witness this new popular uprising." A transitional government appointed in November is leading the country to elections in June but is struggling to restore services and impose order on myriad armed groups. These groups fought hard in the campaign to topple Gaddafi but still refuse to hand in their weapons. The government lost control of the former Gaddafi stronghold of Bani Walid last month after local people staged an armed revolt, posing the gravest challenge yet to the NTC's authority. However elders in the desert city dismissed accusations they wanted to restore the late dictator's family to power or had any ambitions beyond their local area. Saadi told Al-Arabiya: "The Libyan people should revolt against these militias and against this deteriorating situation. The NTC is not a legitimate body ... and is not in control of the militias," he added. "We call on all to be ready for the coming uprising."

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"We have to exert pressure to change this situation and to remove this evil doing that exists in Libya. We do not know any such thing as elections. We are a Muslim nation," he said. Government officials were not immediately available for comment. Mohammed alAlagy, former interim justice minister and who now heads the human rights council, told Al-Arabiya Saadi's comments were "an attempt to drive a wedge between the Libyan people." Saadi, a businessman and former professional footballer, said he was in contact with people in Libya. Interpol last year issued a "red notice" requesting member states to arrest Saadi with a view to extradition if they find him in their territory. "I have daily communications with Libya from Niger and these contacts are not just to start the uprising but also to follow up the status of our tribes, our relatives and the people," he said. "The situation of the people is deteriorating. I am in contact with the militias, the tribes, the NTC and the national army. I can confirm that more than 70 percent of those who are in Libya now whether they support the February 17th (revolution) or not, all are not satisfied with the situation and are ready to cooperate to change this situation." Libya is preparing for the first anniversary of the start of the February 17 uprising which began in the eastern city of Benghazi. Libyan armed forces chief Yousef al-Mangoush this week said there were concerns for potential sabotage of the anniversary by Gaddafi loyalists. "A large number of February 17th members do regret this and we are now in full cooperation with the February 17th and our supporters to change this deteriorating situation," Saadi said. "As for my return, yes I must return to Libya and this will happen at any minute. If I do return I will prevent any revenge." Saadi said he was also in contact with his family members. Gaddafi's wife Safiya, his daughter Aisha and his sons Mohammed and Hannibal fled to Algeria in August. Saadi's brother Saif al-Islam was captured in the Sahara desert in November and is now being held in the town of Zintan. "I am in contact with my family inside and outside Libya and in the neighboring countries and in Europe," Saadi said. "I call on all the elders, the youth, the militias and the tribes to come and to sit with each other and to negotiate with each other and to come up with a true reconciliation." Mexican authorities said in December they had uncovered and stopped an international plot to smuggle Saadi into the country using fake names and false papers.
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### DR Congo president's aide killed in crash (Al Jazeera) http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2012/02/201221214315141185.html February 12, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Democratic Republic of Congo President Joseph Kabila's chief adviser has been killed in a plane crash, along with a co-pilot, near the eastern town of Bukavu, an interior ministry official said. The official, Richard Ilunga, confirmed the death of Augustin Katumba Mwanke and said the accident occurred on Sunday. Ilunga said said finance minister Matata Ponyo Mapon and Marcellin Cishambo Rohuya, governor of the South Kivu province, who were travelling with the aide, survived the crash. "We've extracted two bodies from the plane, that of the honourable Augustin Katumba Mwanke who has just been moved to the morgue, and that of a co-pilot," said Laban Kyalangalilwa, a provincial transport minister. He said there were two pilots and 10 passengers on the private jet. South Kivu Governor Marcellin Cishambo has been admitted to the hospital for emergency treatment, and most of the other passengers were taken from the plane alive, Kyalangalilwa said. "We do not know the cause of the crash and we await the investigations, but apparently there was not bad weather here in Bukavu," he said. Small and often ageing aircraft are used to traverse the DRC, a vast country with dense forests but without roads. Accidents are common as some airports lack even the basic facilities to function normally. Last July dozens of passengers were killed when a plane crashed as it approached Kisangani airport. Rescuers managed to pull 40 survivors from the wreckage, officials said. The aircraft belonged to the Hewa Bora Airways which is on a European Union list of airlines banned due to security concerns, as are all carriers certified in the DR Congo. ### Libya demands Niger hand over Gaddafi's son (Al Jazeera)
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http://www.aljazeera.com/news/middleeast/2012/02/2012212105530677812.html February 12, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Libya has demanded Niger hand over one of Muammar Gaddafi's sons who is under house arrest in the neighbouring nation after he warned in a television interview that his homeland was facing a new uprising. Mohammed Hareizi, spokesman for the ruling National Transitional Council (NTC), said on Saturday that Niger must extradite Saadi Gaddafi and other ex-regime officials to "preserve its relationship and interests" in Libya. The demand came days before the first anniversary of the February 17 start of the uprising that led to months of civil war and the eventual removal and death of the longtime Libyan leader. Saadi Gaddafi and more than 30 other loyalists fled to Niger after Tripoli fell to rebels in September. Niger responded that it could not hand over Saadi, who fled south to the West African state in September as Libyan forces gain the upper hand over his father's forces, because he would face execution in Libya. But officials in Libya and Niger told Reuters news agency that the Niger authorities had placed tighter restrictions on Saadi's movements and agreed that the Libyan foreign minister, Ashour Bin Hayal, would meet his Niger counterpart to discuss the issue. In a telephone call to Al Arabiya television late on Friday, Saadi said that he was in regular contact with people in Libya who were unhappy with the authorities put in place after the ousting and killing of his father. Reading out a statement to reporters, Hareizi said: "They should follow the Algerian government which prevented Gaddafi's daughter from making statements or causing any trouble from their land." He added that NTC Chairman Mustafa Abdel Jalil had called Niger's president to discuss Saadi. Algeria ordered members of Gaddafi's family in exile on its territory to stay out of politics, after Gaddafi's daughter Aisha angered the Libyan government last year by telling the media her father was still fighting to hold onto power. The Libyan News Agency LANA said Bazoum Mohamed, Niger's foreign minister, and his Libyan counterpart Bin Hayal had spoken by phone, and quoted Bin Hayal as saying Saadi's comments "threaten the bilateral relationship between the two countries".
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Authorities in Niger signaled that their position on any future extradition of Saadi had not changed. "We will hand over Saadi Gaddafi to a government which has an independent and impartial justice system," government spokesman Marou Amadou told a news conference. "But we cannot hand over someone to a place where he could face the death penalty or where he is not likely to have a trial worthy of the name," he added. Tighter surveillance Amadou acknowledged that Saadi's comments violated a condition of his stay in Niger not to engage in subversion against the Libyan authorities. Police sources in Niger told Reuters that supervision of Saadi's residence in the capital Niamey had been stepped up, but that he had not been formally arrested. A Libyan security source, speaking on condition of anonymity, told Reuters: "Niger informed us that he [Saadi] will stay in his residence and will not move from the house where he lives." Nick Kaufman, a lawyer who represents Saadi Gaddafi, told Reuters all he could say was that he has been unable to contact his client, despite many attempts. "His telephone would appear to be disconnected," said Kaufman. The Libyan security source said it had been agreed that the new restrictions would be kept in place until foreign minister Ben Hayal meets Niger officials for talks about Saadi Gaddafi's status. In his televised phone call, Saadi said he was in contact from Niger with the Libyan army, militias, the NTC and other members of the Gaddafi family. About 30 protesters demonstrated outside Niger's embassy in Tripoli, with some spraying graffiti that read "Cut ties now" and "Close the embassy" on its walls. Interpol last year issued a "red notice" requesting member states to arrest Saadi with a view to extradition if they find him on their territory. Niger has cited other reasons for not extraditing Saadi, including a United Nations travel ban on him. It has pledged to comply with commitments to the Hague-based International Criminal Court (ICC), which has not indicted Saadi, who before the war was best known for his soccer obsession.

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The ICC has indicted Saadi's brother Saif al-Islam for crimes against humanity. Saif alIslam, once viewed as a likely successor to his father, is held by a militia in Libya, where he awaits trial on rape and murder charges. In an interview broadcast by France 24 on Saturday but recorded before Saadi's interview was aired, Niger President Mahamadou Issoufou said Niger would study any extradition request on strict legal merits. "If we receive an official request we will study it. We are a state based on the rule of law. We will study that question according to our laws and our international commitments," Issoufou told France 24. The Libyan conflict has created new problems for the fragile region to its south. Heavily armed former fighters from Gaddafi's army have joined a new rebellion in northern Mali that has forced tens of thousands to flee from their homes. ### Africa Cup of Nations: Zambia win dramatic shoot-out (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/16999874 February 12, 2012 By Alistair Magowan Zambia delighted in winning their first Africa Cup of Nations title by beating tournament favourites Ivory Coast on penalties. After 14 kicks were converted, Kolo Toure and Gervinho failed to find the target for the Elephants as Zambia's Rainford Kalaba also blazed over. But Stoppila Sunzu found the top corner to complete an amazing 8-7 victory. It was a heartbreaking end for Ivorian skipper Didier Drogba, who missed a spot-kick in normal time. And it means the wait goes on for an Ivory Coast team replete with many Premier League and European stars, with the country losing the 2006 final to Egypt in the same way and last winning the title 20 years ago. For the Chipolopolo, who have already been runners-up twice, it concluded a tournament where they were inspired by the loss of the 1993 Zambian team after a plane crash close to the venue of the final in Libreville. The last time the southern African country reached the final in 1994, it was just a year after 18 Zambian team members died as they took off from the Gabonese capital.

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En route to the final, the current team had spoken of the strength they had gained in remembering that tragedy. And in winning the shoot-out, they showed a steely determination to beat their supposedly more illustrious opponents with a performance that was built on an indefatigable spirit. Having more than matched the Ivorian team throughout the 120 minutes of play, they showed greater composure when the contest came down to the crunch. Drogba's penalty miss after the hour mark was startling, as he smashed the ball way over the bar after Gervinho was pushed over. But Zambia were also unlucky as Boubacar Barry made two crucial saves at opposite ends of the match, first stopping Nathan Sinkala's shot from a well-worked corner and then poking Chris Katongo's shot onto the post in extra-time. Between those chances, Yaya Toure shot off-target from 10 yards and, although Francois Zahoui's team showed some impetus at times, they rarely tested the impressive Zambia keeper Kennedy Mweene, who also scored in the mammoth shoot-out. With Zambia conceding just three goals en route to the final and Ivory Coast none, the game was never likely to be an open contest. And as the game progressed, the belief in the Ivorian team seemed to shrink. Buoyed by their vocal coach Herve Renard, Zambia always posed a threat from their well-worked set-pieces and it certainly appeared that fate was on their side when Chelsea forward Drogba missed from the spot. Spurned on by that miss, substitute Max Gradel injected some urgency into Zahoui's side as they pushed for a winner and the former Leeds forward was inches from scoring after Wilfried Bony's knock down. Although Didier Ya Konan and Kalaba both went close for either side in extra-time, they could not prevent the game being decided by the engrossing shoot-out. Drogba made amends for his earlier miss by scoring his team's fifth kick, after Souleymane Bamba was fortunate to earn a second chance having missed his first effort. Mweene was penalised for encroachment on that occasion, but he was the coolest man on the pitch as he took it to sudden death. That left Sunzu to make the most of misses by Kolo Toure and Gervinho, sparking wild celebrations for a triumph which almost seemed scripted.
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### Nigeria recaptures Boko Haram 'Christmas Day bomber' (BBC) http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16988371 February 10, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author A man suspected of masterminding the deadly bombing of a Nigerian church on Christmas Day has been recaptured, Nigeria authorities have said. Officials say the suspect, Kabiru Sokoto, was captured in the eastern state of Taraba. He is accused of being a member of the Islamist sect, Boko Haram, which has said it carried out the attack. His escape last month was a huge embarrassment for the police, whose head was sacked shortly afterwards. Boko Haram has staged a series of increasingly deadly attacks in recent years - last month 185 people were killed during a series of bombings in Kano. Dozens of people died when a church on the outskirts of the capital, Abuja, was bombed on Christmas day. Mr Sokoto was first arrested last month, but escaped the next day while being escorted by police. "He was re-arrested this morning at Mutum Biu in Taraba State by the [secret police]," a security source told AFP. "He's being flown to Abuja now by the Nigeria air force." He fled last month while police took him for a search of his house. Police said their convoy was attacked by suspected Boko Haram members. Correspondents at the time said it was a result of huge incompetence or worse on the part of the police. Some suspected there may have been some kind of collusion between security officials and Boko Haram. Boko Haram, whose name means "Western education is forbidden", wants to establish Sharia (Islamic law) in Nigeria. Nigeria, Africa's most populous nation with 160 million people, is divided between a largely Muslim north and a south where most people are Christians and some animists. ### Egypt strike to mark Mubarak overthrow 'fails' (BBC)
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-16994374 February 11, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author Calls by Egyptian activists for a day of strikes and civil disobedience to mark the first anniversary of President Hosni Mubarak's overthrow appear to have very little impact. Strikes at universities attracted small numbers of protesters, and public transport in Cairo ran as normal. The action aimed to pressure the ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (Scaf) to hand power to civilians. The Scaf earlier said "plotters" were trying to undermine the Egyptian state. It warned they would bring "chaos and destruction" to Egypt. The Scaf has promised to hand over power after presidential elections in June, but opposition groups have been calling for an immediate transfer of power. In a separate development, Gen Martin Dempsey, chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, held talks in Cairo with the Scaf leader, Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi. It was the first meeting between top US and Egyptian officials since Cairo said last week it would put on trial 43 people - including Americans and other foreigners - over the funding of non-governmental organisations. The night that President Mubarak stepped down, Tahrir Square was the centre of a huge party. "It's like a dream," a protester, Mohammed told me. "Anything else will be much easier now." "The military will never betray us," smiled a woman called Nora. One year on those sentiments seem a little naive. Activists now say that although Mubarak left office, remnants of his regime remained in place. Their trust of the ruling generals has broken down. Now they call for them to leave power. But the plan for a general strike to push their demand did not gain popular support. Most ordinary people probably agree with Egypt's most powerful political group, the Muslim Brotherhood, which warned such action would hurt the economy.
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The idea it could destabilise the country, as suggested by the army, will also have struck a chord. Many Egyptians are now weary of protests and turmoil. On Saturday, about 100 students gathered outside the main building of Cairo University, chanting "Down with military rule!" Similar protests were reportedly held at more than 30 public and private universities across the country. Members of Egypt's revolutionary groups also took part in the strike. "We are starting to use civil disobedience as a weapon once more to get us the rights of the revolution," Ramy el-Swissy, spokesman for the April 6 Youth Movement, told the BBC. "We want the revolution to stay peaceful. We have logical demands but the military council does not listen or respond," he added. However buses and other public transport ran as normal in the capital and there was no disruption at Egypt's airports. The industrial action also had no impact on the Suez Canal, one official was quoted as saying by Reuters. Many Egyptians do not work on Saturdays as it is weekend, and many people across the country are now weary of protests and turmoil, the BBC's Yolande Knell in Cairo reports. The Muslim Brotherhood, which won the largest number of seats in recent parliamentary elections, earlier said it would not back the protests because they would hurt the economy. The Scaf's claim that the strikes could destabilise the country appears to have also struck a chord with many Egyptians, our correspondent adds. The ruling generals - who have lost popularity since they took over last year - said they would not yield to threats, or bow to pressure to speed up the transition process. Continue reading the main story "Last year, I felt like the revolution had won when Mubarak was removed; but actually the same system is still present so nothing changed really" However, activists said they were now planning to begin a campaign of strikes in universities and workplaces. Mr Mubarak stepped down on 11 February last year after 18 days of street protests in which hundreds were killed.
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He is on trial accused of ordering the killing of demonstrators, charges he denies. The military took power under the leadership of Field Marshal Tantawi. Following a protracted election process, a new parliament dominated by Islamist parties held its first session earlier this month. However, protests and unrest have continued, most recently with the deaths of 74 people after a football match in the city of Port Said and at least four others in ensuing demonstrations. In its statement broadcast on Friday evening, the Scaf warned against conspiracies, saying the army had played a vital part in the revolution. "We are facing plots against the nation aiming to undermine the institutions of the Egyptian state, and to topple the state itself so that chaos reigns," the message said. The Scaf also confirmed that presidential elections were on course to take place in June. Thousands of protesters demonstrated outside the defence ministry on Friday, calling for a swifter transition to civilian rule. In the year since Mr Mubarak was toppled, Egypt's economy has been battered. The country is haemorrhaging about $1bn (£638m) a month in foreign currency reserves, and the Egyptian pound has fallen to new lows. ### Africa: Acid Test for Democracy in Africa As 12 Nations Braced for Elections (allAfrica) http://allafrica.com/stories/201202110136.html February 11, 2012 By Ciugu Mwagiru Nairobi ² As world attention remains riveted on the US political campaigns and their implications for the Obama presidency, many may forget that in Africa there will be major tests for democracy this year. Among the most critical political events on the continent will be a referendum in Darfur that is expected to pave the way for the self-determination of the people of that troubled Sudanese region In the wake of the emergence of independence for South Sudan, what happens in Darfur will be of great significance for East Africa, and Africa as a whole.

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Ravaged by war for many years, Darfur has been one of the major hotspots on the African continent. Tellingly, it was the allegedly genocidal violence in Darfur that resulted in the issuing of a warrant of arrest for Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir by the International Criminal Court. Also of great significance this year will be developments in Libya and Egypt, the counties in Africa in which, together with Morocco, the so-called Arab uprising has had a major impact. While in Egypt there will be elections for the Shura Council expected to steer the country's political future, in post-Gaddafi Libya there will be the Public National Conference election expected to put paid to the uncertainties currently facing the troubled country. Other countries holding either presidential or parliamentary elections this year include Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Togo and Sierra Leone. Also expected to hold polls before the year ends are Algeria, Angola, Burkina Faso and Madagascar. Regarding Senegal, the usually stable West African state has already set a blistering pace for the rest of Africa. As the worrying political situation unfolds in that country, amidst mounting pre-election violence that has already claimed some lives, there is cause for concern about the future of democracy in Africa. The situation in Senegal in fact presents a typical case study of the stubborn intransigence of the old order in the face of looming and inevitable generational change in Africa. With incumbent President Abdoulaye Wade already having served the constitutional limit of two terms, he insists he can seek two more, arguing that the cap on two terms was introduced into the country's constitution after his last re-election. By all indications due for a well-deserved retirement, Wade has in recent times been displaying remarkable energy for an octogenarian, while insisting on holding onto the reins of power despite the fact that he is already 85. Emboldened by a January 27 ruling by Senegal's highest court that upheld his assertion, Wade is certainly the epitome of Africa's power-hungry fogies who will not leave the political scene without a bloodied nose. For his efforts, Wade has incurred the wrath of a livid opposition determined to see the last of him.

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Contending that the incumbent's bid for a third term is unconstitutional, the opposition has launched a protest movement to force him out of the race. Dubbed the June 23 Movement, the united opposition has already brought together many out of the 14 candidates -- including musician Youssour N'Dour -- originally approved for the February 26 polls. Already agreed about fielding one candidate against the obstinate Wade, the opposition has also stepped up protests against the incumbent. These protests have been turning increasingly violent. In a show of rare self-confidence though, the beleaguered Wade has dismissed the mounting opposition action as "temper tantrums" and "a light breeze". First elected president in 2000 and re-elected for a second seven-year term in 2007, Wade in typical African fashion seems determined to hold onto power at any cost and has already warned the West to keep off Senegal's affairs. Following criticism of his re-election bid by the US and France, Senegal's former colonial master, the ageing president minced no words in reacting to what he perceives as their intrusion into Senegal's sovereign space. "The Americans and the French are not the Senegalese's bosses," he said, adding: "I do not seek the interest of the toubabs (Westerners), but that of the Senegalese people... I won't be dictated to from abroad." That sort of affront from an African leader might have been unimaginable by top western government officials, leave alone ministers, just a few years ago. And since they are preoccupied with their own looming national elections, countries like the US and France are unlikely to assert their influence. It is therefore not surprising that in Mali, not far away from Senegal, rebels have been wreaking havoc in the recent past, obviously determined to influence the way forthcoming presidential elections in that country later this year will go. Given the unfolding scenarios in Senegal and Mali, there are real prospects of flare-ups in other African countries holding elections this year. ### Mali bombs rebels, France wants ceasefire, talks (REUTER) http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFJOE8190BI20120210 February 10, 2012 By A Non Attributed Author
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BAMAKO (Reuters) - Malian helicopter gunships bombed rebel positions near the key northern town of Kidal on Friday, a military official said, hours after former colonial power France called for a ceasefire and immediate talks to end a three-week rebel offensive. France, which remains an ally of its former colonies, backed Bamako's stance against the rebels' claim for an independent north. In a further sign of disruption caused by clashes, the United States delayed its annual counter-terrorism training for its allies in the Sahara region. Dozens of people have been reported killed on both sides and tens of thousands of civilians have been forced from their homes since the MNLA rebels, boosted by weapons and men from Libya, started attacking towns and military outposts in mid-January. Last weekend, rebels had come within eight kilometres (5 miles) of Kidal, the capital of one of three northern regions they are targeting. But a Malian military official said they have since been pushed back by helicopter gunships, as well as heavy weapons fire by the armed forces. "Five of our helicopters have been bombing the rebels ... to take out the attackers," the official said, adding that raids had taken place about 15 km from the town. A second military source said: "We are not waiting for them to attack us anymore. Now it is us going on the offensive." No toll was available from the military. A rebel spokesman said he was not aware of any assaults on Friday. He said Malian military helicopters had tried to attack them on Wednesday and Thursday but there were no injuries. Mali's military has the advantage of air power over the rebels but the MNLA pose the most robust threat yet to Bamako, even if they are not seen having the might to carve out an independent state in the north. Speaking during a visit to Bamako on Thursday, Henri de Raincourt, France's minister for cooperation, said Paris rejected any idea of part of Mali splitting off but he repeated France's call for dialogue not force to end the conflict. "There cannot be a military solution: we call for an immediate ceasefire and we will condemn, whenever necessary, the use of force," he said in statement. "We call for dialogue to find a sustainable political solution to the social, economic and security problems that the north of the country is faced with," he added. Local media has accused France of bias in favour of the Tuareg rebels.
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There are fears the rebellion has disrupted efforts to improve regional cooperation and diverted Mali's military resources from tackling the threat posed by al Qaeda's North Africa wing, AQIM, which operates in the area. Underlining simmering tensions between nations in the region, the president of Mauritania, said neighbouring Mali's north had practically become a "free zone" for terrorists and called for countries to take concrete steps to tackle the group. "We are talking about a small enemy (in AQIM) of no more than 300 men. That should be within the capabilities of any country," President Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz told France's Le Monde newspaper on Friday. The U.S. embassy in Bamako said on Friday Flintlock 2012, its counter-terrorism exercise bringing together African and Western nations and was due to start later this month and run through March, had been delayed while Mali tackled the rebels. "Mali's participation in Flintlock 2012 is critical to its success and we understand the need to focus necessary efforts on maintaining its security," said U.S. Ambassador to Mali Mary Beth Leonard. No details were given for when the training would take place. ### Guinean military official charged in 2009 killings, rapes of protesters (CNN) http://edition.cnn.com/2012/02/11/world/africa/guinea-mass-rape/index.html?hpt=iaf_c2 February 11,2012 By Sarah Jones (CNN) -- A Guinean court has filed charges against an army colonel for his alleged role in mass rapes and killings after security forces opened fire on protesters in 2009. Lt. Col. Moussa Camara is the highest ranking official charged in the attacks on demonstrators gathered in a Conakry stadium to protest the military rule in the country at the time. More than 150 people died in the ensuing chaos and 109 women were sexually abused, the United Nations said in a statement. "Women were raped by soldiers in the stadium. I saw them," former Guinean prime minister Sidya Toure said at the time. Toure led the country from 1996-1999, and was participating in the peaceful demonstration in the capital. The Guinean government has said most of the victims were crushed as the crowd stormed the stadium doors.
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"The recent charges are a welcome step in the right direction. They signal that no official is above the law, and no citizen is below it," said Margaret Wallstrom, a U.N. special representative on sexual violence in conflict. Wallstrom highlighted the need to protect survivors while prosecuting those responsible for crimes against humanity. "There remains an urgent need to assist the survivors and bring the remaining perpetrators to justice," she said. "It is equally crucial that all victims, other witnesses and their families are afforded full protection and that no effort is spared to ensure their safety throughout this process." Tens of thousands of people had gathered to protest the rule of Capt. Moussa Dadis Camara, who seized power in a bloodless coup. Military rule in the nation ended in 2010, when President Alpha Conde took over after winning elections. ###

Sudan army says seizes rebel-held area in border state (AlertNet) http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/sudan-army-says-seizes-rebel-held-area-in-borderstate/ February 11, 2012 By Khalid Abdelaziz; and Ulf Laessing KHARTOUM, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Sudan's armed forces said on Saturday they had seized an area held by rebels after a battle lasting two days in the border state of Blue Nile where fighting has been raging for five months. Clashes spread to Blue Nile in September after violence broke out in June in the nearby oil-producing state of South Kordofan between the army and rebels from the SPLMNorth, which wants to topple the Khartoum government. Sudan wants to explore oil and gas in Blue Nile which is also rich in minerals such as chrome. The fighting has forced about 417,000 people to flee their homes, more than 80,000 of them to newly independent South Sudan bordering the two northern states, according to the United Nations. Army spokesman Sawarmi Khalid Saad said the army had seized from rebels on Saturday the area of Magja, some 100 km (60 miles) south of Blue Nile's capital of Damazin.
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"The armed forces liberated the area ... after two days of fighting with the SPLM during which the SPLM lost tens of fighters," he said. SPLM-North spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi did not answer his cellphone when Reuters called seeking comment. Magja lies between Damazin and the town of Kurmuk, a former rebel stronghold seized by the army in November. Blue Nile and South Kordofan contain large groups who sided with the south in a decades-long civil war, and who say they continue to face persecution inside Sudan since South Sudan seceded in July. The SPLM is now the ruling party in the independent south and denies supporting SPLMNorth rebels across the border, as Khartoum alleges. Events in South Kordofan and Blue Nile are difficult to verify because aid groups and foreign journalists are banned from areas where fighting takes place. SPLM-North is one of a number of rebel movements in underdeveloped border areas who say they are fighting to overthrow Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir and end what they see as the dominance of the Khartoum political elite. Sudan and South Sudan, who still have to resolve a range of issues including the sharing of oil revenues, regularly trade accusations of supporting insurgencies on each other's territory. ### Mali sets April deadline to quell rebellion (AlertNet) http://www.trust.org/alertnet/news/mali-sets-april-deadline-to-quell-rebellion/ February 11, 2012 By Tiemoko Diallo, Mark John, and Alessandra Rizzo BAMAKO, Feb 11 (Reuters) - Mali is determined to quell a heavily armed Tuareg rebellion in its north before an election scheduled for April, the defence minister said on Saturday. Dozens have been reported killed and thousands of civilians forced from their homes since the rebels, boosted by ethnic allies who returned to Mali after fighting for Muammar Gaddafi in Libya, started attacking towns and army bases last month. The upsurge of fighting in an area already struggling to tackle the presence of local al Qaeda agents has raised concerns that the presidential election might have to be postponed.
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"We have a mission which is very restricted in time. The elections are in three months and we need to have a solution in this short timeframe," Defence Minister Sadio Gassama told national radio from the northern town of Gao during a visit to troops. "The men (in the army) are determined to make sure we can settle this problem in a very short time," he added. President Amadou Toumani Toure, who has pledged to step down as leader of the West African country after the election, has faced a wave of domestic anger for not doing enough to crack down on the rebellion. The United Nations and allies including former colonial power France have called for a ceasefire and negotiations, though they have backed Mali's rejection of the rebels' goal of outright independence for three northern regions. The fighting is the most serious fallout yet from the Libyan war on the fragile Sahel region, whose resources include gold, oil and uranium. Last weekend, rebels came within 8 km (5 miles) of Kidal, the capital of one of the three regions they are seeking to control. But a Malian military official said they have since been pushed back by helicopter gunships, as well as heavy weapons fire by the armed forces. ### Dempsey Discusses Issues With Egypt¶s Defense Leaders (Defense.gov) http://www.defense.gov//News/NewsArticle.aspx?ID=67154 February 11, 2012 By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press Service CAIRO, Feb. 11, 2012 ± The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff met here today with Egypt¶s top defense officials to discuss a wide range of issues related to the long-standing security relationship between the two countries, said Marine Corps Col. Dave Lapan, the chairman¶s spokesman. The meetings occur on day three of Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey¶s second visit to the region, which included a stop in Afghanistan. The chairman met here with his counterpart, Lt. Gen. Sami Hafez Enan, chief of staff of the Egyptian armed forces. He also met with Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi and with other officials this afternoon at the Ministry of Defense in Cairo. Discussions included Egypt¶s investigation into the allegedly illegal foreign funding of pro-democracy nongovernmental organizations by more than 40 Egyptian and American activists, including 19 U.S. citizens.
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Officials of the Cairo Criminal Court have prevented some Americans involved in the investigation from leaving the country, including Sam LaHood, son of U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. He and several others have taken refuge at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. So far no trial date is set. Lapan declined to give details of Dempsey¶s ³private´ discussions with Egyptian defense officials. The chairman also visited the U.S. Embassy, where he met with Ambassador Anne W. Patterson and was briefed by the Egypt country team. Afterward he posed for photographs with members of the Marine Corps detachment assigned to the embassy. Later, after a wild motorcade ride through the Saturday streets of Cairo, Dempsey arrived at the Ministry of Defense with Patterson. There he met with Enan and Tantawi. He also met with Maj. Gen. Mohamed el-Assar, assistant minister of defense and a member of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces; Maj. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, director of military intelligence; Maj. Gen. Ibrahim Mohamed Noshy, chief of the Egyptian Army¶s training authority; and others. During a seven-course official lunch with the Egyptian military leadership, Dempsey sat between Enan and el-Assar at the head table. During lunch he asked to thank the chef, who came out of the kitchen for a handshake and a coin from the chairman. Dempsey also thanked and gave coins to a group of local musicians who played during the meal. This afternoon, Dempsey participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the pyramid-shaped monument on the site of the Unknown Soldier Memorial and the Anwar Sadat Tomb in Cairo. ### Sudans¶ Oil Feud Risks Shattering a Fragile Peace (NYT) http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/world/africa/sudan-and-south-sudan-edge-closer-tobrink-in-oil-dispute.html?_r=1&ref=africa February 10, 2012 By Jeffrey Gettleman KHARTOUM, Sudan ² Sudan and the breakaway nation of South Sudan have been locked in an exceedingly dangerous game of brinkmanship over billions of gallons of oil, seizing tankers, shutting down wells and imperiling the tenuous, American-backed peace that has held ² just barely ² between the two countries after decades of war.

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Not for years have north-south relations been so poisonous, with a proxy war between the two nations fueling rebel groups and sometimes even flaring into direct Sudan-South Sudan clashes. The jagged, disputed frontier separating Sudan from its newly independent neighbor is now probably the most incendiary fault line in Africa, with two big armies that fought each other for generations massing on either side. After emergency talks to prevent a full-fledged conflict, the two sides agreed to a vague nonaggression pact late on Friday, yielding to intense pressure from the African Union, the United States and China ² a major oil partner for both sides ² to move beyond the language and tactics of mutual destruction. But few analysts see any easy solutions to the heated push and pull over oil, and it is not clear how the nonaggression pact will be any different from previous security deals that have led nowhere. In May, the two sides agreed to demilitarize the contested border. But just days after that, Sudan began heavy bombardment along the border, occasionally dropping bombs in the south, while the South Sudanese rushed in weapons to rebel allies fighting just across the divide. The border area has been a tinderbox for years because that is where most of the oil lies. Both sides desperately need oil to run their governments, feed their people and stamp out spreading rebellions. And theoretically, both sides need each other. The conundrum of the two Sudans is that 75 percent of the oil is in the south, just across the border, but the pipeline to export it runs through the north. Because of this, oil was once thought to be the glue that would hold the two nations together and prevent a conflict. Now, it seems, oil is becoming the fuse. When South Sudan broke off from Sudan last year, after years of guerrilla struggle, its independence was heralded as the triumphal capstone ending one of Africa¶s deadliest civil wars. But the question of how exactly the two sides would share oil profits loomed ominously over the separation, unresolved. Now that both nations are struggling to make it on their own, the issue has proved to be as prickly ² and perilous ² as many feared. It was South Sudanese oil that drove Sudan¶s economic boom of the past decade and made the repression by Sudan¶s Islamist government (which is still heavily penalized by the United States) tolerable to many Sudanese. When South Sudan declared independence, it took oil worth billions of dollars with it, gutting Sudan¶s economy and creating one of the deepest crises that President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has faced in his more than 20 years in power. Mr. Bashir is now battling high inflation, a shrinking economy, student protests and several simultaneous rebellions ² in Darfur, the Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile State ² as well as genocide charges related to the massacres several years ago in Darfur, and stiff American sanctions. At the same time, South Sudan, one of the world¶s poorest countries, is facing a major food crisis and heavily armed ethnically based militias that have been sweeping parts of the countryside, killing hundreds and making a mockery of the South Sudanese security forces.
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Stoking the tensions, Sudan and South Sudan have been covertly backing rebels in each other¶s backyards, leading to border clashes and relentless aerial bombings. The more than 1,000-mile border between them is now effectively closed, with millions of pounds of emergency food and just about all trade held up in a two-way stranglehold. Before the emergency accord on Friday, the situation was so precarious that many saw only violent outcomes. ³I, personally, expect full-fledged war,´ said Mariam al-Sadiq alMahdi, a leading opposition politician in Khartoum, Sudan¶s capital. ³This is like the previews before a film.´ In the fight over oil, the south has refused to turn over royalties for using Sudan¶s pipelines. Sudan upped the ante in late December by seizing oil tankers filled with South Sudanese crude. Then the south took the drastic step of abruptly shutting down all of its oil wells, a measure that could quickly bring the economies of both north and south to their knees. South Sudanese officials have admitted they are using their oil to squeeze Khartoum to make concessions on all sorts of issues, including the disputed area of Abyei, insisting that oil production, about 350,000 barrels a day, will resume only after ³all the deals are signed.´ The south has even threatened to sit on its oil for years while it builds an alternative pipeline through Kenya. But it is not clear how the new country will survive that long; oil provides about 98 percent of government revenue. And experts question whether the Kenya pipeline is even feasible. It would have to run uphill, requiring many expensive pumping stations, and most likely slice across Jonglei, a South Sudanese state that, with all its militias, is essentially a war zone. In Khartoum, many people are still struggling to swallow the fact that the south is gone. Nobody likes the new map of Sudan. It used to be Africa¶s biggest country. Now it looks as if it has been crudely amputated, left with the ragged edges of a raw wound. ³I still can¶t get used to it,´ said Nada Gerais, a sales manager in Khartoum. ³It looks, looks ...,´ she struggled for the right word. ³Weird.´ Mrs. Gerais is a perfect example of the nose dive Sudan¶s economy has taken. She works in a meticulously polished Nissan dealership that used to sell 50 cars a month. Now, sometimes, it is down to five. She is thinking of switching to pharmaceuticals or food. ³People can stop buying cars, but they can¶t stop eating,´ she explained. During the past decade, Sudan¶s oil wealth helped build factories, roads and countless shish kebab joints, and it fueled plans for a futuristic minicity, a new airport and a reconfiguring of Khartoum to include a breezy promenade along the Nile. But now high-rise buildings stand half-finished, and the plummeting value of the Sudanese pound has pushed electronics, books and even tomatoes out of reach for many.
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Officials in Khartoum say the south owes them nearly $1 billion in pipeline fees, money needed to keep their economy from collapsing, and they recently sold some of the oil from the seized tankers before releasing them. South Sudan¶s president, Salva Kiir, said the amount Khartoum wanted, $32 per barrel, was ³exorbitant´ and ³completely out of international norms.´ Sabir M. Hassan, a Sudanese government negotiator, said that the north was willing to be flexible, but that the southerners were ³too emotional´ and still saw themselves as rebels. ³If you give them two choices, they¶ll choose the one that hurts the north, not the one that helps the south,´ Mr. Hassan said. South Sudanese leaders say the same about Khartoum, which has blockaded roads leading south and recently held up humanitarian shipments, all to punish the south at the cost of millions of dollars in lost business. Many political analysts wonder whether Mr. Bashir will be able to survive these crises. But it is hard to see who would replace him. Sudan¶s political opposition is deeply divided and run by white-bearded septuagenarians. The rebel movements do not have much support in Khartoum. Sudanese students started an Arab Spring-like movement last year, but they failed to gain any traction. The security forces were quick to arrest protesters and string them up from ceiling fans. And Sudan has a resilience that transcends the turmoil. Every Friday, in a dusty ring on Khartoum¶s outskirts, hundreds of Nuban men gather to watch traditional wrestling. Ethnic Nubans are leading the rebellion in the Nuba Mountains. But there is little evidence of that here. ³Things are fine,´ said one elderly spectator. Just as he was about to elaborate, a young wrestler scooped up his opponent and bodyslammed him in the dirt. ³You see that!´ the old man hollered. ³My God, I love this.´ ### END REPORT

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