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The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

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Evidence obtained through illegal search and seizure can also be used in the following circumstances: When evidence is obtained illegally outside the United States. Probation or parole revocation hearings. When a private person, not a government agent, illegally seized the evidence. When evidenced seized illegally is used to impeach the defendant's testimony. Tax hearings. Deportation hearings.

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This is one of James Otis's famous speeches and this was about the writs of assistance: The child independence was then and there born, every man of an immense crowded audience appeared to me to go away as I did, ready to take arms against writs of assistance.

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The Federalist had to convince enough anti-Federalists to support the Constitution the pass it and have it go into effect, so they promised to the anti-Federalist that if they vote to accept the Constitution, the First Congress would address their concerns by adding a bill of rights to it. So in other words the 4th Amendment was the anti-Federalist idea.

THE 4TH AMEDMENT


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The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

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The 4th Amendment is originally from an event that happened when we were still under the British's control. The British were making many revenue collection bills for the Americans could pay. Then we started smuggling operations in order to get around the customs taxes imposed by the British government. As the King and parliament response to the widespread smuggling, they began to use writs of assistance. It is a legal search warrants that were very broad and general in their scope. Only customs agents could use it to search any property they believed might contain contraband goods. In return Massachusetts the legislature passed search and seizure laws in 1756 outlawing the use or general warrants. That created a great deal of friction between the Royal Governor and the people of Massachusetts until the death of King George II in 1760.

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It requires that in order for as government official, such as a police officer, to search a person's home, business, papers, bank accounts, computer or other personal items, in most cases, he must obtain a search warrant signed by a judge.

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Some exceptions to the 4th amendment warrant rule: The Plain View Doctrine The Open Fields Doctrine Exigent Circumstances Motor Vehicle Exception Searches Incident to a Lawful Arrest Border Search Exception Other Exceptions

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The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

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The 4th Amendment to the United States Constitution was added as part of the Bill of Rights on December 15, 1791. It deals with protecting people from the searching of their homes and private property without properly executed search warrants. The 4th Amendment reads like this: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers. And effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

A search warrant from Texas.

Willie Jones North Carolina's leading Anti-Federalist.

Alexander Hamilton A protagonist in the Federalist.

A 1739 Land Warrant of Andreas Brinker Bucks County, Pennsylvania

A 1794 British Admiralty Press Warrant