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1.1 INTRODUCTION

Businesses are not separate entities, but collections of people. All collections of people produce certain common and important patterns of behaviour. So the topic of organization culture is really about people and the way they behave when in groups together. The presence of a strong and appropriate organizational culture has become essential for an organization to function effectively and efficiently in the modern era. Organizational culture is the consciously or subconsciously accepted and followed way of life or manner of performing day-to-day activities in an organization. It plays an important role in determining and controlling employee behavior at workplace. The core values, assumptions, norms, procedures, etc. that are followed in an organization constitute its culture. These are more often than not, accepted and followed throughout the organization, without much deviation. However, the presence of individuals from various social cultures and backgrounds in an organization, may lend a slight variation to the beliefs and ideologies of the organizational members. This difference results in the formation of subcultures within organizations Organizational culture deals with the internalization of the core values and norms. If the organizational culture is well internalized, it can replace the formalization of rules and procedures in an organization. The difference between the two lies in the fact that, while formalization deals with the standardization of jobs and involves documentation of accepted values and norms, a strong organizational culture can achieve a certain amount of uniformity in work processes without documentation being required. Organizational culture plays a variety of roles in strengthening bonds between the members of an organization. The boundary-defining role of organizational culture implies that it helps to draw distinctions between one organization and another. It also creates a sense of identity and belongingness among the employees of the organization. Organization culture synergizes the efforts of organizational members towards the achievement of the common objectives of the organization. It also maintains the stability of the social system in the organization by minimizing individual differences between employees.

NATURE OF ORGANISATIONAL CULTURE:

The culture of an organization may reflect in various forms adopted by the organization. These could be: The physical infrastructure Routine behaviour, language, ceremonies Gender equality, equity in payment Dominant values such as quality, efficiency and so on Philosophy that guides the organizations policies towards it employees and customers like customer first and customer is king, and the manner in which employees deal with customers. Individually none of these connote organizational culture, however, together, they reflect organizational culture. Although organizational culture has common properties, it is found that large organizations have a dominant culture and a number of sub cultures. The core values shared by the majority of the organizational members constitute the dominant culture. Therefore, whenever one refers to the culture of an organization one actually talks about the dominant culture of an organization one actually talks about the dominant culture. Subcultures within an organization are a set of shared understandings among members of one group/department/geographic operations. For example, the finance department of an organization may have a sub culture which is unique to this department visavis other departments. This means that this department will not only have the core values of the organizations dominant culture but also some unique values. If an organization does not have a dominant culture and is comprised only of various sub cultures, its effectiveness would be difficult to judge and there will be no consistency of behaviour among departments. Hence, the aspect of common or shared understanding is an essential component of organizational culture. Also, organizational culture exists at various levels.

1.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE

AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY HISTORY: In the year 1769, a French engineer by the name of Nicolas J. Cugnot invented the first automobile to run on roads. This automobile, in fact, was a self-powered, three wheeler, military tractor that made use of steam engine. The range of the automobile, however, was very brief and at the most, it could only run at a stretch for fifteen minutes. In addition, these automobiles were not fit for the roads as the steam engines made them very heavy and large, and required ample starting time. Oliver Evans was the first to design a steam engine driven automobile in the U.S. The automobile industry finally came of age with Henry Ford in 1914 for the bulk production in cars. This lead to the development of the industry and it first begun in the assembly lines of his car factory. The several methods adopted by Ford, made the new invention ie) car, popular amongst the rich as well as masses. According to the history of automobile industry U.S, dominated the automobile markets around the globe with no notable competitors. However, after the end of Second World War in 1945, the automobile industry of other technologically advanced nations such as Japan and certain European nations gained momentum and within a very short period, beginning in the early 1980s, the U.S automobile industry was flooded with foreign automobile companies, especially those of Japan and Germany. The current trends of the Global automobile industry reveal that in the developed countries the automobile industry are stagnating as a result of the drooping car markets, whereas the automobile industry in the developing nations, such as India and Brazil, have been consistently registering higher growth rates every passing year for their flourishing automobile markets. INDIAN AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY: India is one of the fastest growing automobile industries in the world. After 1960, the automobile industry saw rapid growth and many automotive manufacturers started production. The automobile industry in India is the seventh largest in the world with and annual production of over 2.6 million units in 2009. In 2009, India emerged as Asias fourth largest exporter of automobiles, behind Japan, South Korea and Thailand. By 2050, the country is expected to top the world in car volumes with approximately 611 million vehicles on the nations roads.

A well developed transport network indicates a well developed economy. For rapid development a well-developed and well-knit transportation system is essential. As Indias transport network is developing at a fast pace, Indian automobile industry is growing too. Also, the automobile industry has strong backward and forward linkages and hence provides employment to a large section of the population. Thus the role of automobile industry cannot be overlooked in the Indian economy. Indian automobile industry includes manufacture of trucks, buses, passenger cars, defence vehicles ,two wheelers etc.., The industry can be broadly divided into the car manufacturing, two-wheeler manufacturing and heavy vehicle manufacturing units. The major car manufacturers are Hindustan Motors, Maruti Udyog, Fiat India Pvt. Ltd, Ford India Ltd., General Motors Pvt. Ltd., Honda Siel Cars India Ltd., Hyundai Motors India Ltd., Skoda India Pvt. Ltd., Toyota Kirloskar Motor Ltd., to name a few. The two wheeler manufacturing is dominated by companies like TVS, Honda Motorcycle & Scooter India Pvt. Ltd., Hero Honda, Yamaha, Bajaj etc.., The heavy motors like buses, trucks, defence vehicles, auto rickshaws and other multiutility vehicles are manufactured by Tata-Telco, Ashok Leyland, Eicher Motors, Bajaj, Mahindra and Mahindra etc.., HEAVY VEHICLES MARKET: Heavy vehicles market in India comprises of trucks, machines, ambulances and school buses. The popular heavy vehicle brands in India are Volvo, Eicher, Tata, Telco, Ashok Leyland and Swaraj Mazda. Following are the major players in the Indian Heavy Vehicles Market: Tata Motors is the largest automobile manufacturing company in India that manufactures a wide range of heavy vehicles adhering to world class standards. It is the market leader in commercial vehicles in all the segments, be it heavy vehicles, medium size vehicles, small vehicles, buses or defence vehicles. The heavy vehicles manufactured by Tata Motors have highly developed braking structure, high ground authorization, better direction competence and a muscular body. The advanced engine imparted to these heavy vehicles makes them a class apart from the other heavy vehicles running on the Indian roads and Highways. Tata Motors leads this segment with a market share of 61%.

Ashok Leyland is an exclusively heavy vehicle manufacturing company situated in Chennai

and was initiated in the year 1948. It is one of Indias biggest producers of heavy vehicles such as trucks, buses, military vehicles and also the second biggest commercial vehicle firm in India heavy vehicle division with a market share of around 27%. Ashok Leyland is also renowned for producing auto spare parts and engines for marine and industrial submission. Eicher Motors was initiated in 3rd September, 1960. The first firm to manufacture the first tractor in India. The indigenously manufactured tractor was introduced in the Indian market straight from Eichers Faridabad factory. The history of the firm can be traced back to 1948, when Goodearth Company was established for vending and repairs of imported tractors in the nation. Swaraj Mazda, a tie up between Mazda and Swaraj Enterprise, Swaraj Mazda

represents advanced Indian expertise and manufacturing. The firm has Research and Development improvement edge on international scale. The firm manufactures various products such as Bus, Ambulance, Trucks etc. The modern automobile market in India has been considering key issues in the process of growth: Customer care, and not just service Domestic as well as multi-national investments Searing through cut-throat competition Road safety Anti-pollution norms Co-ordination with government to enable advancement Used vehicle trade

1.3 COMPANY PROFILE Ashok Leyland is the leading manufacturer of trucks, buses, special application vehicles and engines in India. The products of Ashok Leyland are at par with the best in the world. Ashok Leyland is the leaders in the Indian bus market, offering unique models such as CNG, Double

Decker and Vestibule bus. More than 80% of the State Transport Undertaking (STU) buses come from Ashok Leyland. The company is a pioneer in multi axle trucks and tractor-trailers. Ashok Leyland is the largest provider of logistic vehicles to the Indian army. It also manufactures diesel engines for Industrial, Genset and Marine applications, in collaboration with technology leaders. HISTORY: In 1948, Ashok Motors was set up in what was then Madras, for the assembly of Austin Cars. The Company's destiny and name changed soon with equity participation by British Leyland and Ashok Leyland commenced manufacture of commercial vehicles in 1955. Since then Ashok Leyland has been a major presence in India's commercial vehicle industry with a tradition of technological leadership, achieved through tie-ups with international technology leaders and through vigorous in-house R&D.Access to international technology enabled the Company to set a tradition to be first with technology. Be it full air brakes, power steering or rear engine busses, Ashok Leyland pioneered all these concepts. Responding to the operating conditions and practices in the country, the Company made its vehicles strong, over-engineering them with extra metallic muscles. "Designing durable products that make economic sense to the consumer, using appropriate technology", became the design philosophy of the Company, which in turn has moulded consumer attitudes and the brand personality. The Hinduja Group is a transnational conglomerate that provides a wide range of products in over fifty countries worldwide. Today, the Hinduja Group has become one of the largest transnational business conglomerates in the world. The Group employs over 25,000 people and has offices in many key cities of the world and all the major cities in India. Ashok Leyland vehicles have built a reputation for reliability and ruggedness. The 5,00,000 vehicles we have put on the roads have considerably eased the additional pressure placed on road transportation in independent India. In the populous Indian metros, four out of the five State Transport Undertaking (STU) buses come from Ashok Leyland. Some of them like the double-decker and vestibule buses are unique models from Ashok Leyland, tailor-made for high-density routes.. For over five decades, Ashok Leyland has been the technology leader in India's commercial vehicle industry, moulding the country's commercial vehicle profile by introducing technologies and product ideas that have gone on to become industry norms. From 18 seater to 82 seater

double-decker buses, from 7.5 tonne to 49 tonne in haulage vehicles, from numerous special application vehicles to diesel engines for industrial, marine and genset applications, Ashok Leyland offers a wide range of products. Eight out of ten metro state transport buses in India are from Ashok Leyland. With over 60 million passengers a day, Ashok Leyland buses carry more people than the entire Indian rail network. VISION Achieving leadership in the medium/heavy duty segments of the domestic commercial vehicle market and a significant presence in the world market through transport solutions that best anticipate customer needs, with the highest value -to-cost ratio. MISSION -Identifying with the customer. -Being the lowest cost manufacturer. -Global benchmarking our products, processes and people, against the best in the industry. QUALITY POLICY Ashok Leyland is committed to achieve customer satisfaction by anticipating and delivering superior value to the customer in relation to their own business, through the products and services offered by the company and comply with statutory requirements. Towards this, the quality policy of Ashok Leyland is to make continual improvements in the processes that constitute the quality management system, to make them more robust and to enhance their effectiveness and efficiency in achieving stated objectives leading to 1. Superior products manufactured as also services offered by the company. 2. Maximum use of employees potential to contribute to quality and environment by progressive up gradation of their knowledge and skills as appropriate to their functions. 3. Seamless involvement from suppliers and dealers in the mission of the company to address customers changing needs and protection of the environment. Manufacturing plant Ashok Leyland has seven manufacturing plants Ennore Plant, Chennai. Hosur Plants Unit I, Unit II and Unit II A. Alwar, Rajasthan.

Bhandara, Maharashtra. Pantnagar, Uttarakhand . The total covered space at these seven plants exceeds 650,000 sq m and together employs over 11,500 personnel

The Five AL Values are: 1.International 2.Speedy 3.ValueCreator 4.Innovative 5. Ethical Major Achievements of Hinduja Group In 1993, became first Indian Auto Company to receive ISO 9002 certification. Received ISO 9001 certification in 1994, QS 9000 in 1998, and ISO 14001 certification for all vehicle manufacturing units in 2002. Became the first Indian auto company to receive the latest ISO/TS 16949 Corporate Certification (in July 2006). First company to introduce full air brakes, power steering and rear engine busses in India. ASSOCIATE COMPANIES: Automotive Coaches & Components Ltd (ACCL) Lanka Ashok Leyland Hinduja Foundries IRIZAR TVS Ashok Leyland Project Services Ltd Gulf Ashley Motors Ltd Ennore Foundries Ltd The chief competitors of the company are;

Mahindra Volvo Tata Motors PRODUCT OFFERED BY COMPANY: Ashok Leyland offers a comprehensive product range with trucks from 7.5 tons GVW to 49 tons GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight). From 19 to 80 seaters in passenger transport, a host of special application vehicles and diesel engines for industrial gensets and marine application. Product profile can be broadly split into five categories viz. Buses, Trucks, defence vehicles, special Vehicles and Engines. BUSES LYNX BS-II Viking BS-III Panther (Rear engine) Falcon (Front engine) Viking BS-II Viking AL Cruiser Stag BS-II 12 M Bus-BS II Airport Tarmac Coach Viking CNG BS-III Cheetah (Front engine) Vestibule Bus Double Decker

TRUCKS 4x2 Haulage models Tractor DEFENCE VEHICLES Short Chassis Bus Stallion 6x6 SPECIAL VEHICLES Hippo tractor Stallion Mk III Tipper Hippo Tipper Beaver tractor Rapid Intervention Vehicle Beaver Haulage Field artillery tractor Stallion truck fire fighting Comet 4x4 Topchi field Artillery tractor Ecomet Multi Axle vehicles 4x2 and Multi-axle Tipper

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Hippo Haulage ENGINES Genset application Marine application Industrial application DG sets for exports

1.4. LITERATURE REVIEW ORGANISATION An organization as a purposeful system with several subsystems where individuals and activities are organized to achieve certain predetermined goals through division of labour and coordination of activities. ORGANISATION CULTURE MEANING Organizational culture can be defined as a pervasive underlying set of beliefs, assumptions, values, shared feelings and perceptions, which influence the actions and decisions taken by the organizations. DEFINITION

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Turnstall defined organizational culture as A general constellation of beliefs, morals, value systems, behavioural norms, and ways of doing business that are unique to each corporation. Joanne Martin defined organizational culture as As individuals come into contact with organizations, they come into contact with dress norms, stories people tell about what goes on, the organizations formal rules and procedures, its formal codes of behavior, rituals, t asks, pay system, jargon, and jokes only understood by insiders, and so on. These elements are some of the manifestations of organizational culture. TYPES OF CULTURES The more prominent types of cultures are, Dominant culture and subculture: A dominant culture is marked by a set of core values that are shared by a majority of the organizational members. In fact, when we talk about organizations culture, we refer to its dominant culture. The dominant culture gives a macro view of organizations personality. This creates a dominant culture in the organization that helps guide the day to day behaviour of employees. A subculture expresses a set of values that are shared by the members of a division or department. Subculture typically is result of problems or experiences that are shared by members of a particular department or unit. These subcultures can form vertically or horizontally. When one product division of a conglomerate has a culture unique from that of other divisions of the organization, a vertical subculture exists. When a specific set of functional specialists, such as accountants, have a set of common shared understandings, a horizontal subculture is formed. Strong culture and weak culture : Based on intensity of sharedness, organizational cultures are of two types: strong weak. A strong culture is characterized by the organizations core values being intensely held and widely shared. So to say, more intensely the core values are shared, the stronger the culture

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is. The degree of sharedness depends on two factors: orientation and rewards. In order for people to share the same cultural values, orientation programmes are organized to tell the new comers about the organizations philosophy and method of operation. Orientation may be done through both words of mouth and day to day work habits. Rewards do also affect sharedness. This in turn results in lower employee turnover. When core values are not shared with high degree of intensity, it forms weak culture. It is usually characterized by high turnover of employees. FUNCTIONS OF CULTURE We mentioned about organizational cultures impact on employee behavior. Culture performs several functions in an organization. The major functions performed by culture are: 1. Culture provides shared patterns of cognitive perceptions or understanding about the values or beliefs held by the organization. This enables the organizational members how to think and behave as expected of them. 2. It also provides shared patterns of feelings to the organizational members to make them know what they are expected to value and feel.
3. It provides a boundry that creates distinctions between one organization and other.

Such boundry defining helps identify members and non-members of the organizations. 4. It enhances social stability by holding the organizational members together by providing them appropriate standards for which the members should stand for. 5. It serves as a control mechanism that guides and shapes the attitudes and behavior of organizational members. It helps organizational members stick to the conformity to the prescribed and expected mode of behavior. Culture is valuable for the organization because it enhances organizational commitment of the employees. It guides employees how things are done and what important for them. These clearly are benefits to employees.

CREATING, SUSTAINING AND CHANGING A CULTURE CREATING A CULTURE:

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Beliefs and values have their base on the past happenings. It implies that the ultimate source of an organizations culture is its founders. The founders start their organization with a vision of what their organization should do. Then, the vision is imposed on all organizational members. The members imbibe the vision through interaction and their own experience. Thomas Watson of IBM is a good example. Watsons views on research and development, product development, product innovation, employee dress attire, and compensation policies still influences practices at IBM, though he died long back in 1956. SUSTAINING A CULTURE: Culture once established may far away also hence, once a culture is created, it needs to be sustained through reinforcement practices of human resources. Three such practices particularly important in sustaining a culture are selection practices, the actions of management, and socialization methods. (i) Selection The first step involved in sustaining culture is the careful selection of entry level candidates. The basic purpose of selection process is to appoint right people for right jobs. For this, the trained recruiters interview candidates and attempt to screen out candidates those whose personal styles and values do not make a fit with the organizations culture. Thus, by identifying the suitable candidates who can culturally match the organizational culture, selection helps sustain culture considerably (ii) Top management

Subordinates emulate their superiors. Hence, the actions of top management such as what the managers say and how they behave have a major impact on the employees working at lower levels. As a matter of fact, this filters down in the entire organization and becomes a common feature or culture of organization. Managerial actions like degree of freedom granted to the subordinates, prescriptions for the employee uniform, pay off in terms of pay raises, promotions, and other rewards also help create a common history i.e., culture in the organization. (iii) Socialization

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In simple words, socialization is the process of adaption. New organizational members coming from different moods and mores are likely to disturb the common customs and beliefs already established in the organization. Therefore, the new employees need to be indoctrinated to adapt the organizational culture. This adaptation process is called socialization. Socialization process involves three phases: Pre-arrival Encounter Metamorphosis

Productivity

Prearrival

Encount er

Metamor phosis

commitment Turnover

Pre-arrival : It refers to all the learning that occurs before a new member joins the

Organization. Encounter : It is the stage of induction which the new recruit joins the firm and put on the job.

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The role playing start here. The recruit starts comparing expectations, the image, which he had formed during pre-arrival stage with reality. If expectation and reality concur, the encounter is smooth.. When the two differ, stress and frustration set in. what follows thereafter is a mental process of adjustment. In this adjustment, the individual tries to replace his/her own values and norms with those of the organization at least in vital areas, if not in all. In other extreme, the recruit simply cannot reconcile to those values and norms of the organization and get illusioned and quit the job. Metamorphosis : It is the completion stage of changes and consolidation of changed behavior. In this stage, the employees master the skills required for their new roles, and make the adjustment to the organizations norms and values. This is, of course, a voluntary process and a conscious decision which enables them to become compatible with the group and organization. This signals the completion of socialization process.

CHANGING A CULTURE The ever fast changing business environment has made everything in nature. So is organizational culture also. As organizations do not remain the same over a period of time, so is the case of culture as well culture However, a changing culture is as much important is not so simple. Changing a strong culture is particularly difficult because the cultural values and assumptions have taken deep roots and employees become so committed to them. Changing a weak culture is easy. Deal and Kennedy identified five situations which facilitate change in the culture:

Top manageme nt Philosophy of organizatio ns Selection criteria Organizational culture

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Socializatio ns

1. When the environment is going rapid changes and the company has always been highly value-driven. 2. When the industry is highly competitive and the environment changes quickly. 3. When the company is worst.
4. When the company is truly at the threshold of becoming a large corporation.

5.

When the company is growing very rapidly.

Creating an ethical organizational culture The content and strength of a culture influence an organizations ethical climate and the ethical behavior of its members. An organizational culture most likely to shape high ethical standards is one thats high in risk tolerance, low to moderate in aggressiveness, and focuses on means as well as outcomes. Be a visible role model Employees will look to the behavior of top management as a benchmark for defining appropriate behavior. When senior management is seen as taking the ethical high road, it provides a positive message for all employees. Communicate ethical expectations Ethical ambiguities can be minimized by creating and disseminating an organizational code of ethics. It should state the organizations primary values and the ethical rules that employees are expected to follow. Provide ethical training Set up seminars, workshops, and similar ethical training programs. Use these training sessions to reinforce the organizations standards of conduct, to clarify what practices are and not permissible, and to address possible ethical dilemmas. Visibly reward ethical acts and punish unethical one

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Performance appraisal of managers should include a point-by-point evaluation of how his or her decisions measure up against the organizations code of ethics. Appraisals must include the means taken to achieve goals as well as the ends themselves. People who act ethically should be visibly rewarded for their behavior. Just as importantly, unethical acts should be conspicuously punished. Provide protective mechanisms The organization needs to provide formal mechanisms so that employees can discuss ethical dilemmas and report unethical behavior without fear of reprimand. This might include creation of ethical counselors, ombudsmen, or ethical officers. HOW EMPLOYEES LEARN CULTURE Since the term organizational culture refers to the underlying beliefs and values that are shared by organization members, culture cant be dictated by the top management. Instead, organizational culture is transmitted to employees in a number of forms. The most important ones are stories, rituals, symbols and language. Stories : The stories, be these true or false, told to the organizational members can have a profound impact on organizational culture. Most stories are narratives based on true events about the organizations founders, rule breaking, rags-to-riches successes, reductions in the work force, relocation of employees, reactions to past mistakes, and organizational coping. Some stories are considered legends because the events are historic. Stories are useful because they preserve the primary values of the organization by anchoring the present in the past. The popular practice of storytelling by the grand-parents to their grand children in our society also aims at inculcating old values and beliefs in the new generation so as the same can be preserved for all the times. Rituals Rituals also are means for transmitting culture. Activities such a award Ceremonies, weekly Friday picnic, and annual general meeting are some examples. These rituals reinforce the key values of the organization, what goals are important, which people are important and which are expendable.

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Many organizational researchers have even considered some of the established management methods and techniques as cultural rituals. Managers employ techniques such as PERT/CPM, complex modeling and simulation, dissemination of regular updates on projects, brainstorming sessions etc. Symbols : A symbol is something that represents something else. Physical symbols in Organizations are often used to represent and support organizational culture. Examples of symbols include the size of offices, the elegance of office furnishings, executive perks. The values of these symbols are that they communicate important cultural values. Symbols become more powerful facilitator of culture if symbols are consistent with the stories that are narrated to the organizational members.

Language : As language is a means of universal communication, most organizations tend to

develop their own language in the forms of jargon, phrases, acronym, slogans etc. by learning this language, the members attest to their acceptance of the culture and, in so doing, help preserve the organizational culture. Organization uses a specific slogan, metaphor, or saying to convey special meaning to employees. Metaphors are often quite meaningful and convey an entire sermon in only a short sentence. Slogans can be readily picked up and repeated by employees as well as customers of the company. Organization also develop unique terms to describe their key personnel, products , equipments and so on. New employees frequently come to hear such terms and over time, these become part of their language.

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2.1 NEED FOR THE STUDY

The main aim of the study is to know the organization culture at Ashok Leyland. A organizational culture will helps to know about the employee perception towards their organization. And it helps the organization to analyze its strength and weakness. Jobs are the link between organization and their human resources. The combined accomplishment of every job allows the organization to meet its objectives. This study mainly concentrates on to know the deficient areas to make necessary steps to further enhance the good culture life of its employees. Further the management wants to know the employees perception towards organizational culture to know their expectations from the organization.

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2.2 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY

PRIMARY OBJECTIVES: To study the organization culture in the Ashok Leyland To find out the attitudes of the employees in the organization SECONDARY OBJECTIVES: To analyze the relationship between co-workers. To analyze the factors affecting the organizational culture and suggest the organization to improve the organizational culture

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2.3 SCOPE OF THE STUDY The study is conducted only among the employees in Ashok Leyland. The scope of this study is to know about the effectiveness of work in the organization, their attitudes towards the work and to know the work culture in the organization. This study is helps to know the relationship between co-workers. It helps to control the way to interact with each other and to know about the employees behavior in different group of people.

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2.4. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research: Research in common parlance refers to search for knowledge. It is an organized, systematic, inquiry or investigation in to a specific problem, undertaken with the objective of finding answers there to. According to Clifford woody, Research comprises of defining and redefining problems, formulating hypothesis or suggested solutions collecting, organizing and evaluating data, making detection and reaching conclusions and at last carefully testing the conclusion to determine whether they fit the formulating hypothesis. Research methods: Research methods refer to the behavior and instruments used in selecting and constructing research techniques. Research technique: Research technique refer to the behavior and instrument we use in performing research operations such as making observation, recording data and techniques of processing data and the like. Research methodology: Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It also considers the logic behind the methods used in the context of research study and explains why a particular

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method or technique is used, so that research results are capable of being evaluated. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. Type of research: The type of research used in this project is descriptive in nature. The descriptive study is typically concerned with determining frequency with which something occurs or how two variables vary together. It is concerned with describing the characteristics of particular individual or group.

Research design: A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedure. It constitutes the blueprint for the collection, measurement, and analysis of data. The research design undertaken for the study is descriptive one. Questionnaire The primary instrument used in the study was the questionnaire . A questionnaire is a research instrument consisting of a series of questions and other prompts for the purpose of gathering information from respondents. Although they are often designed for statistical analysis of the responses, this is not always the case. The questionnaire was invented by Sir Francis Galton the form of each question is also important. Closed end question include all the possible answers and subjects matters choices among them. Questionnaires have advantages over some other types of surveys in that they are cheap, do not require as much effort from the questioner as verbal or telephone surveys, and often have standardized answers that make it simple to compile data. Questionnaires are also sharply limited by the fact that respondents must be able to read the questions and respond to them. Thus, for some demographic groups conducting a survey by questionnaire may not be practical Data collection:

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Primary data: Primary data is the original data collected by the researcher for the first time. The various sources for collecting primary data are questionnaire, observation, interview, consumer panels etc. The primary source used for this study is questionnaire.

Secondary data: Secondary data is the information which is already available in published or unpublished form. The various sources of secondary data are books, magazines, statistical data sources etc. The secondary data source used for this study is company profile, scope, need, review of literature. Sampling: Collecting data about each and every unit of the population is called census method. The approach, where only a few units of population under study are considered for analysis is called sampling method. Probability Sampling Under this method, every item of the universe has an equal chance of inclusion in the sample. Under probability sampling there are 4 types of sampling techniques. A simple random sampling technique is used for data collection among the respondents. Simple random Sampling In this type of sampling is also known as chance sampling or probability sampling where each and every item in the population has an equal chance of inclusion in the sample and each one of the possible samples, in case of finite universe, has the same probability of being selected Population: All items in any field of enquiry constitute a universe or population. The population or universe can be finite or infinite. The population in Ashok Leyland is found to be 3800 employees.

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Sampling unit: A decision has to be taken concerning a sampling unit before selecting sample. It may be a geographical area such as state, district, villages etc. The sampling unit of this study is the employees of Ashok Leyland.

Sampling frame: A sampling frame may be defined as the listing of the general components of the individual units that comprise the defined population. Sampling size: It refers to the number of elements of the population to be sampled. The sample size chosen for survey is 120. Hypothesis: Hypothesis may be defined as a proposition or a set of proposition set forth as an explanation for the occurrence of some specified group of phenomena either asserted merely as a provisional conjecture to guide some investigation or accepted as highly probable in the light of established facts. Types of Hypothesis (i) Null hypothesis The null hypothesis is set up in testing a statistical hypothesis only to decide whether to accept or reject the null hypothesis. It asserts that there is no difference between the sample statistic and population parameter and whatever difference is there, is attributable to sampling errors. Null hypothesis is denoted by, H0. H0: 1 = 2 (ii) Alternative hypothesis

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Any hypothesis which is not a null hypothesis is called an alternative hypothesis. It is denoted by H1 or Ha. It is set in such a way that the rejection of null hypothesis implies the acceptance of alternative hypothesis. H1: 1 2 H1: 1> 2 H1: 1< 2

Statistical Tools for Analysis The researcher carries out analysis through various statistical tools. The statistical analysis is useful for drawing inference from the collected information. Percentage: Percentage refers to a special kind of ratio. Percentage is used in making comparison between two or more series of data. No. Of Respondents Percentage = Total No. Of Respondents X 100

Chi-square test: Chi-Square Test for Goodness of Fit 2: This test is a measurable of probabilities of association between the attributes. It gives us an idea about the divergence between the observed and expected frequencies. Thus the test is also described as the test of goodness of fit. Formula:

2 = [(Oi - Ei) 2 / Ei]

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ANOVA test: The analysis of variance is a method of splitting the total variation of a data into constituent parts which measures different sources of variations. Analysis of variance is to find out the components of total variations. 2.4 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Time provided for completing this project work was a major constraints The respondents may be biased. Time and cost constraints were a major limitation which prevented a large sample from been chosen
Some of the respondents reacted indifferently while filling up the questionnaire.

The statistical tools which used for converting qualitative data into quantitative data may often lead to inaccurate results.

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. 2.6 ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Analysis involves estimating the values of unknown parameters of the population and testing of hypotheses for drawing inferences. Interpretation refers to the task of drawing inferences from the collected facts after an analytical and/or experimental study. Tools used for this research is Percentage analysis, Chi-square for goodness of fit, Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA).

Table no. 2.6.1. Table showing the age details of the respondents

Sl.No 1 2 3 25 - 35 36 - 45

AGE

NO OF RESPONDENTS 10 28 82 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 8 24 68 100

Above 45 Total

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 68% of respondents are above 45 years of age and 24% of respondents are between 36-45 years of age and 8% of respondents are between 25-35 years of age

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Chart no. 2.6.1(a). Chart showing the age details of the respondents

Table no. 2.6.2. Table showing the gender details of the respondents

Sl.No GENDER 1 Male

NO OF RESPONDENTS 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 100

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Female Total 120

100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 100% of respondents are male.

Chart no. 2.6.2(a) Chart showing the gender details of the respondents

Table no. 2.6.3. Table showing the experience details of the respondents

Sl.No EXPERIENCE 1 2 3 4 Below 10 years 10 - 20 years 21 - 30 years above 30 years Total

NO . OF RESPONDENTS 9 6 36 69 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 8 5 30 57 100

Interpretation:

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The above table shows it is inferred that 57% of respondents are above 30 year of experience and 30% of respondents are between 21-30 years and 8% of respondents are below 10 years and 5% of respondents are between 10-20years of experience in their work. Chart no. 2.6.3(a). Chart showing the experience details of the respondents

Table no. 2.6.4. Table showing the salary details of the respondents

Sl.No SALARY 1 2 3 Total Below 20000 20000 - 30000 30000 - 40000

NO OF RESPONDENTS 6 52 62 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 5 43 52 100

Interpretation: The above table shows that 52% of respondents are between 30000-40000 and 43% of respondents are between 20000-30000 and 5% of respondents are getting below 20000 of salary. Chart no. 2.6.4(a) Chart showing the salary details of the respondents

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Table no. 2.6.5. Table showing the employees opinion about the strategic goals and objectives are shared with all. Sl.No OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 6 94 14 6 0 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 5 78 12 5 0 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 78% of respondents are agree and 12% of respondents are neutral and 5% of respondents are strongly agree and another 5% of respondents are disagree on the strategic goals and objectives are shared with all. Chart no. 2.6.5(a). Chart showing the employees opinion about the strategic goals and objectives are shared with all.

Table no. 2.6.6. Table showing the employees opinions regarding the organizational policies is reviewed annually.

Sl.No 1 2

OPTIONS Yes No Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS 110 10 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 92 8 100

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Interpretation: The above table it shows that 92% of respondents are Yes and 8% of respondents are No on the organizational policies are reviewed annually. Chart no. 2.6.6(a) Chart showing the employees opinions regarding the organizational policies are reviewed annually.

Table no. 2.6.7. Table showing the organization shows respect for diverse range of opinions. Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%) 2 88 26 2 2 120 2 73 22 2 1 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 73% of respondents are agree,22% of respondents are neutral,2% of respondents are strongly agree,2% of respondents are disagree and another 1% of respondents are strongly disagree about the organization shows respect for diverse opinions Chart no. 2.6.7. (a) Chart showing the organization shows respect for diverse range of opinion

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Table no.2.6.8.Table showing the employees opinion on the culture followed in organization for both employees and organization. Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 2 88 24 6 0 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 2 73 20 5 0 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is inferred that 73% of respondents are agree, 20% of respondents are neutral, 5% of respondents are disagree and 2% of respondents are strongly agree on that the culture followed in organization for both employees and organization Chart no. 2.6.8(a) Chart showing the employees opinion on the culture followed in organization for both employees and organization.

Table no.2.6.9.Table showing the employees opinions on human resource department is creative in finding new ways

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Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total

NO. OF RESPONDENTS 6 86 26 0 2 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 5 72 22 0 1 100

Interpretation: The above table shows that it is seen that 72% of respondents are agree, 22% of respondents are neutral, 5% of respondents are strongly agree and 1% of respondents are strongly disagree on that the HR department is creative in finding new ways. Chart no. 2.6.9(a) Chart showing the employees opinions on human resource department is creative in finding new ways

Table no. 2.6.10. Table showing employees opinions on the management teams are diverse in nature Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 2 65 49 4 0 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 2 54 41 3 0 100

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Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 54% of respondents are agree, 41% of respondents are neutral, 3% of respondents area disagree and 2% of respondents are strongly agree on that the management teams are diverse in nature Chart no. 2.6.10(a) Chart showing employees opinions on the management teams are diverse in nature.

Table no. 2.6.11. Table showing that the organization values employees opinion

Sl.No. 1 2 3 4 5

OPTIONS Strongly agree agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total

NO.OF RESPONDENTS 7 87 23 3 0 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 6 73 19 2 0 100

Interpretation: It is clear that 73% of respondents are agree, 19% of respondents are neutral, 6% of respondents are strongly agree and 2% of respondents are disagree on the organization values my opinion. Chart no. 2.6.11(a) Chart showing that the organization values employees opinion

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Table no. 2.6.12. Table showing the satisfactory level regard to these factors

Sl.N o

OPTIONS

HIGHLY SATISFI SATISFIED ED % % 97 81

NEUTRAL %

DISSATISFI ED %

HIGHLY DISSATISFI ED %

TOTA L

Working 1 Environment

10

10

120

4 2 Training 8 3 Promotion Shared 4 values 4

69

57

45

38

120

48

40

43

36

15

12

120

51

43

45

38

16

13

129

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that in working environment 81% of respondents are satisfied, 8% of respondents are neutral, 8% of respondents are dissatisfied and 3% of respondents are highly satisfied in their work environment. In training 57% of respondents are satisfied, 38% of respondents are neutral, 3% of respondents are highly satisfied and 2% of respondents are highly dissatisfied in training. In promotion 40% of respondents are satisfied, 36% of respondents are neutral, 12% of respondents are dissatisfied, 7% of respondents are highly satisfied and 5% of respondents are highly dissatisfied in promotion.

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In shared values 43% of respondents are satisfied, 38% of respondents are neutral, 13% of respondents are dissatisfied, 3% of respondents are highly dissatisfied and 3% of respondents are highly satisfied in shared values.

Chart no. 2.6.12. Chart showing the satisfactory level regard to these factors

Table no. 2.6.13 Table showing the employees satisfactory level on the organization rules and regulations.

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Sl.No 1 2 3 4 5 Total

OPTIONS Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied

NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%) 4 102 10 4 0 120 3 85 9 3 0 100

Interpretation: It is clear that 85% of respondents are satisfied, 9% of respondents are neutral, 3% of respondents are dissatisfied and another 3% of respondents are highly satisfied of the organization rules and regulations. Chart no. 2.6.13(a) Chart showing the employees satisfactory level on the organization rules and regulations

Table no. 2.6.14 Table showing the employees opinion about the organization communicates effectively. Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%) 6 78 34 2 0 120 5 65 28 2 0 100

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Interpretation: The table shows it is inferred that 65% of respondents are agree, 28% of respondents are neutral, 5% of respondents are strongly agree and 2% of respondents are disagree on that the organization communicates effectively Chart no. 2.6.14(a) Chart showing the employees opinion about the organization communicates effectively.

. Table no.2.6.15. Table showing that the every level of workers has a unique code of conduct Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 0 82 28 10 0 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 0 68 24 8 0 100

Interpretation: From the above table shows that 68% of respondents are agree, 24% of respondents are neutral, 8% of respondents are disagree on every level of workers has a unique code of conduct. Chart no.2.6.15 (a) Chart showing that the every level of workers has a unique code of conduct

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Tableno.2.6.16.Table showing the employees opinion about the team members are rewarded based on performance Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 10 71 25 8 6 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 8 59 21 7 5 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 59% of respondents are agree, 21% of respondents are neutral,8% of respondents are strongly agree 7% of respondents are disagree and 5% of respondents are strongly disagree on the team members arena rewarded strictly based on performance Chartno.2.6.16(a)Chart showing the employees opinion about the team members are rewarded based on performance

Table no. 2.6.17 Table showing satisfactory level on employees driven to make difference in workplace Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 Highly satisfied Satisfied NO. OF RESPONDENTS 11 80 PERCENTAGE (%) 9 67

42

3 4 5

Neutral Dissatisfied Highly dissatisfied Total

26 1 2 120

22 1 1 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 67% of respondents are satisfied, 22% of respondents are neutral, 9% of respondents are highly satisfied, 1% of respondents are dissatisfied and another 1% of respondents are highly dissatisfied on driven to make difference in their workplace. Chart no. 2.6.17(a) Chart showing satisfactory level on employees driven to make difference in workplace

Table no. 2.6.18. Table showing that there is openness to suggestion from people at all levels. Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 7 68 25 9 11 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 6 56 21 8 9 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is inferred that 56% of respondents are agree, 21% of respondents are neutral,8% of respondents are disagree, 6% of respondents are strongly agree

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and 9% of respondents are strongly disagree on there is openness to suggestion from peoplerelated at all levels. Chart no. 2.6.18(a) Chart showing that there is openness to suggestion from people at all levels.

Table no. 2.6.19 Table showing the employees opinion on culture learned from the organization Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 Stories Symbols Rituals Language Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 12 47 12 49 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 10 39 10 41 100

Interpretation: It is clear that 41% of respondents are learned the culture through language, 39% of respondents are through symbols, 10% of respondents are learned through stories and 10% of respondents are learned the culture through rituals. Chart no. 2.6.19(a) Chart showing the employees opinion on culture learned from the organization

Table no. 2.6.20 Table showing the employees opinion about the perfect

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co-operation in the work Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS 10 92 12 4 2 120 PERCENTAGE (%) 8 77 10 3 2 100

Interpretation: The above table shows that77% of respondents are agree, 10% of respondents are neutral, 8% of respondents are strongly agree,3% of respondents are disagree and 2% of respondents are strongly disagree on the perfect co-operation in the work. Chart no. 2.6.20(a) Chart showing the employees opinion about the perfect co- operation in the work

Table no. 2.6.21 Table showing the employees opinion about the good relationship with co-workers Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 Yes No Total NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%) 116 4 120 97 3 100

Interpretation:

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The above table shows it is clear that 97% of respondents are yes on good relationship with co-workers and 3% of respondents are no on good relationship with co-workers.

Chart no. 2.6.21(a) Chart showing the employees opinion about the good relationship with co-workers

Table no. 2.6.22. Table showing the employees opinion about enjoying starting a new day at work Sl.No. OPTIONS NO. OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (%) 1 2 3 4 5 Total Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree 29 87 2 0 2 120 24 73 2 0 1 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is inferred that 73% of respondents are agree, 24% of respondents are strongly agree and 1,67% of respondents are neutral on the enjoy starting a new day at work. Chart no. 2.6.22(a) Chart showing the employees opinion about enjoying starting a

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new day at work

Table no. 2.6.23. Table showing the employees opinion on organization recognizes and celebrates successes of team members.

Sl.No. OPTIONS 1 2 Yes No Total

NO. OF RESPONDENTS 116 4 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 97 3 100

Interpretation: The above table shows it is clear that 96.67% of respondents are yes on the organization celebrate success of team members and 3.33% of respondents are No on the organization celebrate success of team members

Chart no. 2.6.23(a) Chart showing the employees opinion on organization recognizes and celebrates successes of team members.

Table no.2.6.24 Table showing that the satisfactory level on strong culture

Sl.N o.

OPTIONS

HIGHLY SATISFIE D %

SATISFIE D %

NEUTRA L %

DISSATIS FIED %

HIGHLY DISSATISFI ED %

TOT AL

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Rewards 1 Orientation 2 Beliefs 3 Communication 4

83

69

20

17

12

10

120

66

55

40

33

120

65

54

46

38

120

64

53

42

35

120

Interpretation: The above table shows it is inferred that in rewards 69% of respondents are satisfied on their rewards, 17% of respondents are neutral, 10% of respondents are dissatisfied and 4% of respondents are highly satisfied on rewards. In orientation 55% of respondents are satisfied on orientation, 33% of respondents are neutral, 6% of respondents are dissatisfied, another 4% of respondents are highly satisfied and 2% of respondents are highly dissatisfied on orientation. In beliefs 54% of respondents are satisfied on beliefs,38% of respondents are neutral, 4% of respondents are highly satisfied, 2% of respondents are dissatisfied and 2% of respondents are highly dissatisfied about their beliefs. In communication 53% of respondents are satisfied on the communication, 35% of respondents are neutral on this, 6% of respondents are highly satisfied, and 6% of respondents are dissatisfied on communication.

Chart no.2.6.24 (a) Chart showing that the satisfactory level on strong culture

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Chi-square test for goodness of fit

Sl.No. 1 2 3 4 5

OPTIONS Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree Total

NO. OF RESPONDENTS 10 71 25 8 6 120

PERCENTAGE (%) 8 59 21 7 5 100

Ho: there is no relationship between the team members performance and rewards

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H1: there is relationship between the team members performance and rewards The value of the test-statistic is

Table no.2.6.25 Table showing that there is a relationship between the team members performance and rewards Observed Options Strongly agree Agree Neutral Disagree Strongly disagree frequency(O ) 10 71 25 8 6 24 24 24 24 24 Expected frequency(E) (O-E) -14 47 -1 -16 -18 (O-E)2 196 2209 1 256 324 (O-E)2/E 8.17 92.04 0.045 10.67 13.5

Total

120

124.4

Expected frequency =120/5 = 24. Calculated value = 124.4 Level of significance =0.5 Degree of freedom= n-1 = 5-1 =4 Table value = 9.488

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RESULT: Since the Calculated value > table value, so reject Ho. Hence, there is relationship between the team members performance and rewards.

ANALYSIS OF VARIANCE (ANOVA)

Components

Highly satisfied

Satisfied

Neutral

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

Rewards Orientation Beliefs Communication

5 5 5 7

83 66 65 64

20 40 46 42

12 7 2 7

0 2 2 0

Ho: there is no significant difference between the components of strong culture

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H1: there is significant difference between the components of strong culture

Step 1: Table no.2.6.26 table showing that there is a significant difference in these components Particulars Rewards Orientation Beliefs Communication X1 5 5 5 7 X2 83 66 65 64 X3 20 40 46 42 X4 12 7 2 7 X5 0 2 2 0

Total

X1= 22

X2= 278

X3= 148

X4= 28

X5= 4

Step 2: Particulars Rewards Orientation Beliefs Communication


X21 X22 X23 X24 X25

25 25 25 49

6889 4356 4225 4096

400 1600 2116 1764

144 49 4 49

0 4 4 0

Total

X21=172

X22=18380

X23=6056

X24=232

X25=8

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Step 3: Calculate T value: N=20 T=x1+x2+x3+x4+x =22+278+148+28+4 T= 480 Step 4: Correction Factor = T2/2 = 4802/20 =230400/20 CF=11520 Step 5: TSS = (X21+X22+X23+X24+X25) CF = (124+19566+5880+246+8) 11520 = 25824 11520 = 14304. Step 6: Sum of square between components = [(X1)2/n+ (X2)2/n + (X3)2 /n+(X4)2/n + (X5)2/n] CF = [(22)2/4 + (278)2/4+ (148)2/4+(28)2/4+(4)2/4] -11520 = (121+19321+5476+196+4) 11520 = 13598

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Step 7: (Total sum of squares) (sum of squares) = (14304) (13598) = 706. Step 8: ANOVA table Source of variance Between variables Within variables Sum of squares 13598 706 Degree of freedom C-1= 5-1 =4 N-C= 20-5 = 15 variance SSC/C-1 = 3399.5 SSE/N-C = 47.07

F= between variable / within variable = 3399.5/47.07 = 72

Calculated value =72 Table value = 3.06 RESULT: Since Calculated value > table value, so reject Ho. Hence, there is a significant difference between the components of strong culture.

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3.1 FINDINGS

It is inferred that majority (68%) of the respondents are above 40 years of age.

It is inferred that majority (100%) of the respondents are male.


It is inferred that majority (57%) of the respondents are above 30 years of experience in

their work.
It is inferred that majority (52%) of the respondents are getting salary between 30000 to

40000.
It is inferred that majority (78%) of the respondents agree that the strategic goals and

objectives are widely shared with all in Ashok Leyland.


It is found that majority (92%) of the respondents said that the organization policies are

reviewed annually.

55 It is inferred that majority (73%) of the respondents agree that the organization shows

respect for a different opinions and ideas.


It is inferred that majority (73%) of the respondents says that the organization culture

followed for both the organization and employees.


It is inferred that majority (72%) of the respondents agree with the human resource

department is creative in finding new ways to attract diverse groups.


It is inferred that majority (54%) of the respondents agree with the management teams are

diverse in nature.
It is found that majority (73%) of the respondents feel that organization values our

opinion.
It is inferred that majority (81%) of the respondents satisfied with their working

environment in Ashok Leyland.


It is inferred that majority (57%) of the respondents satisfied with their training programs

conducted in the Ashok Leyland. It is inferred that majority (40%) of the respondents satisfied with their promotions.
It is inferred that majority (43%) of the respondents satisfied with the organization shares

the information. It is found that majority (85%) of the respondents satisfied with their rules and regulations of Ashok Leyland Company. It is inferred that majority (65%) of the respondents agree with the organization communicates effectively.
It is found that majority (68%) of the respondents agree with that every level of workers

has a unique code of conduct in the organization.


It is inferred that majority (59%) of the respondents are stated that rewarded the team

members based on their performance.


It is found that majority (67%) of the respondents are feel driven to make a difference in

their work place.


It is inferred that majority (56%) of the respondents are agree with that openness to

suggestion from all levels of people in the organization.


It is found that majority (41%) of the respondents learned the culture of the organization

by the way of language.

56 It is found that majority (77%) of the respondents have a perfect co-operation in their

work.
It is found that majority (97%) of the respondents have the good relationship with their

co-workers in the organization.

It is inferred that majority (73%) of the respondents enjoying their work from the new day they starting their work.

It is inferred that majority (97%) of the respondents are celebrates the success of team

members.
It is inferred that majority (69%) of the respondents satisfied with the strong culture is

based on the rewards. It is inferred that majority (55%) of the respondents satisfied with the strong culture is based on the orientation.
It is inferred that majority (54%) of the respondents satisfied with the strong culture is

based on beliefs.
It is inferred that majority (53%) of the respondents satisfied with the strong culture is

based on communication.
It is inferred that there is a relationship between the team members performance and

rewards. It is found that there is a significant difference between the components of strong culture.

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3.2. SUGGESTION
The management can provide proper guidance to the employees regarding organizational

culture through HR department.


Management can improve the better communication between management and

employees and improve to consider the openness suggestion from all levels of people working in the organization. To improve the relationship between top level to low level.
The Management can improve the training programs to the employees, it helps to develop

their skills.
The company will improve to share the information to all working in the organization\

The company can improve to promote the employees based on their performance in the work.
Work will be planned well in advance, taking care that work assignments do not overlap

with one another. Information regarding the work could reach in time.

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3.3. CONCLUSION

The present study was conducted at Ashok Leyland Private Limited, Chennai. Organizational culture helps to identify the employees perception towards the organization. The emphasis has been on improved receptivity to feedback, more openness of communication, introduction of new methodologies of work, better clarity of roles and jobs, as well as adequacy and appropriateness of training. The type of research design used for the study is descriptive research design. Sample size taken for the study is 120 employees in Ashok Leyland. Simple random sampling technique has been used. A structured questionnaire is prepared to collect data. To a lesser degree, the respondents also agree that they have more freedom in their work, that the organization has become less bureaucratic and more flexible, and that the work environment is pleasant. Since most of the respondents have positive feelings about it, the management should take care to maintain the current way of working.

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