Lesson Plan #1 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Introduction to Matter: liquids, solids, and gases

Date: August 31st Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching) and Interactive (Large group discussion)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students understand how to work respectfully in pairs. Students understand the concept of sorting. Adaptive Dimension:

Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Envelopes and cards (13), teacher cards, chart paper, pen Set-up: photo copy cards for pg. 19-21 in Properties of liquids and solids.

Set ( 20 minutes) 1. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 2. Tell students that today we are going to start a fun science unit and we are going to do an activity in pairs to help us figure out what we are going to learn about. 3. Each pair is going to get an envelope of cards then you will go find a place in the room to work. You and your pair are going to take turns reading the word on the card then place the cards on the table/floor where you are working. Then I want you to sort the picture cards in a way you think makes sense. Sorting: Putting things together that are the same. Every time you sort things you need a sorting rule. Example, colour, shape, size etc. 4. Show students an example of sorting on the chart paper. 5. Repeat the instructions for the task. #1 When your name and your partners name is called take your envelope and quietly go find a place to work in the room. #2 Take turns pulling a picture card out of the envelope and saying the word that is on the card then place it on the floor/table. #3 Sort the cards how ever you think is right. You will have 5 minutes. 6. Ask 2 students to repeat the instructions before beginning. Development ( 20 minutes) 1. Give students about 5 minutes to complete sorting activity. 2. Ask students to share how they sorted their cards and why. 3. After a few groups to share their answers I will ask the students to come sit back on the mat. 4. Share with the student how I sorted the cards. (blow up the cards and sticky tack them to the board. Why do you think I sorting the cards this way? I sorted these cards by their state of matter. (Liquid or Solid) Matter is anything that takes up place or as weight. Matter can be in the form of a solid like a tree of a clock. Matter can be in the form of a liquid like rain or juice. Matter can be in the form of gas like steam or fog. Liquid matter can flow one place to another. Liquid spreads out and gravity pulls it down. This means that liquids will usually flow from a high place to a low place. The farther liquid falls the faster liquid flows. Liquid

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts.

Lesson Plan #2 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Introduction to Matter: liquids, solids, and gases (Continue from lesson #1) Date: September 1st/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching) and Interactive (Large group discussion)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students understand how to listen respectfully when a story is being read to them. Adaptive Dimension:

Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Change It! Solids, liquids and you By Adrienne Mason, Solids and Liquids handout from lesson #1, pg. 24 from properties of liquids and solids. (26 copies) Set-up: Have all materials ready to go and up by the teaching chair.

Set ( 2 minutes) 1. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 2. Tell students that today we are going to review what we started to learn about yesterday. Ask who remembers what we are learning about? (Matter, liquids, solids) Tell the students that I have a book called Change it! Solids, liquids, gases and you that I’m going to read to you. 3. Before beginning the story review what and how I expect the students to act while I’m teaching. Introduce the “non-verbal cue system” If you are disturbing the class I will simply write your name on the whiteboard and if you get 2 x’s beside your name you will have to come talk to me after class. Development ( 25 minutes) 1. Begin reading the story to the class. Each page has an interactive component. Tell students that I don’t what you to yell out the answers. I will call your name, then you can give me an answer. 2. After the story make a chart with the class. The chart will include three categories. ( Solids, Liquids and Gases) Ask students to help you decide what each of the state matters look like. Solids: don’t change shape easily (they have to be pushed or pulled, heated or cooled.) Liquids: can flow, take the shape of the container they are in. Gases: have no shape, they spread out to fill the space they are in. 3. Remind students to put up their hands if they have an idea (answer). 4. Tell students that I will keep the list we started today and we can add things as we are learning. 5. ***If students are getting to distracted stand up and play a quick game of Miss Scherle Says. 6. Tell/show students that I have a fun worksheet for the students to do called Favourite Solids and Liquids Survey. 7. Read through questions with the students. 8. Tell students that when you get your paper go sit down at your table and first write your name then fill out the “my answer” column, then quietly ask two friends at your table their answers and write them down. Closure ( 2 minutes)

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Use non-verbal cues for off task students (write names on the board and when you have 2 x’s you will need to come talk to me after class.

Lesson Plan #3 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Liquids (Part One) Date: September 2nd/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching),Interactive (Large group discussion) Experiential (experiments)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. b. Investigate how liquids change when they are poured into different containers.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in groups and help others who don’t know how to read. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Rice, blocks, jelly beans, plastic cups, trays, basins, small containers (6), water, measuring cup, 3 different sized containers, food colouring Set-up: Organize all stations before class starts.

Set ( 10 minutes) 4. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 5. Tell students that today we are going to explore liquids and we are going to do a fun experiment to help us learn more about liquids. 6. Begin by doing an experiment with the class. “which container has more water?” 7. Do a class vote. Record student’s answers. 8. Then measure the water out to see how much water each container has. (They are all the same.) Refer back to the chart we made. All liquids take the same of their container. 6. Tell students that now you are going to do an experiment with your friends at the table you sit at but before we can begin I want go over the rules. 7. #1 Include everyone in your group in the activity. #2 Be careful with all the materials at your table and try not to spill. #3 If you do spill, clean up your mess. #4 Be on your best behaviour if you want to do more experiments on another day. 8. Ask students to go sit at their desk and tell them to not touch any of the materials until I say so. Development ( 25 minutes) 6. Tell students to fill the plastic cup with jelly beans. Look at the cup and draw a picture of what you see. “Do the containers look full?” 7. Then fill the jelly bean cup with water and observe then answer these questions on the handout. What happened when we added water? (It could fit between the solids) What can liquids do differently than solids? (Take the shape of their container) 8. Students will do this with each material. (Blocks and rice) and draw a picture of what happened. After each item students must carefully clean up before you can go to the next material. Closure ( 2 minutes) 1. When students are done the experiment and have filled out the whole sheet they can hand it in and clean up their table. 2. If students are done before others they can work on lesson #2 handout “Favourite Solids and Liquids Survey”

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after.

Lesson Plan #4 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Liquids (Part Two) Date: September 6th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching),Interactive (Large group discussion) Experiential (experiments)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. g. Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids. h. Demonstrate that liquids and solids are matter because they have mass and take up space.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

b. Investigate how liquids change when they are poured into different containers. f. Carry out an investigation to determine the viscosity of different liquids (e.g., water, milk, and syrup) when placed on various surfaces (e.g., paper, paper towel, cotton, plastic, and wax paper). Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies

Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in groups and help others who don’t know how to read. I will divided groups to help with classroom management Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Rice, jelly beans, plastic cups, trays, basins, water, ketchup, oil, liquid soap, syrup, trays (2), sandpaper, paper towel, stop watch, wax paper Set-up: Organize all stations before class starts, put up chart paper

Set ( 20 minutes) 9. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 10. Review what we are learning about so far. Ask a few students (both students with hands up and hands down.) 11. Review the chart that we made as a class. 12. Refer back to lesson #3 (where the blocks and water were in the container.) 13. Ask students what they remembered or learned from that lesson. 14. Ask students to quietly turn around and watch me do the same experiment with jelly beans. What is the solid and what is the liquid? Liquid=water Solid=jelly beans What happened when we added water? The water can fit between the solids. What can liquids do differently then solids? Take the shape of the container. 15. Refer back to handout from lesson #3. 16. Tell students that you will have some time to finish this handout today if you’re not finished. 17. Today we are going to be exploring some more about liquids. We are going to have a liquid race. 18. Explain how some of you had a hard time staying on task the other day when we do our experiments in groups so today we are going to try something different. Instead of everyone doing the experiment at once we are going to take turns doing the experiment at the back of the room. Everyone will get a chance to do the experiment than you will have a few tasks to work on. 19. Tasks: - When I call your name you will come to the back table. - If you are not at the back table you will be working independently and quietly at your table. - Things to work on: - Finish handouts from lesson #2 and #3. (If you need help reading the question or you are unsure of what to do ask a friend at your table) - Once you’re done both handouts you can work on a cover page for your Science duotang. - Must have Liquids and Solids neatly printed on it. Then draw pictures of solid matter and liquid matter. - Remind students that I expect your best effort as your parents will be looking

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Liquid Race Name: _________________________________________________

Liquid

Surface

Properties of Liquid

Time (Speed)

Lesson Plan #5

Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Liquids (Part Three)

Date: September 7th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching),Interactive (Large group discussion) Experiential (experiments)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. g. Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids. h. Demonstrate that liquids and solids are matter because they have mass and take up space.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

b. Investigate how liquids change when they are poured into different containers. f. Carry out an investigation to determine the viscosity of different liquids (e.g., water, milk, and syrup) when placed on various surfaces (e.g., paper, paper towel, cotton, plastic, and wax paper). Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Class will work together as a large group. This will help with classroom management and with students who have difficulty following directions.

Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: basins, water, oil, shampoo, syrup, trays (2), sandpaper, paper towel, stop watch, wax paper Set-up: Organize all materials before class starts

Set ( 5 minutes) 20. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 21. Review what we started to learn about yesterday. Tell students some of you had a chance to start yesterdays experiment called liquid race however many of you didn’t get a chance to yet so together as a class we are going to do this experiment. 22. Tell students that we are still learning how to be scientists and sometimes we get to chatting or off task so we need to work on that so we can do lots of more experiments in the future. 23. I want everyone to be their best behaviour and if you are I might ask you to come help me with the experiment. 24. Ask students to quietly turn around. Development ( 30 minutes) 13. Tell students that today we are going to have a liquid race to see how liquids act and also to see if they behave the same why or not. 14. Introduce all the liquid materials. 15. Ask students if they think all liquids are the same or if they are different and why. 16. Discuss the properties of liquids. We use our senses to determine “properties” of objects that can be used to identify them. --What are some properties we determine by using our… a) sense of sight b) sense of smell c) sense of touch d) sense of taste e) hearing. How do the liquids look? How do the liquids feel? Pour? 5. Pick the first liquid and surface and begin demonstration. 6. Pick on task students to come help time and pour the liquid. 7. Discuss: How did the liquid pour? What are some of its properties? Record students answers and times on the white board. 8. Demonstrate all 4 liquids and compare and discuss: Do all liquids behave the same? (No because all liquids flow differently) What is different? (they have different thickness, some flow fast, some are slow, some are more gooey than others) What is

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #6 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Liquids (Part Four) Date: September 8th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching),Interactive (Large group discussion) Experiential (experiments)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. g. Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids. h. Demonstrate that liquids and solids are matter because they have mass and take up space.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

b. Investigate how liquids change when they are poured into different containers. f. Carry out an investigation to determine the viscosity of different liquids (e.g., water, milk, and syrup) when placed on various surfaces (e.g., paper, paper towel, cotton, plastic, and wax paper). Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases)

Adaptive Dimension: Class will work together as a large group. This will help with classroom management and with students who have difficulty following directions. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: basins, water, oil, shampoo, syrup, trays (2), sandpaper, paper towel, stop watch, wax paper Set-up: Organize all materials before class starts

Set ( 10 minutes) 25. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 26. Tell students that today we are going to make a chart of how I expect you to act when it’s Ms. Scherle time. 27. Ask students to share ideas about how the classroom should look like, feel like, and sound like when I’m teaching or trying to show you an experiment. Students should be: -sitting -hands to yourself -listening to the teacher -mouths closed and eyes on Ms. Scherle -raise your hand when you have a question or answer -be kind and respectful -putting your best effort into your work -learning Teacher: Teaching the students Helping the students Tell students that we will be using this chart to help us remember how to act in class with me. If the classroom does not look like this chart we will not be able to learn lots of fun things like conducting science experiments. 4. Demonstrate good behaviour and bad behaviour of what the classroom should look like, sound like and sound like. 5. Ask students to quietly turn around. **movement break** Development (25 minutes) 17. Have a discussion about the liquid race experiment we did yesterday. Have students share what they learn from the experiment 18. Discuss the similarities and differences about liquids. (Not all liquids are the same thickness, some are runny, some are sticky, they can be different colours, you can eat some and others you can’t. Some flow more quickly and fast and others are slow. They are the same because they all flow and they all take the shape of its container.) 19. Tell students that today we are going to try one more liquid race to see how liquids act on different kinds of surfaces. Ask students what surface were the

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #7 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Liquids (Part Five) Mixing Liquids Date: September 9th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct (Explicit Teaching),Interactive (Large group discussion) Experiential (experiments)

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

d. Investigate and describe the changes in characteristics of familiar solids and liquids resulting from processes such as mixing and dissolving liquids with liquids, solids with solids, and liquids with solids. Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Class will work together as a large group. This will help with classroom management and with students who have difficulty following directions. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Liquids: milk, water, pop, oil, orange juice, dish soap, shampoo, corn syrup, chocolate syrup, vinegar , jelly bean water, food colouring. clear plastic cups, spoons

Set-up: Organize all materials before class starts

Set ( 8 minutes) 28. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 29. Tell students that today we are all going to get a chance to be scientists working and observing in the lab. We are going to be exploring mixing different liquids together to see what happens. 30. Before we start our experiment we need to go over how to act when we are doing a class experiment. Look over chart paper. 31. Also, before we start I have a few mystery liquids. Two liquids were mixed together in this cup and as we mix many different liquids together we are going to try and figure out what the mystery liquids are in this cup. 32. Move students to the “lab area” so all observers can see the experiments being done. 33. Remind students that I want them to watch closely to all the liquid mixtures because after we are done all of them I want you to draw a picture of your favourite and explain why with a few words. **movement break** Development (25 minutes) 28. Students names will be drawn out of a bucket (2 at a time) to see who the first scientists are. Remind students that everyone will get a chance. 29. Ask students to predict what they think will happen when I mix two liquids together? Do all liquids mix together the same? 30. Each student will have a liquid and at the same time they will pour the each liquid into one cup and see what happens. 31. Continue with about 6 pairs then have a stretch break! 32. Explanation of why some liquids mix and some separate: Certain liquids are heavier, "dense", than others. When you attempt to mix two liquids which have different densities, they separate when you stop mixing them. The "heavier" liquid deposits itself on the bottom and the "lighter" liquid deposits itself on top. There exists a wide range of liquids with various densities. Molasses is most dense while alcohol is the least dense liquid. 33. Remind students to try and figure out the mystery liquids. Also remind students to

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Mixtures: 1) Orange juice, milk 2) Coke, milk 3) Vinegar, oil 4) Dish soap, oil 5) Chocolate syrup, milk 6) Corn syrup, shampoo 7) Blue water, vinegar 8) Orange juice, coke 9) Purple juice, corn syrup 10) Vinegar, coke 11) Oil, chocolate syrup 12) Orange juice, purple juice 13) Student’s ideas

Lesson Plan #8 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Solids Date: September 12th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning) Independent Study (assigned question) Interactive Instruction (brainstorming, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. c. Identify examples of how liquids, in all three states of matter, are used at home, in the school, and throughout their communities. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape,

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. g. Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners so they can help each other working on the handout. Students are able to draw, write and share what they learned about their solid matter. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: -Chart Paper from previous lessons -Candle, Banana, Rice, Rock, Salt, Sugar, Book, Ziploc bag, Toothpicks, Glass, pencil, spoon Set-up: Organize all materials before class starts

Set ( 8 minutes) 34. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 35. Tell students that for the past we having been exploring liquids and through a variety of fun experiment we learned a lot about liquids. Lets add to our chart paper a few things we have learned about liquids: Liquids can be different colours, some are thick some are thin, some we can eat some we can’t, flow at different rates, which can also depend on what surface the liquid is flowing on, all liquids flow down, certain liquids heavier “more dense” then others, some liquids mix together and some separate. 36. Tell the class that today we are going to learn more about solid matter. Ask students what a solid is: --A solid is one kind of matter. --A solid takes up space. --Solids have a shape of their own. --Solids keep their shape and size. Solids have a definite shape that you can see and feel. --The molecules in a solid are very close together and have little space to move around. What do we know about properties of solids? --Many of a solid’s physical properties are easy to see and describe. We use these properties to help identify the solid. Properties show how one solid is the same and yet different from other solids. What are these properties? Brainstorm words that describe how a solid looks, feels, is made of, etc (write on board). a) size b) shape c) colour d) hardness e) texture, etc. --Talk about pouring a solid. **movement break** Development (10 minutes) 36. Tell students that today everyone is going to become an expert on some kind of solid object then they are going to share their findings with the class. 37. Show an example so students understand what their task is. 38. Tell students they will be working with a partner. 39. Check for understanding then begin the activity. Students will have about 5 minutes to work with their partner.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #9 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Exploring Solids (Part Two) Date: September 13th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning) Interactive Instruction (brainstorming, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. c. Identify examples of how liquids, in all three states of matter, are used at home, in the school, and throughout their communities. f. Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids. g. Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Students have a basic understanding of what matter is and the three states (solid, liquids and gases) Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners so they can help each other working on the handout. Students are able to draw, write and share what they learned about their solid matter.

Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: -Chart Paper from previous lessons, weight scale -Candle, Banana, Rice, Rock, Salt, Sugar, Book, Ziploc bag, Toothpicks, Glass, pencil, spoon Set-up: Organize all materials before class starts

Set ( 15 minutes) 37. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 38. Review I Chart 39. Review what we started yesterday ask students to share what we did. Learning about solids. Each pair had to work together to become an expert on their solid matter. 40. Pick names out of bag for the order students will share their work. 41. Remind students of what a good answer is. Give an example (chair) 42. ***stretch 43. Tell students that today we are going to explore the solid objects we used yesterday a little more by learning about if the solid is heavy or not. And if all solid weigh the same or not. 44. Show students a scale and how it works. Development (10 minutes)

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly.

Remind students how to use 40. Tell students that each table has a scale materials and how to clean up after. and two solid objects. You will have about 1 minute to explore the solid Move disruptive student towards objects and see how heavy they are. me. 41. Then when you hear the drum 3 times you will point and move to the next table and explore those solids at the table. 42. Show students how to properly move from one table to the next. 43. Check for understanding then begin the activity. 44. Once everyone has rotated through each table students will come meet back on the mat. Closure ( 20 minutes) 1. Ask students to share how they think the activity went. 2. Ask students: Do all solids look the same? (shape, size, texture, colour?) Do all solids weigh the same? How are solids and liquids different? 3. Add anything new about solids the students learned to the chart paper. Solids can be different colours, shapes, sizes, textures and weigh differently. 4. What are some other things you want to learn about solids?

Lesson Plan #10 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Buoyancy Date: September 14th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning) Interactive Instruction (brainstorming, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. e. Select and safely use materials and tools (e.g., magnifier, scale, measuring cup, and spatula) to carry out their own explorations of the observable physical properties of familiar liquids and solids. h. Demonstrate that liquids and solids are matter because they have mass and take up space. j. Group or sequence liquids and solids according to one or more properties such as colour, state, texture, smell, transparency, and buoyancy.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What does buoyancy/floating and sinking mean? Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners so they can help each other working on the handout. I will be reading a book and showing students pictures to help engage all types of learners. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Book: My World of Science: Solids in my world by: Joanne Randolph, Sinking picture from Exploring matter cards, containers, water, bolts, paper clips, pencils, spoons, coins, paintbrushes, marbles, dice, cubes. Set-up: each station with materials and water

Set ( 15 minutes) 45. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 46. Review I Chart 47. Ask students what kind of matter we are learning about right now. (Solids) 48. Today I’m going to read you a book called Solids in my world. 49. Read story. 50. Show students a picture ask them to share what they see in the picture. 51. Tell students that today we are going to learn about buoyancy. Ask students if anyone knows what that word means. Buoyancy means: The ability or tendency to float in water or air or some other fluid 52. Tell students that today we are going to be scientists and explore solid objects to see if they will sink or float. In partners you will have time to explore and see what happens. 53. *****Stretch Development (10 minutes)

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after.

45. Instructions: You and your partner will Move disruptive student towards each get a data collection sheet where to me. fill out. With each item you will predict if it will sink or float (check yes or no) Then explore and check if it did sink or float. 46. Go over expectations of working in partners. -voices should be low -on task -respect the materials and each other -when you hear the chime you will stop and put your hands on your head. 47. Students will have about 10 minutes to explore. 48. Give instructions for clean up. Closure ( 20 minutes) 1. Gather students back on the mat. 2. Ask a few students to share what they learned about buoyancy/floating and sinking 3. Ask students: Could we always predict what would happen? Did the object size matter? If we changed the shape or property of the object, did it change what happened? (for example the aluminum foil)

Lesson Plan #11 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Mixing Solids and Liquids: Dissolving Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI] Date: September 15th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Interactive: Large group discussion ` Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

d. Investigate and describe the changes in characteristics of familiar solids and liquids resulting from processes such as mixing and dissolving liquids with liquids, solids with solids, and liquids with solids. e. Distinguish between familiar solids (e.g., sand, sugar, salt, gravel, dirt, and drink crystals) that dissolve in water and those that do not.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What does dissolving mean? Adaptive Dimension: We will work together as a class to help with classroom management. Also everyone will be able to share their ideas with all the students. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Book: Sugar, salt, pepper, coffee grounds, dish detergent, sand. Dissolving picture from Exploring matter cards, plastic clear cups, water, filters Set-up: all materials and document camera

Set ( 10 minutes) 54. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 55. Review I Chart 56. Ask students what kind of matter we are learning about right now. (Solids) --One way to find out what state of matter something is is by what it’s made out of. Has anyone heard the term “molecules” before? --All matter is made up of molecules. A molecule is a tiny, tiny particle that are too small to see, even with a very strong microscope. These tiny particles join together to make solids, liquids and gases. The molecules are always moving. --The molecules in a solid are very close together. The molecules have very little room to move around. (Draw picture on the board). --The molecules in a liquid are close together, but not as close as solids. They have room to move around. The molecules in liquids flow. (Draw picture on the board). 57. --The molecules in a gas are spread far apart. The molecules float around and spread out in all directions. These molecules keep moving and gently bump into each other. (Draw picture on the board). 58. Show students picture and ask students what they see in this picture and ask them what do they think we are going to learn about today. Dissolving Solids in water. 59. Read the back of the card. 60. Tell students that today as a class we are going to explore if solids dissolve in water or not. 61. *****Stretch Development (20 minutes) 49. Tell students we are going to sit on the floor by the document camera so we can all see what happens when we mix some solids in liquids together. 50. Remind students how to sit on the floor: Quietly, watching the screen, don’t stand up and look at my materials (watch the screen) 51. Show students the first solid. (Sugar) Pour solid into water mix and see what happens. 52. Try with all materials sand, salt, pepper, coffee grounds. 53. Ask students what happened to each solid when it was mixed in the water? Where do the sugar crystals go when they dissolve in water?

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #12 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Mixing Solids and Liquids: Dissolving and creating Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI] Date: September 16th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Interactive: Large group discussion ` Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids.

LS2.2 Assess results of combining liquids and solids, including technologies based on understanding these interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

d. Investigate and describe the changes in characteristics of familiar solids and liquids resulting from processes such as mixing and dissolving liquids with liquids, solids with solids, and liquids with solids.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What does dissolving mean? Mixing? Adaptive Dimension: We will work together as a class to help with classroom management. Also everyone will be able to share their ideas with all the students. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Flour, salt, mixing bowl, a spoon, hot water, food colouring Set-up: all materials and document camera

Set ( 10 minutes) 62. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 63. Review I Chart 64. Review what we talked about yesterday. Molecules: Solids, liquids and gases Dissolving solids in liquids. 65. Show students what happened when we filtered the solutions. 66. Ask students what did they learn about dissolving solids. 67. Tell students to look up on the board at this recipe. Today we are going to be mixing together these liquids and solids and we will see what it creates. 68. *****Stretch Molecule game Development (20 minutes) 54. Make the Play Doh with the students using the document camera. 1 cup flour ¼ salt mixing bowl a spoon ½ cup hot tap water food colouring 55. Ask students what happened to all the liquids and solid ingredients? 56. What did the liquids and solids create? 57. Is Play Doh a liquid or a solid Solid: it keeps the shape you mold it into. Solids keep their shape unless you do something to change them. 5. Tell students that we are all going to have a change playing with their own play doh as I made some last night for all of you! Some things you can try with your play doh -spell the worlds Solid or Liquids -make molecules -make animals -ask students for ideas Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Tell students that they will be able to take their play doh home at the end of the day. 2. Also if they want to, they can play with it for Fun Friday.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Assessment: Observation and classroom discussion

Lesson Plan #13 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Gases Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI] Date: September 19th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Interactive: Large group discussion Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as gases. h. Demonstrate that gases are matter because they have mass and take up space.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What is a gas? Adaptive Dimension: We will work together as a class to help with classroom management. Also everyone will be able to share their ideas with all the students. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Book called Gases in my World, 26 cups, paper towel, Balloon Picture from Exploring Matter Booklet, CD Singin Songs of Science #8 Matter is Everywhere Set-up: all materials

Set ( 10 minutes) 69. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 70. Review I Chart 71. Remind students that we have been learning about matter and so far we have learned about 2 kinds (liquids and solids) now we are going to learn about gases. 72. Introduce Gases by reading book called “ Gases in my World” 73. Ask students to share some ideas of what gases are. 74. Show students the picture of the balloons. Ask them what do they see? 75. Read the back of the card and ask the basic and challenge questions. **Molecule game Development (15 minutes) 58. Activity: Gases fill up space 59. Show students a cup and then scrunch of some paper towel and put it in side the cup. 60. Ask students: What do you think will happen when I put this cup upside down in water and why? The paper towel will stay dry because air is a gas and it’s inside of the cup. Gases take up space so the water was unable to get inside the cup. 61. Demonstrate for students first then students will have a chance to go try it. 62. Practice going to the table, listening for the chime then coming back to the mat. 63. Give students a few minutes to explore with the activity. Closure ( 10 minutes) 1. Gather students back on the mat. 2. Let students share what they explored and learned about. 3. Listen to the song called “Matter is Everywhere” on the CD Singin’ Songs of Science by J.P. Taylor and the Academics 4. Tell students that this week we are going to go to the dance studio and we are going to do some “matter” dancing.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work in groups. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Assessment: Observation and classroom discussion

Lesson Plan #15 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Gases and Chemical reactions Date: September 21st/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Independent Study (assigned questions) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as gases. h. Demonstrate that gases are matter because they have mass and take up space. k. Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: -Properties of gases -A gas takes up space Adaptive Dimension: We will work together as a class to help with classroom management. Also everyone will be able to share their ideas with all the students. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Magic School Bus gets backed in a cake book, bottle, vinegar, baking soda, work sheet. Set-up: materials for experiment

Set ( 20 minutes) 76. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 77. Tell students that today we have another fun experiment to do but before we do the experiment I have a great story called the Magic School Bus gets baked in a Cake. 78. Read the story tell the marked spot (when the bus is stuck in the bake) 79. Have a discussion about how might happen next. What happens when you mix baking soda and vinegar together? 80. Let a few students share their ideas and tell them that together we are going to do an experiment to find out. Development (30 minutes) 64. Tell students that I will be picking quiet helpers to come up and help me with the experiment. 65. First full the bottle with some vinegar then add some baking soda then put a balloon over the top. 66. Watch and see what happens! 67. Ask the students what happened what we mixed the baking soda and vinegar together? 68. Show students picture card and read the information on the back. 69. Redo the experiment trying to use a bigger bottle or more amounts of vinegar or baking soda. 70. Ask students to predict what they think will happen. 71. Try the experiment with the class. 72. Have students go draw and write a few words about what happen in this experiment. Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Finish reading the Magic School Bus gets baked in a Cake. 2. Finish reading The Magic School Bus Gets Baked in a Cake --stop at the part where they use baking soda and vinegar to get out of the cake. Why do they do this? --the gas has no where to go so it pushes against the bus and shoots them out of the cake.

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Assessment: Observation, classroom discussion and work sheet

Lesson Plan #16 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Gases and Chemical Reactions (Wrap-up) and Changes of State Date: September 22nd/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Independent Study (assigned questions) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases k. Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases. Identify changes of state. Associate changes of state with temperature changes. Investigate some physical changes.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Can states of matter change? Ex. Solid to a liquid. Adaptive Dimension: Read of worksheet directions before students go to work. Students can draw picture and write words to describe their work. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Worksheet from yesterday, picture of melting water, brain pop jr. http://www.brainpopjr.com/science/matter/changingstatesofmatter/, ice cubes and cups Set-up: computer and video.

Set ( 20 minutes) 81. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 82. Ask students to share what we did yesterday. (Gases and Chemical Reaction) 83. Show students and read the card. 84. Tell students that now you will have some time to draw and write about the experiment. 85. Show students the handout and read the question out for everyone to hear. 86. Ask students what are some things you could draw and write about. Bottle, vinegar, baking soda, balloon, gases etc. 87. Tell students that they will have about 10 minutes to work on this handout. 88. Ask students how should they be working? Quietly, sitting in your spot and giving effort. Development (30 minutes) 73. Gather students back on the foam mat. 74. Tell students that now we are going to learn about changes of states. 75. Ask students what are the states of matter? 76. Tell students we are going to watch a short video about changes of states of matter. You will hear about some words in the video that you might not know. That’s okay; we will talk about them after. 77. Remind students when they are watching the video you should not be talking and your hands should be to yourself. 78. Stand up and have a quick stretch. 79. Ask students what are some of the words that they heard in the video. What is changing states of matter? 80. Tell students that today we are going to talk about melting. 81. Ask students what is melting? 82. Show students the melting picture and read the back of the card. 83. Ask students what does this picture show? 84. Tell students that we are going to do an ice cube experiment. 85. Ask students what state of matter is an ice cube? If we melt an ice cube it will turn into a liquid. Remind your students that heat can change matter and adding more heat might make matter change faster. They may want to put the ice

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #17 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Changes of State: Melting Date: September 26th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases k. Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases. Identify changes of state. Associate changes of state with temperature changes. Investigate some physical changes.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Can states of matter change? Ex. Solid to a liquid. Adaptive Dimension: Students will be working together as a class to help with classroom management. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Plastic Cups, ice cubes, microwave, hairdryer, hot water, wool (mitten), picture card, timer (watch), spray bottle

Set-up: take ice cubes out of the freezer right before lesson starts

Set ( 10 minutes) 89. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 90. Ask students if they remember what we started to talk about last day we had theme. 91. Show students melting picture. Tell students that we are learning about how matter can change from different states. So how can a Solid become a Liquid? By melting it. 92. Bring out chart from last day about different ways we can melt ice cubes. Review what we wrote then ask students which ones do you think we can try in the classroom. 93. Tell students that we are going to try each of these methods to see which way ice cubes melts the fastest. 94. Tell students that I have all their names in this bag and I’m going to be picking out students to come help us conduct each mini experiment. Remind your students that heat can change matter and adding more heat might make matter change faster. Stretch Break*** Development (20 minutes) 88. Ask students to predict which why melt the fastest/slowest? 89. Begin with the slowest ones. Put in sun. (Mark the time on the board and watch it melt through out the class. 90. Do this with each method of trying to melt ice cubes. -microwave -hairdryer -shake it -pour warm water -spray warm water -crush it -blow hot air on it -wrap it in wool -put by light -sit in the classroom Stretch Break in-between mini experiments. Closure ( 10 minutes) 1. Gather students back on the carpet. 2. Debrief what the students learned about melting ice cubes. 3. Discuss how when there is more

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #18 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Changes of State: Evaporation Date: September 27th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted eexperiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases k. Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases. Identify changes of state. Associate changes of state with temperature changes. Investigate some physical changes.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Can states of matter change? Ex. Liquid to a Gas? Adaptive Dimension: Students will be working together as a class to help with classroom management. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Hot water, tap water, 2 plastic cups, mirror, picture card

Set-up: heat up water before lesson starts.

Set ( 10 minutes) 95. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 96. Ask students what materials they see at the front and what state it is. 97. Show students the picture card of the cup and steam and discuss what they see. 98. Then read the back of the card. Evaporation occurs when a liquid changes into a gas by heating. Evaporation is a physical change because only the physical properties of the matter change, and no new substances are created. As water evaporates, as shown in this photograph, it changes from a liquid to a gas. The evaporated water rising above the cup is steam, The steam will become an invisible gas called water vapour. Liquid will evaporate faster when it has more surface area (when it is in a container with a wider opening.) Stretch Break*** Development (20 minutes) 91. Begin the experiment by placing the mirror over the cup with tap water. Leave on for about 20 seconds then take it off and show the students. 92. Ask: did anything happen? 93. Do this again with the hot water. What happened? 94. Have students go write their prediction on their worksheet. 95. Ask/remind students what a prediction is. 96. Give students 3 minutes to go write their prediction then quickly come sit back down. 97. Have a classroom discussion about what happened with the experiment. Steam is a gas. When water becomes very hot it turns into a gas. Why else have you seen steam before? Closure ( 10 minutes) 1. Have a class discussion about where they have seen steam before. 2. Tell students that water is a very special substance. It can be found in three forms: liquids, solids, and gases 3. Show students page 27 in Properties of liquids and Solids Molecule Game

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #20 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Changes of State: Liquids and Solids Date: October 5th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases k. Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases. Identify changes of state.

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: Can matter be two different states at once? Ex. A liquid and a Solid. Adaptive Dimension: Students will be working together as a class to help with classroom management. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: water, corn starch (1 cup water, 1 ½ cups corn starch), spoon, paper plates, Bartholomew and the Oobleck book, Starting with Science Solids, Liquids and Gases book, newspaper. Set-up: newspaper on tables.

Set ( 25 minutes) 99. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 100. Tell students that today we are going to read this book called Bartholomew and the Oobleck. Does anyone know what Oobleck is? 101. Begin reading the story to the students. 102. Read till marked page. 103. Ask students what do you think the oobleck will look like? What will happen next in the story? 104. ***Stretch Break*** (Liquid, Solid, Gases Game) 105. Continue reading the story. Development (20 minutes) 98. Tell students that we are going to make our own oobleck as a class. 99. Show the students the ingredients. 100. Ask students to tell me what the ingredients are and what state of matter they are. 101. Ask students to predict what they think will happen when we mix these two ingredients together. 102. Together as a class measure out the ingredients and ask for student student helpers. 103. Ask for 2 class helpers to put newspaper on the tables. 104. Tell students they will have time to explore and play with oobleck at their table. 105. Tell students that while they are playing with and exploring the oobleck what do you notice happening? Is it a solid? Liquid? Both? Why? 106. Ask tables to come up one at a time to wash their hands. Then come sit back on the carpet. Closure ( 5 minutes) 1. Class discussion about what they learned about their oobleck. Read page 28 in Solids, Liquids and Gases. Corn starch is made of million of tiny particles. When you add water to the starch, the particles float freely, keeping themselves spaced evenly apart. Imagine the floating starch particles are like a school group going through a doorway. If everyone walks in an evenly spaced line, the group

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #21 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Buoyancy: Build a Lifeboat Challenge Day 2 Date: October 12th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indirect Instruction (worksheet) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases j. Group or sequence liquids and solids according to one or more observable physical properties (e.g., colour, state, texture, smell, transparency, and buoyancy).
i. Demonstrate an understanding of sinking

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

and floating by solving a related practical problem such as building an object that will float, carry a load, and be stable.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What type of matter floats better than others? Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners to help each other work. Julie partners with Rheanna Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: straws, aluminium foil, paper clips, tape, popscicle sticks, yarn, cotton balls, pennies, bowl of water pg. 66 in properties of liquids and solids.

Photo copy liquid word search, finish collage, coverpage Set-up: water in containers and solid materials ready to use Set ( 10 minutes) 106. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 107. Tell them today we are going to have our lifeboat challenge. 108. Explain that I will call one group at a time to see how many pennies your boat can hold. 109. Everyone else will be working at their table on their handout. 110. Go over expectations of the handout. 111. Drawing of boat is detailed, fully labelled, name given to boat; write words to explain why you chose those materials to make your boat. 112. Tell students that you will be keeping tract of your boat and how many pennies it can hold. 113. The winning group will win some jellybeans. 114. Everyone will get a certificate for building a boat. 115. Repeat instructions and what tasks students should be working on. Development (20 minutes) 107. Call groups up one by one everyone else working independently. Closure ( 15 minutes) 1. Compare results and have a class discussion about why some boats held more pennies then others and why. 2. Story time or read to self is extra time. Assessment: Observation, and handout. Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #22 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Buoyancy: Build a Lifeboat Challenge Day 2 Date: October 12th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indirect Instruction (worksheet) Indicators: Students will be able to: a. Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids and gases j. Group or sequence liquids and solids according to one or more observable physical properties (e.g., colour, state, texture, smell, transparency, and buoyancy).
i. Demonstrate an understanding of sinking

Outcomes: LS2.1 Investigate observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, and texture) of familiar liquids and solids. [SI]

LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

and floating by solving a related practical problem such as building an object that will float, carry a load, and be stable.

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What type of matter floats better than others? Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners to help each other work. Julie partners with Rheanna Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: straws, aluminium foil, paper clips, tape, popscicle sticks, yarn, cotton balls, pennies, bowl of water pg. 66 in properties of liquids and solids. Photo copy liquid word search, finish collage, cover page

Set-up: water in containers and solid materials ready to use Set ( 10 minutes) 116. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 117. Tell them today we are going to have our lifeboat challenge. 118. Explain that I will call one group at a time to see how many pennies your boat can hold. 119. Everyone else will be working at their table on their handout. 120. Go over expectations of the handout. 121. Drawing of boat is detailed, fully labelled, name given to boat; write words to explain why you chose those materials to make your boat. 122. Tell students that you will be keeping tract of your boat and how many pennies it can hold. 123. The winning group will win some jellybeans. 124. Everyone will get a certificate for building a boat. 125. Repeat instructions and what tasks students should be working on. Development (20 minutes) 108. Call groups up one by one everyone else working independently. Closure ( 15 minutes) 1. Compare results and have a class discussion about why some boats held more pennies then others and why. 2. Story time or read to self is extra time. Assessment: Observation, and handout. Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #23 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Buoyancy: Build a Lifeboat Challenge Day 3 Storyboard Date: October 13th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Experiential Learning (conducted experiments) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indirect Instruction (creating a story) Indicators: Students will be able to:
i. Demonstrate an understanding of sinking

Outcomes: LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

and floating by solving a related practical problem such as building an object that will float, carry a load, and be stable.

CC2.2Use a variety of ways to represent f. Combine illustrations and written text understanding and to communicate ideas, (e.g., captions, labels) to express ideas, procedures, stories, and feelings in a clear feelings, and information. manner with essential details. Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What is buoyancy? What is a storyboard? Adaptive Dimension: Students will work in partners to help each other work. Julie partners with Rheanna Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Paper, markers, pencils Set-up: fold paper into 4s

Set ( 10 minutes) 126. Gather students on the floor on the foam mat. 127. Have a quick discussion about the boat challenge what worked and didn’t work with their boats and why. 128. Tell students that today we are going write/draw a story board about our adventure. 129. Tell students that you and your friends are shipwrecked on a deserted island. 130. Have a discussion about what a story has: -beginning (problem) -middle (what happened/ events) -end (solution) -setting -characters 131. Tell students that all of your picture stories are going to start with “stuck on a deserted island and all are going to end safely at home) 132. What could happen in the middle of your story? 133. Let students talk to a buddy to get ideas. 134. Show students my example. Development (25 minutes) 109. Review instructions 110. Hand out paper and tell students to get there pencil boxes and begin working quietly. 111. Students will have about 20 minutes to work on their story. 112. Looking for effort and hard workers Closure ( 15 minutes) 1. Gather back on carpet with the class. 2. Have a discussion about their stories and let a few people share. 3. If time begin making a list about “ all the things we learned about in our Solids, liquids and gases unit” Assessment: Observation, storyboard

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Lesson Plan #24 Name: Ashley Scherle Subject: Science Content/Topic: Solids, Liquids and Gases: Wrap up and review Date: October 17th/11 Grade: Two Instructional Strategies: Direct Instruction (questioning, listening and viewing) Interactive Instruction (discussion, cooperative learning groups) Indicators: Students will be able to:
a. Pose questions that lead to investigation

Outcomes: LS2.2 Investigate interactions between liquids and solids, and technologies based on those interactions. [CP, SI, TPS]

and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids. b. Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids. Review of all properties of matter

Cross Curricula Competencies: developing thinking, developing literacies Prerequisite Learning: What is matter? Solids, Liquids and Gases Adaptive Dimension: Students will share ideas with the class. Students can use words and pictures to show what they learned about. Preparation: (equipment/materials/set-up) Materials: Video: http://vimeo.com/1592015, chart paper, self evaluation sheet Set-up: video

Set ( 10 minutes) 135. Tell students that today we are going to wrap up and review what we have learned about solids, liquids and gases through out the past few weeks. 136. Start by watching a review song: http://vimeo.com/1592015 Development (25 minutes) 113. Tell students that each of them are going to think about something they have learned about to share with the class. I will write it done on chart paper. 114. Half way through stop and have students complete a self evaluation. 115. Go over it on the document camera. 116. Once students have completed the sheet gather students back and continue list of what we learned about. Things we learned about: -Matter is anything that takes up place or as weight. Matter can be in the form of a solid like a tree of a clock. Matter can be in the form of a liquid like rain or juice. Matter can be in the form of gas like steam or fog. Liquid matter can flow one place to another. Liquid spreads out and gravity pulls it down. This means that liquids will usually flow from a high place to a low place. The farther liquid falls the faster liquid flows. -Solids: don’t change shape easily (they have to be pushed or pulled, heated or cooled.) -Liquids: can flow, take the shape of the container they are in. -Gases: have no shape; they spread out to fill the space they are in. -Explanation of why some liquids mix and some separate: Certain liquids are heavier, "dense", than others. When you attempt to mix two liquids which have different densities, they separate when you stop mixing them. The "heavier" liquid deposits itself on the bottom and the "lighter" liquid deposits itself on top. There exists a wide range of liquids with various densities. Molasses is most dense while alcohol is the least dense liquid. Solids can be different colours, shapes, sizes, textures and weigh differently. -Buoyancy All matter is made up of molecules. A molecule

Student Engagement/Classroom Management Strategies Give clear directions so students always know what to do and stay on task. Keep an eye on the time to make sure the lesson does not run too long. Have all materials ready to go before the lesson starts. Remind students to raise their hand when they have an answer. Remind students how to work independently and quietly. Remind students how to use materials and how to clean up after. Move disruptive student towards me.

Liquid Race Name: __________________________________________ Draw a picture to show what you learned in today’s experiment. Use words to help explain your picture.

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