12 Tips

Use this Top 12 self introduction speech topics for if you have to develop a brief self introduction that tells the
audience who you are and what you are about.
There are public speaking opportunities in life in which you have to make a good first impression.
The key question for a successful and effective self introduction speech in both occasions is: how much and what
information do you want the audience to know about you?
Rule number one is: focus on one speech topic. Do not write an award winning boring autobiography :-)
I recommend you to develop one aspect of your life. That aspect will tell who you are and what you are about.
Some people call this self introduction speech type a one-point speech, because it is based on only one speech
idea.
Look at the sample self introduction speech topics below and pick out the aspects of your personal life you want to
share with the audience. Approach the list below with the who, what, where, why, how and when questions. It is an
effective way to outline your first thoughts for introducing yourself.
1. What activity has played or plays an important part in your life? Tell the story and distract the message.
2. What is your main personal goal?
3. What do you like very much?
4. What do you hate or dislike?
5. Do you have developed a very special skill?
6. What is your lifestyle?
7. Can you come up with a turning point or milestone in you life?
8. What is your hobby or interest in you spare time?
9. What is a pet peeve or another very familiar topic you like to talk about, to do or to discuss?
10. Where you are from? Do your roots reveal something about yourself that is new for the audience? That always
works in a speech for self introduction.
11. Is there an object or prop that means a lot to you?
12. What distinguishes you from other individuals?

As I find myself in the airport to visit my relatives , I saw one individual standing in the middle of the scene trying to
figure out things . Right there and then , I realized that she was an immigrant trying to find her way . It is through this
that I remembered the first instance that I arrived in the United States
Prior to arriving , there was optimism revolving around that person but all these changed when he began to live
the real life . This man had to struggle to adjust to the culture where he is in . He had to work extra hard to learn the
language and familiarize himself with the cultures and practices by many . The American culture that is
characterized to be independent in nature at first shocked the man . The man had to experience a culture that can
be characterized as self-sufficient and productive in their own individualistic way . This man had to endure all trials
and challenges so as to survive such scenario . It was only after a year that life began to act normally and
functionally for this man
As he pushed through with the life in the United States , there were moments of challenges and struggles , but
that did not make him surrender or give up . On the other hand , he used such instance as a tool to improve himself
. Along with his pastime -reading books , the man ventured into the unknown with only his guts as a weapon . He
adapted quite greatly to the environment and culture
Now as he embarks into a new phase in his life , he is full of confidence that he can achieve whatever he wishes
. Given the proper amount of persistence and an open mind , the boy from the airport before has now matured into a
man a man capable of anything he can dream about . He treats criticisms and prejudices with a smile and a tool for
self-improvement . With such mindset , he sets out a goal to conquer the world in his own achievements and
capabilities
Like the famous line says America is the land of opportunity . Truly such can be said about the case of this man .
This man is way different than before . Today , this man is more confident to endure more challenges that this
country and its people will give him . He is equipped with the proper arsenal (English , education , and experience )
to stand up against detractors and critics . The man who dreamed and struggled to survive is standing before you
know , with full confidence , with one goal and objective in mind - success
Black is real sensation, even if it is produced by entire absence of light. The sensation of black is distinctly different from the lack of all sensation. -
Hermann von Helmholz
The Color Psychology of Black
y Black absorbs all light in the color spectrum.


y Black is often used as a symbol of menace or evil, but it is also popular as an indicator of power. It is used to represent treacherous characters
such as Dracula and is often associated with witchcraft.


y Black is associated with death and mourning in many cultures. It is also associated with unhappiness, sexuality, formality, and sophistication.


y In ancient Egypt, black represented life and rebirth.


y Black is often used in fashion because of itsslimming quality.


y Consider how black is used in language: Black Death, blackout, black cat, black list, black market, black tie, black belt.
White...is not a mere absence of colour; it is a shining and affirmative thing, as fierce as red, as definite as black...God paints in many colours; but
He never paints so gorgeously, I had almost said so gaudily, as when He paints in white. - G. K. Chesterton
The Color Psychology of White
y White represents purity or innocence.


y White is bright and can create a sense of space or add highlights.


y White is also described as cold, bland, and sterile. Rooms painted completely white can seem spacious, but empty and unfriendly. Hospitals and
hospital workers use white to create a sense of sterility.
Red
y Red is a bright, warm color that evokes strong emotions.


y Red is associated with love, warmth, and comfort.


y Red is also considered an intense, or even angry, color that creates feelings of excitement or intensity.


y Consider how red is used in language: redneck, red-hot, red-handed, paint the town red, seeing red
How does the color red make you feel? Read what others have to say and share your own reactions in the links below.
The Color Psychology of Blue
y Blue is described as a favorite color by many people and is the color most preferred by men.


y Blue calls to mind feelings of calmness or serenity. It is often described as peaceful, tranquil, secure, and orderly.


y Blue can also create feelings of sadness or aloofness.


y Blue is often used to decorate offices because research has shown that people are more productive in blue rooms.


y Blue is one of the most popular colors, but it is one of the least appetizing. Some weight loss plans even recommend eating your food off of a
blue plate. Blue rarely occurs naturally in food aside from blueberries and some plums. Also, humans are geared to avoid foods that are poisonous
and blue coloring in food is often a sign of spoilage or poison.


y Blue can also lower the pulse rate and body temperature.


y Consider how blue is used in language: blue moon, blue Monday, blue blood, the blues, and blue ribbon.
Green, which is Nature's colour, is restful, soothing, cheerful, and health-giving. - Paul Brunton
The Color Psychology of Green
y Green is a cool color that symbolizes nature and the natural world.


y Green also represents tranquility, good luck, health, and jealousy.


y Researchers have also found that green canimprove reading ability. Some students may find that laying a transparent sheet of green paper over
reading material increases reading speed and comprehension.


y Green has long been a symbol of fertility and was once the preferred color choice for wedding gowns in the 15th-century. Even today, green M
& M's (an American chocolate candy) are said to send a sexual message.


y Green is often used in decorating for its calming effect. For example, guests waiting to appear on television programs often wait in a ³green
room´ to relax.


y Green is thought to relieve stress and help heal. Those who have a green work environment experience fewer stomachaches.
How wonderful yellow is. It stands for the sun. -Vincent Van Gogh
The Color Psychology of Yellow
y Yellow is a bright that is often described as cheery and warm.


y Yellow is also the most fatiguing to the eye due to the high amount of light that is reflected. Using yellow as a background on paper or computer
monitors can lead to eyestrain or vision loss in extreme cases.


y Yellow can also create feelings of frustration and anger. While it is considered a cheerful color, people are more likely to lose their tempers in
yellow rooms and babies tend to cry more in yellow rooms.


y Yellow can also increase the metabolism.


y Since yellow is the most visible color, it is also themost attention-getting color. Yellow can be used in small amount to draw notice, such as on
traffic sign or advertisements.
How does yellow make you feel? Do you associate yellow with certain qualities or situations? Read what others have to say and share your own
reactions in the links below.
The Color Psychology of Purple
y Purple is the symbol of royalty and wealth.


y Purple also represents wisdom and spirituality.


y Purple does not often occur in nature, it can sometimes appear exotic or artificial.
Notice how purple is used in this image. How does purple make you feel? Do you associate purple with certain qualities or situations?
You can discover how other people react to the color purple by reading the reader responses to purple below and share your own reactions.
Color Psychology - Reactions to Brown
y Brown is a natural color that evokes a sense of strength and reliability.


y Brown can also create feelings of sadness and isolation.


y Brown brings to mind feeling of warmth, comfort, and security. It is often described as natural, down-to-earth, and conventional, but brown can
also be sophisticated.
Orange is very blatant and vulgar. It makes you immediately start having feelings.--Wolf Kahn
The Color Psychology of Orange
y Orange is a combination of yellow and red and is considered an energetic color.


y Orange calls to mind feelings of excitement, enthusiasm, and warmth.


y Orange is often used to draw attention, such as in traffic signs and advertising.
How does orange make you feel? Do you associate orange with certain qualities or situations? You can discover how other people react to the color
orange in reader responses to orange, and share your own reactions in the comments area found below.
The Color Psychology of Pink
y Pink is essentially a light red and is usually associated with love and romance.


y Pink is thought to have a calming effect. One shade known as "drunk-tank pink" is sometimes used in prisons to calm inmates. Sports teams
sometimes paint the opposing teams locker room pink to keep the players passive and less energetic.


y While pink's calming effect has been demonstrated, researchers of color psychology have found that this effect only occurs during the initial
exposure to the color. When used in prisons, inmates often become even more agitated once they become accustomed to the color.
Paint is any liquid, liquefiable, or mastic composition which after application to a substrate in a thin layer is converted to
an opaque solid film. One may also consider the digital mimicry thereof. It is most commonly used to protect, color or
provide texture to objects.
In 2011, South African archeologists reported finding a 100,000 year old human-made ochre-based mixture which may
have been used like paint.
[1]
Cave paintings drawn with red or yellow ochre,hematite, manganese oxide,
and charcoal may have been made by early Homo sapiens as long as 40,000 years ago.
Ancient colored walls at Dendera, Egypt, which were exposed for years to the elements, still possess their brilliant color,
as vivid as when they were painted about 2,000 years ago. The Egyptians mixed their colors with a gummy substance,
and applied them separate from each other without any blending or mixture. They appeared to have used six colors:
white, black, blue, red, yellow, and green. They first covered the area entirely with white then traced the design in black,
leaving out the lights of the ground color. They used minium for red, and generally of a dark tinge.
Pliny mentions some painted ceilings in his day in the town of Ardea, which had been done prior to the foundation
of Rome. He expresses great surprise and admiration at their freshness, after the lapse of so many centuries.
Paint was made with the yolk of eggs and therefore, the substance would harden and stick onto the surface it is applied
to. Pigments were made from plants, sands, and different soil types.
Painting is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium
[1]
to a surface (support base). The application of
the medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other objects can be used. In art, the term painting
describes both the act and the result of the action. However, painting is also used outside of art as a common trade
among craftsmen and builders. Paintings may have for their support such surfaces
as walls, paper, canvas, wood,glass, lacquer, clay, copper or concrete, and may incorporate multiple other materials
including sand, clay, paper, gold leaf as well as objects.
Painting is a mode of expression and the forms are numerous. Drawing, composition or abstraction and other aesthetics
may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner. Paintings can be naturalistic and
representational (as in a still life or landscape painting), photographic, abstract, be loaded with narrative
content, symbolism, emotion or be political in nature.
A portion of the history of painting in both Eastern and Western art is dominated by spiritual motifs and ideas; examples of
this kind of painting range from artwork depicting mythological figures on pottery to Biblical scenes rendered on the
interior walls and ceiling of The Sistine Chapel, to scenes from the life ofBuddha or other scenes of eastern religious
origin.
What enables painting is the perception and representation of intensity. Every point in space has different intensity, which
can be represented in painting by black and white and all the gray shades between. In practice, painters can articulate
shapes by juxtaposing surfaces of different intensity; by using just color (of the same intensity) one can only represent
symbolic shapes. Thus, the basic means of painting are distinct from ideological means, such as geometricalfigures,
various points of view and organization (perspective), and symbols. For example, a painter perceives that a particular
white wall has different intensity at each point, due to shades and reflections from nearby objects, but ideally, a white wall
is still a white wall in pitch darkness. In technical drawing, thickness of line is also ideal, demarcating ideal outlines of an
object within a perceptual frame different from the one used by painters.
What is a Painting? "We should remember that a picture -- before being a war horse, a nude woman, or telling some other story -- is essentially a
flat surface covered with colours arranged in a particular pattern."
--Maurice Denis, Definition of Neotraditionism. Originally published in Art et Critique in Paris, 23 & 30 August 1890
(This version of the quote translated from French by Peter Collier for Art In Theory: 1815--1900 edited by Charles Harris, Paul Wood & Jason Gaiger, page 863.)

Joy of Modern Art: "In listening to a concert, the music-lover experiences a joy qualitatively different from that experienced in listening to natural
sounds, such as the murmur of a stream... Similarly [modern] painters provide ... artistic sensations due exclusively to the harmony of lights and
shades and independent of the subject depicted in the picture."
-- Parisian art critic and poet Guillaume Apollinaire,On the Subject in Modern Painting, 1912.
"Painting, like music, has nothing to do with reproduction of nature, nor interpretation of intellectual meanings. Whoever is able to feel the beauty of
colors and forms has understood non-objective [abstract] painting."
-- Hilla Rebay, The Beauty of Non-Objectivity (quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology, edited by Francis Frascina and Charles
Harrison, p145)
Patience: "Nothing can be rushed. It must grow, it should grow of itself, and if the time ever comes for that work -- then so much the better!"
-- Paul Klee, in On Modern Art, 1948.
Renoir's Color Mixing: "He always mixed his colors on the canvas. He was very careful to keep an impression of transparency in his picture
throughout the different phases of the work ... he worked on the whole surface of his canvas [and] the motif gradually emerged from the seeming
confusion, with each brushstroke."
-- Jean Renoir, son of the Impressionist Painter Auguste Renoir, writing in his memoir Renoir: My Father
Physical Side of a Painting: "Making people forget the extent to which painting a picture depending on material processes [stretching and nailing
canvases, grinding pigment] became necessary for those who wished to convince the public that the artist was no hired hand performing manual
work, but a creative artist who used his judgement, learning and imagination to produce works whose merit lay as much in the idea itself as much in
its execution." -- Nadeije Laneyrie-Dagen, How to Read Paintings, page 104
"Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where
it happens to be." -- Walter Benjamin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical
Anthology, edited by Francis Frascina and Charles Harrison, p219.
Finger Painting: "Throughout history a small number of artists have rejected both palette knives and brushes. A few used their fingers to spread the
paint. Artists turned to such primal means for various reasons, including display of skill, experimental playfulness, or nose-thumbing at convention.
"...The young Leonardo's use of his fingers can be linked to the properties of the newly available medium of oil painting. ... It should not surprise us
that he played with the tackiness of the new oil medium, palpating the paint as he sought new effects."
-- Seeing Through Paintings by Andrea Kirsch and Rustin S Levenson, p133/4.
Painting from Photos: "I always think photographs abominable, and I don't like to have them around, particularly not those of persons I know and
love.... photographic portraits wither much sooner than we ourselves do, whereas the painted portrait is a thing which is felt, done with love or
respect for the human being that is portrayed."
-- Vincent van Gogh in a letter to his sister Wilhelmina, 19 September 1889.
Difficulty: "Painting should never look as if it were done with difficulty, however difficult it may actually have been."
-- Robert Henri, in his book The Art Spirit, p135.
Cochineal Red: "When I started telling my stories about cochineal, many people were horrified, or at least surprised to learn where it comes from. If
they didn't already know it was made from insects, they found the truth hard to believe. Sixteenth-century Europeans had the same problem."
-- Victoria Finlay in Color: Travels Through the Paintbox, p165.
Interpreting Paintings: "Our perception of a work of art is not something that is fixed. It depends as much, if not more, on the period in which the
work is being viewed and on our expectations of it as it does on the period in which it was created."
-- Nadeije Laneyrie-Dagen in How to Read Paintings, pxii.
"...to appreciate a work of art we need bring with us nothing from life, no knowledge of its ideas and affairs, no familiarity with its emotions. Art
transports us from the world of man's activity to a world of aesthetic exaltation. For a moment we are shut off from human interests; our anticipations
and memories are arrested; we are lifted above the stream of life."
-- Clive Bell, The Aesthetic Hypothesis, quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology, edited by Francis Frascina and Charles
Harrison, p72.
Subject of a Painting: "Every intelligent painter carries the whole culture of modern painting in his head. It is his real subject, of which everything
he paints is both an homage and a critique."
² Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell, New York Times, 19 June 1977. (Quoted inTeaching Art by Carl Goldstein, page 117)
Masterpieces: "A masterpiece withstands time. Its importance grows on those who feel attracted by its unending life. It creates enthusiasm which
spreads from soul to soul..."
² Hilla Rebay, The Beauty of Non-Objectivity (quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology, edited by Francis Frascina and Charles
Harrison, p146).
History Painting: "If you want to be a historical painter, let your history be of your own time, of what you can get to know personally ² of manners
and customs within your own experience." ² Robert Henri, The Art Spirit, p218.
Developing as an Artist: "Take solace in the example of Vincent van Gogh. Look at some of his early drawings -- they are dreadful, as if he were
sketching with a potato. But how far he came, quite quickly, and what enormous heights he reaches."
² Danny Gregory, The Creative License, p61.
Monet and Tone: "The decorative qualities of Monet's later works, and the ease with which they lent themselves to actual decorations, are the result
in part of his interest in 'pattern', but to a great extent also of his subordination of tonal contrast to colour relationships."
² John House in "Monet: Nature Into Art" p133.
Watercolor: "Watercolor is tricky stuff, an amateur's but really a virtuoso's medium. It is the most light-filled of all ways of painting... It is
hospitable to accident... but disaster-prone as well. One slip, and the veil of atmosphere turns into a muddy puddle, a garish swamp."
² Art critic Robert Hughes in "Winslow Homer" in Time magazine, 1986, quoted in Nothing if Not Critical p109
The Secret of Constable's Green: "... lies in the fact that it is composed of a multitude of different greens. The lack of life and intensity in the
greenery of the common landscape painters is caused by the fact they usually paint it in a uniform green."
-- Delacroix's Journal I, 5 March 1847, p281 (quoted in Art in Theory 1815-1900, edited by Harrison, Wood, and Gaiger, p980).
Painting Frames: "The Neo-Impressionists relinquished the golden frame. Its gaudy glitter modifies or destroys the harmony of a painting. They
generally use white frames which ... intensify the saturation of colours without disrupting their balance." -- Neo-Impressionistpainter Paul Signac in
his book From Eugene Delacroix to Neo-Impressionism (1899)
Gauguin: "For the mystical Gauguin, art's mission was to detach itself from earthly reality and, through arrangements of pure colour, float free,
taking the beholder into a blissed-out state of alternative consciousness. Use your imagination, he would tell Vincent [van Gogh]; paint from
memory, not from what's in front of you."
-- Arts critic Simon Schama, Power of Art, p321.
"Painting is the most beautiful of all arts. In it, all sensations are condensed, at its aspect everyone may create romance at the will of his imagination,
and at a glance have his soul invaded by the most profound memories... Like music, it acts on the soul through the intermediary of the senses...
hearing can only grasp a single sound at one time, whereas the sight takes in everything and at the same time simplifies at its will."
-- Paul Gauguin, notes on painting made in a sketchbook c.1889-90
(Quoted in John Rewald, Gauguin, 1938, pp161.)
Success as an Artist: "[In] the field of painting, we have a sort of inverse snobbery. This or that painting does not address itself to enough people
hence it cannot be great art, at which point one must ask when the number of people who respond to it is great enough ... the box office would
become the measure of our culture."
-- Mark Rothko, "Indigenous Art" in his book The Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art, p126.
"This word art is entirely modern; the ancients thought of themselves only as workers, and they were certainly right." -- Renoir
-- Renoir's "Statement of 1904" in Nature's Workshop: Renoir's Writings on the Decorative Artsby Robert L. Herbert, Yale University Press, 2000,
p154.
Painting Portraits: "To paint a full-length portrait [Whistler] would place a large canvas near his table palette, and his sitter about four feet [1.2m] to
the other side of the easel. He would then stand back about twelve feet [3.6m] to observe the scene, taking a good look at both the sitter and canvas,
then step forward quickly... His need to maintain the whole visual picture was achieved by his stepping back to assess and memorize, then returning
to the easel, often with a run and a slide, to fix the image on the canvas. Such an athletic approach to portraiture would have tired both the painter and
the sitter."
-- Ronald Anderson & Anne Koval, Whistler: Beyond the Myth, p201.
Painting Edges: In Cezanne's paintings, "edges aren't boundaries but places where paint, surging across the surface, changes color."
-- Art critic Peter Schjeldahl, "Cezanne versus Pissarro", New Yorker magazine, 11 July 2005
Expression: "Between beauty of expression and power of expression there is a difference of function. The first aims at pleasing the sense, the second
has a spiritual vitality which for me is more moving and goes deeper than the senses."
-- Henry Moore, "On Being a Sculptor", p40.
Size and Scale: "A painting is isolated by a frame from its surroundings (unless it serves just a decorative purpose) and so retains more easily its own
imaginary scale." -- Henry Moore, "On Being a Sculptor", p27.
Inspiration and Uniqueness: "Inspiration alone belongs altogether to the individual; everything else, including skill, can now be acquired by
anyone. Inspiration remains the only factor in the creation of a successful work of art that cannot be copied or imitated. ...

[The pictures of Abstract Expressionist painter Barnett Newman] "look easy to copy, and maybe they really are. But they are far from easy to
conceive... "The onlooker who says his child could paint a Newman may be right, but Newman would have to be there to tell the child exactly what
do do. The exact choices of color, medium, size, shape, proportion -- including the size and shape of the support -- are what alone determine the
quality of the result, and these choices depend solely on inspiration or conception."
-- Clement Greenberg, New York art critic, in his essay After Abstract Expressionism, first published inArt International, VI, no.8, October 1962.
"Knowing how to paint and to use one's colours rightly has not any connection with originality. This originality consists in properly expressing your
own impressions."
-- French Artist Thomas Couture (1815-1879) in his book Conversations on Art Methods
(Quoted in Art in Theory 1815--1900, Edited by C Harris, P Wood, J Gaiger, p618.)

Abstract Art: "Resemblance to nature is at best superfluous and at worse distracting, it might as well be eliminated."
-- Alfred H Barr Jr, Director of Museum of Modern Art in New York, in "Cubism and Abstract Art", published Moma 1936.
(Quoted in Art in Theory 1900--1990, Edited by C Harris & P Wood, p363.)
A ship is always referred to as "she" because it costs so much to keep one in paint and powder.
Chester W. Nimitz

William Faulkner once said : Do not bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors . Try to be
better than yourself . This is a roadmap for self-improvement that I have always believed in However it is a difficult
roadmap because understanding our own strengths and weaknesses is a difficult thing . But that understanding is a
requirement for writing a self-introductory speech . So I have solicited opinions from others on what they think are
the good things and what they think are the bad things about my character . I have also thought hard on this issue .
Based on my own analysis and on discussions with those with whom I have close interactions on a daily basis , I
have decided that my three good qualities include having a fun personality having an understanding approach
regardless of the situation involved and having a caring attitude . The bad quality includes setting overly ambitious
targets when I am evaluating myself
Thesis statement
The essential me consists of four attributes : a fun loving personality an understanding approach , a caring
attitude towards others and an impatient attitude towards myself
Analysis
One of the most important characteristics that I possess is a fun loving personality . I believe whole-heartedly in
the statement that all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy . As a result I like to go on vacations with friends and
greatly enjoy camping trips . I have an outgoing personality which I think derives from my interest in having fun in all
situations , whether it has to do with work or play . This outgoing personality drives me to experimenting with new
things that I think will enhance my life style . However I like to share the good things with my friends and family . If I
find something good in a particular situation then I make sure everyone around me can share in that . I can easily
make friends and they seem to enjoy being around me This is particularly true when it comes to my being part of a
study group . Sometimes the During these times I can usually make interesting remarks that help to lighten the
mood
I like to have fun through every moment in life . However that does not make me insensitive to other people 's
problems . In this respect , some of my friends have described me as having an understanding approach . I believe
that too . I think the understanding approach allows me to make a lot of friends because we can relate to each other
more easily Frequently I participate in organizing different events and programs at college and then I have to work
as part of a team . In this team environment , I have the ability to communicate with team members on the same
wave length . This is not easy , trying to understand other people 's feelings and motives , but there is a lot to be
gained when it comes to building lasting relationships
Third in the list is a caring attitude . The...
A bud workmun blumes hls tools.
A book holds u house of gold.
CHINESE PROVERB
A book ls llke u gurden currled ln the pocket.
CHINESE QUOTES
A chlld's llfe ls llke u plece of puper on whlch every person leuves u murk.
A clever person turns greut troubles lnto llttle ones und llttle ones lnto none ut ull.
A crlsls ls un opportunlty rldlng the dungerous wlnd.
A dlumond wlth u fluw ls worth more thun u pebble wlthout lmperfectlons.
A gem ls not pollshed wlthout rubblng, nor u mun perfected wlthout trluls.
A mun's conversutlon ls the mlrror of hls thoughts.
A nutlon's treusure ls ln lts scholurs.
A person who suy lt cunnot be done should not lnterrupt the mun dolng lt.
A wlse mun mukes hls own declslons, un lgnorunt mun follows publlc oplnlon.
Be cureful whut you wuter your dreums wlth. Wuter them wlth worry und feur und you wlll produce weeds thut choke
the llfe from your dreum. Wuter them wlth optlmlsm und solutlons und you wlll cultlvute success. Alwuys be on the
lookout for wuys to turn u problem lnto un opportunlty for success. Alwuys be on the lookout for wuys to nurture your
dreum.
LAO TZU
Be not ufruld of growlng slowly, be ufruld only of stundlng stlll.
Bluck cut or whlte cut: If lt cun cutch mlce, lt's u good cut.
By three methods we muy leurn wlsdom: Flrst, by reflectlon, whlch ls noblest; Second, by lmltutlon, whlch ls euslest;
und thlrd by experlence, whlch ls the bltterest.
CONFUCIUS
Dlg the well before you ure thlrsty.
Do the dlfflcult thlngs whlle they ure eusy und do the greut thlngs whlle they ure smull. A |ourney of u thousund mlles
must begln wlth u slngle step.
LAO TZU
Everyone euts und drlnks; yet only few uppreclute the tuste of food.
Glve u mun u flsh und you feed hlm for u duy. Teuch u mun to flsh und you feed hlm for u llfetlme.
Glve me llberty, or glve me deuth!
He who usks ls u fool for flve mlnutes, but he who does not usk remulns u fool forever.
He who depends on hlmself wlll uttuln the greutest hupplness.
I'd ruther dle for speuklng out, thun to llve und be sllent.
If I um wulklng wlth two other men, euch of them wlll serve us my teucher. I wlll plck out the good polnts of the one
und lmltute them, und the bud polnts of the other und correct them ln myself.
CONFUCIUS
If you ure putlent ln one moment of unger, you wlll escupe u hundred duys of sorrow.
If you bow ut ull, bow low.
If you don't wunt unyone to know, don't do lt.
If you shoot for the sturs und hlt the moon, lt's OK. But you've got to shoot for somethlng. A lot of people don't even
shoot.
CONFUCIUS
If you thlnk ln terms of u yeur, plunt u seed; lf ln terms of ten yeurs, plunt trees; lf ln terms of 100 yeurs, teuch the
people.
CONFUCIUS
Let's put our heuds together for the beneflt of ull.
Llfe ls flnlte, whlle knowledge ls lnflnlte.
ZHUANG ZI
Llfe ls reully slmple, but we lnslst on muklng lt compllcuted.
CONFUCIUS
Llke Weuther, one's fortune muy chunge by the evenlng.
Muke My Home Everywhere wlthln the Four Seus. The World Is My Home.
XIAO HE
Never hesltute to usk u lesser person.
CHINESE QUOTES
Nothlng ls softer or more flexlble thun wuter, yet nothlng cun reslst lt. Luo Tzu
Pust scholurs studled to lmprove themselves; Toduy's scholurs study to lmpress others.
Rulse your sull one foot und you get ten feet of wlnd.
Respond lntelllgently even to unlntelllgent treutment.
LAO TZU
Rlse und full of u nutlon rests wlth every one of lts cltlzens.
Seelng lt once ls better thun belng told 100 tlmes.
To know the roud uheud, usk those comlng buck.
CHINESE PROVERB
We should feel sorrow, but not slnk under lts oppresslon.
CONFUCIUS
Whut you do not wlsh upon yourself, extend not to others.
CHINESE PROVERB
When lt ls obvlous thut the gouls cunnot be reuched, don't ud|ust the gouls, ud|ust the uctlon steps.
CONFUCIUS
When you drlnk the wuter, remember the sprlng.
CHINESE QUOTES
When you huve only two pennles left ln the world, buy u louf of breud wlth one, und u llly wlth the other.

and sophistication. The man who dreamed and struggled to survive is standing before you know . Rooms painted completely white can seem spacious.. Hospitals and hospital workers use white to create a sense of sterility. black list. black tie. he sets out a goal to conquer the world in his own achievements and capabilities Like the famous line says America is the land of opportunity . White is also described as cold. even if it is produced by entire absence of light. y y y y Black is associated with death and mourning in many cultures. but He never paints so gorgeously. It is used to represent treacherous characters such as Dracula and is often associated with witchcraft. formality. black belt. Truly such can be said about the case of this man . Consider how black is used in language: Black Death. In ancient Egypt.G. with full confidence . He is equipped with the proper arsenal (English . but that did not make him surrender or give up . Today . Given the proper amount of persistence and an open mind .. and experience ) to stand up against detractors and critics . black cat.God paints in many colours. The sensation of black is distinctly different from the lack of all sensation.is not a mere absence of colour.. y y Black is often used as a symbol of menace or evil. there were moments of challenges and struggles . Along with his pastime -reading books . but it is also popular as an indicator of power. it is a shining and affirmative thing. bland. Hermann von Helmholz The Color Psychology of Black Black absorbs all light in the color spectrum. and sterile. black market. blackout. Chesterton The Color Psychology of White White represents purity or innocence. as definite as black. black represented life and rebirth. he used such instance as a tool to improve himself . He treats criticisms and prejudices with a smile and a tool for self-improvement . It is also associated with unhappiness.success Black is real sensation. with one goal and objective in mind . White. Black is often used in fashion because of itsslimming quality. This man is way different than before . as when He paints in white. this man is more confident to endure more challenges that this country and its people will give him .As he pushed through with the life in the United States . as fierce as red. the man ventured into the unknown with only his guts as a weapon . With such mindset . y y y White is bright and can create a sense of space or add highlights. He adapted quite greatly to the environment and culture Now as he embarks into a new phase in his life . he is full of confidence that he can achieve whatever he wishes . Red . I had almost said so gaudily. but empty and unfriendly. K. the boy from the airport before has now matured into a man a man capable of anything he can dream about .. . On the other hand . sexuality. education .

. Blue rarely occurs naturally in food aside from blueberries and some plums. and blue ribbon. Those who have a green work environment experience fewer stomachaches. y y y y y Blue calls to mind feelings of calmness or serenity. Consider how blue is used in language: blue moon. blue blood. but it is one of the least appetizing. Red is also considered an intense. tranquil. blue Monday. Researchers have also found that green canimprove reading ability. which is Nature's colour. Some weight loss plans even recommend eating your food off of a blue plate. or even angry. It stands for the sun. paint the town red. guests waiting to appear on television programs often wait in a ³green room´ to relax. green M & M's (an American chocolate candy) are said to send a sexual message. warmth. It is often described as peaceful. Even today. y y Blue can also lower the pulse rate and body temperature. y Green is often used in decorating for its calming effect. Blue is often used to decorate offices because research has shown that people are more productive in blue rooms. Blue is one of the most popular colors. Some students may find that laying a transparent sheet of green paper over reading material increases reading speed and comprehension.Paul Brunton The Color Psychology of Green Green is a cool color that symbolizes nature and the natural world. Also. and jealousy. and comfort. How wonderful yellow is. seeing red How does the color red make you feel? Read what others have to say and share your own reactions in the links below. humans are geared to avoid foods that are poisonous and blue coloring in food is often a sign of spoilage or poison. y Green is thought to relieve stress and help heal.y y y y Red is a bright. and orderly. Blue can also create feelings of sadness or aloofness. good luck. is restful. soothing. -Vincent Van Gogh . and health-giving. Red is associated with love. Green. cheerful. red-hot. red-handed. The Color Psychology of Blue Blue is described as a favorite color by many people and is the color most preferred by men. y y y Green also represents tranquility. Consider how red is used in language: redneck. warm color that evokes strong emotions. the blues. secure. For example. y Green has long been a symbol of fertility and was once the preferred color choice for wedding gowns in the 15th-century. health. color that creates feelings of excitement or intensity.

down-to-earth. enthusiasm. It makes you immediately start having feelings. How does purple make you feel? Do you associate purple with certain qualities or situations? You can discover how other people react to the color purple by reading the reader responses to purple below and share your own reactions. y y y Purple also represents wisdom and spirituality. Color Psychology . Yellow can be used in small amount to draw notice. Since yellow is the most visible color.--Wolf Kahn The Color Psychology of Orange Orange is a combination of yellow and red and is considered an energetic color. While it is considered a cheerful color. Purple does not often occur in nature. .The Color Psychology of Yellow Yellow is a bright that is often described as cheery and warm. It is often described as natural. comfort. Brown brings to mind feeling of warmth. y y y Brown can also create feelings of sadness and isolation. it is also themost attention-getting color. people are more likely to lose their tempers in yellow rooms and babies tend to cry more in yellow rooms. y y y Orange calls to mind feelings of excitement. Using yellow as a background on paper or computer monitors can lead to eyestrain or vision loss in extreme cases. it can sometimes appear exotic or artificial.Reactions to Brown Brown is a natural color that evokes a sense of strength and reliability. y y Yellow can also increase the metabolism. and conventional. Orange is often used to draw attention. y Yellow can also create feelings of frustration and anger. and security. y y Yellow is also the most fatiguing to the eye due to the high amount of light that is reflected. and warmth. such as in traffic signs and advertising. The Color Psychology of Purple Purple is the symbol of royalty and wealth. but brown can also be sophisticated. Notice how purple is used in this image. such as on traffic sign or advertisements. Orange is very blatant and vulgar. How does yellow make you feel? Do you associate yellow with certain qualities or situations? Read what others have to say and share your own reactions in the links below.

When used in prisons. painters can articulate shapes by juxtaposing surfaces of different intensity. For example. leaving out the lights of the ground color. painting is also used outside of art as a common trade among craftsmen and builders. red. be loaded with narrative content. He expresses great surprise and admiration at their freshness. yellow. such as geometricalfigures. Paintings may have for their support such surfaces as walls. Painting is a mode of expression and the forms are numerous. and generally of a dark tinge. paper. However. the term painting describes both the act and the result of the action. wood. Sports teams sometimes paint the opposing teams locker room pink to keep the players passive and less energetic. y While pink's calming effect has been demonstrated. y y Pink is thought to have a calming effect. They appeared to have used six colors: white. after the lapse of so many centuries. clay.How does orange make you feel? Do you associate orange with certain qualities or situations? You can discover how other people react to the color orange in reader responses to orange. Paint is any liquid. as vivid as when they were painted about 2. and may incorporate multiple other materials including sand. Pigments were made from plants. abstract. and charcoal may have been made by early Homo sapiens as long as 40. the substance would harden and stick onto the surface it is applied to. color or provide texture to objects. and green. Egypt. researchers of color psychology have found that this effect only occurs during the initial exposure to the color. which had been done prior to the foundation of Rome. Thus. The application of the medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush but other objects can be used. black. Pliny mentions some painted ceilings in his day in the town of Ardea. to scenes from the life ofBuddha or other scenes of eastern religious origin. In practice. The Egyptians mixed their colors with a gummy substance. emotion or be political in nature. In 2011. a painter perceives that a particular white wall has different intensity at each point. pigment. gold leaf as well as objects. It is most commonly used to protect. South African archeologists reported finding a 100. sands. due to shades and reflections from nearby objects. still possess their brilliant color. clay. color or other medium[1] to a surface (support base). Ancient colored walls at Dendera. The Color Psychology of Pink Pink is essentially a light red and is usually associated with love and romance. paper. manganese oxide. blue. In art. photographic. symbolism.hematite. Paintings can be naturalistic and representational (as in a still life or landscape painting). Drawing. examples of this kind of painting range from artwork depicting mythological figures on pottery to Biblical scenes rendered on the interior walls and ceiling of The Sistine Chapel. which can be represented in painting by black and white and all the gray shades between. One shade known as "drunk-tank pink" is sometimes used in prisons to calm inmates. copper or concrete.000 years ago. the basic means of painting are distinct from ideological means. by using just color (of the same intensity) one can only represent symbolic shapes. which were exposed for years to the elements. and applied them separate from each other without any blending or mixture. Painting is the practice of applying paint. and symbols. canvas. inmates often become even more agitated once they become accustomed to the color.glass.000 year old human-made ochre-based mixture which may have been used like paint. and different soil types. One may also consider the digital mimicry thereof. but ideally. They used minium for red. composition or abstraction and other aesthetics may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner. various points of view and organization (perspective). or mastic composition which after application to a substrate in a thin layer is converted to an opaque solid film.000 years ago. Every point in space has different intensity. lacquer. and share your own reactions in the comments area found below. They first covered the area entirely with white then traced the design in black. A portion of the history of painting in both Eastern and Western art is dominated by spiritual motifs and ideas. What enables painting is the perception and representation of intensity. liquefiable. Paint was made with the yolk of eggs and therefore. a white wall .[1] Cave paintings drawn with red or yellow ochre.

." -. A few used their fingers to spread the paint.. p219. What is a Painting? "We should remember that a picture -.Victoria Finlay in Color: Travels Through the Paintbox." -. ". Whoever is able to feel the beauty of colors and forms has understood non-objective [abstract] painting. p135. experimental playfulness.Parisian art critic and poet Guillaume Apollinaire.Walter Benjamin. ". many people were horrified. "Painting. it should grow of itself. palpating the paint as he sought new effects.The young Leonardo's use of his fingers can be linked to the properties of the newly available medium of oil painting.Nadeije Laneyrie-Dagen in How to Read Paintings. page 104 "Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space. Difficulty: "Painting should never look as if it were done with difficulty. The Beauty of Non-Objectivity (quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology. How to Read Paintings..Seeing Through Paintings by Andrea Kirsch and Rustin S Levenson. no familiarity with its emotions." -. nor interpretation of intellectual meanings. thickness of line is also ideal. .. p165. grinding pigment] became necessary for those who wished to convince the public that the artist was no hired hand performing manual work. Art transports us from the world of man's activity to a world of aesthetic exaltation.. like music. It should not surprise us that he played with the tackiness of the new oil medium. Cochineal Red: "When I started telling my stories about cochineal. Finger Painting: "Throughout history a small number of artists have rejected both palette knives and brushes. 23 & 30 August 1890 (This version of the quote translated from French by Peter Collier for Art In Theory: 1815--1900 edited by Charles Harris. It depends as much. Sixteenth-century Europeans had the same problem. or nose-thumbing at convention.before being a war horse. in On Modern Art." -. demarcating ideal outlines of an object within a perceptual frame different from the one used by painters.. edited by Francis Frascina and Charles Harrison.. The Aesthetic Hypothesis.Hilla Rebay. It must grow. its unique existence at the place where it happens to be." -. pxii.is still a white wall in pitch darkness. with each brushstroke.) Joy of Modern Art: "In listening to a concert. If they didn't already know it was made from insects. a nude woman." --Maurice Denis. Artists turned to such primal means for various reasons.. the music-lover experiences a joy qualitatively different from that experienced in listening to natural sounds. In technical drawing.Robert Henri. our anticipations and memories are arrested.to appreciate a work of art we need bring with us nothing from life. p133/4. including display of skill. writing in his memoir Renoir: My Father Physical Side of a Painting: "Making people forget the extent to which painting a picture depending on material processes [stretching and nailing canvases." -.Paul Klee. Originally published in Art et Critique in Paris." -. p72. Definition of Neotraditionism. whereas the painted portrait is a thing which is felt. on the period in which the work is being viewed and on our expectations of it as it does on the period in which it was created. or at least surprised to learn where it comes from.. and I don't like to have them around. son of the Impressionist Painter Auguste Renoir.Nadeije Laneyrie-Dagen.On the Subject in Modern Painting.is essentially a flat surface covered with colours arranged in a particular pattern. edited by Francis Frascina and Charles Harrison. Similarly [modern] painters provide . but a creative artist who used his judgement. and if the time ever comes for that work -. particularly not those of persons I know and love. we are lifted above the stream of life. artistic sensations due exclusively to the harmony of lights and shades and independent of the subject depicted in the picture. they found the truth hard to believe. learning and imagination to produce works whose merit lay as much in the idea itself as much in its execution. ... no knowledge of its ideas and affairs. has nothing to do with reproduction of nature." -. or telling some other story -. The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. For a moment we are shut off from human interests." -. done with love or respect for the human being that is portrayed.. such as the murmur of a stream.Jean Renoir.. quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology. photographic portraits wither much sooner than we ourselves do. page 863.Vincent van Gogh in a letter to his sister Wilhelmina.. 1948. quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology.then so much the better!" -. He was very careful to keep an impression of transparency in his picture throughout the different phases of the work . Paul Wood & Jason Gaiger. he worked on the whole surface of his canvas [and] the motif gradually emerged from the seeming confusion.Clive Bell. edited by Francis Frascina and Charles Harrison. if not more." -. however difficult it may actually have been. 19 September 1889.. 1912. Renoir's Color Mixing: "He always mixed his colors on the canvas. Interpreting Paintings: "Our perception of a work of art is not something that is fixed." -. in his book The Art Spirit. p145) Patience: "Nothing can be rushed. Painting from Photos: "I always think photographs abominable.

are the result in part of his interest in 'pattern'. It is hospitable to accident. Its importance grows on those who feel attracted by its unending life. at which point one must ask when the number of people who respond to it is great enough ." -.. and at a glance have his soul invaded by the most profound memories. .. lies in the fact that it is composed of a multitude of different greens.they are dreadful. but disaster-prone as well. He would then stand back about twelve feet [3. p154.Henry Moore. let your history be of your own time. edited by Harrison." ² John House in "Monet: Nature Into Art" p133.. Painting Edges: In Cezanne's paintings. Gauguin. (Quoted inTeaching Art by Carl Goldstein. we have a sort of inverse snobbery. "edges aren't boundaries but places where paint. Such an athletic approach to portraiture would have tired both the painter and the sitter.." -. but to a great extent also of his subordination of tonal contrast to colour relationships. and the ease with which they lent themselves to actual decorations. an amateur's but really a virtuoso's medium. and what enormous heights he reaches.2m] to the other side of the easel.. pp161.Art critic Peter Schjeldahl. and Gaiger. "On Being a Sculptor". Like music. all sensations are condensed.Renoir's "Statement of 1904" in Nature's Workshop: Renoir's Writings on the Decorative Artsby Robert L...." -.Neo-Impressionistpainter Paul Signac in his book From Eugene Delacroix to Neo-Impressionism (1899) Gauguin: "For the mystical Gauguin. One slip. p61. p146). hearing can only grasp a single sound at one time. then returning to the easel. Painting Portraits: "To paint a full-length portrait [Whistler] would place a large canvas near his table palette. surging across the surface. 2000.Renoir -. 1938.Paul Gauguin. and his sitter about four feet [1." ² Danny Gregory. "This word art is entirely modern. It is his real subject.6m] to observe the scene.. quite quickly. quoted in Nothing if Not Critical p109 The Secret of Constable's Green: ". notes on painting made in a sketchbook c.) Success as an Artist: "[In] the field of painting. New York Times. intensify the saturation of colours without disrupting their balance. p218..Ronald Anderson & Anne Koval.. But how far he came.Subject of a Painting: "Every intelligent painter carries the whole culture of modern painting in his head. taking a good look at both the sitter and canvas. float free. to fix the image on the canvas. 19 June 1977. "Painting is the most beautiful of all arts. not from what's in front of you." -. Developing as an Artist: "Take solace in the example of Vincent van Gogh. of what you can get to know personally ² of manners and customs within your own experience." ² Art critic Robert Hughes in "Winslow Homer" in Time magazine.Delacroix's Journal I. Painting Frames: "The Neo-Impressionists relinquished the golden frame. p980). he would tell Vincent [van Gogh]. p126." -. The first aims at pleasing the sense. "Cezanne versus Pissarro"." ² Robert Henri. the second has a spiritual vitality which for me is more moving and goes deeper than the senses. it acts on the soul through the intermediary of the senses. of which everything he paints is both an homage and a critique. Monet and Tone: "The decorative qualities of Monet's later works. page 117) Masterpieces: "A masterpiece withstands time.. Whistler: Beyond the Myth. New Yorker magazine. Power of Art. 5 March 1847. taking the beholder into a blissed-out state of alternative consciousness." ² Hilla Rebay. The Beauty of Non-Objectivity (quoted in Modern Art and Modernism: A Critical Anthology. In it.." -. 1986. Watercolor: "Watercolor is tricky stuff. Wood. p201. whereas the sight takes in everything and at the same time simplifies at its will. 11 July 2005 Expression: "Between beauty of expression and power of expression there is a difference of function. Herbert. Use your imagination.Mark Rothko. art's mission was to detach itself from earthly reality and. then step forward quickly. as if he were sketching with a potato. Yale University Press.. His need to maintain the whole visual picture was achieved by his stepping back to assess and memorize. the box office would become the measure of our culture." -. at its aspect everyone may create romance at the will of his imagination.Arts critic Simon Schama. through arrangements of pure colour.1889-90 (Quoted in John Rewald. The Creative License. and the veil of atmosphere turns into a muddy puddle. the ancients thought of themselves only as workers. "Indigenous Art" in his book The Artist's Reality: Philosophies of Art... The Art Spirit. a garish swamp.. p281 (quoted in Art in Theory 1815-1900. and they were certainly right." ² Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell. It creates enthusiasm which spreads from soul to soul." -. p321. Look at some of his early drawings -. often with a run and a slide. They generally use white frames which . It is the most light-filled of all ways of painting. This or that painting does not address itself to enough people hence it cannot be great art. The lack of life and intensity in the greenery of the common landscape painters is caused by the fact they usually paint it in a uniform green. Its gaudy glitter modifies or destroys the harmony of a painting.. paint from memory." -. changes color. History Painting: "If you want to be a historical painter. p40. edited by Francis Frascina and Charles Harrison.

are what alone determine the quality of the result.. October 1962. and maybe they really are.. The exact choices of color. This outgoing personality drives me to experimenting with new things that I think will enhance my life style . can now be acquired by anyone. However that does not make me insensitive to other people 's problems . Chester W.) A ship is always referred to as "she" because it costs so much to keep one in paint and powder. [The pictures of Abstract Expressionist painter Barnett Newman] "look easy to copy.Size and Scale: "A painting is isolated by a frame from its surroundings (unless it serves just a decorative purpose) and so retains more easily its own imaginary scale. but Newman would have to be there to tell the child exactly what do do.. Director of Museum of Modern Art in New York.including the size and shape of the support -." -. Inspiration and Uniqueness: "Inspiration alone belongs altogether to the individual.Henry Moore. "The onlooker who says his child could paint a Newman may be right. p363. P Wood. size. New York art critic. But they are far from easy to conceive. I believe . Sometimes the During these times I can usually make interesting remarks that help to lighten the mood I like to have fun through every moment in life . p27.Alfred H Barr Jr. I can easily make friends and they seem to enjoy being around me This is particularly true when it comes to my being part of a study group . This originality consists in properly expressing your own impressions. it might as well be eliminated. p618. However I like to share the good things with my friends and family . But that understanding is a requirement for writing a self-introductory speech . I have decided that my three good qualities include having a fun personality having an understanding approach regardless of the situation involved and having a caring attitude . "On Being a Sculptor". including skill. In this respect . Based on my own analysis and on discussions with those with whom I have close interactions on a daily basis . As a result I like to go on vacations with friends and greatly enjoy camping trips . The bad quality includes setting overly ambitious targets when I am evaluating myself Thesis statement The essential me consists of four attributes : a fun loving personality an understanding approach . This is a roadmap for self-improvement that I have always believed in However it is a difficult roadmap because understanding our own strengths and weaknesses is a difficult thing . J Gaiger. Try to be better than yourself . shape. Edited by C Harris. "Knowing how to paint and to use one's colours rightly has not any connection with originality. a caring attitude towards others and an impatient attitude towards myself Analysis One of the most important characteristics that I possess is a fun loving personality ." -. first published inArt International. So I have solicited opinions from others on what they think are the good things and what they think are the bad things about my character ." -. I believe whole-heartedly in the statement that all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy . in "Cubism and Abstract Art". If I find something good in a particular situation then I make sure everyone around me can share in that . proportion -. no. ." -. I have also thought hard on this issue .) Abstract Art: "Resemblance to nature is at best superfluous and at worse distracting. published Moma 1936. medium.Clement Greenberg. whether it has to do with work or play . some of my friends have described me as having an understanding approach . Nimitz William Faulkner once said : Do not bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors . and these choices depend solely on inspiration or conception. (Quoted in Art in Theory 1900--1990.8.French Artist Thomas Couture (1815-1879) in his book Conversations on Art Methods (Quoted in Art in Theory 1815--1900. I have an outgoing personality which I think derives from my interest in having fun in all situations .. VI. Edited by C Harris & P Wood. in his essay After Abstract Expressionism. Inspiration remains the only factor in the creation of a successful work of art that cannot be copied or imitated. everything else.

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