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V

EXERCISES

LATIN ETYMOLOGY;
ADAPTED TO

ANDREWS AND STODDARD'S

LATIN GRAMMAR.

,0

E

.

a\

ANDREWS, LL.D

BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY CROCKER AND BREWSTER,
47

Washington Street.
1855.

Entered according to Act of Congress,

in the year 1855,

BY CROCKER AND BREWSTER,
In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

A)

PREFACE

Among

those principles relating to education, which are sanc-

tioned alike
rules by

by reason and experience, few, probably,
of particular examples.

are better

established, than the expediency of fully illustrating general

means

To minds

of every class,

but especially

young, abstract principles, while unexplained by examples, have a character of vagueness alike unsatisfactory to the understanding and unfitted to retain their hold upon the memory. Particular examples, on the contrary,
to those of the

are easily

comprehended and remembered, but are of
be arranged.

little

prac-

tical value, till

they suggest the general principle, under which

they are

to

student's mind, two have been pursued the one known as the synthetical method, the other as the analytical. By the former, a principle is first enunciated, and subsequently
establish general principles in the

To

opposite courses of instruction

;

illustrated
is

by individual

instances.

By
he

the

latter,

the student

led through single examples, until

arrives at the general

principle.

The one, therefore, begins, where the other ends, and ends, where the other begins. Each of these methods, it is well known, has its advocates, and this is not less true in regard to instruction in language, than in other departments of education. Without presuming to hazard an opinion respecting the relative advantages of these two methods, we may perhaps be permitted to remark, that the synthetical method has some-

times suffered from the inadvertence of

its

professed friends,

who have
means

too

often

rested in the

enunciation of principles,
by-

without sufficiently providing for their adequate illustration
of appropriate exercises.

A
ed

conviction of this fact led the author of this small work,
since, to prepare a book of " Latin Exercises," adapt-

many years

to the illustration of

Latin Grammar.
as to

each division of Andrews and Stoddard's That volume was arranged in such a manner be used with convenience from the time when the stu-

commenced the study of the Grammar; and, in connection with the " Questions n adapted to the same Grammar, was
dent
-

intent and proper application. such connection that those works have been generally used in the best schools of New England, and in this way only can the true value of either work be fairly estimated. At a later period than the one last referred to, and in further prosecution of the author's design, he prepared a small volume, which he called his u First Latin Book," in which, in successive lessons, he presented the rules of the Latin grammar with exercises designed to illustrate and to fix them permanently in the student's memory This latter work, which was intended more particularly for the use of those academies and high schools, in which the study of the Latin language is pursued to a limited extent only, and as a necessary part of a good English education, has received the favorable attention of many practical teachers, and of several eminent scholars, into whose hands it has fallen. In pursuance of the same purpose, which led to the preparation of his Latin Exercises and First Latin Book, the author has been induced, by the friendly suggestion of a classical teacher of much experience, to prepare these few pages for the special accommodation of those students, who make use of Andrews and Stoddard's Grammar at the commencement of To these, and especially to the younger their Latin studies.

designed so to illustrate doubt concerning their
It
is

its

leading principles, as to leave no

true

in

members

of the classes, the

constant use of a large Jbook of
in

exercises during the

many months

which they are mastering

the principles of Latin Etymology, is attended with considerable inconvenience, while the possession of a small manual will, it is hoped, facilitate the study of their daily lessons,

without reminding them continually how much remains for them to do. It may be added, that the etymological exercises contained in the larger work are less copious, and are confined to fewer topics, than those

which

are comprised in this

manual.

As

this

work

is

designed

to

be used

in connection with the
it it

study of the etymological part of the Grammar, the name of " Etymological Exercises," though
fessed, that, in strict propriety, every

has received

must be con-

change

in the termination

of a

word has ultimate reference

to its

proposed use in the confirst

struction of a sentence.

In the exercises on the verbs contained in the

part of this

work,

it

would have been easy

to substitute
it

tives, instead of the

perpetual " he, she,

nouns as nomina" and " they ;" but it

would have been a departure from the general plan of the work, and would have tended to confound unnecessarily the departments of etymology and syntax. In its present form the nominatives ego,
tu,

nos 7 vos,

ille

}

Mi,

etc.,

as in the verbal para-

digms, are considered as implied in the forms of the verbs,
and, consequently, in preparing the lessons they can be entirely
omitted.

To

the exercises are subjoined an English- Latin and a Latin-

English Vocabulary, containing such words in each language,
as the student will have occasion to
exercises.
irregular,

employ

in preparing his

Many

of the Latin words in these Vocabularies are

but as their irregularities are explained under the

appropriate

heads in the Grammar, such explanations
in the
to

have

been generally omitted

Vocabularies, lest they should

seem

to

diminish the motives of the student

a faithful study

of every part of his

Grammar.

In his Vocabulary, for

exam-

ple, the student will find that sto is a neuter verb of the first

conjugation; but

if

a knowledge of this fact should lead him,
it

without further search, to form for

a regular perfect, he

may

chance

to find that other
l*

members

of his class

have surpassed

6 him
in diligence.
it

By

the use of the Vocabularies the teacher

will find

easy, on occasion, to prepare other exersises,

and

to

diversify their character to almost

any

extent.

The designed connection of these Exercises with the Grammode in which they were intended to be used, will sufficiently appear by means of the directions and the
mar, and the

grammatical references embodied in the work.
E. A. A.

New

Britain, Conn., Oct. 1855.

ETYMOLOGICAL EXERCISES.

Part

I.

NOUNS.
Grammar
§

26.

Directions. In regard to each of the following English sentences the teacher will ask, 1st. What words in this sentence are nouns ? 2d. Why is this word (naming it) a noun ? The answer to the second question will be found in the definition of a noun contained in the 26th Section of the Grammar.

Dido founded Carthage. Neptune is the god of the

sea.

Care follows wealth. Hope cheers the husbandmen.
Virtue
is its

own

reward.

CLASSIFICATION OF NOUNS.
questions in regard to each Latin word in 1st. What kind of noun is it ? 2d. Whyis it a proper, a common, a collective, an abstract, or a material noun ? The respective definitions of each of these classes of nouns will afford the proper answer to the second question.

Directions.

—The

the following table are,

Roma, Rome. Aurum, gold.
Fluvius, a river. Nox, night. Gladius, a sword.

Necessitas, necessity.
Sicilia, Sicily.

Formido, fear. Ignavia, sloth.
Athenae, Athens. Senatus. the Senate. JEs, brass.

Apenninus, the Apennines.

Poema, a poem.

Panis, bread. Glacies, ice. Fides, faith.

Panis, a loaf. Oceanus, the ocean. Aqua, water.

Oleum,

oil.

Caseus, cheese.
Pietas, piety.

Concilium, an assembly. Caseus, a cheese. Mel, honey.
Magister, a master. Plebs, the common people. jEtas, an age.

Horatius, Horace. Triticum, wheat.
Justitia, justice.

Vinum, urine. Marcus. Marcus.

Malum, an

evil.

Tiberis, the Tiber.

GENDER OF NOUNS.
Grammar
§

27.

Directions. The questions in regard to each of the following nouns are, first, " Is its gender natural or grammatical V* The answers to these questions will be Secondly, " Why

V

found

in this section of the

Grammar.
Romulus, m., Romulus.
Puella,/., a girl.

Diana, /., Diana. Clypeus, m. t a shield. An ram, n., gold. Puer, m., a boy.
Glacies, f. ce.

Nox, /, night. Panis, m., bread. Fluvius, m., a river.
Filia,

Poema,

n.,

a poem.

Pater, m., a father. Caseus, m., cheese.

Sicilia,

Flumen, »., a river. f, a daughter. /, Sicily.

Grammar

H

28

30.

Directions. The questions in regard to each of the following nouns are, 1st. " What is its gender ?" 2d. "Why?" The general rules of gender in these sections will suggest the proper answers.
Horatius, Horace. Mater, a mother. Hispania, Spain.

Helena, Helen.

Roma, Rome.
Auster, the South-wind. Parens, a parent.
Aprilis, April.

Conjux, a spouse. Pirus, a pear-tree.
Tiberis, the Tiber.

^Egyptus, Egypt. JNemo, nobody.

Nardus, spikenard. Rhodus, Rhodes. Aper, a wild-boar.

DECLENSIONS.
Grammar
Directions. — The
§

38.

and genitive singular

following table contains the nominative of certain Latin nouns, whose gender the

;

student
section.
etc.

is to

The
2d. "

determine by the principles contained in the 38th questions are, 1st. " What is the gender of cw?a,

V

}

Why ?"
Gen.
curae,
care.

Nom.
Cura, Puer,
Turris,

pueri,
turris,

a boy. a tower.

Ara, Clypeus, Facies,
Glacies,

aree,

an
ice.

altar.

clypei,
faciei,

a shield. a face.

glaciei,
antri,

Antrum,
Arbos, Fructus, Res,
Pater,

arboris, fructus,
rei,

a a

cave.
tree.

patris,
lateris,
viri,

fruit. a thing. a father.

Latus,
Vir,

Lapis,

lapidis,

a side. a man. a stone.

Que reus,
Currus, Hortus, JEneas, Alexander,

quercus,
currus,
horti,

an oak. a chariot.
a garden. JEneas. Alexander.

JEneae, Alexandri,

TERMINATIONS OF NOUNS.
FIRST DECLENSION.
Grammar §§39 and
41.

are the terminations of the several cases of Latin nouns of the 1st declension, in the singular number? in the plural ? What is the termination of the nominative singular ? of the nominative plural \ of the gen. sing. ? of the gen. plur. ? of the dat. sing. 1 of the dat. plur. } of the ace. sing. of the ace. plur. ? of the voc. sing. % of the voc. plur. % of the abl. sing. % of the abl. plural ? What cases in the singular end in a ? in <z ? What case in am ? What cases in the plural end in a % in is ? What case in ? in s ? arum ? in as ? What cases end in

What

?-

m

— — —

CLASSIFIED DECLENSION.
Decline musa, naming together, in each number, those cases that have the same termination thus
;

Singular.

Plural.
rausa,

Nom. and Voc. Gen. and Dat.
Ace. Abl.

Nom. and
Gen.
Dat. Ace.

Voc.
.

musae,

musae, rnusam,

musarum,

and Abl.

musis,

musa

musas.

10
Decline in like manner
Aula, a hall. Cura, care. Galea, a helmet. Dea, a goddess.
Insula, Litera,

Machina,
Filia,

an island. a letter. a machine. a daughter.

SECOND DECLENSION.
Grammar §§39 and
46-53.
are the terminations of masculine Latin nouns of the 2d declension in the nominative sing. % What is the termination of neuter Latin nouns of the 2d declension in the nominative singular ? Give the terminations in the singular number of the several cases of masculines of the 2d declension in us. of nouns of the 2d declension in er. of all masculines of this declension in the plural. How are feminines in us declined'? Give the terminations of neuters of the 2d declension in the several cases of the singular. of the plural. What cases of neuters of the 2d declension have the same terminations as masculines ? What cases of neuters of the 2d declension have different terminations from those of masculines % In what class of nouns of the 2d decl. is the voc. sing, unlike the nom. ? What cases of the 2d decl. always end in o ? in * ? What three cases of neuters end alike in the singular ? in the How in the 2d declension do these cases end in the plural ? singular? What three words are excepted? How do these cases end in the plural ? Give the classified declension of each of the following nouns.

What

— —

Dominus, a

lord.

Animus, the mind.
Puer, a boy. Liber, a book.

Gener, a son-in-law. Ager, a field. Regnum, a kingdom. Pelagus, the sea. in sing.
Filius,

Exemplum, an example.
§ 51.

a

son. § 52.

Vir, a man. § Deus, a god.

48.

THIRD DECLENSION.
MASCULINES.

Grammar

§§

58-61.

What
line? Latin

See Gr.

terminations of nouns of the 3d declension are mascuOr the following answer from the First § 58.
:

Book may be given Nouns in

viz.
e r, o r, o,

(Excepting i o, do, and go,) With nouns in os and wis,

11

And

es, if it

increase,*

E x and n (excepting men,)
With
Are
*t.
e. if

And mons and
to
the genitive has

dens and fons, pons.

be counted masculine.
more
syllables than the nominative.

Directions. The following table contains both regular and irregular nouns in o, er, etc. The student will find, in the sections of the Grammar referred to, the answers to the questions, lt j; v etc.? and " ? Of what gender is sermo,

Why

Sermo,

speech.

Flos, a flower. Pes, a foot.

Dolor, pain. Career, a prison. Ratio, reason.

Arundo, a reed. Comedo, a glutton.
Caro, flesh. Iter, a journey.

Imago, an image. Cupido, desire.
Linter,

a

boat.

JEquor, the sea. Merees, edis, a reward. Obses, a hostage. Os, oris, the mouth.

Ver, the spring. Cor, the heart. Quies, etis, rest. Arbos, a tree. Os, ossis, a bone.

FEMININES.

Grammar

§§

62-65.
?

What
See Gr.

terminations of nouns of the 3d declension are feminine Or the following lines can be repeated ; viz. § 62.

Nouns, not increasing, in e s} Us (utis, udis,*) x, as, is, In 5 impure,! ys, aus, i o, Are feminine with do and go.

*i.

e.

having

Utis or

Mis

in the genitive.

1

1. e.

following a consonant.

Directions.

— The following, like the preceding
The

both regular and irregular nouns. as in the preceding table.
As, a piece of money. Vas, vasis, a vessel.

table, contains questions are the same

Nubes, a cloud. Dens, a tooth. Thorax, a breastplate. Pax, peace.
Avis,

^Etas, an age. Vates, a prophet. Crinis, the hair.

Pons, a bridge.
Calix,

a cup.
cloak.

Trabs, a beam.

a

bird.

Chlamys, a


12
What
See
Gr.

§

terminations of nouns of the 3d declension are neuter 66. Or the following lines can be repeated viz.
:

1

Nouns neuter end
:

in a

and
if

e,

In i and y, in / and c ; In us} ar, ur in men and

Directions. The same questions are to be proposed respecting the nouns in this table as in the tables relating to masculines and feminines.
Diadema, a crown.
Vectigal, revenue.
Sal, salt.

Rete, a net. Sol, the sun.

Flumen, a
rule.

river.

Canon, a

Turtur, a turtle dove. Pectus, the breast. Juventus, youth. Grus, a crane.

Caput, the head. Calear, a spur. Lepus, a hare. Tellus, the earth. Sus, a swine.

FORMATION OF THE GENITIVE.

Grammar
Directions.
are, "

$$

68-78.

What

is

The questions respecting the following nouns the genitive ? By what rule ?"
Sermo,

Poema, a poem.
Sedile, a seat.

A run do, a

speech. reed.

Imago, an image. Animal, an animal.
Career, a prison.

Caro, flesh.

Flumen, a
Far, corn.

river.

Pietas, piety.

Ales, a bird. Obses, a hostage. Avis, a bird. Hon os, honor.

Canon, a rule. Mel, honey. Mater, a mother. Robur, strength. Vas, a surety, Aries, a ram.
Pes, a foot. Lapis, a stone. Nepos, a grandchild. Frigus, cold. Trabs, a beam. Caput, the head. Grex, a flock.

Bos, an ox.
Incus, an anvil. Pars, a part.

Vox,

the voice.

Pollex, the thumb.

Senex, an old man.

TERMINATIONS OF CASES.
Grammar
§

39 and 57.

What is the termination of the nom., ace, and voc. plural of masculines and feminines of the 3d declension'? of the gen. sing, of all nouns of the 3d declension 1 of the gen. plur. ?


13
of the abl. sing. ? of the of the dat. sing. ? of the dat. plur. 1 ? of the nom., ace, and voc. plur. of neuter nouns of the 3d declension? What two case's of all nouns of the 3d declension and singular number are alike ? What three cases of all neuter nouns are alike in the singular? What three cases of all nouns of the 3d declension are alike in the plural ? What two other cases are alike in the plural ? What is the termination of these two cases ? What case in the singular number of masculines and feminines of the 3d declension ends in ml in i ? in e or t ? Where, in the plural of masculines and feminines of the 3d declension, is the termination es found ? How do the same cases end in neuters ? In what cases of the plural of neuters of the 3d declension is s final found ? In what case of the plural of masculines, and feminines is final s not found ? Give the classified declension of
abl. plur.

Honos, m. Rupes, /.
Sedile, n.

Sermo, m.
Ars, /.

Carmen, n
Iter, n.

Nox,

/.

FOURTH DECLENSION.
Grammar
§§

87—89.

What is the termination of the nom. and voc. singular of masculines and feminines of the 4th declension'? of the nom, acc. r and voc. plural \ of the dat. singular ? of the dat. plural ? of the gen. singular of all of the abl. plural? of the abl. sing? nouns of the 4th declension? of the gen. plural ? of the nom. singular of neuter nouns of the 4th declension ? of their nom.,, ace, and voc. plural? What cases of neuter nouns of the 4th declension are like the nom. singular? Give the classified declension of fructus of manus of cornu of veru. of pecu of portus of artus

— —

— —

FIFTH DECLENSION.
Grammar
§

90.

What are the terminations of the several cases of nouns of the 5th declension in the sing.? in the plur.? of the nom. and of the gen. of the nom., ace, and voc. plural ? voc. singular ? singular ? of the gen. plural? of the dat. singular ? of the dat. of the abl. plural ? plural ? of the abl. singular ? Give the classified declension of res of dies.

— —

— — —

2

.

14
Which of the declensions contain no neuter nouns'? What What is the termination of three cases of neuters are alike ? these cases in the plural ? What is the termination of the ace. of masculines and feminines of the sing, in the 1st declension ? 2d declension? of the 3d? of the 4th? of nouns of the 5th? What is the termination of the dat. and abl. plural of the 1st and 2d declensions ?— of the 3d ?— of the 4th ?— of the 5th ?— of the gen. plural of the 1st?— of the 2d?— of the 3d '—of the 4th?— of the ace. plural of the 1st? of the 5th? of masculines and feminines of the 2d ?— of the 3d ?— of the 4th ?— of the 5th ?

ROOTS OF NOUNS.
Grammar
§

40.

Rem.

10.

Give the grammatical root of each of the following nouns
Aula.
Litera. Sagitta.

Cura
Luscinia.
Stella.

Galea.

Insula.

Machina. Toga.
Corvus. Aper.

Penna.
Via.
Gladius.

Animus.
Puer.

Antrum.

Clypeus. Socer. Bellum.

Faber.

Negotium.

Saxum.
Gen.
aquilonis.

Gen.

Poema,
Steinma,
Ancile,

poematis. stemmatis.
ancilis.

AquTlo,
Piegio,

region is.
ferruginis.

Ferrugo,

Formido,
Caro,
Titan,

formidinis.

Homo,
Animal,
Career,

hominis.
animalis.
carceris.

earn is.
Titanis. mellis.
tibicinis.'

Mel,
Tiblcen, Crater,

Agmen,
Frater,

agminis.
fratris.
farris.

crateris.

Hepar, Ebur, Mas,
Clades,

hepatis. eboris maris,
cladis. lebeiis.

Far, Cor,
Pietas, Ales,

cordis. pietfuis.
alTtis.

Comes,
Miles,

comitis.

Lebes, Seges,
Ceres, Cuspis,
Lis,

mi lit is.
obsidis.
classis.

segetis.

Obses,
Classis,

Cereris. cuspldis.
litis.

Sanguis,

Mos,
Bos, Corpus,
Virtus,

sanguinis. moris.
bovis. corporis.
virliitis.

Custos, Foedns, Pal us,
Jus,
Stirps,

cuslodis.
foederis,
paliidis.

juris,
slirpi*.

Laus, Dens,
Frons,

laud is.
dentis.
frontis.

Forceps, Frons, Cornix,

forclpis.

frond is.
cornicis.
legis.

Lex,
Nix,

nivis.

Auceps, Conjux, Senex, Nox,

auciipis. conjtigis. senis. noctis.

15
Cantus.
Fides.

Currus.

Exercitus.
Facies.

Veru.

Spes.

Res.

EXERCISES UPON EACH DECLENSION.
Pat each of the following nouns into the case annexed
viz.
to
it

Aula, Cura, Galea,
IusQla, Sagitta,

dat sing.

Litera,

ace. plur.
abl. sing.

gen

plur..

Luscinia,

ace sing. abl. plur. voc. plur.

Machina, Penna, Toga,
Clypeus,

nom. plur.
gen. sing.
voc. sing.
voc. sing.

Animus,
Corvus,
Gladius,

nom
abl.

plur. sing.

Numerus
Trochus, Puer, Socer,
Auster, Liber,

,

gen. plur. dat plur.
dat. sing.
abl. sing.

Focus, Lucus,
Ocearius,
Tullius,

ace. sing.
ace. plur.

Lucifer,

dat. sing. voc. sing. ace. sing.
ace. plur.

gen. phir.
dat. sing.
abl. plur.

Onager, Antrum, Bellum, Negotium,

dat. ace. ace. dat.

plur. sing. plur.
sing..

Aper, Faber, Magister, Teucer, Atrium,

nom. phir.
voc. si?ig.
abl.

sing,

nom. plur.
abl plur.

Exemplum
Saxum,
Schema,

gen. plur.

Poema, abl. sing. Stemma, gen. plur.
Ancile,
dat. sing.
abl.

nom. plur.
,

~

Epigramma gen.
Rete,
Ovlle,

sing.

gen. plur.
ace. phir.
ace. sing,

Ma utile,
Aquilo,

sing.

gen. sing.
ace. plur.

Bubo,
Oratio,

Regio,
Ratio,

nom. plur.
abl.

gen. plur.
dat. sing.

Latro,

sing.

Ferrugo, Grando,
Virgo, Caro,

Formldo,
Orlgo,

ace. plur.

gen. sing.
dat. plur.
abl. sing.

gen. plur.
ace. sing.

Homo,
Dido,
Titan, Siren, Calcar,

gen. sing.
dat. sing.
abl.

Animal,
Vigil,

nom. plur.
ace. si?ig.

dat. plur. Career, Pulvlnar, nom. plur. Agmen, dat. sing. Carmen, abl. plur. Tibicen, ace. sing. abl. ])lur. Fraler, Crater, ace. plur. dat. sing. Hepar,

ace plur. sing,

Mel, Crimen,

nom. plur. nom. plur.
abl. sing. 710m. plur.

Gramen,
Mater,
Accipiter,

ace. sijig.
abl. sing,

Far/
Cor,
Pietas,

nom. plur.
ace sing.

Ebur,

abl. sing.

Mas,
Ales, Crates,

abl. plur.

Anas,
Clades,

nom. plur.
ace sing.

gen. sing.
dat. plur.

Comes,

gen. plur.

16
JEdes,
Miles,

gen. plur.

Lebes,
Vulpes, Seges, Heres, JEs, Messis,
Pellis,
Sitis,

nom. plur.
dat. sing.
abl.

ace plur.
sing, nom. plur. abl. sing. ace. sing. gen. plur. ace. plur. abl. sing. ace. sing. nom. plur.
abl.

Pedes, Obses,
Ceres,
Classis,

plur.

ace. sing. dat. sing.

Ovis,
Vitis,

Aprilis,

Cinis,

nom. plur. dat. sing. ace. sing. dat. sing.
abl.

Cuspis,
Lis,

Sanguis,
Quiris,

sing.

gen. plur.
abl. sing.

Mos,
Arbos, Sacerdos, Bos, Fcedus,
Frigus,

abl. plur.

ace. sing. dat. plur.
ace. sing,

Ros, Dos,
Custos, Bos,

ace. plur.

nom. plur.
dat. plur.
abl. sing.

nom. plur.
dat. plur. dat. sing.
ace. sing.
abl.
abl. abl.

Corpus,

Munus,
Vulnus,
Palus, Virtus, Tellus,

ace. plur.

Nemos, Tempus,
Juvenilis, Jus,

gen. plur.
ace sing,

sing.

nom. plur.
ace. sing. dat. plur.

ace. plur.

Laus,
Stirps,

plur.
sing.

Sus,

Dens,
Cliens,

nom.

plur.

JMons,

Forceps,

dat. plur. ace. si?ig.

gen. plur.

Frons
Crux,

(frontis,)

nom. plur.

Comix,
Nutrix,

gen. sing.
dat. sing. ace. sing.

Frons (frondis,) ace. plur. Auceps, dat. sing. Conjux, dat. plur. Lex, ace. plur. abl. plur. Frux,
Index, Supellex. Nix,
abl. sing.

Apex,
Pontiiex,

nom. plur.
ace. sing.

ace. sing.
abl.

Senex,

Nox,
Canlus, Currus, Senatus, Veru,
Fides, Facies,

plur. gen. plur.
abl.

sing.

Thrax,
ExercTtus, Fluctus,

gen. plur.
ace. plur.
abl.
abl.

abl.

sing.

gen. sing.
dat. sing.
abl. abl.

plur.

sing. sing.

Lacus, Pecu,
Spes,
Glacies,

dat. plur.

plur.

nom. plur.
abl.

gen. sing.

sing.

ADJECTIVES.
Grammar
§

104.

The questions in regard to each of the following English sentences are, 1st. What word in this sentence is an adjective? The answer to the latter ques2d. Why is it an adjective'? tion is to be derived fiom the definition of an adjective.
The
Icy winter is approaching. ripe apples fall.

17
Delay
is

not safe.

swift stags fly. There is no reason. The night is cold.
I

The

have learned

my

lesson.

Two

centuries have elapsed.

CLASSIFICATION OF ADJECTIVES.
The questions in regard to the following combinations are, Which of the two words is an adjective % 2d. Why is it an adjective? 3d. To which class of adjectives does it belong?
1st.

For the answers

to

these questions see

\

104, 1-13.

Nulla prsecepta, no precepts. Avus maternus, a maternal grandfather. Viginti arbores, twenty trees. Hostlles naves, hostile ships. Bellum trojanum, the Trojan war. Ater corvus, a black raven.

Suramus

locus, the highest place.
boy.

Parvus puer, a small

Craslina lux, tomorrow's light. Lignea turris, a ivooden tower.

Quota hora? what hour J

Homines somnolenti,

sleepy

men.

COMPARISON.
Grammar,
Directions.
adjectives are,
§

122,

—The questions respecting each of the following
1st.

Does

it

admit of comparison
Annuus
Asper, rough
Ullus, any. Fortis, brave.

1

?

2d.

Why?

Albus, white.

Patemus, -paternal. Secundus, second.
Jucundus, pleasant.

Romanus, Roman.
Totus,
total.

Omnis,

all.

Blpes, two-footed.
Infinltus, boundless.

Centum, a hundred.
Hilaris, cheerful.

Opulentus, wealthy. Bisulcus, tioo-cleft. Quadriiplex, fourfold.

Cselebs, unmarried. Opportunus, seasonable. Tot, so-many.
Similis, like.

Grammar
Directions.
tions are, 1st.
its

§§

124-126.

— In regard
is
its
1

What
is

comparison
so

to each of these adjectives the quesIf root? 2d. How is it compared'? in any respect irregular, then, 3d. By what rule

is it

compared
2*

18
Audax, daring.
Fidus, faithful.

Nequam,

Iners, sluggish. worthless.
Difticilis, difficult. Senex, old.

Malus, bad. Ingens, huge.

Munif Icus,

liberal.

Carus, dear.
Alacer, active. Superus, high.

Crudelis, cruel. Dulcis, sweet. Sacer, sacred.
.

Vetus, old. Dexter, right.

Parvus, small. Pulcher, beautiful. Malevolus, malevolent.

bers,

Put the following adjectives into the several genders, numand cases specified, viz.

Altus into the abl. sing. fern. nom. plur. neut. ace. plur. masc. JFidus, gen. plur. masc. ace. plur. fem. abl. plur. dat sing. masc. Lortgus, ace. sing. masc. abl. sing. masc. gen. plur. fem. ace. plur. neut. Benignus, voc. sing masc. voc. plur. fem. dat. plur. Asper, dat. sing. masc. nom. plur. neut. abl. sing. fem. Miser, nom sing. neut. nom plur. fem. JEger, nom plur masc. ace. sing, fem dat. sing. neut. .Sacer, gen. plur. fem ace. plur. masc. dat. sing. fem. Alms, nom. sing, neut.— gen sing. dat. sing. Solus, gen. sing abl. sing. fem. Alter, ace sing. masc. dat sing Alacer, nom. sing neut. nom. plur. masc. abl. plur. Celeber, nom. plur. masc. abl. sing. Paluster, ace. sing. fem. nom. plur. neut.

— — — —— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — JSalubris, — ace. plur. neut. ~Terrestris, — gen. plur — abl sing. Brevis,— ace. sing. neut. — gen. plur. Dulcis, — nom. plur. masc — abl. plur. Oynnis, — nom. plur. neut. — gen. plur. Tres,— gen. plur. — ace. plur. neut. Altior, — dat. sing. — ace. sing. neut. — nom. plur. fem. Felicior, — abl. sing — dat. plur. — ace. plur. neut. Gravior, — gen. plur.— ace plur. masc. Audax, — dat. sing—^nom. plur. neut. —abl. plur. — ace. sing. fem. Ingens, —ace. sing. neut. — ace plur. fem. Hebes,—ace. sing. masc. — ace. plur. masc. Dives, — abl. sing — gen plur. — nom. sing. neut. Deses, — nom. plur. masc — ace. sing. fem. JBipes, — ace. sing. masc. — nom. plur. masc. Compos, — abl. sing. — nom. plur. masc. Calebs, —abl sing— nom. plur. masc. Anceps, — nom plur. masc. — nom. plur. neut. Pauper, — gen. plur. — dat. sing. Senex, — ace. sing. masc. — gen. plur. Co7icors, — dat. sing. — nom. plur. neut. Vetus,— gen. plur — ace. plur. neut. —ace. plur. neut. — abl, plur. Volucer, — nom. sing fem. — gen. plur. Memor, — ace. sing. masc. — gen. plur.

fiber,

— — — — — — — —

:;

19

CONNECTED DECLENSION OF NOUNS AND ADJECTIVES.
Decline in connection the following nouns and adjectives in both numbers and in all the cases ; viz.
Bonus amicus, a good friend. Bona mensa, a good table. Bonum exemplum, a good example. Tener puer, a tender boy. Ten era puella, a tender girl. Tenerum virgultum, a tender shrub,
Noster ager, our field. Sacra insula, a sacred island. Vestrum donum, your gift. Niger corvus, a black raven.

Thus:
Singtdar.
Plural.

Nom.
Gen. Dot.
Ace. Voc.
Abl.

Bonus amicus,
boni amici, bono amico,

Nom.
Gen. Dat.
Ace. Voc. Abl.

boni amici,

bonorum amicorum,
bonis amlcis, bonos amlcos, boni amici, bonis amlcis.

bonum amlcum,
bone amice, bono amico

Decline in like manner the following, in some of which the noun and adjective are of different declensions viz.
;

a good father. Alta populus, a tall poplar. Mons sacer, a sacred mountain. Alter homo, another man. TJtraque man us, each hand; in the
pater,

Bonus

plural, both

hands.

Sinistrum cornu, the

left

horn.

B re vis
Vir

via, a short way. fortis, a brave man. Breve tempus, a short time. Leo nobilis, a noble lion.

Uxor fida, a faithful wife. Carmen dulce, a sweet song.

And

in the plural only

Duae Tres

res, two things. dies, three days. leones, two lions. Duae filiae, two daughters. Duo corp6ra, two bodies. Ambae voces, both voices.

Duo

:

20

PRONOUNS.
Grammar
required
§$

133-139.

Put the following pronouns into the several cases, numbers,
etc.

— ace. sing. —abl. plur. — gen. plur. — dat. sing. — dat. sing. —ace. plur.—gen. sing. — gen. plur. Sui,—abl. sing. —abl. plur. — gen. plur. —ace. sing. Hie, — ace. sing. neut. — gen. plur. fern. —abl. plur. —dat. sing. — ace. plur. fem. — nom. plur. neut. Ipse, — gen. sing. — ace. sing. neut. — ace. plur. neut. Mic,—abl. sing. fern. —dat. plur. — gen. plur. fem. Is, — dat. sing. — dat. plur.— ace. plur. fern. —abl. sing. neut.— nom. plur. neut. Idem, —ace sing. fem. —abl. plur. Qui, —ace. sing, masc. — ace. plur. neut.— ace. sing. neut. Quis, — nom. sing. neut. —dat. plur. Quisquis, —abl. sing, neut — dat. plur. masc. Quicumque, — abl. sing. fem.— dat. plur. Quis nam, — ace. sing. masc. — ace sing. neut. Ecquis, — nom. sing. neut. — dat. sing. Cujas,— ace. sing. — nom. plur. Siquis,— abl. sing. fem. — ace. sing. neut. Quisque, — nom. sing. neut. — abl. sing. masc. JJnusquisqxie,— abl. sing. masc. Quilibet,— dat. sing —abl. plur. Quivis, — ace. sing. masc. — nom. plur. fem. Quidam, — abl. plur. — nom. plur. neut. Mens, — voc. sing. masc. — nom. plur. masc. Noster, — dat. sing. neut. —abl. plur.
Ego,
Tu,
Iste,

Istic,

Decline in connection the following adjective pronouns and nouns viz.
:

Ille

homo,

that

man.

Ista mater, that mother. Insum saxum, the rock itself.

Idem sermo,

Qui gener? what son-in-law? the same speech.

Ea

res, that thing. Islud negotium, that business. Eadem mulier, the same woman.

Hoc regnum,
Ilia

this

kingdom.

Idem exeinplum,

spes, that hope. the same example. Id bellum, that tvar. Hoec insula, this island.

21

VERBS.
Grammar
The
§

140.

questions to be asked in regard to each of the following English sentences are, What word in this sentence is a verb ? The answer to the second question and, Why is it a verb I will be, that it affirms something respecting (name the person or thing of which it affirms,) and that " A verb is a word," etc., quoting the definition of a verb.
Scipio destroyed Carthage.

The bee loves flowers. Romulus founded Rome.
Life
is short.

Roses shine among the The dogs will pursue.

lilies.

The

stag

was puisued.

Note. Auxiliary verbs and the word with which they are connected constitute but one verb as,
:

The times The times The times

are changed.
will be c
will

have been changed.

CLASSIFICATION OF VERBS.
Grammar
The
§§ 141, 142.

questions in regard to each of the following Latin sentences are, 1st. What is its verb? 2d. What kind of verb is Of which voice is it ? And, it ? and 3d, if it is an active verb, in regard to each answer to those questions, the further questions, Why is it a verb? Why is it active? etc. are to be asked.
Beneficia parant amicos, Anima est immortalis, Darius victus est ab Alexandre),
Benefits procure friends. The soul is immortal.

Unum dedeeus restat, Amici inventi sunt, Mite poinum cadit,
Oculi falluntur,

Clamor

audltur,

Venit hiems,

Moriemur, Cura sequitur pecuniam,

Darius was conquered by Alexander. One disgrace remains. Friends have been found. The ripe apple falls. The eyes are deceived. A shout is heard. Winter is coming. Gr. § 145, I. shall die. Gr. § 142, R. 4. Care follows money.

We
I

Diem perdldi, Mora non est tuta,

have lost a day. Delay is not safe.

22

MOODS.
Grammar
§

143.

In the following Latin sentences the questions to be asked in regard to each verb are, What is its mood 1 and, ?

Why

Anima

est immortalis,

The
I

Si rex re gat,

soul is immortal. If the king rule.

Monemini,

Te

cupio videre,

Cum

tempus

veniat,

Puniuntor fures,

Poma

cadebant, Si poma caderent, Clamor auditus est,

A
I

Labuntur anni, Intelligere non possum, Vince iram,

advised. desire to see you. When the time comes. Let thieves be punished. The apples were falling. If the apples should fall. clamor was heard. Years glide away.

Be ye

cannot understand.
follow thee. have followed thee. desired to follow thee.

Overcome anger.
I will

Te
Te

sequar, Si te secutus sim, sequi cupiebat,

If I

He

TENSES.
Grammar
Questions.
§§ 144, 145.
is

In what tense

the verb
rules.

?

Why %

Rex regit, Legem tulit, Legem tulit, Rex regit, Rex regebat, Legem tulisset,
Diem Diem
perdet, perdiderat, Milltes dorraiverint, Vince iram,

The king

He made a law. He has made a law.
The king is ruling. The king was ruling. He would have made a
law.

He He

will lose a day.

had

lost a

day.
slept.

The soldiers will have Overcome anger.

Dido CarthagTnem condebat, Dido was founding Carthage. Dido Carthaglnem condldit, Dido founded Carthage. May the time come. Tempus veniat,

CONJUGATIONS.
Grammar
§

149.

dicative

Directions. The following table contains the present inand present infinitive of certain Latin verbs the student is thence to determine to which conjugation they belong.
:

Laudo, laudare. Duco, ducere. Compleo, complere.

Vestio, vestire.

Muto, mutare.
Jacio, jacere.

——
23
Punio, punlre. Voco, vocare.
Mitto, mittere.

——— —

Do, dare. Gr. § 149, N. Nutrio, nutrlre.

Moveo, movere.
Fugio, fugere. Floreo, florere. Sero, serere. Invenio, invemre.

Terreo, terrere. Vinco, vincere.
Sto, stare.

Desidero, desiderare.

VERBAL ROOTS.
Grammar
§

150.

The following table contains the first roots of certain regular verbs, from which the student is to form their present and perfect indicative and their former supine. Those which belong to the 2d conjugation, however, add ui and itum, instead of evi and etum, according to the 2d clause of § 150, 3. The figure prefixed denotes the conjugation.
2.
1.

Hab—
Accus—

4.

Erud—
Terr— Ira per— Carp— Moll— Plac— Nunti—

3.

Argu
Fin

2.
1.

4.
1.

4.
3.

2.
1.

Aud— Acu— Tac—
Invit—

Nomin

3. 4.

2.

Mer—
Indu— Nutr— Prob—
JVIon—

3. 4.
1.

2.
1.

4.

Mun—

3.
2.
1.

Ru—

3.
4.

Noc—
Regn

Due— Sc—
Tribu—

2. 3.
4.
1.

3.

Carp— Vest—
Loc

4.

Pun—

3.

Metu—

FIRST ROOT.
Grammar
§

152.

What tenses of the indicative mood, active and passive voices, are formed from the first root 1 of the subjunctive mood in both What mood is wholly formed from the first root in voices'? both voices ? What part of the infinitive in both voices is formed from the first root? What active participle? What passive participle ? What other part of the active voice comes from the

first

root ?

VERBAL TERMINATIONS.
Grammar
:

§

152.

Give the verbal terminations, first in the active voice and then in the passive Of the indicative mood, present tense, in the 1st conjugation. in the 2d. in the 3d. in the 4th.


24

— Of the indicative mood, imperfect tense, in the conjuga— the — the — the — Of the indicative mood, future the conjuga— the 2d.— in the — the — Of the subjunctive mood, present tense, in the conjuga—in the — in the — the 4th — Of the subjunctive mood, imperfect tense, the conju— the 2d.— the 3d —in the — Of the imperative mood, the conjugation. —in the 2d. —in the 3.d.—in the 4th — Of the mood, present conjugain the —in the — the 3d — the 4th — Of the present active conjugation. the in the — the — the — Of the future passive conjugation.— the the in the 2d —in the 3d.— — Of the gerund, the conjugation. — the — the
1st 1st
tion.

in

2d.

in

3d.

in

4th.

tense,

in

tion.
#

in

3d.

in
in

4th.

1st

tion.

2d.

3d.

in

1st

gation.

in

in

4th.

in

1st

infinitive

tense,

1st

tion.

2d.

in

in

2d.

in

3d.

in

participle, in 4th.

1st

in

participle, in 4th.
1st

1st

in

in

2d.

in

3d.— in

the 4th.

SECOND ROOT.
Grammar
In which voice
is
§

152.

Whut parts of the active the 2d root used ? voice are formed from the 2d root ? Give the terminations of the active voice, indicative mood, future perfect tense. perfect tense. pluperfect tense. Of the subjunctive mood, perfect tense. pluperfect tense. of the infinitive perfect.

THIRD ROOT.
Grammar
§

152.

What parts of the active voice are formed from the 3d root? What parts of the passive voice are formed from the 3d roof?
Give the terminations of the masculine forms of the passive of the feminine forms. voice, indicative mood, perfect tense. Of the masculine forms of the passive voice, indicative mood, pluperfect tense. of the feminine forms. Of the masculine forms of the passive voice, indicative mood, future perfect tense. of the feminine forms. Of the masculine foims of the passive voice, subjunctive mood, perfect tense of the feminine forms. Of the masculine forms of the passive voice, subj. mood, pluperfect tense. of the feminine forms. Of the masculine forms of the passive voice, infinitive mood, perfect tense. of the feminine forms.

— — — — —

:

25
Of the masculine, feminine, and neuter forms of the perfect passive participle. of the infinitive future active.— of the future active participle. Give the termination of the future infinitive passive. of the former and latter supines.

EXERCISES ON THE VERBS.
Grammar
Directions.
§§

155-160.

In translating from English into Latin, the auxverb do is a sigh of the present tense, did of the perfect indefinite, unless continued or customary action is spoken of, when it is a sign of the imperfect. These auxiliaries are used,
iliary

principally in interrogations. Latin sentence may be changed from the declarative form to the interrogative by commencing with an or num, or by annexing the enclitic ne to the first word as, audis, thou hearest an audis ? or num audis ? or audisne ? dost thou hear ? The proper force of the auxiliaries may, can, might, couldt would, and should, as connected with the subjunctive, cannot beexpressed in independent clauses, where they imply ability, duty, will, etc. In subjunctive clauses, on the contrary, they denote contingency. In the following sentences, therefore, whenever these auxiliaries occur, the student is to suppose the sentences in which they stand to be dependent clauses separated from the leading clauses on which they properly depend. For example,. " I can lead," if taken as an independent sentence, would be translated ducere possum, but as a contingent clause, connected with some leading verb, it will be translated by the present subjunctive, ducam.

A

;

Vocabulary of verbs
Part
I.

to

be used in the following exercises of
-avi,
-avi,

Laudo, Muto,
Voco,

-are,
-are, -are,
-ere,

-atum,

to praise.
to

atum,
-atum, -etum,

change.

-avi,
-evi,

to call.
to Jill. to

Compleo, Moveo,
Terreo,

-ere,

movi,
terrui,

mdium,
terntum,

move.

-ere,
-ere,
-ere,

to terrify. to lead.
to send.

Duco,
Mitto,
Jacio,

duxi,
misi,
jeci,
-Ivi,
-Ivi, -Ivi,

ductum, missum,
jactum,

-ere,
-Ire,
-Ire, -Ire,

to

throw.

Nutrio,

-Hum,
-Itum,

to nourish'. to

Punio,
Vestio,

punish.

-Hum,

to cloth&

:

;

26
Translate the following English sentences and phrases into Latin

ACTIVE
I praise,

VOICE.
;

thou wilt praise, he was praising we have praised, ye may praise, they have praised do I praise ? I was changing, thou hast changed, he had changed we shall have changed, ye will change, they change hast thou
:

;

:

changed
called,

?
;

thou mayst call, he would, call we might have ye call, they had called would he call? I have filled, thou shouldst have filled, he will have filled; we would have filled, ye fill, they were filling will ye fill ? I have moved, thou mightst move, let him move we may move, ye will have moved, they will move: will they move ? I may terrify, thou wast terrifying, he would have terrified we terrify, ye might terrify, they have terrified does he terrify ? I might lead, lead thou, let him lead we will lead, ye had had ye led? led, they would lead I may have sent, thou wilt have sent, he sends we will send, send ye, they can send wilt thou have sent ? I might have thrown, thou hadst thrown, let him throw; we would throw, ye will throw, let them throw will ye throw ? we I shall have nourished, nourish thou, he was nourishing did we nourish ? nourish, ye were nourishing, they will nourish I punished, thou mayst have punished, he had punished ; we did they should have punished, ye punish, they punished punish? we have I shall clothe, thou shouldst clothe, he clothed clothed, ye will have clothed, they could have clothed did he
I will call,
:
:

;

:

;

:

;

:

:

;

:

:

;

:

clothe

?

I do call, dost thou praise % did he move ? do we send ? we did they punish ? did terrify, (imp.) To praise ; to be about to move, (participle nom.. masc. sing.) ; by sending to lead, (supine,) § 162, 14. to have led; of calling I was about to praise, (part, masc), thou mayst be about to call, (part, fern.), he will be about to lead; we may have been about to throw, (part. masc). ye are about to punish, (part, fern.), they
; ; ;

would have been about

to clothe, (part. neut.).

PASSIVE VOICE.
the following exercises the participles are to be put in the masculine gender unless it is otherwise directed.

Note.

— In

I am praised, thou wast praised, he will be praised ; we may be praised, ye had been praised, tney were praised were they
;

praised

?


27
I was changed, (imp.), thou wilt be changed, he had been changed we would have been changed, ye have been changed, they will be changed wilt thou be changed ? I shall be called, thou wilt have been called, he may be called we would be called, ye are called, they should have been
;
:

;

called
I

shall I be called ? have been filled, thou wilt be shall have been filled, ye may be
:

filled
filled,

let

him be

filled
:

;

we

they are

filled

were
;

they
I

filled

?

had been moved, be thou moved, he will have been moved we were moved, (per/), ye should have been moved, they may be moved: had I been moved? I may be terrified, thou couldst be terrified, he was terrified, (imp.) we would be terrified, ye will be terrified, they were terwere they terrified ? (per/.). rified, (perf.) we I might be led, thou wast led, (imp.), he has been led should have been led, be ye led, they had been led has he been led? I should have been sent, thou art sent, will he be sent? we have been sent, ye might be sent, let them be sent. I would have been thrown, thou mayst be thrown, is he thrown ? we shall be thrown, ye might have been thrown, they
;
:

;

:

are thrown. 1 shall have been nourished, be thou nourished, he was nourished, (imp.) ; we might be nourished, ye had been nourished, will they be nourished ?
I could be punished, thou art punished, he would have been punished; we shall be punished, were ye punished? (perf.), they are punished. I may have been clothed, thou wilt have been clothed, he wT as clothed, (imp.), we had been clothed, can ye be clothed? they might have been clothed. Am I called? art thou moved? is he changed? were ye led? had ye been nourished ? have they been punished ? (perf.) To be praised, to be about to be moved, to have been led sent or being sent, (fart. sing, masc); to be punished, (part, nom. plur. masc), called, (fern sing. ace). I ought to be praised, (masc), thou deservedst to § 162, 15. be called, (fern.), he has deserved to be sent; we may deserve to be praised, (fern.).
;

;

ACTIVE AND PASSIVE VOICES.

They
will
;

will praise, I am changed, ye have been moved, he leads. are terrified, they send, thou wilt
(imp.), I

call

;

we

are filled,

ye

We

be nourished, ye were

punished,

throw; they will have been clothed.

28
Be thou called, he may change, I have praised, I will fill, ye were clothed, (perf.), be ye filled. Let him be praised, I am nourished, thou art clothed, he leads, we shall have been nourished, they will change. We were sent, (imp.), they had been terrified, I lead, he will be filled, we shall have been clothed, I am led. am I sent ? Thou art called, ye might have been nourished, he sends, they fill, we might have been led, did ye call? (imp.). We have been clothed, thou wast praised, thou leadest, let him be sent, lead ye, they should be punished. t may move, they may be filled, he is nourished, thou sendest, we shall have led, ye nourish. Let them be filled, 1 did praise, (perf), have we been terrified, be ye clothed, they might have been sent, we shall
change.
ing,

He would be terrified, I was praising, they have been we have been led, ye will be punished, we had filled.

send-

PARTICLES.
Grammar
§§ 190, 195, 198, 199.

The following English sentences are intended as exercises on the definitions of adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions and interThe questions are What particle or particles do you jections. What kind of particle is find in this sentence % ? (naming it.) Why is it an adverb, etc. ? If an adverb To which class of adverbs does it belong? See Gr. § 191: and, What does it Of what words does it express the modify ? If a preposition What does it connect? and, To relation'? If a conjunction: which class of conjunctions does it belong?
:

:

— —

:

The birds fly swiftly. John writes well. He walks very slowly. James is very sick. The steamer passes swiftly through the waves. war greatly to be dreaded He was equally loved and respected. Virtue is lost neither by shipwreck nor by fire.
!

The

Civil wars are 1 will write to

earth revolves around the sun. most pernicious.

you from Rome.

He

sees, but does not perceive. If the sky falls, we shall catch larks.

I know not whether he will come. He is now here, but will soon go away.

Why

is it cold in winter ? Let Stoics determine, whether pain

is

an

evil.

!!

!

!

29

Fart

II.

NOUNS
Directions.
into Latin
it is

— In

translating the following

English, phrases

to

1st. That of, to be expressed in Latin, not by corresponding particles, but by the termination of the cases of which they are the sign, viz. of by the genitive, to and for by the dative, and by by the ablative. 2d. That from is expressed by a, if the word following it begins with a consonant, but by ab, if it begins with a vowel as
:

be observed, for, to, and by are

from the stars ab insula, from the island. 3d. That with and in are expressed respectively by cum and in with the ablative into, by in with the accusative, and by with the vocative. 4th. That, as the Latin has no articles, a or an and the cannot be expressed in Latin.
a
stellis,
;
;

FIRST DECLENSION.
.

each noun

Translate the following English phrases into Latin, putting into its proper case and number.
In the hall.

Of doves.
For
boats.

Of care.

To

a helmet. Into the island.

O muse

!

With arrows. Of Midas.

By

Comets, nom. the north- wind.

Spears, ace. O nightingales By a machine. Into an abridgment. For a turban. O so n-of- Priam!
Altars, ace.

SECOND DECLENSION.
In the mind. For a shield.

Of a

raven.

A sword,

O

master

ace. In a grove.

Numbers, nom. For gardens. O swans

Of rivers.

From

Into the clouds. the rocks.

Of Bacchus.

O
ace.

boys!

A father-in-law.
Bocks, ace. O defence

For the evening.

"Wild-boars, nom. Into the caves.

By workmen. By war.
For examples.

O

Virgil!

Of sceptres. Of the Greeks.

3*

!

!

30
To
To
the gods.

Lyres. For a sword.
the ravens.

O son! Alpheus. ace. O
shield
fingers.

For the

O

river!

Of the

son.

In the groves. a son-in-law. Into the groves. In the field. Of the fields. To a lord. By gold.

By
To

For

the wind. the fields.

O

sons

In the fields. Into the field. Of a son-in-law. Of the wind.

THIRD DECLENSION.
Flowers. Reeds.

Of reason. With flesh.
In peace.

For a
Trees.

boat.

O

spring.

Of the mouth.
Into the clouds. Of a crown.

For a reward.
the bones. Peace, ace. For a seat. Images.

With

Peacocks.
In order.

To

the Anio. Into the Anio.

To

Apollo. Milk. ace.

O consuls Into the prison. In a prison. From the rivers. A cup. ace.
!

Animals.
In the cup.

Of honey.
Showers,
ace.

Corn. plur.

To Jupiter. To the heart.
Males. Of a vessel. O guests
!

With

strength.

By

Piety, ace. sureties.

Of ducks. Of a bird.
Rest. ace.

From

the fir-trees.

Hostages.

To To To

heirs.

Of brass.
Into the dust. O birds!

Ceres.

the prince. In the dust.

A

helmet, ace.

Romans.
Honors.

For grand-children.
Into the tree. O the times Anvils. For the country. Into the earth.
!

Of keepers. With disgrace.
In safety. Of a crane. fraud. In winter. Of princes.

By

Beams
For the forehead.
Leaves. Of the cuckoo. For an old-man.
In the night.

Voices, ace.

The thumb,
Snows.

ace.

O

kins!

!

31
Into the Tiber. In the sea.

From a seat. Of birds.
For swine.
Into a tower.

With oxen.

*~>

Thirst, ace. In the country.

Of oxen.

Of mountains. Of a cloak.
Lamps, ace. O Orpheus Of speech.
In speech. In the river. Of corn.

A hero.
To

ace.

poetry. Into the air. Into the country. Prisons. Into the cup. O Jupiter!

Hearts.

By

piety.

For the males.

Ducks, ace. For the guests.

By hostages. The fir-trees.
For the beams. Of the voices. From the forehead. From the country. Of the oxen.

By

With lamps.

the birds. Of the helmet. In time. From the leaves. In the earth. Of the night. The heroes, ace. Ceres, ace.

O Romans
For the

!

anvils.

With honor. The prince, ace.
Safety, ace.

In the towers.

FOURTH DECLENSION.
Of a song. In the waves.
Spits, ace.

For a

Into my house. Of a house. Of the knee. By the senate.

chariot. grief! The ice {ace) of winter. For the tribes.

O

For the knees.

The motion of the waves Of the horns.
Armies. By the waves.

The

fruits

of summer.

By

the fruits.

FIFTH DECLENSION.
The common-people,
ace.

Of faith.
For
things.

By
To

days.
ace.

Hopes

Faces.

In the "day. the common-people. O. faith
!

From the face. By my faith.
For
his face.

From

In hope. the common-people. In his face.

By

faith.

!

32
Translate the following Latin nouns into English
Aulae. gen.
Curat.
:

In galeam.

In insulis.

O

musae

Machinae. dat.

Ab

aris.

Columbarum.
Lusciniae. dat. Midae. dat.

A

cymba.

Hastse. gen.

Epitomes. Priamlden. Anlmi. gen. Gladiorum.

Sagittas. Tiarae. gen.

Borea.

Epitoinen.

Corvorum. Domini, voc.
In
fluviis.

Clypeo. dat.
In lucis. Horto. dat. Scopuli. voc.

Numerorum.
Nimbos. Puerorum.
In antris.

Cycnum.
Socero. dat. Bellorum.
Praesidio. dat.

Apros.

A saxis.
Sceptri.

Exempla.
Virgilii.

Danaum.
Barbita.

Gr. $ 53.

A

diis.

Ofilii!
Floris.

nom.

Deorum.

Carni. Ab arbSre. In ossa.

Rationes. In lintribus.

Cum arundlne.
Veris. Ab ejus ore. In pace.

Mercedem.
In nubibus. In sedilibus.

Diademati. Imaginis. In Aniene.
In domum. In carceribus. Imbris.

Ordlnum.

Pavones. Apollinem.
Animali. dat. In vere. In flumine.
Farris.

A

consulibus.
melle.

In Anienem.

Cum

Crateris.

Jovem.
Pietate.

Roboris.

In

meo

corde.

Marem.
Anates.
Quietis. In pulvere.

Vadlbus. dat.

Vasa.
Alitibus.

Heredum.
Quiritium. Cantu.
In luctu. Plebis.

Cum

nepote.

Cum hospilibus Obsldis. Casside. Ab arboribus.

Curms.

A

Cum veriibus.
Fidem.

fluctibus. In mea domo. Faciei, gen.

ADJECTIVES AND NOUNS
To be
translated into Latin
:

A
O

good boy. nom.
a high rock.
ace.

Of faithful
With
a
full

friends.

Of avaricious men.

For kind mothers.
hand.

From
With

A rough beard,
ill

A

full

wretched fortune
health.

Of tender

voice, nom. grass.
ace.

Sacred temples,

Another time. ace. Penelope alone. nor> To each pole.

No letter, nom. Of any fountain.
Other books, nom.

!

!

33
Sharp vinegar.

A

celebrated

monument.
nom.

Woody

places, In a short time.

Of a cheerful mind. In a healthy place. By a winged dove.
Cruel tyrants, ace. O brave breasts

Sweet fields. With a heavy burden.
In deeper water. A more cruel war. In happier ages.

Daring deeds. the huge Cyclops Dull weapons. From more capacious cups. A more cruel mind. ace. With a very loud voice. A very celebrated event, nom. Most magnificent gifts.

To

Of all men. Of a shorter life. To sweeter fountains. With many words. Happy men. Of the cunning Ulysses.
In rich
fields.

With

better fortune.

Dearest friends, ace O most merciful judge Of a milder punishment. In very difficult times. In a very r igh place. A very worthless man. nom.
!

To be
Bone puer
Altas rupes.

translated into English
Fid is amicis. dat.

Plenas manus.

Benignse matri. Asperam barbam. Miseras fortunae gen. iEgrae valetudinis.
Alii tempori. Penelope solas, dot.

Avaro homlni.
Libera voce.

A tenero

gramme.
dat.

Sacro templo.

Utriusque

poli.

Nulla? literas. nom. In ullo fonte. Alterorum librdrum.

Acris aceti. Celebris monumenti.
In silvestn loco.

Alacrcs animi. Salubria loca.
In silvestrem locum.

Breve tempus.
In dulci arvo.

Fortium pectorum.
Gravia onera.
In altiorem aquam. Crudelioris belli.

Volucris columbae. In dulcia arva. Cum forti peclore.

Omnes homines.
Breviores
vilae.

Dulcion fonti. Felciora saecula.
Feliclbus
viris.

In crudelissimo bello. In dulcem fontem. multis verbis.

Cum

dat.

Hebetlbus

telis.

abl.

A

In divlte agro. Cum caris amicis. Capacis scyphi. crudeli animo.

A

divitibus agris.

Carissimo amlco. dat.
In capacisslmis scyphis.

A crudelissimo
!

tyranno.

O clementissimi judlces Cum voce altisslma
Cum
donis magnificis. In superiorem locum. Cum bona forluna.

Vox
In

alta
difficiliore.

Celeberrimae res.

In temporibus difficillimis.

tempore

Dona magnificentisslma. In summis locis.
Acri aceto abl. Dulcisslme amice.

Dulce mel.

— —
!

34

PRONOUNS.
Translate into Latin
:

Of me. From me. To themselves.
Itself.

With thee. Of us. From themselves. From herself.
For himself.

For me.

To

him.
this

With
man.

her.
that

To

From

woman.

In those places. Into the same places. In the same war. To whom. sing. Of whom. fern. plur. From which, plur. ? rnasc. sing.

With, these books.

To the same friend. From the same field. For whom. plur.
With whom.
phir.

Who

To some-one.
For each boy.

What man ? nom. To what woman? From some-one. masc. From each girl.
:

Translate into English
Mihi.
Tibi.

Nobis.

Nos. nom.
Sibi. dat. plur. Illi. dat. fern.

Vos. ace.

Nos
R.
4.

ace.

Secum.

plur. § 133.

A te.
Vestrum.

Ab

illis.

Illi

homini.
crudelia bella.

Huic femTnae.

Hanc matrem.
Ilia

Hos
Isti

patres.

Illorum temporum.

Jstarum rerum.
Istius veris.

In iis locis. In easdem aulas. Ipsa puella.

homines. Ab eo monte. In ea loca.

Eidem matri. In eundem fluvium.

Ipsorum hominum. Cui hormni?

Cum
O
mi

diis ipsis.

Quarum
fili

rerum.

Cum
In

illo

viro.

Ab eodem Ab

loco.

Istis pueris. dat.

eandem partem.
his regnis. istoc sene.

Cum
Istis

Cum

In hac palude. iis amicis. In eadem loca.

Istos mores.

morlbus.


35

VERBS
SUM AND
We are.
Ye will be. Thou hast been. They had been.
have been. He was. Thou wouldst be.
I shall

ITS

COMPOUNDS.
:

Translate into Latin

He would

be.

They may be. She may have been.

We would have been.
Be To To
I

ye.

be about to be.
profit.

Thou

canst. I may be able.

have been able. To have been able.

FIRST CONJUGATION.
He
I

accuses.

was building. Thou hast ploughed. They had condemned.

I may be invited. Thou hast been praised.

I shall

be

freed.

We shall have wandered.
Ye might have

We are reconciled.
Let them be slain. About to be sacrificed, masc. sing I had tamed. To have washed. We shall have been surrounded.
It

dwelt. has given. Thou mightst have helped.

He

They have been killed. They have stood. Ye may have forbidden. It may be folded. Thou abhorrest.

thunders.

We had drunk.
Thou hast been tamed. He was flattering.

He

has despised.

We

had helped.

Ye will dislike. I may endeavor. He may have delayed.
Rejoice ye.

They will have accompanied. Thou wouldst blame.

We

To be

might have ruled. about to buy. fern.

I restrained.

SECOND CONJUGATION. We may want.
Ye might flourish. They may have had. Ye will have blotted-out.

Thou wast

coveting.

He
I

had grieved. have dared.

Thou wilt increase. Beware thou.
have been taught. Thou hadst been moved.
I

Ye were favoring. They will weep.

We shall be

held.

He
It
It

will be soothed.

Ye are admonished. They may have been
It

seen.

pleased.

It

may be clear. may have behooved.
declared.

I was fearing. Thou hast confessed.

We may deserve.

has been lawful. behooved, per/. May it be lawful.
It

He

Ye would pity. They would have promised.

36

THIRD CONJUGATION.
I

have driven.
nourishest.

We shall drink.
Ye will have fallen. They were singing.

Thou

had strangled. 1 had taken. Thou wast plucking.
has yielded. Shall I consult? Dost thou believe Could he desire?

He He

We

might decree.

Ye may have girded. They would have shut. Have we lived ?
Could ye have said
? ?

?

Lead thou. Say thou.

Can they have learned Let them feign.
Flee ye.

Do

thou.

To strike To have joined. To be about to hurt.
had been sought. Thou hast been ruled. He had been loosed.
I I was led. Thou hast been taken. She might have been sent. I was growing young. Thou hast grown old. He may have fallen asleep.
I

Let them cast. To be loved. To have been left.
be placed. despised. Ye will be taken away. They will have been beaten. Thou mayst be destroyed. They have been deceived.
to

To

We

be about

may have been

Ye may have been known.

We should

have become
dull.

silent.

Ye will grow rich They would grow

have obtained.
angry. will have spoken.

We should

have obtained.
forgotten.

Thou mayst be

He

Ye may have They suffer.

FOURTH CONJUGATION.
I was sleeping. Thou art mad.

We will
foolishly.

finish.

He
I

had kept have drawn.

Ye will have served. They have instructed,

We should
Bind ye.

have

felt.

Thou speakest

Ye would come.

He may
I

have obeyed. have been kept
instructed.
is

We
We

may

be crowned

Thou wast

Ye would have been bound.
Let them be punished.

He
I

entangled.
tried.

have been Haltering.
had
wilt assent.

They may have
Ye would

led.

He

should have begun.
obtain.

Thou

IRREGULAR VERBS.
I

may

wish.

We

shall

be unwilling.

Thou hadst wished. He was wishing.

To

bear.

Ye are more willing. To have been more willii To be about to bear,

Bear thou.

To have

borne.
neut.

Made, liom.plar.

To To

Borne. be borne. be about to be made.

37
About
Going,
to

be made. nam. sins- fern.
masc.

To have been made.
ace. sing.

Let them be made. It had been made.
1

was going.
went.

Of going.

We
Say

He goes. I shall hate.
To
hate.

Ye may go. Ye remember. They were saying.
thou.

We

began.

Translate into English :Eris.

Sumus.
Sitis.

Fuit.

Fuerunt.
Estis.

Fuero.

Essen t.
Este. Fore. Prosunt. Potui.

Essemus.
Futura esse.
Profuit.

Esto. 2dpers.

Fuissemus.
Prodest.
Prosint.

Possumus.
Accusant.

Foret Prodessem. Poteramus.

Posse.

JEd if icant.
Errabam.
Laudabitur. Mactabant.

A rat.
Habitabit.

Damnaverunt
Jnvitabit.

Liberata es.
Sacrificabit.

Conciliati

sumus.

Dederunt. Lavant.
Steterant. Potavit.

Domui.
Necabantur. Tonant. Domuit.
Adulatur. Aversantur. Criminabaris. Laelatus est.

Juvatura es. Circumdatus.
Vetuit. Plicabat.

Abominantur.
Auxiliamur.

Aspernaris.

Comitamlni.
Cunctatur.
Laetati essemus.

Conemur.
Dominabitur.
Coerceor.

Avemus.
Floruerunt.

Egebamus. Ausa es.
Delebit.

Auxerunt.
Favete.

Doluere. Habuissent. Cavebant.
Flerunt. § 162. 7 Mulcebit.

Doclse eratis. Tenentur. Veremini.
Acti erant. Biberunt. Cadcre. inf. Canis. Ceperunt. Cesserunt. Cincta est. Clausae sunt.
Credidit.

Moti sunt. Admoneris.
Confitebaris.
AlTtis.

Visa

erat.

Professi erant.

Angor.
Bibisse.

Bibite.

Cadentem.
Ceclnit.

Casus.

Canendo.
Capient.

Capienda. Cedentes.
Cingeretur.

Cedam.
Cinxere. Clauduntur. Credidimus. Cupientes. Dicebatur.

Claudenda.
Credite.

Cupis. Dictu.

Ducerentur. Faciam. Fingens.
Jactus.

Cuperent. Die. Duxit. Fac.
Finxit.
Jecit.

Due.
Fecit.

Finguntur.
Jacere.

Junge.

JungSbat.

Jungunt.

38
Quaerendo.
Juvenescit.

Quae rant.
Juvenuit.
Conticuit. Adipiscendi.g-er.

Qusesitiirus.

Senesdmus.
Conticuissent Adepti.

Conticescam.
Adipiscantur.

Loquuntur.
Oblita est.

Locuta

est.

Passi sunt.
Custodiant.

Loquentes. Nactus sum.
Finivit.

Dormiunt.
Servivisti.

Servirem.

Hauriuntur.

HausTmus.
Obedientera. Venire. Punlto.
Voluisti.

Obediebam.
Venisse.
Puniit. Vis.

Servissem. Hauserant. Obediturus.
Vinxerit. Vinciatur.
Velis. Nolite.

Nolumus.
Ferimini. ind.
Fit.

Malunt. Latus sim.

Latum

iri.

Factum
Ibifmus.
Coepisti.

est.

Faciendus.
Ivero. lnquiunt.

Ibat.

Oderunt.

ENGLISH VOCABULARY.

EXPLANATION OF ABBREVIATIONS.
a
adj
active. adjective.

w. or neut.. neuter.

adv
c

adverb.

gender. dep. ... deponent. os fern. ...feminine. f.

common

num. part pass
per/.

numeral.
participle.

passive.
perfect. plural.

imp

imperfect.

plur prep

preposition.

impers
irr

impersonal.
irregular.

pron
« sing.
. .

pronoun.
.substantive. singular.

m. or masc... masculine.
Gr.

Andrews and Stoddard's Grammar.

A

or an, see p. 29, note 4th.
v. a.,

Anvil,

s.,

incus,

xidls.

Abhor,
Gr.

abominor,
n.,

dri.

Any,

adj., ullus, a,
s.,

um.

Gr. § 107.

Able, (to be), v.
§ 154,

possum, posse.
fore

Apollo,

Apollo, biis.

R.

6.

Are, see sum.

About

to be,

see

sum and
es.

:

and
§ 45.

Army,

s.,

exercitus, us.

Gr. §§ 153, 154, 3. Abridgment, s., epitome,

Arrow,
Gr.

s.,

sagitta, a.

Art, v. n., see

sum.
Iri.

Accompany,
Accuse,

v. a., eomxtor, dri.

Assent, v. n., assentior,

v. a., accuso, are.
,

Avaricious, adj., avdrus, a,
ere.

w».

Admonish, v a admoneo, Age, s., seculum, i.
Air,
5.,

B.

aer, aeris.

Bacchus,
Be,
v.

s.,

Liber, eri.

All, adj.,

omnis,
,

e.

n
s

,

see sum.
trabs. trabis.

Alone, adj

solus, a,

um. Gr.
i.

§ 107.

Beam,
Beard,
Beat,

,

Alpheus,
Altar,
s. f

s.,

Alpkeos,
<z.

Gr.

§

54.

Bear, v.

a., fero, ferre.

Gr. § 179.

am,

s.,

barba,
,

ce.

Am, see sum. Angry, (to be), v n irascor, Animal, s., animal, dlis.
.

v.

a

tundo, ere.

,

i.

Become
Begin,
§ 107,
§

silent, v. n., conticesco, 2re.

Been, see sum.
v. a-, ordior, Iri,

Anio,

s.,

the river Anio, inis.
,

or capi.

Gr.

Another, adj

alius, a, ltd.

Gr.

183.
a., credo, ere.

Rem

1.

Believe, v.

40
Better, adj., melior. Gr.
§ 125, 5.

Consul,

s.,

consid, ulis.

Beware,
Bind, v.
Bird,
s.,

v. n., caveo, ere.
a., vincio, ire.

Consult, v.

a

,

consulo, ere.

Corn,
is.

s.,

far,
s.,

farris.
aveo, ere.

ales, itis, v. a.,

or avis,

Country,
Covet, v.

rus, ruris.

Blame,
Boat,

crimhior, dri.

a.,

Blot-out, v.

a., deleo, ere.

Crane,
ce.

s.,

grus, gruis.

s., linter, tris,

or cymba,

Book, s., liber, bri. Bone, s., os, ossis. Boy, 5., puer, iri.
Brass,
s.,

Crown, Crown,

v. a., redimio, Ire.
s.,

diadema,

dtis.
e.

Cruel, adj., crudelis,
.<?.,

as,

ceris.

Brave,
Breast,
Build,

adj., fortis, e.
s.,

Cuckoo, coccyx, ygis. Cunning, adj., solers, tis. Cup, s., crater, eris, or scyphus,
Cyclops,
s.,

i.

pectus, oris.
cedifico, are.

Cyclops, opis.

v. a. t

Burden, s., onus, iris. Buy, v. a., mercor, dri.

D.
in

By, prep., a sign of the ablative
Latin. Gr.
§ 37.

Dare, v.

n.,

audeo, ere.

Daring, adj., audax, dcis.

Day,
C.
Call, v. a., voco, are.

s.,

dies, ii.

Dear,

adj., carus, a,

um.

Deceive,

v. a., /alio, ere.
a., projiteor, eri.

Declare, v.
§ 154,

Can,

v. n.,

possum, posse. Gr.
ce.

Decree,

v. a.,

cerno, ere.

R.6.
Care,
s.,

cura,

Capacious,
Cast, v.
a.,

adj.,

capax, dcis.

acinus, oris. Deed, s., f Deep, adj altus, a, um. Defence, s., prasidium, ii.
,

jacio, ere.
i.

Delay,

v. n., cunctor, dri.

Cave,

*.,

antrum,

Deserve,
bris, bre.

v. a., meteor, eri.
a.,

Celebrated, adj., celiber,

Desire, v.

cupio, ere.

Ceres,

s.,

Ceres, eris.

Despise, v

a.,

spenw,

ere,

or asper-

Certain- one,
$

pron.,

quidam.
are.

Gr.

nor, dri.

13S, 5.
v.
,

Destroy, v.

a.,

perdo, ire.

Change,

a muto,
,

Difficult, adj., difficilis, e.

Chariot, s

currus, Us.
eris, ere.

Disgrace,

s.,

dedecus, oris.

Cheerful, adj., aldcer,

Dislike, w. a., aversor, dri.

Cloak,

s.,

chlamys, ydis.
a., vestio, Ire.

Clothe, v.

Do, v. Dove,
i.

a.,
s.,

jacio, ere.

columba,

ce.

Cloud,

s.,

nubis,

is,

or nimbus,

Draw,

v. a.,

haurio,

ire.

Come,

v. n., venio, Ire.

Drink, v.

a., bibo, ire,
,

or poto, are.

Comet, s., comites, ce. Gr. § 45. Common-people, s plebs, plebis. Condemn, v. a damno, are.
,

Drive, v. a

ago,

ire.

Duck,
Dust,

s.,

anas, anatis.
,

,

Dull, adj
s.,

hebes, itis.

Confess,

v. a., confiteor, eri,

or profi-

pidvis, iris.

teor, eri.

Dwell,

v.

n

,

hablto, are.

41
Friend,
*.,

amicus,

i.

Each,
§

From,
adj.,
:

prep.,

uterque, utriusque.

a or
its.

ab.

Gr.

Gr. § 195,

R.

2.

Frost, s.,gelu,

107

or umisquisque. Gr.

§ 138, 4.

Earth,

Full, adj., plenus, a,

um.

s., tellus, itris.

Endeavor,

v. n., conor, dri.

Entangle, v. a., impedio, ire. Evening, s., vesper, eris or eri.

G.
Garden,
Gift,
s., s.,

hortus,
i.

i.

Event,

n., res, rei.
s.,

donum,
a.,

Example,

exemphim,
F.

i.

Gird, v.

cingo, ere.

Give, v.

a., do, dare.

Go,

v. n., eo, ire.

Gr.

§ 1S2.

Face,

s.,
,

facies,

ei.

God, s., deus, i. Good, adj., bonus,
Grandchild,
s.,

a, itm.

Faith, s

fides, ei.

nepos, otis.

Faithful, adj., fidus, a,
Fall, v. n., cado, ere.

um.

Grass,

s.,

Greeks,
Grief,
s.,

s.,

gramen, hits. Danai, drum or um.
ere.

Fall-asleep, v. n., abdormisco, ere.

luctus, us.

Father-in-law,

s.,

socer, 2ri.

Grieve, v. n., doleo,

Favor, v. n.,faveo, ere. Fear, v. a. vereor, eri.
,

Grove, s., lucus, i. Grow-dull, v. n., hebesco,

ere.

Feel, v.

a

,

sentio, ire.

Grow-old,

v. n., senesco, ere.
v. n., ditesco, ere. v. n.,

Feign,

v. a.,

Jingo,

ere.

Grow-rich,
Guest,

Flatter, v.
iri.

a.,

adulor, dri, or blandior,

Grow-young,
s. }

juvenesco,

ere.

hospeSf Uis.

Flee, v. n., fugio,

ere.

Flesh,

s.,

caro, camis.

Flourish, v. n., floreo, ere.

H.
Hall,
i.

Flower,
Field,
s.,

s.,

flos, floris.

s.,

aula,

ce.

ager, gri, or arvttm,

Fill, v. a.,

compleo, ere.
ire.

Hand, s., manus, us. Happy, adj., felix, icis.
Hate,
v. a., odi.

Finish, v. a., finio,
Fir-tree,
s.,

Gr.

\

183.

abies, etis.

Have,

v. a., habeo, ere.
s.,

Fold, v.

a., plico, are.

Health,

valetudo, inis.
bre.

For, prep., a sign
Latin. Gr. $ 37.

of the dative in

Healthy, adj., saluhris,
Heart,
s.,

cor, cordis.

Forbid, v.

a., veto, are.

Heavy,
Heir,
s.,

adj., gravis, e.

Force,

s.,

vis, vis.
s.,
,

heres, edis.
s.,

Forehead,
Fortune,

frons,

tis.
i.

Helmet,
Help,

cassis, idis, or galea,

as.

Forget, v. a
s.,

obliviscor,
ce.

v. a., auxilio'-, dri,
ille.

or juvo, are.

fortuna,
fons,

Her, see hie and

Fountain,

s.,

tis.

Hero,
High,
a,

s,

heros, dis.

Fraud,
Free, Free,

s.,

fraas.

dis.

Herself, pron., see sui

and

ipse.

adj., liber, era,

erum.
4*

adj., altus, a,

um, or

stipencs,

v. a., libero, are.

um.

42
Him,
pron., see hie

and Me.
ire.

Knee,

s.,

genu,

us.

Himself, pron., see sui and ipse.

Know,

v. a.,

cognosco, ere.

Hinder,

v. a.,

impedio,
is.

His, pron., ejus, see

L.

Hold,

v. a., teneo, ere.
s.,
s.,

Home,

domus,

Lamp,
Lead,
Leaf,

s.,

lampas, adis.
duco, ere.

us.
v. a.,
s.,

Honey,

mel, mellis.

Honor, s., honos, oris. Hope, s., spes, ei.
Hostage,
s.,

frons, frondis.

Learn,

v. a., disco, ere. v. a., relinquo, ere.
$ 138.

Leave,
obses, idis.
i.

House, s., domus, us or Huge, adj., ingens, tis.
Hurt,
v. a., Icedo, ere.

Lest-any, pron., nequis. Gr.
Letter,
s., litira, ce.

Lie, v. n., mentior,
Life,
I.

iri.

s.,

vita, ce.
ire,

Live, v. n., vivo,

or dego,

ere.

Loose,
If-any-one, pron., siquis. Gr.
Ill,

v. n., solvo, ere.

§ 138.

adj., ceger, gra,
s.,

grum.

Loud, Love,
Lyre,

adj., altus, a,

um.
Gr.
$ 54.

v. a., diligo, ire.
s.,

Image,

imago,
,

hiis.

barbiton,

i.

In, prep., in.

Increase, v.

a.,

augeo,

ere.

M.
Machine,
s.,

Instruct, v. a., erudio, Ire.
Into, prep., in.
Invite, v. a., invito, are.
Is, v. n.,

machina,

ce.

Mad, (to be), v. n., insanio, ire. Made, (to be), v. pass., fio, eri.
Magnificent, adj., magnificus, a, um.
*
,

see sum.
insula,
ce.

Island,
It

s.,

behooves,
It

v. impers., oportet.

clear, liquet.

Male,
It is

s.,

mas, maris.

It

is

lawful,
It

licet.

pleases,

libet.

Man, s., homo, inis, or vir, i. Many, adj., multus, a, um.
Master,
s.,

repents, pee-

dominus,

i.

nitet.
Itself,

Me, pron., me, see
Midas,
J.
s.,

ego.
tis.

pron., see sui and ipse.

Merciful, adj., clemens,

Midas,

ce.
e.

Gr.

$ 45.

Mild, adj., mitis, Milk,

Join, v. a.,

jtmgo,
judex,

ire.

s., lac, lactis. s.,

Judge,

*.,

lets..

Mind,
Gr.
§ 71.

animus,
5.,

i.
i.

Jupiter,

s.,

Jupiter, Jovis.

Monument,
More, and
§ 110.
s.,

monumentum,
Gr.
§

adj., plus, pluris.

125, 5,

K.

Mother,

mater,
s.,

tris.
tis.

Keep, v. a., custodio, ire. Keeper, s., custos, odis. neco, are. Kill, v. a Kind, adj., benignus, a, um.
,

Mountain,

mons,

Mouth,

s.,

os, oris.

King,

s.,

rex, regis.

Move, v4 a., moveo, ire. Muse, s., musa, ce. My, pron., meus, a, um.

43
N.
Night,
s.,

Punish,

v. a.,

punio,
s
,

ire.
ce.

Punishment,
nox, noctis.
s.,

pana,
R.

Nightingale,

luscinia,

ce.

No,

adj., nullus, a, zim.
s.,

North- wind, Nourish, v.

Boreas,

ce.

Gr.

$ 45.
ire.

a., alo, ere,

or nutrio,

Raven, s., corvus, i. Reason, *., ratio, onis.
Reconcile,
v. a.,

Num,
tion.

interrog. adv., denotes a ques-

concilia, are.
\nis.

See
s.,

p. 25.

Reed,
i.

s.,

arundo,

Number,

numerus,
0.

Rejoice,

v. n., lector, dri. v. a.,

Retnember,
Rest,
s.,

memini. Gr.

§

183.

quies, itis.
a., coirceo, ire.

Restrain, v.

0!

inter j.,

0/
a., adipiscor,
i. i,

Reward,
potior,
iri,

s.,

merces, idis.
itis.
ii,

Obey,

v. a., obedio, ire.

Rich, adj., dives,
River,
s.,

Obtain, v.

Jluvius,

or flumen, xnis.
scopulus,
i,

or nanciscor,
Of,
prep., a
S 37.
,

sign of the

genitive.

Rock, s., rupes, saxum, i.

is,

or

Gr.

Roman,
senex, senis.

s

,

Quiris,

itis.

Old- man, s

Rough,
Rule,

adj., asper, era,

erum.
dominor,
dri.

Order,

s.,

ordo, xnis.
s.,

v. a., rego, ere, or

Orpheus,

Orpheus,
alter, era,

i.

Other, adj.,

irum.

S.

Ox,

*.,

bos, bovis.

Sacred, adj., sacer, era, crum.
P.
Sacrifice, v. a., sacrifico, are.

Safety, s

,

solus, utis.
§ 134,

Peace,

s.,

pax, pads.
s.,

Same,
Say,
es.

pron., idem. Gr.

R.

6.

Peacock,
Piety,
s.,

pavo, onis.
Penelope, Gr.
§ 44.

v. a., dico, ere, aio,
§ 183.
s.,

or inquam.

Penelope,

s.,

Gr.

pietas, dtis.
iri.
§

Sceptre,

sceptrum,
is.

i.

Pity, v. a., misereor,

Sea,
92, 2.

s.,
s.,

mare,
a

Place,

s.,

locus,
a.,

i.

Gr.
ere.

Seat,

sedile, is.
,

Place, v.

pono,

See,

v.

video, ire.

Plough,
Pluck,
Poetry,
Pole,

v. a., aro, are.

Seek,

v. a., qucero, ere. s
,

v. a., earpo, ire.
s.,

Senate,

sendtus, us.
mitto, ere, or jacio, ere.

poisis,
i.

is.

Send,
Sharp,
Gr.
§ 178, 3,

v. a.,

*.,

pokes,
,

Serve, v
Shield,

a., servio, ire.

Praise, v. a

laudo, are.

adj., acer, cris, ere.
s.,

Prefer, v. a

,

malo, malle.

clypeus,

i.

Prince,
Prison,

s., s.,

princeps, xpis.
career, eris.

Short, adj., brevis,

e.

Shower,
Gr.

s

,

imber, bris.
i.

Profit, v. a.,
§ 154, 5.

prosum, prodesse.
polliceor, iri.

Shrub,
Shut,

s.,

virgultum,

v. a.,
a.,

claudo, ere.

Promise,

v.

a

,

Sing, v.

cano,

ere.

44
Slay, v.
a.,

macto, are.

Tiber,

s.,

Tiberis, is.

Sleep,

v. n.,
s.,

dormio,

're.

Time,

s.,

tempus,

oris.

Snow,

nix, nivis.
n.,

To, prep., a sign of
ere.

the

dative.

Soothe, v.

mulceoy

Some-one, pron.,
Son,
s.,

aliquis. Gr, § 13S.

Gr. § 37. Tooth, s ., dens,

tis.

Jilius,

ii.

Tower,
Priamldes.
Gr.

*.,

turris, is.

Son-of-Priam,
$ 145.

s.,

Tree,

s.,
,

arbos, oris.
tribus, us.
,

Tribe, 5
cantus, us.

Song,

s.,

Sought, see seek. Speak, v. a., loquor,
Spear,
Spit,

a experior, Iri. Turban, s., tiaras, ce. Gr.
Try,
v.
i.

§ 45.

Tyrant,
Ire.

s.,

tyrannus^

i.

Speak-foolishly, v. a., effiUio,
s.,

hasta,

ce.

V.
Ulysses,
*.,

s.,

veru, us.
s.,

Spring,

ver, veris.

JJlixes, is.

Stand,

v. n., sto, are.
,

Unwilling, (to be), ».»., nolo, nolle.
Gr. § 178, 2.

Strangle, v. a

ango, he.

Strength,

s.,

robur, oris.

Us, pron., see ego.

Strike, v. a., ico, he.
Suffer, v. a., patior,
i.

Surety,

s.,

vas, vadis.

Surround,

Vessel,
v. a.,

s.,

vas, vasis.

circumdo, are.

Swan,

Vinegar,
i.

s.,

acetum,

i.

s.,

cycnus,

Virgil,

s.,
s.,

Virgilius,

ii.

Sweet, adj., dulcis, e. Swine, s., sits, suis. Sword, s., gladius, ii.
T.

Voice,

vox, vocis.

W.
Wander, v. n., erro, are. Want, v. n egeo, ire. War, 5., bellurn, i. Was, v. n., see sum. Wash, v. a., lavo, are.
,

Take,

v.

a

,

capio, ere.
ire.

Take away, t>. a., sustollo, Tame, v. a., domo, are.
Teach, v. a., doceo, ere. Temple, s., templum, i.
Tender,
adj., tener, era,
a., terreo, ere.

Water,
erum.

s.,

aqua,

ce.

Terrify v.

The, see p. 29, note 4th. Thee, pron., see tu. Them, pron., see Me, hie, and is. Themselves, pron., see sui and ipse.
Thing,
Thirst,
*.,
5.,

Wave, s., fluctus, i. Weapon, s., telwn, i. Weep, v. n., fieo, ere.
Were, v
».,

see sum.

What?

pron., see quis.

Whom,
§ 137.

pron

,

see qui.
pron., quicumque. Gr.

res, rei.

Whomsoever,
istic.

skis,

is.

This, pron., hie, or

Wild-boar,
Gr.

n., aper,pri.

Thumb,

s.,

pollex, icis.

Willing, (to be),
§ 178, 1.

v.

n,

volo,

velle.

Thunder,

v. «., tono, are.

45
Winged,
Winter,
adj., volucer, cris, ere.
*.,

Workman,
Worthless,

5.,

faber,

bri. §

hiems, emis.
§ 178, 1.

adj.,

nequam. Gr.

125, 5.

Wish, v. n., volo, velle. Gr. With, prep., cum.

Wretched,

adj., miser, era,

erum.

Woody,
Word,

adj., silvestris, e.

Y.
Yield, v.
it .,

s. }

verbum,

i.

cedo, ere.

LATIN VOCABULARY.

A or ab, prep., from.
Abominor,
Abies,
Aeeipiter,
elis, fi,

Gr. § 195, R. 2.
abhor.

An, interrogative adverb.
a question, but
lated.
is

It

denotes

ari, v. dep., to

not lo be trans-

tris,

a fir-tree. m., a hawk.
sharp.

Accuso, are,
Acer,

v. a., to acctcse.

Anas, anatis, f, a duck. Anceps, Jpitis, adj., doubtful.
is, n., a shield. Ango, ere, v. a., to strangle. Animal, alis, n., an animal. Animus, i, m., the mind.

cris, ere, adj..
i,

Anclle,

Acetum,

n.,
i,

vinegar.

Adipiscor,

v. dep., to obtain.

Admoneo,
Adulor,

ere, v. a., to

admonish.

ari, v. dep., to flatter.

Anio, en is, m., the river Anio.

jEdes,

is,

JEdif ico,

/, a temple. are, v. a, to build.
adj.,
air.
ill.

Antrum,
Aper,

i,

».,

pri, m.,
icis,

JEger, gra, grurn,
Aer, aeris, m., the

Apex,

m

a cave. a wild-boar. the summit.
,

Apollo, Inis, m., Apollo.
Aprilis,
is,

JE.s, aeris, n., brass.

m., April.

Ager,

gri,

m., a field.

Aqua,
Ara,

ae,

f, water.

Agrnen,

inis, ».,

a

train.

Aquilo, onis, m., the north wind.
ae, /.,

Ago,
Aio,

ere, v. a., to drive.
v. defect., to say.

an

altar.

Gr. § 183.
bird.

Alacer,cris, ere, adj., active, cheerful.

/, a tree. Arundo, inis, /, a reed.
Arbos,
oris,

Ales,

itis,

m. and/, a

Aro, are,

v. a., to

plough.

Aliquis, pron. Gr. § 138,

Alius, a, ud, adj.

some one. Gr. % 107, R.

Arvum,
1,

i,

n., a field.

Asper, era, erum, adj., rough.
Aspernor,
ari, v. dep., to despise.
Iri,

another.

Alo, ere, v.

a., to

nourish.

Assentior,

v. dep., to assent.
,

Alpheos,
Altus, a,

i,

m

,

the river Alpheus.
adj., other.
:

Ater, tra, tram, adj

black.

Alter, era,

£rum,

Atrium,

ii,

n.,

an
,

entry.

um,

adj., high, deep

— of the

voice, loud.

Ambo,

je, o, adj.
i,

Gr

§ 118, 1, both.

Auceps, ciipis, m., a fowler. Audax, acis, adj daring. Audeo, ere, v. neut. pass. Gr.

\

142,

Amicus,

m., a friend.

R.

2, to dare. ire, v. a., to

Amicus,

a,

um,

adj., friendly.

Audio,

hear.

47
Augeo,
Aula,
ere, v. a., to increase.

Chlamys, yd is, /, a
Cingo, ere,
Cinis, eris, m.

cloak.

ae, /.,
tri,

a hall.
m., the south wind.

v. a., to gird.

Auster,

and/,

ashes,

Auxilior,

ari, v. dep., to help.

Circumdo,
Classis,

are, v. a., to surround.

Avarus,

a, urn, adj.,

avaricious.

Clades, is,/, slaughter.
is,

Aveo,
Avis,

ere, v. a., to covet.
ari, v. dep., to dislike.

/, a

fleet.

Aversor,
is,
i,

Claudo, ere,

v. a., to shut. adj., mercifid.

f, a

bird.

Clemens,
Cliens,

tis,

Avus,

m.. a grandfather.

tis,
i,

m., a client.

Clypeus,

m.,

a

shield.

B.
Barba,
ae.,

Coccyx, ygis, m., a cuckoo.
Coepi, v. defective, to begin.

f,
i.,

the beard.

Barbiton,

n. Gr. § 54,

a

Co6rceo, ere,
lyre.

v. a., to restrain.

Bellum,

i,

n.,
a,

war.

Benignus,

um,

adj., kind.

Bibo, ere, v. n., to drink.
Bipes, edis, adj., two footed.
Blandior,
iri,

v. a., to know. Columba, as, /., a dove. Comes, itis, c, a companion. Cometes, ae, m., a comet. Comitor, ari, v. dep., to accompany.

Cognosco, ere,

v. dep., to flatter.
adj.,

Bonus,
Boreas,

a,

um,

Compleo,

ere, v. a., to fill.
otis, adj.,

good.

Compos,
Concors,

participating

i?i.

ae,

m., the north wind.

Concilio, are, v.

a., to reconcile.

Bos, bovis, c, an ox or cow.
Brevis, e, adj., short.

dis, adj.,

concordant.
confess.

Confiteor,

eri, v. dep., to

Bubo,

onis, m.,

an

owl.

Conjux,
Conor,
Consul,

iigis,

c,

a spouse.
endeavor.

C.

ari, v. dep., to

ulis,

m., a consul.
v. a., to consult. v. n., to

Cado, ere,

v.

n

,

to fall.

Consuto, ere,

Caelebs, ibis, adj., unmarried.

Conticesco, ere,

become

silent.

Calcar, aris, n., a spur.

Cor, cordis, n., the heart.

Cano, ere,

v.

a

,to sing.

Cantus, us, m., a song.

Capax,
Career, Caro,

acis, adj., capacious.
v. a., to take.

Capio, ere,

/, a crow. a horn. Corpus, oris, n., a body. Corvus, i, m., a raven.
icis,

Comix,
Cornu,

vis,

«.,

eris, m.,

a prison.

Crastlnus,
Crater,

a,

um,
a

adj.,

tomorrovfs.

Carmen,

Inis, n.,

a song.
pluck.

eris,
is,

m., a cup.
htirdle.

nis, /., flesh.

Crates,

f.,

Carpo, ere,
Carus,
a,

v. a., to

Credo, ere, v.

a., to believe.

um,

adj., dear.

Crimen,
Crudelis,

inis, «.,

an

accusation.

Cassis, ?dis,/,

a

helmet.

Criminor,

ari, v. dep., to
e,

blame.

Caveo, ere, v. n., to beware. Cedo, ere, v. n., to yield.
Celeber, bris, bre, adj., celebrated.

adj., cruel.

Crux, crucis, f, a

cross.

Cum,

prep., with. Gr. § 195, 2.
ari, v. dep., to delay.

Ceres,

eris,

f,

Ceres.

Cunctor,

Cerno, ere,

v. a., to decree.

Cupio, ere,

v. a., to desire.

48
Cura,
ae,

/,

care.

Eflulio, Ire, v. a., to speak foolishly.

Currus, us,
Custodio,

m

Cuspis, Idis,

a chariot. /., a spear.
,

Ire, v. a., to keep.

Egeo, ere, v. n., to want. Ego, pron. Gr. § 133, I. Eo, ire, v. n., to go.

Custos, odis, c, a keeper.

Epigramma,
Epitome,
ment.

atis, n.,

an

inscription.

Cyclops, opis, m., a Cyclops.

es, f.

Gr. § 45,

an

abridg-

Cycnus,

i,

m., a sioan.

Cymba,

ae,

f.,a

loot.

Erro, are, v. n., to wander.

Erudio,

ire, v. a., to instruct.
i,

D.

Exemplum,
condemn.
Experior,

n.,

Damno,

are, v.

a

,to

Exercitus, us, m.,
iri,

an example. an army.

Danai, orum, m.plur., the Greeks.

v. dep., to try.

Dedecus, oris, n., disgrace. Dego, ere, v. a., to live.
Deleo, ere, v.
a., to blot out.

F.
m., a workman. f, a face. Faclnus, oris, n., a deed.

Dens, tis, m., a tooth. Deses, Idis, adj., indolent. Deus, i, m., a god. Diadema, atis, n., a crown.
Dico, ere, v.
Dies,
a., to say.

Faber,

bri,
ei,

Facies,

Facio, ere, v.
Fallo, ere, v.

a., to do.
a.,
,

to deceive.

Dido, As or onis, f, Dido.
ei,

Far, farris,

n

com.

m. and /., a day.

Faveo, ere,

v. n., to favor.

Difficilis, e, adj., difficult.

Felix, Icis, adj., happy.

Diligo, ere, v. a., to love.

Fero, ferre, v.

a., to bear.

Disco, ere, v.

a., to learn.

Ferrugo,
Fides,

Inis,

f,

iron.

Ditesco, ere, v. n., to grow rich.

ei, /.,

faith.

Dives,

Itis,

adj., rich.
to give.
a., to teaeh.

Fidus,

a, urn, adj., faithful.

Do, are, v. a., Doceo, ere, v.
Doleo, ere,

Filia, ae,

Filius,

ii,

f, a daughter. m., a son.
a., to feign.
,

v. n., to grieve.

Fingo, ere, v.
Finio, Ire, v.

Domlnor,

ari, v. dep., to rule.

a

to finish.

Doino, are,

v. a., to

tame.
house, home.

Fio,

eri, v.

pass., Gr. § 180, to be made.
v. n., to

Domus, us or i, f., a Donum, i, n., a gift.

Fleo, ere,

weep.

Floreo, ere, v. n, to flourish.

Dormio, ire, v. n., to sleep. Dos, dotis, f., a dowry. Duco, ere, v. a., to lead.
Dulcis, e, adj., sweet, kind.

Duo,

83, o, adj.,

two.

a flower. a wave. Flumen, Inis, n., a river. Fluvius, ii, m a river. Focus, i, m., a fire place. Foedus, eris, n., a league.
Flos,
floris.

m.,

Fluctus, us, m.,

,

Fons,

tis,

m., a fountain.
Ipis,

Forceps,

m. and/1,

pincers.

Ebur,

oris, «., ivory.
§

Fore,
137,

v.

defl
be.

Gr. § 154, R. 3, to be

Ecquis ? pron. Gr.

whether any.

about to

49
Formldo,
Fortuna,
Frater,
Inis,

/,

fear.

I.

Fortis, e, adj., brave.
re,

tris,

f, fortune. m., a brother.

Ico, ere, v. a., to strike.

Idem, pron. Gr.§
II le,

134, 6, the
;

same.

Fraus, fraudis, f, fratid. Frigus, 6ris, n., cold.

pron. Gr.
Inis,

§

134, that

he.

Imago,
Imber,

Frons,

dis,

f, a leaf

foliage.

bris, m.,

f, an image. a shower.
anvil.

Frons, Xis,f, a forehead. Frux, frugis, f, fruit. Fugio, ere, v. n., to flee.

Imped io,
Index,
Iners,

Ire, v. a., to hinder.

Incus, udis,
Icis,
tis,

m.,

f, an an

informer.

adj., sluggish.

Ingens,

tis, adj.,

huge.

G.
Galea,
se,

Inquam,

v. dep.,

Isay.

Insanio, ire, v. n., to be

mad.

/, a

helmet.

Insula, 3d,

f, an

island.

Gclu, us,

n., frost.

Invito, are, v. a., to invite.

Genu,

us, n.,
ei,
ii,

a knee.
ice.

Ipse, pron. Gr. § 135, himself.

Glacies,

f,
m.,

Iraseor,
Is,

i,

v. dep., to be

angry.
or that.
3, this.

Gladius,

a sword.
,

pron. Gr.

§ 134, he. § 134, this §

Gramen,
Grando,

Inis,
Inis,

n

grass.

Iste, -pron.
Istic,

Gr.

m., hail.

pron. Gr.

134,

R.

Gravis, e, adj., heavy.

Grus, gruis, c, a crane.

H. Habeo,
ere, v. a., to have.

Jacio, ere, v. a., to cast.

Judex,

Icis, m.,

a judge.

Jungo, Sre,

v. a., to join.

Hablto, are, v. a. and n., to dwell. Haurio, ire, v. a., to draw.

Jupiler, Jovis, m., Jupiter.

Jus, juris, n., right.

Hebes, etis, adj., dull. Hebesco, ere, v. n., to grow Hepar, atis, w., the liver. Heres, edis, m., an heir. Heros, ois, m., a hero.
Hie, pron. Gr.

Juvenesco, ere,
Juventus,
utis,

dull.

v. n, to grow yowig, f, youth.

Juvo, are, v.

a., to help.

L.
Lac,
lactis, n.,

§ 134, this ; he.

Homo,
Hora,

Hiems, hiemis, /, winter. Inis, m., a man. Honos, 6ris, m., honor.
re,
i,

milk.
lake.

Lacus, us, m., a
Lsedo, e>e, v.
Latro,

a., to hurt.

Hortus,

f.,an hour. m., a garden.

Lffitor, ari, v. dep., to rejoice.
orris,

m.,

a

robber.

Hospes,

itis, ©.,

a guest.

Hostllis, e, adj., hostile.

Laudo, are, v. a., to praise. Laus, laudis, /., praise. Lavo, are, v. a., to wash. Lebes, etis, m., a caldron.

50
Leo, Lex,
onis, m.,
legis,
Sri,

a lion. f, law.
,

Meus,
Midas,
Miles,

a,

um,

adj.,

my.

se,
itis,

m., Midas.

Liber, Liber,

m. Bacchus.

c, a

soldier.

bri,

m

,

a

book.

Miser, 6ra, erum, adj., wretched.

Liber, era. erum, adj., free.

Misereor,

eri, v. dtp., to pity.

Libero, are, v.

a., to free.
it

Mitis, e, adj., mild.

Libet, v. impers.,
Licet, v. impers.
,

pleases.

it is

lawful.

Ligneus,

a.

um, adj , wooden.
,

Li nter, tris,/, a boat.
Liquet,, v impers Lis,
litis,

it is

char.

/, strife. Littra,ae, f, a letter. Locus, i, m„ a place. Longus, a, um, adj., long.
Loquor,
Lucifer,
i,

a, to send. a mountain. Monumentum, i, n., a monument. Mos, moris, m., a custom. Moveo, ere, v. a., to move. Mulceo, ere, v. a., to soothe. Mulier, eris, f, a vjoman. Munus, eris, n., an office.
Mitto, ere, v.

Mons,

tis,

m.,

Muto, are,

v. a., to

change.

v. dep., to speak.

eri,

m., the morning-star.

N.
Nanciscor,
i,

Luctus, As, m., giief.

Lucus,

i,

m

,

Luscinia, ae

,

a grove. f, a nightingale.
light.

v. dep., to obtain.

Navis, is,/., a ship.

Lux,

lucis,

/,

Ne,

enclitic conj.,

denoting a ques-

tion.

Gr.

§ 198,

R

2.

M.
Machina,
Magister,
ae,

Neco,

rre, v.
ii,

a

,

to kill.

Negotium,

f, a machine.
w., a master.
a,

Nemus,
Nepos,

oris, n.,
otis,

Macto, are,
Magniflcus,

v. a., to slay.

a business. a grove. m., a grandchild,
n.,

tri,

Nequam,

adj.

indecl.

Gr. § 125, 5,

um.

adj.,
,

magnificent.

worthless.

Malo, malle,
Mantile,
is,

v. irreg

to prefer.

Nequis, pron.,

lest

any.

n.,

Manus, As, /., Mare, is, n the sea. Mas, maris, m., a male. Mater, tris, f, a mo/her. Maiernus, a, um, adj., maternal.
,

a towel. a hand.

Niger, gra, grum, adj., black.

Nimbus,

i,

m., a cloud.

Nix, nivis,/., snow.

Nolo, nolle,
Noster,
tra.

v. irreg., to be

unwilling.

trum, adj., our.

Mel, mellis,

n

,

honey.
to

Nox, noctis, /, night. Nubes, is,/, a cloud.
Nullus, a,

Memlni, v def,

remember.
mindful.
to lie.

um,
i,

adj.. no.

Memor,
Mensa,
Mentior,

oris, adj..
a?,

Numerus.
Nutrix,

m., a number.

/, a
v.

table.

Nutrio, Ire, v.

a

,

to

nourish.

Iri,

dep

,

icis, /.,

a nurse.

Mercor, ari, v dep., to buy. Merccs, edis,/, a reward. Mereor, eri, v- dtp to deserve.
.,

O,

Messis,

is,

/,

harvest.

Obdormisco,

£re, v. n., to fall asleep.

51
Obedio,
Ire, v. a., to obey.
i,

Poenttet, v. impers.,

it

repents.

Obliviscor,

v. dep., to forget.

Pollex,

Tcis,

m., the thumb.

Obses,

Idis, c,
i,

a hostage.
,

Polliceor, eri, v. dep., to promise.

Oceanus,

m

the ocean.

Pol us,

i,

m., the pole.

Odi, v. def, to hate.

Pono,

ere,

v

.

a., to

place.

Omnis, e, adj., all. Onager, gri, m., a wild ass. Onus, en's, n., a burden.
Oportet, v. dep.,
it

Pontifex,

icis,

m., a high priest.
poplar-tree.
potui, v. irreg., to be

i, /., a Possum, posse,

Populus.

behooves.

able,

1 can.
Iri,

Oratio, onis,/, speech.

Potior,

v. dep., to obtain.
a., to
i,

Ordior,

Iri,

v. dep., to begin.

Poto, are, v.

drink.

Ordo,
Origo,

inis,

m., order.

Praeceptum,
Praesidium,

n.,

a precept.

inis, /., origin.

ii,

n.,

a
,

defence.

Os,

oris, n., the

mouth.

Princeps,

ipis,

m

a

prince.

Os, ossis, n., a bone.
Ovlle,
is, n.,

Profiteor, eri, v. dep., to confess.

a sheep-fold.

Prosum, prodesse,
Gr.
Puella,
33,

profui,

v. irreg.,

Ovis,

is,/.,

a sheep.

\ 154, 5, to profit.

Puer,
Palus, udis,/!, a marsh.
Paluster,
tris, tre, adj.,

/, a girl. a boy. Pulcher, chra, chrum,
i,

m.,

adj., beautiful.

Pulvlnar,
Pulvis,

aris, n.,

a couch.
putiish.

marshy.

em,

m., dust.

f, apart. Parvus, a, um, adj small. Pater, tris, m., a father. Patior, i, passus sum, v. dep,
Pars, parlis,
,

Punio,

Ire, v. a., to

Q.
h

suffer

Quasro, ere, v.
en's, adj.,

a., to seek.

Pauper,

poor.

Qui, quae,

quod, pron.,

Gr. § 136,

Pavo, onis,

m ,a

peacock.

who.

Pax, pacis, /, peace. Pecu, us, n., cattle.
Pectus,
oris, n., the breast.
Itis,

Quicumque, pron. Gr,
ever.

§

136,

who-

Quidam, pron,
tain one,

Gr.

§

138, 5.

a

cer-

Pedes,

m., a foot soldier.

Pellis, is,

/, a skin.

Quies, etis,/,

rest.

Penelope, es, f, Penelope. Penna, 33, f, a feather.
Perdo, ere,
Pietas, atis,
v. a., to destroy.

Quillbet, pron.
one. Quiris,
itis,

Gr.

§

138,

5,

any

m., a

Roman.
Gr. § 137,

f, piety. Plebs, plebis, f, the common people. Plenus, a, um, adj., full.
Plico, are, v. a., to fold.

Quis, quae, quid, pron.

any one. Quisnam? pron. Gr. § 137, who? Quisque, pron Gr. § 135, each.
Quisquis, pron. Gr.
Quivis, pron.
§

Plus, pluris, adj. Gr. § 125,

5,

more.

136, whoever.

-Poema,

a poem. Poena, ee, f, punishment.
atis, n.,

Gr

§ 138, 5,

any

one.

Quotus,

a,

um?

<tdj.,

which or what ?

52
R.
Ratio, on is, f, reason. Redimio, Ire, v. a., to crown.
Sitis, is,

/,

thirst.

Socer,
Solers,

eri,

m., a father-in-law.

tis, adj.,

cunning.
,

Solus,

a, urn,

adj

alone.

Regio, onis, f, a region.

Solvo, ere, v.

a., to loose.

Regnum,
Rego,
Res,

i,

n a kingdom.
,

Sornnolentus,

a,

um,

adj., sleepy.

ere, v. a., to rule.
v. a., to leave.

Sperno, ere,
Spes,
ei,

v. a., to despise.

Relinquo, ere,
rei,

f, a thing, an event. Rete, is, n., a net. Rex, regis, m a king. Robur, oris, n., strength.
,

f, hope. x,f, a star. Stemma, atis, n., a garland. Stirps, stirpis, f, a stock.
Stella,

Sto, are, v.
Sui, pron.

n

,

to stand.
§ 133,

Ros, roris, m., dew. Rupes, is, f, a rock. Rus, ruris, n., the country.

Gr.

of himself.
Gr.
§ 153,

Sum,

esse, fui, v. irreg.

to be.

Summus,
S.

a,

um,

adj.

Gr.

§

125, 4,

highest, very high.

Supellex,

lectilis,

/, furniture.
adj.

Sacer, era, crum, adj., sacred.

Superus,
high.

a,

um,

Gr. § 125, 4,

Sacerdos,

otis, c

,

a

priest.

Sacrifico, are, v.
Sagitta,
se,

a., to sacrifice.

Sus, suis, c,

a swine.
away.

/, an arrow.
f,
safety.

Sustollo, ere, v. a., to take

Salubris, bre, adj., healthy.

Salus, utis,

T.

Sanguis,

Inis,

m., blood.

Saxum,

i,

n.,
i,

a
n.,

rock.

Sceptrum,

Schema,
Scyphus,

atis,
i,
i,

a sceptre. »., a shape.

Scopillus,

m.,

a rock.

f, the earth. a weapon. Templum, i, n., a temple. Tempus, oris, n., time.
Tellus, uris,

Telum,

i,

n.,

m:, a cup.

Teneo,

ere, v. a., to hold.
adj., tender.

Seculum,
Sedlle,

i,

n an age.
,

Tener, era, €rum,
Terreo, ere,

is, ».,

a

seat.

v. a., to terrify.

Seges,

etis,

/, a

corn-field.

Terrestris, tre, adj., terrestrial.

Senatus, us, m., a senate.

Teucer,

cri,

m., Teucer.

Senesco, ere,

v. n., to

Senex, Senex,

senis, m.,

grow old. an old man.

Thrax,
Tiaras,
Tiberis,

acis, m.,
se,

m.,

a Thracian. a turban.

senis, adj., old.

is,

m., the Tiber. m., a piper.

Sentio, Ire, v. a., to feel.

Tibicen,

Inis,

Sermo,
Servio,

onis, m.,

a

speech.

Titan, anis, m.,

ire, v. n., to 'serve.
tris, tre, adj.,

Toga,

se,

a Titan. /, a Roma?i gown.

Silvester,

woody.
left.

Tono,
Tres,

are, v. n., to thunder.

Sinister, tra, trum, adj.,

Trabs, trabis,
tria,

Si quis, pron. Gr. § 138, if any.
Siren, €nis,

f, a beam. num. adj., three.
tribe.

/, a siren.

Tribus, us,/., a

53
Trochus,
i,

m.,

Trojan us,
Tullius,

a,

a trundling-hoop. um, adj., Trojan.
§ 133, thou.

Veru, us,
Vester,

n.,

a

spit.

tra,

trum, adj., your.
a., to clothe.

Tu, pron. Gr.
ii,

Vestio, ire, v.

m., Tully.

Veto, are,

v. a., to forbid.

Tundo,
Turn's,

ere, v. a., to beat.
is,

Vetus,
Via, se,

eris, adj., old.

/, a
i,

tower.
}

f, a way.
a., to see.

Tyrannus,

m. a tyrant.

Video, ere, v.
Vigil, is, m.,

a watchman.
adj.,

U.
Uber,
eris, adj., rich.

Viginti,

num.

twenty.
bind.

Vincio,

ire, v. a., to

Vir, viri, m.,
Virgilius,
ii,

a man.
m., Virgil.

Ullus, a,

um,

adj.,

any.
each.
adj.,

Ulixes,

is,

m., Ulysses.
§ 138, 4,

Virgo, mis,yi, a virgin.

TJnusquisque, pron. Gr.

Virgulium,
Virtus, utis,
Vis, vis,
Vita, se,

i,

n.,

a shrub.

Uterque,
each.

utraque,

utrumque,

/,
life.

virtue.

/,

force.

/,

V.
Valetudo,

Vitis, is,

f, a

vine.
to live.

Vivo, ere, v. n.,

/, health. Vas, vasis, n., a vessel. Vas, vadis, m., a surety.
inis,

Voco, are,
to wish.

v. a., to call.
§ 178, 1,

Volo, velle, volui, v. a. Gr.
VolQcer,

Venio,

Ire, v. n., to

come.

eris, ere, adj.,

winged.

Ver, veris,

n., the

spring.

Vox, vocis, /, a
Vulpes,
is, /.,

voice.

Verbum,
Vereor,

i,

n.,

a word.
dep. t to fear.

eri, v.

Vulnus,

£ris, ».,

a fox. a wound.

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