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FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012
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Its Tech Time!
Students share technology
knowledge. PAGE 4
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
Residents are troubled by the re-
vised plans to replace the historic
Jacobs Creek Bridge at the corner
of Bear Tavern and Jacobs Creek
roads.
Continuing a discussion on the
bridge and the realignment of Bear
Tavern Road that has gone on for 40
years, about 100 residents showed
up at a joint meeting of the town-
ship committee, the township envi-
ronmental commission and the his-
toric preservation commission on
Feb. 6 for a presentation of those
plans by the Mercer County engi-
neers office.
The bridge, which is part of a
state and nationally designated his-
toric district, is said to have been
crossed by George Washingtons
troops on their way to Trenton dur-
ing the American Revolution on
what is known as the Victory Trail.
It was rehabilitated in 1950. In 1966,
Mercer County acquired the right-
of-way to accommodate the new
alignment.
Plans call for construction of a
new curved bridge adjacent to the
existing site as part of a realign-
ment of Bear Tavern Road with Ja-
cobs Creek Road that would elimi-
nate the T-intersection and the left
turn on to Jacobs Creek Road.
The bridge was dismantled after
Hurricane Irene in September, and
the span has been closed to traffic
since 2009. An independent engi-
neering assessment, Mercer County
Engineer Gregory Sandusky said,
determined the bridge could no
longer sustain use of vehicles in ex-
cess of 3 tons, such as emergency
Troubled
waters
Revised plans for bridge draw ire
please see BRIDGE, page 5
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012
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police report
The following items are taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
A 53-year-old Trenton woman
was arrested and charged with
drunken driving after being
pulled over on Van Brunt Road on
Jan. 30 at 8:49 p.m., according to
police reports.
Police said an officer saw the
woman driving 50 mph in a 35
mph zone along Denow Road and
pulled her over. The driver report-
edly had the odor of alcohol on
her breath, and was placed under
arrest after performing field-so-
briety tests.
She was taken to headquarters,
where she also was charged with
reckless driving, speeding, driv-
ing with an open container of al-
cohol in a vehicle, failure to dis-
play license plates and failure to
exhibit credentials.
She was released to a relative,
and the case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
A 46-year-old Trenton woman
was charged with burglary and
theft on Jan. 30 after she allegedly
entered a storage room at a Capi-
tal Health Hospital gift shop and
removed a wallet from an employ-
ees purse. The woman, police
said, was processed at police
headquarters and remanded to
the Mercer County Correction
Center on $50,000 bail.
A 21-year-old Trenton woman
was charged with hindering ap-
prehension for giving a false
name to police after she and a 22-
year-old Lambertville man were
discovered sitting in a car in the
driveway of a vacant Harbour-
ton-Woodsville road home on Jan.
31 at 10:39 a.m.
Police said the woman was
found to have outstanding war-
rants out of West Windsor and
Pennsauken, and the man was
found to have an outstanding
warrant from Seaside Park. They
were taken to police headquar-
ters, where the man was released
after posting bail on the outstand-
ing warrants. The woman, police
said, was released on her own re-
cognizance on the outstanding
warrants, and the hindering ap-
prehension charge will be heard
in municipal court.
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Teenagers who dont know life
without technology are giving a
hand to senior citizens getting
used to a life with it.
Several of those Hopewell Val-
ley Regional High School stu-
dents spent their monthly hour at
the library on Feb. 7, sharing
their knowledge of cell phones
and PowerPoint.
The Tech Time Group, Hopewell
Senior Citizens Coordinator Abi-
gail Waugh said, is the result of a
brainstorming session among a
small group of teens and seniors.
It really takes the awkward-
ness out of meeting someone of a
different generation, Waugh
said. Ive been watching the in-
teractions, and its been great.
Teaching someone, she said, is
a skill that takes a lifetime.
Charlotte Prudhomme and her
fellow junior Lauren Gilmore en-
joyed starting to learn that skill at
the Tech Time session.
I heard about it in school
Bridging the age gap in technology
By JIM WRIGHT
The Hopewell Sun
JIM WRIGHT/The Hopewell Sun
Student Mark Tengi helps Betty Hall add contacts to her cell phone
during the Tech Time event at the Hopewell Branch Library.
please see TEENS, page 7
Wendy Scloiland VMD Debbie Ellioii, DVM
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The bridge, prior to its closing,
had received a rating of 6.5 out of
100, making it the lowest-rated
bridge in Mercer County, and offi-
cials have deemed it structurally
deficient and functionally obso-
lete.
The bridge, project manager
Michael Troncone of Parsons
Brinkerhoff said, has been dis-
mantled and is in storage until it
is reconstructed over a stream on
the Howell Living History Farm
in Lambertville.
The bridge project would also
include 4-foot shoulders on Bear
Tavern Road for bikes and pedes-
trians, and also as a refuge for dis-
abled vehicles.
Don Timbie, of the township
historic preservation commis-
sion said, however, the project
had not been studied from the
perspective of a historical dis-
trict.
The state prefers bridges done
in the existing footprint, he said
of the plans. That is not being
done here. The state also has ex-
pressed the desire to stop sprawl.
This would only create more traf-
fic leading to more sprawl.
We are not adding capacity,
Troncone responded. There are
two lanes there now and we are
putting two lanes back. We are
not promoting growth or sprawl,
and we are doing our best to pre-
serve the bridge.
You cant move a bridge out to
a place out in the country it
means nothing, Timbie said,
commenting that the state also
wants to promote heritage
tourism. The historical signifi-
cance is gone.
Troncone also said 75 percent
of the project is in the footprint of
the original road.
Dave Blackwell, also of the his-
toric preservation commission,
questioned how the county could
prove its not compromising the
historic district in which the
bridge sits.
You say that youve success-
fully maintained the characteris-
tics of the district, but how does
the audience know that? he
asked. I give wagon tours on
Howell Farm, but to position the
bridge there doesnt connect any-
thing to anything.
Ray Nichols of the township
environmental commission,
questioned whether the flood
plain had been addressed in the
plan, noting the stream water
would strike the new curved abut-
ments at a different angle.
Troncone said the plan has
been presented to the state De-
partment of Environmental Pro-
tection, which has determined it
is compliant with stream-water
standards.
The abutments are changing,
but the overall area through
which the water passes is not
changing, he said. We are not
allowed to raise the stream eleva-
tion.
The area of the bridge is wood-
ed and includes wetlands.
Other residents had safety con-
cerns about the new alignment.
That bridge was a safety fac-
tor, said Maddock Road resident
Mary Jane Cooper. Now trucks
are going to be taking that S-
curve and when its wet, it will be
very treacherous. No amount of
realignment is going to prevent
that when the road is wet and peo-
ple are unfamiliar with it. You
have eliminated the only acci-
dent-prevention feature we had.
Responding to a question from
Nancy Weinstein, also of Mad-
dock Road, traffic engineer
George Fallat said the intersec-
tion does not meet state standards
for traffic movement volume to
warrant a traffic light.
Fallat had earlier told the audi-
ence the intersection would ac-
commodate large trucks regard-
less of whether it was in a T-for-
mation, and the state is open to a
ban on commercial trucks on
Bear Tavern Road except for local
deliveries.
Janssen Pharmaceuticals is lo-
cated on Trenton Harbourton
Road near Maddock Road.
Fallat told the residents one-
third of all crashes on county
roads are rear-end collisions, and
BRIDGE
Continued from page 1
Bridge replacement plan draws criticism
please see HISTORIC, page 6
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6 THE HOPEWELL SUN FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JIM WRIGHT
Hopewell Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300,
Princeton, NJ 08540. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium including elec-
tronically.
in our opinion
O
nly LeBron James Decision
captured more attention than
Chris Christies ultimate no
to seeking the GOPs presidential
nomination this year.
In hindsight, his move was genius.
Since ultimately deciding to not run
for the top spot, Christie has been col-
lecting headlines stumping for likely
GOP standard bearer Mitt Romney.
Christies candor plays well to crowds.
His willingness to engage opponents
energizes the GOP base.
In other words, hes a great fit on
what could be a formidable Romney-
Christie ticket this November.
As it stands, the GOP will be the un-
derdogs this fall. Incumbent presi-
dents can be difficult to knock off, but
theres still plenty of time for things to
change.
While Christie wouldnt necessarily
woo the social conservatives of the
GOP, he would appeal to independent
voters, would bring a real shot to take
a traditionally Democratic state in the
November elections, and would be a
tough-talking counterpart to Rom-
neys laid back approach to politick-
ing.
For Christie personally, he wins
even if the Republican ticket falls
short in the election. Should he decide
to run in 2016, he will be known across
the land, and he wont have to face an
incumbent president at the polls.
Should the GOP pull out a win this
year, Christie is next in line to be pres-
ident when Romneys turn at the helm
is over.
We think Christie has been thinking
about the presidency for awhile now.
Why wouldnt he? A number of influ-
ential Republicans tried desperately to
get him into this race. No reason he
wouldnt think about 2016 and beyond.
Now, as the primaries are rolling
along and Romney seems to be the
choice of the party, those Republicans
might get their wish. Christie might
not be at the top of the ballot come No-
vember, but he certainly can position
the party to win.
Christie a nice No. 2 for GOP
Win or lose in November, the gov would benefit from national exposure
Christie 2016? 2020?
All of those Republican insiders who
wanted Chris Christie on the ballot
this November might get their wish.
He would be a great choice for the
No. 2 spot.
the new alignment would keep traffic flow-
ing better than a T-intersection.
He said such measures as skid-resistant
pavements, raised pavement markers and
center-line rumble strips could be used in
the new road.
Jacobs Creek Road resident Navdeep
Jakaria questioned the 40 mph speed limit
on the bridge when it is being used by cy-
clists, calling the limit a serious safety haz-
ard. He said a 25 mph limit made more
sense.
Fallat said the posted speed must be at
least the 85th percentile of traffic speed de-
termined in a speed survey, or the risk of
overtaking and tailgating increases, ac-
cording to studies.
Well, sometimes you have to use com-
mon sense if safety is our goal, Jakaria
said.
Resident Roni Katz called the plan try-
ing to fit a square peg into a round hole.
Seeing this was very alarming to me
tonight, she said. This curve does not
seem natural at all, and with residents hav-
ing to make a left turn into traffic coming
both ways, it is very dangerous. I think we
are looking at a disaster waiting to happen.
You are taking away a chance for a fire
truck to make a left turn off Bear Tavern
Road, and you also have school buses and
emergency vehicles traveling on this
road.
Heritage tourists, she said, could also be
distracted when coming upon the realign-
ment with Jacobs Creek Road.
We went the route of putting this on
the historic register for a reason, Bear
Tavern Road resident Beth Kerr said. We
do not want this destructive project after
all the work weve done. You said this
bridge was structurally unsound. That
bridge was made of wrought iron. Oxen
and cattle used to go over it. It did not come
down because of Hurricane Irene. It came
down because of sheer neglect by the coun-
ty.
That bridge is junk, said Nicholas Toz,
of Fiddlers Fork Road, in a rare dissent to
the residents in the room. I went over that
bridge 5,000 times on my way to work and
the doctor and everything else. The troops
went over it one time. Did they fight there?
Did they even take a drink out of that
creek?
You call it historic, he said. That
bridge is obsolete and structurally defi-
cient, its junk and its outlived its useful
purpose. The county is trying to preserve it
for you, so at least give them credit for
that.
Joe Bedford asked if any studies had
been made about tractor-trailers coming
through residential areas.
This is insane, he said of the plan.
This is a monstrosity. We need to get this
done, but there is a right way and a wrong
way.
Sandusky told residents that he must ul-
timately sign off on the plan, and the pro-
posal is the safest his department could
come up with.
Standards are not always perfect, resi-
dent George Space said. Public opinion
and public views have to take precedence.
Mayor Michael Markulec said the town-
ship committee would meet with the coun-
ty again, taking residents comments into
consideration.
Historic significance gone if bridge
moves, says commission member
HISTORIC
Continued from page 5
FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
through the National Honor Soci-
ety, and it sounded fun, Prud-
homme said. Im pretty good at
technology. Id set up somebodys
playlist on iTunes, and it was re-
ally rewarding and kind of cool to
be able to explain that to them.
Prudhomme, who was attend-
ing her third Tech Time, has also
been proficient in PowerPoint
since about seventh-grade, and
she and Gilmore were offering ad-
vice to Pennington resident Tom
DiMuzio, a member of the
Hopewell Senior Advisory Board.
They were very helpful, he
said. One has an iPad and the
other doesnt, so there were two
different perspectives. Now all I
have to do is get on the computer
and practice it.
In the next computer room,
Mark Tengi was showing Betty
Hall how to add contacts to her
cell phone.
Theres some here that I didnt
put in, she said, so Tengi showed
her how to delete the default con-
tacts on the list.
You can even put a picture on
here, she said in mild surprise.
He was very good, she said of
Tengi. In less than hour, he
taught me to list new names and
phone numbers on my cell phone,
to change my ring tone and set
my alarm clock. He was patient,
and it was very helpful.
Hall had also come to a morn-
ing presentation for senior citi-
zens about Twitter, presented by
Anna Van Scoyac at the library.
Bearing out the pleasant gener-
ational interactions, students and
seniors chatted throughout the
lessons, including Prudhomme
and Gilmore talking about al-
ready being asked what college
they were going to.
Gilmore, who was attending
her second Tech Time, said she,
too, heard about the program
thorough the NHS.
I thought it would be really
cool to teach people the things
that we know. Its a really useful
program for everyone.
Waugh said the students are
usually more inclined to experi-
ment with the equipment, while
those who havent been exposed
to it are a little more wary of hit-
ting a wrong key or button.
Sometimes theyve just
learned something before and for-
gotten it, Gilmore said. Its cool
to be taught at the high school all
day, then walk over to the library
and do the same thing for others.
TEENS
Continued from page 5
Teens and seniors bond
through technology
WEDNESDAY
February 15
FOR ALL
eLibraryNJ - eBooks @ Your
Library: 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Learn how to down-
load eBooks to your computer, a
compatible eReader or compatible
mobile device. This hands-on work-
shop includes a demonstration of
eLibraryNJ, a free source of current
and classic books for Mercer County
Library patrons. Participants are
encouraged to bring a laptop and/or
eReader. A limited number of library
laptops may be reserved at the time
of sign up. Advance registration
required by calling 737-2610.
FOR CHILDREN
Story Time : Ages 2 to 5 years, sib-
lings welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. These sto-
ry times introduce children to the
best age appropriate stories in chil-
drens literature. Action rhymes,
songs, and felt board activities are
part of the program. The content of
each story time centers on a differ-
ent theme. An age appropriate craft
follows story time. Each program
runs about 30 minutes. Parental
supervision is required.
THURSDAY
February 16
FOR CHILDREN
Toddler Rock : Featuring Music
Together. 10 to 10:30 a.m.at
Hopewell Branch Library. Join us
with your baby, toddler or pre-
schooler for a special music and
movement story time with Sarah
Orfe. Shell mix a few Music Togeth-
er songs and activities, including
instrument play, with some favorite
stories.
Story Time : Ages 2 to 5 years, sib-
lings welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. These sto-
ry times introduce children to the
best age appropriate stories in chil-
drens literature. Action rhymes,
songs, and felt board activities are
part of the program. The content of
each story time centers on a differ-
ent theme. An age appropriate craft
follows story time. Each program
runs about 30 minutes. Parental
supervision is required.
FRIDAY
February 17
FOR CHILDREN
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
10:30 to 11 a.m. at Hopewell Branch
Library. Ages newborn to 5. Since
and dance to classic childrens
songs played on live guitar. Parental
supervision required.
Open Play Time: 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. All ages.
Adult supervision required. Come to
our Children's Activity Room for
Open Play Time! This is a time for
parents/caregivers and children to
socialize. Toys and coloring supplies
will be available for the children.
TUESDAY
February 21
FOR ALL
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washington
Crossing-Pennington Rd. the third
Tuesday of the month. Verify time at
hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the Hopewell
Township Main Administration
Building the third Tuesday of the
month. For more information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. Bring a yoga mat or
large towel. Registration mandatory
as class size is limited. Call (609)
737-2610 or email
ktayloro@mcl.org.
Reiki Guided Meditation: 7 to 8
p.m.at Hopewell Branch Library.
Mary Ryan of Namaste Holistic Cen-
ter will guide participants through a
Reiki Meditation in two sessions.
Registration required by calling
(609) 737-2610 or email ktay-
loro@mcl.org.
FOR CHILDREN
Baby Time: Recommended ages
birth to 2 years. Adult supervision
required. 11 to 11:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch Library. This program is a
great way to introduce children to
library story times and reading. Age
appropriate books are shared.
Songs, nursery rhymes, puppets,
and felt board figures create a rich
audio-visual and social experience.
After 20 minutes of structured
group time, there is time for play
and for socializing.
Story Time : Ages 2 to 5 years, sib-
lings welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch Library. These sto-
ry times introduce children to the
best age appropriate stories in chil-
drens literature. Action rhymes,
songs, and felt board activities are
part of the program. The content of
each story time centers on a differ-
ent theme. An age appropriate craft
follows story time. Each program
runs about 30 minutes. Parental
supervision is required.
calendar PAGE 8 FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012
Want to be listed?
To have your Hopewell meet-
ing or affair listed in the
Calendar or Meetings, infor-
mation must be received, in
writing, two weeks prior to
the date of the event.
Send information by mail to:
Calendar, The Hopewell Sun,
103 Carnegie Center, Suite
300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
Or by email:
calendar@hopewellsun.com.
Or you can submit a calen-
dar listing through our web-
site (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is
available and the quality of
the photo is sufficient. Every
attempt is made to provide
coverage to all organizations.
Hopewell Valley Central High
Schools winter theatrical produc-
tion, Crazy for You, a George
and Ira Gershwin musical, will be
performed March 2, 3, 9 and 10 at
7:30 p.m. at The Performing Arts
Center of Hopewell Valley.
Despite being written more
than 70 years ago, Crazy for You
is billed as The New Gershwin
Musical Comedy.
Thats because Crazy for You
is really a reworking of an older
Gershwin musical, said Sarah
Vander Schaaff, HVCHS theater
arts teacher and the shows direc-
tor. When Crazy for You opened
on Broadway in the early 1990s, it
made a big statement. Here was
something classic, in one way,
and yet fresh. It showcases some
of the best-known Gershwin
songs in a wonderfully original
and funny story with a whole lot
of dancing.
Crazy for You, is the story of
New York City-born banker
Bobby Child who heads west to
Deadrock, Nev., to foreclose on a
rundown theater.
The musical stars Ryerson
Lehman-Borer as Bobby Child
and Imogen Mills as his co-lead
Polly Baker, the cast includes al-
most 50 other students in support-
ing roles as showgirls and town
residents.
We are so grateful to the
parental community for support-
ing the theater and music pro-
grams with such commitment,"
Vander Schaaf said. "This is
going to be a very uplifting show
for the audience.
Tickets for the show are $8 and
$12 and may be purchased at the
door, through the performing
arts center box office at (866) 967-
8167 or online at www.showtix4u.
com.
Crazy for You hits the
stage at Hopewell Valley
Central High School
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
Foz InIoznatIon, to nake a zesezvatIon oz to zeach
ouz tzIp-pIannIng concIezge, caII
(888} 690-0041
FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer (archery,
rifIe, muzzIeIoader), Pheaaant
(fieId and tower), Coyote, Rabbit
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T0BHBY TO PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL
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classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
Cracks are our specialty.
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $300 and up. We buy flood cars.
for more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK SERVICES
Let us do your homework.
Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
Soffitt Fascia
Rotten Wood
Door Installation
Painting
Kitchens
Fully Insured Licensed
609-200-4043
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
SNOW REMOVAL
Home Improvement
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
Handyman Services
Large or Small Repairs
Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
Firewood
LET
THE
SUNS
WORK
FOR
YOU!
Call
(856)
427-0933
for
Advertising
info.
Tree Service
Tutoring
Has your high water alarm
gone off recently?
J WHALEN & SON
PUMP SERVICE
Sewage and Sump Pumps
Installed and Repaired
Call 609-737-2722
Pump Services
Academic Success :
TUTORNG Certified K-12
Honors Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring, ndividualized
instruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests ACT,
All Standardized Tests H.S.
Eng, Lit. and Writing; Math
to Pre-Calc., History Elem.
Phonics, Reading, Math;
Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Pat Osander
"A Lady of Petigree"
House / Pet-Sitting
Phone: 609-896-0082
E-mail:garfdoggy@aol.com
FIREWOOD
Delivered Dumped
All 14-18 inches long
Split Aged Full Cord
SALE $195
Call: 908-359-3000
I CAN TEACH YOUR
CHILD TO READ!
All Ages. Free Consultation.
Call Today!
908-239-9623
CHRYSLER CIRRUS LXi 00
White/tan Lthr; Sun Roof;
Power assist; one owner;
Good written report; 90K mi;
$3,900
609-883-1774
Professional Tree Care & Arborist Services
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
609-730-8199
www.arborbarbertree.com
Certified Arborist | Corrective Pruning | Tree Removal
Cabling & Bracing | Stump Grinding | Cat Rescue
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
A portion of
our proceeds
are donated
to animal
rescue!
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for
36 Month
$ *
CONQUEST CASH
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Closer Than You Think!
*Acquisition fee $695. No security deposit required. Available to qualified customers. Stock #12359. All prices
with tax, tags, registration and documentation fees additional. 36 month, 10,000 mile lease. Expires 2/29/12.
**MSRP $32,175. Total due at signing $3,293. Visit retailer for details.
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.
VCLVC CI kINCL1CN
2931 U.S. 1 South
Lawrencev|||e, NI 08648
(609) 882-0600
8kIDGLWA1Lk VCLVC
1028 U.S. 22 Last
Somerv|||e, NI
(908) S26-7700
VCLVC CI LDISCN
842 U.S. 1 North
Ld|son, NI
(732) 248-0S00
VCLVCCCUN1k.CCM

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SAVL 51,000
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2
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