THIS WEEK

IN YOUR
COMMUNITY
COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT
February 15 - 21, 2012
I’m having trouble keeping
up with the holidays this time
of year.
As I write this, people
around me are wearing red.
It’s a reminder that I need to
get a Valentine’s card for my
husband on the way home. He
already gave me mine along
with a gift, so I’m feeling a
little guilty.
I often have trouble keep-
ing up with the many holi-
days that crop up this time of
year.
It starts in January with
Martin Luther King’s birthday.
Of course we don’t exchange
cards for this event, but I often
forget about the offices that
are closed.
Then before I know it, Val-
entine’s Day is upon me and
it’s time to bring out the red
outfits and lace hearts.
I decided I better open my
calendar and check out the
date for the next holiday.
It’s Monday, President’s Day.
Government offices will be
closed.
Don’t rest though. Next week
is filled with holidays.
On Tuesday, you can cel-
ebrate Mardi Gras by enjoying
good food and parties.
This will be followed by the
beginning of the Lent season
with Ash Wednesday, a time
many of us go to church to
begin our observance of the
season
I’m okay though. Again, I
don’t need to buy a card.
Then, it’s time to go shop-
ping and find a card. I know
someone who was born on
Feb. 29. Since this is a Leap
Year and there is actually a
Feb. 29 marked on the calen-
dar, I will send a card.
So everyone, flip your calen-
dar to March. There are also
important dates to remember
in this month.
Mark your calendars for
March 11. It’s not a holiday,
but the day were we lose
an hour’s sleep because we
turned our clocks forward
to begin Daylight Savings
Time.
By Saturday, you should
have recovered from that
lost hour of sleep and be
ready to party. It’s St. Pat-
rick’s Day, time to wear
green and enjoy drinking
some green or Irish-appro-
priate beverages.
So are you beginning to
understand what I am talk-
ing about when I mention the
numerous events in the first
few months of the year? Many
people think the time between
Christmas and Easter is a quiet
time to rest up from Christmas
and prepare for the Easter
holiday.
I see it as a time when I get
confused and lose track of
the colors to wear, cards to
buy, and correct beverages to
drink.
My failure
to keep up
with the
holidays
Celebrating
a romantiC
50th
anniversary
Page 2
Celebrating 50 years
FREE
Nancy
Kline
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
Putnam Voice
By NANCY KLINE
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
MILLER CITY — At a time when
many schools are seeing a decline
in enrollment or eliminating the
program entirely, Miller City-New
Cleveland High School still has
a highly successful vocational
agriculture and Future Farmers
of America program. This year’s
program has 80 students in grades
nine through 12 enrolled in the
program.
“This is the 50th anniversary of
our agriculture program and FFA,”
said guidance counselor Steve
Peck. “The program has continued
to grow through the years.”
Ron Horstman, vocational agri-
culture instructor at MC-NC, said
he has been fortunate because the
administration at the school is very
supportive of the program.
“They have worked with sched-
uling to allow students to enroll
in the program without conflicting
with required classes,” Horstman
said. He also said all students in
grade 8 take one quarter that is
an introduction to agriculture that
includes the students completing a
shop project.
Currently, MC-NC offers Agricul-
ture Science I and II and Agricul-
ture Tech Prep I and II in the high
school.
“Of course some things have
changed in the classes,” Horstman
said. “I used to show the students
how to repair plows and set them
up,” he said. “Now hardly anyone
does much plowing.” He also
spoke of current farm equipment
that includes GPS systems for the
farmer to use.
Although only 10 percent of
Americans are involved in tradi-
tional farming, there are approxi-
mately 22 million people who work
in agriculture-related fields.
“You name me a career and you
can find a specialization in agricul-
ture in that field,” said Horstman
giving the computers-related fields
and engineers as examples.
Horstman said skills the students
learn in FFA are needed through a
student’s lifetime.
“They learn about parliamentary
procedure, speaking and judging,”
Horstman said. Every year he takes
the students to the Ohio state FFA
convention in Columbus.
“Things have changed in FFA
also,” Horstman said. “When the
program started there were no
girls. Now we have had girls who
won state degrees and have served
as the president of the FFA.”
Horstman said it was instructor
Jack DeVitt who influenced him to
become an agriculture instructor.
“I really enjoy working with the
students,” Horstman admitted. He
allows the children to use their
creative skills as they paint gumball
machines they make in the eighth
grade workshop.
In addition he is proud of the
projects the high school students
take to the fair. “I think Miller
City-New Cleveland has the most
shop projects on display at the
fair,” he said. The FFA students
also take livestock projects to
the fair.
FFA students set up a petting
zoo for the elementary students to
enjoy each spring.
On May 9 the school will cel-
ebrate the 50th anniversary of their
vocational-agriculture and FFA
program during their annual spring
banquet. Former officers of the
FFA have been invited to be special
guests at the event.
NANCY KLINE • Putnam Voice
Ron Horsman, instructor for the Miller City agriculture curriculum, shows gumball machines made by eighth-
graders in the program each year.
• Submitted photos
ABOVE: Members of the Miller City FFA are shown at the 2011 state
convention. RIGHT: Jenny Westrick was the first female in the Miller
City FFA to be an Amercan Degree winner. She and her husband now
operate a dairy farm in central Ohio.
Local school’s
ag program
marks its
anniversary
By NANCY KLINE
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
KALIDA — Ron Kuhlman
arranged the ultimate surprise for
his wife on their 50th wedding
anniversary on Jan. 27. The table
was decorated with flowers, rose
petals, chilled pink champagne
and a cake decorated with red
flowers, the color used at their
wedding. Soft music was playing
in the background and battery-
operated candles were flickering
on the table.
Ron wanted to surprise his wife
Marie on their anniversary. Both
are residents in the assisted-living
residence of The Meadows of
Kalida. He worked with Shannon
Geise, CTRS, Resident Activity
Director, to make his surprise a
reality. It was all part of The Mead-
ows “Live a Dream” program.
Marie smiled at her husband as
they looked back on that special
day. She admitted it had been a
total surprise for her. Staff mem-
bers recalled the happy tears
of both Ron and Marie as they
entered the dining room at The
Meadows. The staff members
stayed only long enough to con-
gratulate the couple then left them
alone to enjoy their meal. The
supper consisted of grilled tilapia
and house salad from the Red Pig
Inn, where the couple often dined
when they were living in their
home.
“I think my family introduced
me to her,” Ron said recalling their
early courting days. He said they
would often go to the movies.
After the couple was married
they lived in Ottawa. Ron was
employed at Sylvania. Marie ini-
tially worked at City Bank, but
later became a teacher’s aid, a job
she held for 20 years. She said it is
the children at Ottawa Elementary
that she misses the most.
The couple has five children.
Ron retired 17 years ago. Marie
retired 3 years ago.
Following a stroke nearly a year
ago, Marie required care at The
Meadows of Kalida. A few months
later Ron also became a resident.
“I was living alone at home and
it just seemed right to come here
and be with Marie,” Ron said.
After working 28 years as a
maintenance employee at Sylva-
nia, Ron said he still enjoys just
“tinkering” at The Meadows.
Marie has always enjoyed sew-
ing, canning, cooking and making
quilts. Now she enjoys her time in
therapy, revealing that the thera-
pists treat her good and aren’t “too
hard” on her.
“The food here is good,” Ron
said, “But not quite as good as
Marie’s cooking always was.”
Marie pointed proudly to a col-
lage of pictures on the wall. Given
to the couple by their children, the
collage includes family pictures,
even Marie’s parents.
“I think we enjoy the time we
get to spend with the kids and
grandkids the most,” Ron said.
The couple has 9 grandchildren.
“Ron was really good about
remembering details about their
wedding,” Geise said. “He even
remembered they had poinsettias
as their flowers.”
As a final gift of the “Live the
Dream” Geise had pictures from
the 50th anniversary celebration
printed and placed in a collage
frame. It joins the other family pic-
tures on display in the Kuhlman
residence.
“It is so fantastic to give these
incredible moments to those we
serve!” Geise said.
APPLAUSE
NEIGHBORS
EVENT
COURT NEWS
Kuhlmans ‘live the dream’ at anniversary dinner
ABOUT THE VOICE
The Putnam Voice is a free weekly newspaper covering
Putnam County. It is delivered on Wednesday as part of The
Lima News and also can be picked up at various distribu-
tion racks.
The newspaper is proud to publish reader-supplied con-
tent it receives from the putnamvoice.com Web site. These
stories and photographs are provided by Putnam County
residents, members of service clubs, business leaders,
government agencies and school officials.
Readers are asked to write about their vacations, achieve-
ments, or other interesting things they want to share with
the community. We strive to be your Voice in Putnam County
Additional content can be found at putnamvoice.com.
The newspaper is a product of The Lima News. It is
headed up by Putnam County resident Nancy Kline, who
serves as editor.
Connie
Ladd
office
coordinator
Nancy
Kline
editor
Donna
Campbell
advertising
The PutnamVoice is an independent news-
paper whose entire contents are Copyright
2012 by The Lima News. No part can be
reproduced in any form without written con-
sent from the publisher or editor.
Single copies are available free throughout
Putnam County. No one is authorized to
remove more than a single copy of the news-
paper from vending machines without the
advance written permission of the publisher.
Putnam County
Common Pleas Court
Dispositions/Feb. 2
Ciara Ybarra, 20, 116 Poplar St.,
Leipsic, was sentenced to 90 days
in jail for theft.
Dispositions/Feb. 8
Amisa Pettry, 37, 516 Barnett,
Findlay, was sentenced to three days
jail for contempt of court’s prior
orders. The jail was suspended and
he was ordered to pay $1,320 to
plaintiff within 180 days.
Wendy S. Parker, Ottawa, was
granted a divorce from Jeffery E.
Parker, Van Wert. They were married
Oct. 18, 2003 in New Cleveland, and
have no children.
New Cases
Morgan J. Bailey, Lakeview, and
Timothy J. Bailey, Jr., Ottawa; dissolu-
tion without children.
Denise Schroeder, Leipsic, v.
Wayne Schroeder, Leipsic; support.
Putnam County Municipal Court
Dispositions/Feb. 6
Christopher A. Rader, 33, 215½ W.
Third St., Ottawa, pleaded guilty to an
amended charge of second-offense
reckless operation. Sentence: Four
points, 30 days jail, $250 fine, with
27 days jail suspended, and credit
for three days jail upon completion
of DIP program, and 24 hours’ com-
munity service.
Elmer D. Gilbert, pleaded no contest
to an amended charge of first-offense
OVI and was found guilty. Sentence:
Six points, 180 days jail, $750 fine,
one-year license suspension, with 174
days jail and $300 suspended, and
credit for three days jail upon comple-
tion of DIP program, and $1,000 resti-
tution to the Buckeye Club.
Zackary A. Bess, 20, 217 N. Cen-
ter St., Vaughnsville, pleaded guilty
to first-offense OVI. Sentence: Six
points, 180 days jail, $750 fine,
one-year license suspension, with
177 days jail and $375 suspended,
and credit for three days jail upon
completion of DIP program.
Dispositions/Feb. 7
Drew T. Steffan, 20, 4053 Road
3, Leipsic, pleaded guilty to under-
age consumption. Sentence: 180
days jail, $375 fine, with 177 days
suspended and credit for three days
jail upon completion of DIP program.
A charge of first-offense OVI was
dismissed.
Justin R. Moats, 26, 15945
U.S. Route 224, Columbus Grove,
pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct.
Sentence: 30 days jail, $150 fine,
with 29 days jail suspended. He also
pleaded guilty to criminal trespass-
ing. Sentence: 30 days jail, $150
fine, with 29 days jail suspended.
Natalie Geiger, 48, 705½ W. Elm
St., Lima, pleaded guilty to obstruct-
ing official business. Sentence: 90
days jail, $150 fine, with 90 days jail
suspended, and complete assess-
ment at a mental health provider.
Judgments/Feb. 8
Credit Adjustments, Inc., Defiance,
default judgment v. David Brinkman,
Fort Jennings, $1,418.90, plus inter-
est and costs.
Omega Dental Center of Ottawa,
default judgment v. Brent J. Foreman,
Ottawa, and Tiffany Foreman, Ottawa,
$426.41, plus interest and costs.
Judgments/Feb. 9
Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Lima, default judgment v. Steven
Bockrath, Pandora, $3,419.07, plus
interest and costs.
West Central Ohio Surgery &
Endoscopy, Lima, default judgment
v. Rudolfo Olivo, Columbus Grove,
and Minerva Olivo, Columbus Grove,
$581.91, plus interest and costs.
Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery,
Lima, default judgment v. Katherine
Lawson, Fort Jennings, and Rodney
Lawson, Fort Jennings, $180, plus
interest and costs.
Imaging Consultants of Findlay,
default judgment v. John Duncan,
Leipsic, and Tammy Duncan, Leipsic,
$346.74, plus interest and costs.
St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima,
default judgment v. John Bejarano,
Leipsic, and Norma Bejarano,
Leipsic, $1,463.44, plus interest
and costs.
Blanchard Valley Pathology, Findlay,
default judgment v. Nancy Hovest,
Pandora, $100.56, plus interest and
costs.
World Day of Prayer is a
worldwide ecumenical move-
ment of women of many faith
traditions who come together
to observe a common day of
prayer each year. Throughout
the day, we collectively pray all
over the world, beginning with
the first sunrise and ending at
the last sunset. The 2012 World
Day of Prayer will be held on
Friday, March 2 and will be pre-
pared by the women of Malaysia
with the theme “Let Justice Pre-
vail”. They invite us to work with
them, with God and with the
people nearest to us to create
a world in which each gender,
race, culture, religion and state
is honored, nutured and empow-
ered.
The local service will be held at
11:45 a.m. in Sts. Peter and Paul
Church on the corner of Fourth
and Locust Streets. A salad bar
luncheon will be provided imme-
diately following in the Sts. Peter
and Paul School cafeteria. The
church and school are handicap
accessible.
Invite your friends, families
and communities of faith to join
the women of Malaysia in prayer
and song to support women’s
ecumenical ministries toward
peace and harmony through fair
and just governance. The Annual
Offering supports the work of
WDP USA and helps meet the
needs of families in Malaysia
and around the world who are
victims of many forms of pov-
erty, violence and injustice.
For more information, contact
World Day of Prayer USA, 475
Riverside Drive, Rm. 1316, New
York, NY 10115; 1-866-937-8720
or www.wdpusa.org
Founded in 1941, Church Women
United is an ecumenical move-
ment reaching 25 million Protes-
tant, Roman Catholic, Orthodox
and other Christian women.
World Day of Prayer is an inter-
national movement in 170 coun-
tries and regions whose prayers
follow the sun across the globe
on the day of the celebration.
Prayer and action are insepara-
ble and both have immeasurable
influence in the world.
OFFICE
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Ottawa, Ohio
419-231-2444
DELIVERY
For delivery issues, rack
placement queries or
questions about where to
find the Putnam Voice,
phone 419-233-3029
• Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m.; 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
CONTACT US
News:
Editor: Nancy Kline
nkline@putnamvoice.com
419-231-2444
ADVERTISING:
Donna Campbell
dcampbell@limanews.com
866-546-2237
putnamvoice.com
V2
February 15 - 21, 2012
KALIDA — Barbara Ver-
hoff, a Registered Nurse at
The Meadows of Kalida in
Kalida, Ohio has been rec-
ognized by her employer,
Trilogy Health Services,
LLC, for having perfect
attendance in 2011.
Verhoff was one of nearly
800 employees company-
wide who did not miss a
day of work and was not
tardy from January 1, 2011
through December 31, 2011.
For this achievement, Ver-
hoff and the other eligible
employees were entered
into a drawing for one
of two rewards valued at
$2,500 or $1,000. Verhoff
was the recipient of the
$2,500 reward.
The drawing was held
via conference call at the
Trilogy Health Services
Home Office in Louisville,
Kentucky. Following the
drawing, Randy Bufford,
Trilogy President/CEO com-
mented, “We are thrilled to
have employees like Bar-
bara Verhoff on the Trilogy
Team. Her commitment to
the residents of The Mead-
ows of Kalida and to her
coworkers is outstanding.
She truly embodies the Tril-
ogy spirit.”
“Barbara is such a great
nurse and she has been with
our campus for a number
of years,” said Kevin Kidd,
Executive Director of The
Meadows of Kalida. “She
always puts our residents
first. We are thrilled that
she received this recogni-
tion.”
“I was unbelievably sur-
prised to I hear I won the
$2500 prize. I was ecstatic,”
commented Verhoff. “I
haven’t won too many
things in my life so it hit me
like a rocket. I plan on using
the money to start a college
fund for our grandson. It is
something that my husband
and I have talked about but
haven’t gotten around to
it yet. This will help us a
lot. We are extremely grate-
ful to Trilogy.” Verhoff has
worked at The Meadows of
Kalida since 2008.
The $1,000 reward was
received by Anna Faulken-
brg, Director of Resident
Activities at Scenic Hills
Care Center in Ferdinand,
IN. All employees who were
eligible for the drawing also
received a $250 bonus and
an and an additional day
of paid time off, along with
a plaque recognizing their
accomplishment.
The Meadows of Kalida
is a Trilogy Health Services
Community.
Meadows employee honored for perfect attendance
• Submitted photo
Marie and Ron Kuhlman are shown celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary on Jan. 27 at the Meadows
of Kalida. Ron arranged the celebration through the facility’s “Live a Dream” program.
• Submitted photo
Barbara Verhoff (center), recipient of the perfect atten-
dance award from Trilogy Health Services, is shown with
Director of Health Services Rhonda Church (left), and
Executive Director of The Meadows of Kalida Kevin Kidd as
she receives a $2,500 check. (Submitted photo)
World Day of
Prayer coming
SAY WHAT ?!?!
ACROSS

1. Emergency vehicle
10. Eyeball benders (2 wds)
15. Those with sound judgment
16. Optician’s rouge
17. Those who are confined in wartime
18. Lingo
19. Directly
20. "How ———!"
21. W African storytellers
22. Bent
23. Protein particles responsible for
degenerative diseases of the nervous
system
24. ——— and Hardy
27. Amalgam
28. Buenos ———
29. Small tart tree fruit
33. "I had no ———!"
34. Be bombastic
35. Hip bones
36. Discuss an issue from a different
point of view
38. Considers
39. Daughter of Saturn
40. Take back
41. Vascular inner layer of skin
43. Supergarb
44. Pranksters
45. Kill, in a way
46. Long-jawed fish
49. Old World plants, such as cuckoopint
50. Condiment on lamb (2 wds)
52. Lure
53. Person who attacks another
54. Flip, in a way
55. Came in again

DOWN

1. Bone-dry
2. Restaurant options
3. Diminish
4. "It’s no ———!"
5. Large motor vehicles with flat plat-
forms
6. Yearly
7. Demands
8. Algonquian Indian
9. Cousin of -trix
10. Egg-shaped instrument
11. Object valued for evoking a histori-
cal time (2 wds)
12. About 1% of the atmosphere
13. Laugh-a-minute folks
14. Makes lace
21. Cousin of a loon
22. Hansel and Gretel’s trail marks (2
wds)
23. Braids
24. Animal house
25. Assistant
26. Carbamide
27. Chutzpah
29. Algonquin Indians
30. "Guilty," e.g.
31. Describe
32. "——— of Eden"
34. Gold braid
37. 1919 world heavyweight champion
38. Sediment
40. Wicker material
41. Egyptian corn
42. Small ornamental ladies’ bags
43. Perfume
44. Street fleet
45. Workbench attachment
46. ——— gum, used as thickening
agent in food
47. Bad marks
48. Abbr. after many a general’s name
50. Fold, spindle or mutilate
51. A pint, maybe
WATCH FOR IT
WEEKLY PUZZLE • ANSWERS ON PAGE V5
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V3
February 15 - 21, 2012
*Offer redeemable by mail (not redeemable at retail). Offer valid only with proof of purchase of (i) any
Serta
®
mattress or mattress set with an invoice price of $695 or more; or (ii) any iComfort
®
mattress or
mattress set purchase. Offer valid only on qualified purchases between 2/9/2012 and 3/13/2012.
Quantities limited. Visit www.serta.com for official terms and conditions.
*Offer redeemable by mail (not redeemable at retail). Offer valid only with proof of purchase of (i) any Serta® mattress or
mattress set with an invoice price of $695 or more; or (ii) any iComfort® mattress or mattress set purchase. Offer valid only on
qualifed purchases between 2/9/2012 and 3/13/2012. Quantities limited. Visit www.serta.com for offcial terms and conditions.
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Queen Sets starting as low as $499. Every Model, Every Size NOW ON SALE!
www.heringhausfurniture.com
Monday & Wednesday 8:30-8:00
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 8:30-5:30
Saturday 8:30-4
Sunday 12:00-4:00
Our 105th Year
Furniture
and Decorating Center
214 E. Main, Ottawa 419-523-4675
The Ottawa Community
Blood Drive will be held at
the Ottawa VFW Hall, 212
W. Second St., in Ottawa on
Feb. 28. The drive begins
at noon and will run until 6
p.m. To schedule an appoint-
ment, please call the Putnam
County Red Cross at 419-523-
4810 or visit redcrossblood.
org and enter sponsor code:
VFWOTTAWA.
Blood drive planned
at Ottawa VFW
YMCA hosting
overnight event
OTTAWA — Putnam
County YMCA Hosting Over-
night. Overnights are lots of
fun so grab your friends and
join us for a night filled with
swimming, group games,
food, movies and much more.
Dinner, midnight snack and
light breakfast will be pro-
vided. Overnights are open
to all kids age 5-12 years old
and will run from 8 p.m. Feb.
24 to a.m. Feb. 25th. Space
is limited to the first 30 kids
registered. To register or for
more information, contact the
Putnam County YMCA at 419-
523-5233.
Tickets are still available for
the Putnam County Pork Ban-
quet on Feb. 20, at the Kalida
K of C Hall. The evening will
begin with dinner at 6:30 p.m.,
followed by a short program
and ending with entertain-
ment by comedian Travis
Hoewischer. Tickets are $9
and can be purchased at the
OSU Extension office or from
any member of the Putnam
County Swine Committee.
Tickets available for
Feb. 20 pork banquet
MILLER CITY — Come,
warm up with homemade
soup and fresh-baked bread.
The St. Nicholas-Holy Family
Youth Group invite everyone
to come to its Soup Supper
on Feb. 18 from 4 to 7 p.m.
at the Parish Center in Miller
City, located across the street
from the church. There will
be at least five varieties of
homemade soup, three vari-
eties of fresh, homemade
bread and numerous des-
serts, plus drinks. Cost is by
donation. Proceeds will help
fund the youth group’s trip to
St. Jude Children’s Research
Hospital in March. Carryout
is available.
Soup supper
to benefit St. Jude’s
Pandora United Methodist
Church will be hosting a free
Community Meal on Feb.
29, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in
the church fellowship hall,
located at 108 E Washington
St., Pandora. The menu will
be baked potato bar, chili,
cake, coffee and punch
Church hosting
free community meal
OTTAWA — The 2011
annual financial statements
of the Putnam County Dis-
trict Library are complete
and available for inspection
at 136 Putnam Parkway,
Ottawa, OH 45875.
Library financial
statements available
Congratulations to the
Kalida Cats Who Care for
winning the Putnam County
Big Brothers-Big Sisters
First Annual Bowling Battle
of the Schools event. Thank
you to each and every
one of you who came out
recently or organized teams
for the bowl event. It was
a huge success. Rankings
of participating schools
are found below based on
School Team Average.
1. Kalida - 103
2. Ottoville - 102
3. OG- 93.8
4. Leipsic- 88
Cats Who Care
win bowling battle
Putnam Acres would like
to recognize the following
employees for their years of
service:
5-10 years – Darlene Romes
1-5 years – Mary Diaz,
Megan Castilla, and Anea
Esamilla
Putnam Acres
recognizes employees
The county wellness
program launched its first
challenge on Feb. 1 called
the Wild West Healthy Liv-
ing Challenge. It has just
completed the first week
and is becoming a heated
competition. The focus of
the challenge is physical
activity, eating fruits and
vegetables, and drinking
water.
Points are given for
logging these healthy
behaviors into the chal-
lenge website at www.my
wel l s i t e. com/ l hl hpc.
Names are not given on
the website but instead
people choose nicknames
and icons to represent
themselves. The website
also has an active mes-
sage board where partici-
pants post motivational
comments, activity tips
and recipes for others to
view.
Any county resident
may participate in the
year-long series of chal-
lenges with some focus-
ing on physical activity
and nutrition and others
focused on stress reduc-
tion, relaxation and
smoking cessation. The
cost to join is $20 per
person, which includes
access to the challenges,
prizes during the compe-
tition, and a Live Healthy,
Live Happy Putnam
County T-shirt.
You can register and
compete as an individual
and/or a team with fam-
ily, friends, or co-workers.
Registration forms can be
picked up at all branches
of the library, YMCA,
Northwest Fitness Club,
PT Services, Pathways,
Council on Aging, Putnam
County Health Depart-
ment, or visit the health
department’s website at
www.putnamhealth.com
or www.mywellsite.com/
lhlhpc. Join the fun and
interact with others trying
to live healthy and happy
lives in Putnam County.
Wellness
program
launches
challenge
Modern
Woodmen
fundraiser
a success
OTTOVILLE — Mem-
bers of the Putnam
County Modern Wood-
men of America chap-
ter recently helped
raise money for cancer
patient Greg Horstman
by matching funds raised
at a pork chop supper
fundraiser at Big O’Deli
in Ottoville
The event held Dec.
13, raised $8,400. This
included $2,500 matched
by Modern Woodmen’s
home office through the
organization’s matching
fund program. The money
will be used for medical
expenses.
The Matching Fund
program offers Mod-
ern Woodmen members
nationwide the chance to
show their support for a
community cause, orga-
nization or individual in
need by holding fundrais-
ers. Modern Woodmen
matches money raised up
to $2,500. These fundrais-
ing projects contribute
more than $6.5 million to
community needs nation-
wide each year.
Coordinated by local
Modern Woodmen mem-
bers, chapters provide
opportunities to connect
through social activities
and volunteer projects.
For more information
about the local chapter
and how you can get
involved, contact Stan
Haselman at 419-615-
8404.
What is going on in Putnam County?
Every Wednesday check out the Voice
COMMUNITY
The 58th annual Putnam
County Science Fair was
held at Continental Local
School on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 11, 2012. Twenty-six
pairs of judges evaluated
155 student projects from
Putnam County students in
grades 6-11. Individual proj-
ects were judged on a forty-
point scale (team projects
were judged on a fifty-point
scale), which evaluated
knowledge achieved, effec-
tive use of scientific method,
clarity of expression, and
originality and creativity.
Projects receiving a score
of 36-40 (45-50 for teams)
were awarded a superior rat-
ing, those receiving scores of
24-35 (30-44) were awarded
an excellent rating, those
receiving 12-23 (15-29) were
awarded a good rating, and
those receiving 4-11 (5-14)
were awarded a satisfactory
rating.
The Awards Ceremony
began by taking a moment
to recognize Norm Schnipke
for more than 30 years of
service at the Putnam County
Science Fair. Mr. Schnipke
received a plaque and best
wishes in his retirement.
Additionally, on behalf of the
Mary Lou Altenburger family
(Bob, Adam, Ben and Dana),
Adam Altenburger accepted
a plaque in remembrance of
Mary Lou who passed away
last year. Mary Lou’s hard
work and dedication to her
students will not be forgotten.
Eight students received a
Perfect Score of 40 on their
projects. They included Quin-
ton Langhals of Columbus
Grove, Brennen Birkemeier
from Glandorf Elementary,
Mitchell Barlage, Chloe Lam-
mers, and Adam Schroeder
from Miller City-New Cleve-
land, Abby Smith and Alyssa
Langhals from St. Anthony’s,
Jessica Kuhlman from Sts.
Peter and Paul. These stu-
dents received Perfect Score
plaques for their accomplish-
ments. These plaques are
sponsored by Ottoville Bank
Company, First National
Bank of Pandora, and Fort
Jennings State Bank.
Sixty-one Putnam County
students received superior
ratings. Students receiving a
superior rating in the Behav-
ioral and Social Sciences field
were Claire Warnecke and
Bailey Eickholt from Kalida
Junior High; Alicia Honig-
ford, Eric Von Sossan, Maizee
Brinkman, and Alexis Thor-
bahn from Ottoville Junior
High; Makenna Lehman from
Miller City-New Cleveland;
Abraham Morman from St.
Anthony’s; Abbey Recker
from Glandorf Elementary;
and Jessica Kuhlman from
Sts. Peter and Paul.
Two students received a
superior rating in the field
of Microbiology. They were
Lane Brooks from Sts. Peter
and Paul and Abby Smith
from St. Anthony’s.
Many students received a
superior rating in the Bot-
any field. They are Tanner
Inkrott, Kristin Schmenk,
Ben Vennekotter, Corbyn
Niese, and Noah Otto from
Miller City-New Cleveland;
Logan Gerding from Kalida;
Victoria Warnecke from
St. Anthony’s; Matt Hoehn
from Glandorf Elementary;
and Quinton Langhals of the
Columbus Grove District.
Students receiving superior
ratings in the Chemistry field
were Keri Eickholt of Fort
Jennings High School; Renee
Schroeder of St. Anthony’s;
Abigail Schroeder of Miller
City-New Cleveland; Bren-
nen Birkemeier of Glandorf;
and the team project of Erica
Edwards and Mikki Smith
from Kalida.
Several students received
superiors in the Engineering
Science area. Those students
included Linnea Stephens
and Madison Langhals from
St. Anthony’s; Thomas Wal-
dick from Ottoville; Haley
Schroeder and Morgan
Maag from Sts. Peter and
Paul; Colton Niese and Adam
Schroeder from Miller City-
New Cleveland; Alyssa Wie-
deman from Fort Jennings
High School; and the teams
of Ryan Ellerbrock and Grif-
fin Recker and Layne Keefer
and Trent Siebeneck from
Kalida Junior High.
Nine students received a
superior rating in the Envi-
ronmental Sciences field.
They are Noah Emmons
from Continental; Dillon
Schimmoeller and Jeremy
Smith from Fort Jennings;
Tyler Siefker and Austin Wil-
liams from Glandorf; Ryan
Tabler, Adam Birkemeier,
and Robyn Schumacher
from St. Anthony’s; and Jeff
Knueve from Kalida.
In the Medicine and
Health area those students
receiving superior ratings
were Alex Verhoff, Alyssa
Schnipke, and Jordan Ver-
hoff from Glandorf Elemen-
tary; Karenna Langhals from
the Columbus Grove School
District; Mitchell Barlage
and Chloe Lammers from
Miller City-New Cleveland;
and Alyssa Langhals from St.
Anthony’s.
Five students received
superior ratings in the Phys-
ics category. They were Jacob
Ellerbrock and Dylan Altman
from Miller City-New Cleve-
land; Seth Nelson from Sts.
Peter and Paul; and Ryan
Hoersten and Cody Von
Lehmden from Fort Jennings.
In the Zoology field, the
students receiving a superior
rating were Tiffany Welty,
Emily Niese, and Mitchell
Gable from Miller City-New
Cleveland.
In addition to student rec-
ognition for perfect and supe-
rior scores, 45 sponsored
plaques were handed out in
individual fields of entry. The
Agriculture Awards, spon-
sored by Ottawa Feed and
Grain, were won by Mitch-
ell Gable of Miller City-New
Cleveland for his project
titled “Eggs: Rolling vs. Not
Rolling” and Garrett Lang-
hals for his project “The
Importance of Starter Fertil-
izer on Corn Seedlings.”
The Behavioral Science/
Mental Health Services
Awards, sponsored by the
Pathways Counseling Cen-
ter, were won by Makenna
Lehman from Miller City-
New Cleveland for her proj-
ect “What Effect Does Gen-
der Have on Memory?” and
Brooke Mangas of Ottoville
for her project “Basketball.”
Town and Country Flow-
ers sponsored the Botany
Awards given to Quinton
Langhals of Columbus Grove
for his project titled “The
Effects of Microwaved Water
on Common Flora” and
Emily Klir of Fort Jennings
for “Flower Power.”
Tucker’s Ottawa Pharmacy
gave a Chemistry Award to
Abigail Schroeder of Miller
City-New Cleveland for the
project “What effect Does
Salt Have on the Boiling and
Freezing Point of Water” and
to Brennen Birkemeier for
“The Effect of Wood Den-
sity on Combustion Time.”
Furthermore, Wal-Mart
Pharmacy gave a Chemistry
Award to Jeff Knueve from
Kalida for his project titled
“Is Bottled Water as Pure as
Companies Say It Is?.”
The Conservation Award,
sponsored by the Putnam
County Soil and Water Con-
servation District, was won
by Dillon Schimmoeller of
Fort Jennings for his project
“Which Water Purification
System is the Best.”
The Dairy-Related Award,
sponsored by Leipsic Veteri-
nary Service, was given to
the team of Brooke Gable
and Carly Kortokrax of Otto-
ville for their project titled
“Baking Bread.”
The Dental Awards, spon-
sored by the Putnam County
Dental Association, were won
by the team of Sam Langhals
and Carlee Miller of Kalida for
their project “Teeth Whiten-
ing” and by Hailey Young of
Fort Jennings for the project
“Which Toothpaste Cleans
the Best?.”
The Ecological Conser-
vation Awards, sponsored
by Black Swamp Audubon
Society, were won by Aus-
tin Williams of Glandorf for
his project “The Effects of
Various Fire Retardants on
Flammability of Trees” and
by the team of Adam von der
Embse and Reed Fuller from
Kalida for “How Fish Affect
Aquatic Plant Growth.”
The Energy awards, spon-
sored by the Dominion Gas,
were won by Jeremy Smith
of Fort Jennings for “Wind
Energy” and Adam Schro-
eder of Miller City-New
Cleveland for “What Effect
Does Wind Speed Have Upon
the Amount of Energy Pro-
duced by a Windmill.”
EDUCATION
61 students receive superior at county science fair
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V4
February 15 - 21, 2012

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NANCY KLINE photos • Putnam Voice
Students receiving perfect scores during the Putnam County Scienece Fair on Saturday
included (from left) Adam Schroeder, Quinton Langhals, Abby Smith, Jessica Kuhlman, Bren-
nen Birkimier, Chloe Lammers, Mitchell Barlage and Alyssa Langhals.
Superior award winners at the Putnam County Science Fair
on Saturday included (front row, from left) Alyssa Wiede-
man, Corbyn Niese, Thomas Waldick and Madison Langhals;
(middle) Noah Otto, Adam Schroeder, Makenna Lehman,
Jessica Kuhlman and Brennen Birkimier; (back) Abraham
Morman, Abbey Recker, Bailey Eickholt, Maizee Brinkman.
Putnam County students receiving superior awards at the
county science fair on Saturday included (front row, from
left) Karenna Langhals, Alyssa Langhals, Mitchell Barlage,
Chloe Lammers and Robin Schumacher; (middle) Mitchell
Gable, Seth Nelson, Cody Von Lehmden, Logan Gerding,
Emily Niese, Quinton Langhals, Matt Hoehn and Tori War-
necke; (back) Ryan Hoersten, Dylan Altman, Abby Smith,
Lane Brooks, Alexis Thorbahn, Eric Von Sossan.
RIGHT: Superior award recipients at the Putnam County
Science Fair on Saturday included (front row, from left)
Layne Keefer, Trent Siebeneck, Ryan Ellerbrock, Griffin
Recker, Jeff Knueve, Jordan Verhoff (middle) Mikki Smith,
Abby Schroeder, Adam Birkemeier, Austin Williams, Alyssa
Schnipke and (back) Erica Edwards, Morgan Maag, Colton
Niese, Haley Schroeder, Abbey Verhoff.
See SCIENCE FAIR • V5
AT A GLANCE
See Photo Gallery of
Science Fair winners at
www.putnamvoice.com
COMMUNITY
Engineering Awards,
sponsored by the Techni-
con Design Group Inc., were
won by Alyssa Wiedeman of
Fort Jennings for her proj-
ect titled “Does the Size of
an Egg Affect Strength of
Its Shell” and Madison Lang-
hals from St. Anthony’s for
“Which Sock Material Would
Keep Feet the Warmest?”.
Glandorf Warehouse spon-
sored an Environmental
Award that was won by Kyle
Maag of Fort Jennings for
the project titled “What Type
of Detergent is Better on the
Environment?”.
Crop Production Ser-
vices, Leipsic, sponsored
four Environmental Awards,
which were won by Aus-
tin Williams of Glandorf for
“Fire Retardants”, Victoria
Edelbrock of St. Anthony’s
for “Ocean Currents and Cli-
mate”, Anna Selhorst also
of St. Anthony’s for “Does
Surface Temperature Affect
Finger Prints”, and by Grant
Goecke of Sts. Peter and
Paul for “Floating Eggs.”
The Human Health and
Physiology Awards, spon-
sored by St. Rita’s Ambu-
latory Care Center, were
won by Jordan Verhoff of
Glandorf for “Swimming
vs. Running/Effect on Heart
Rate”, Abby Smith from St.
Anthony’s for “Bar vs. Liq-
uid Soap” and by Jenna Ger-
man of Fort Jennings for her
project titled “Lung Capac-
ity: The Effects of Age and
Gender.”
The Medical Awards spon-
sored by the Putnam County
Medical Association were
won by Mitchell Barlage of
Miller City-New Cleveland
for his project “SCBA Life-
saver” and by Alyssa Lang-
hals of St. Anthony’s for her
project “Taste Affected by
Sight and Smell.”
The Putnam County Health
Department sponsored the
Nutrition/Fitness/Health
Awards that were given to
Eric Von Sossan of Ottovi-
lle for “Childproof Contain-
ers: Childproof or Not?” and
Abraham Morman from St.
Anthony’s for “Which Sense
Triggers Reflexes Faster
Eyes or Ears.”
The Physics Award, spon-
sored by the Ottoville Hard-
ware and Furniture Com-
pany was won by Cody Von
Lehmden of Fort Jennings
for his project titled “Does
Arm Length Affect the Dis-
tance of an Object Thrown
by a Catapult?”
The Sight-Related Award
sponsored by the Glandorf
and Ottawa Lions Clubs
was won by Erin Eickholt
from Fort Jennings for
“What is the Effect of Color
on Memory vs. Back and
White?.” Ottawa Lions Club
sponsored the second Sight-
Related Award that was
won by Maizee Brinkman of
Ottoville for the project “Dif-
ficulty of the Stroop Effect
as Age Increases.”
The Solid Waste Manage-
ment Award, sponsored by
the Putnam County Com-
missioners was won by Alex
Sealts from Fort Jennings
for “Trash to Gas.”
The Technology Award
sponsored by Log On Com-
puters was won by Robyn
Schumacher of St. Antho-
ny’s for “iTouch Bacteria.”
The Veterinary Award spon-
sored by Leipsic Veterinary
Service was won by Abbey
Recker of Glandorf for her
project titled “The Effect of
Different Training Cues on
Horses’ Movements.”
The Water Quality Award,
sponsored by The Quarry
Farm Nature Preserve &
Conservation Farm was
given to Dillon Schim-
moeller of Fort Jennings for
“Which Water Purification
Method is the Best.”
Awards from Bethel
Grange #2130 in Henry
County for Originality and
Creativity were won by Abby
Von Sossan of Fort Jennings
for “What Water Dish Keeps
Pets’ Water from Freezing
the Best?”, Avery Ross of Sts.
Peter and Paul for “Cook-
ing Oils: Which One Softens
the Lima Beans the Most?”,
and by Alex Schroeder of
Glandorf for “Fruit Juices
and Antioxidants.”
Awards from the Epi-
lepsy Foundation of North-
west Ohio, given for the
Effective Use of Scientific
Method, went to Connor
Koch from Glandorf for his
project titled “The Effects
of Various Fire Retardants
on Flammability of Trees”
and to Kyle Hellman for Fort
Jennings for “What Type of
Wood Resists Water Absorp-
tion in Its Natural State and
Sealed.”
The Outstanding Presenta-
tion Awards, sponsored by
the Retired Teachers’ Asso-
ciation of Henry County,
were won by Megan Schim-
moeller of Sts. Peter and
Paul for the project “Brown-
ing of Apples”, Haley Schro-
eder also of Sts. Peter and
Paul for her project “Break
the Knot: Which One is the
Strongest”, and by Maizee
Brinkman of Ottoville for
“Difficulty of the Stroop
Effect as Age Increases.”
The Young Scientist Chal-
lenge Award sponsored by
First Federal Bank located
in Ottawa was won by Cody
Von Lehmden of Fort Jen-
nings for his project titled
“Does Arm Length Affect
the Distance of an Object
Thrown By a Catapult?”.
Projects in the behavioral
science field were judged
by Ken Kaufman, Marilyn
Calvelage, Jack Betscher, Dan
VonderEmbse, Jodi Maag,
Shane Maag, Joe Uphaus, and
Bruce Steingass.
Projects in the Biochem-
istry and Microbiology field
were judged by Marilyn
Bohrer, Steve Palte, Bonnie
Brooks, and Bob Gerdeman.
Projects in the Botany
field were judged by Roger
Luersman, Heather Harmon,
Denny Mumaw, Shelley
Mumaw, Dave Leader, and
Kevin Goecke.
Projects in the Chemistry
field were judged by Mike
Lammers, Kevin Blake, Greg
Spitnale, and Wendell Bad-
ertscher.
Projects in Earth and
Space Sciences were judged
by Roger VonderEmbse,
Karl Hirzel, Deb Dulle, and
Paul Lenz.
Projects in the Engineer-
ing field were judged by
Ron Honigford, Mike Siebe-
neck, Rick Carder, and Mike
Jones.
Projects in the Environ-
mental Science field were
judged by Len Ebbeskotte,
Joan Ebbeskotte, Harold
Gerten, and Daryl Rad-
abaugh.
Projects in the Health and
Medicine field were judged
by Krista Schomaeker, Ali-
cia Haselman, Marcille
Liebrecht, Nancy Kroeger,
Darla Warnecke, Dr. Mark
Basinger, Bob Weber, and
Tina Weber.
Projects in the Physics area
were judged by Al Hueve,
Greg Gerten, Rick Balbaugh,
Pat Recker, Rod Nuveman,
and Tim Burkepile.
Projects in the Zoology
field were judged by Beth
Schnipke, Ted Elliott, Clint
Bostelman, and Rob Schultz.
Special Judges, who pro-
vided judging for all of the
sponsored awards, were
led by Jeff Jostpille. Assist-
ing with special judging
were Dr. Jan Osborn, Norm
Schnipke, Deb Schroeder,
Marita Deatrick, Tina Bas-
inger, Tammy Baker, Mari-
lyn Bohrer, Deb Dulle, Gary
Herman and many other
judge volunteers.
The Regional Science Fair
to be held at Northwest State
Community College in Arch-
bold on Saturday, March 3,
2012. Students who earned
superior or high excellent
ratings at the County Fair
are eligible to advance to the
District Science Fair, which
will be held at Ohio North-
ern University on Saturday,
March 24, 2012. If students
receive high enough ratings
at these fairs, they are eli-
gible to compete at the State
Science Fair, hosted by Ohio
State University, on Satur-
day, May 5, 2012, where over
$2 million in scholarships
are available.
Special thanks to the
administration and staff of
Continental Local School
for hosting the 2012 Putnam
County Science Fair, includ-
ing Gary Jones, Superinten-
dent, Joel Mengerink, High
School Principal, Brian Ger-
deman, Elementary School
Principal and Cathy Berry,
District Technology Coordi-
nator. Thanks also to the
staff at Continental Local
Schools, including Marilyn
Bohrer, the cafeteria staff,
NHS students, and the Stu-
dent Council.
The Putnam County Sci-
ence Fair is coordinated by
the Putnam County Educa-
tional Service Center and
science teachers from sev-
eral districts within Putnam
County.
You can submit
your stories
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weekly newspaper covering
Putnam County. It is deliv-
ered to homes throughout
the county and also can be
picked up at various distribu-
tion racks.
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Many of the stories and
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cies and people like yourself.
Tell us about your vacation,
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Stories, photos and videos
should be e-mailed to info@
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COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V5
February 15 - 21, 2012
H.G. Violet Equipment
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SCIENCE FAIR • from V4 –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
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Gary L. Altstaetter, 70, died at 1:20 a.m. Feb. 13, 2012, at St.
Rita’s Medical Center.
He was born Jan. 16, 1942, in Cairo to Jacob J. “Jack” and
Leah G. Lamb Altstaetter, who preceded him in death. On
June 5, 1965, he married Carol Wriggelsworth, who survives
in Columbus Grove.
Mr. Altstaetter was a 1960 graduate of Columbus Grove High
School and a 1965 graduate Ohio Northern University School of
Pharmacy, Ada, from which he became a licensed pharmacist.
During his college years, he worked at Lima Memorial Hospital
in the pharmacy department for a year. Upon graduation, he
worked at Hawkey’s Pharmacy, Columbus Grove. In 1978, he
and his wife, bought the store from George and Bea Hawkey. In
1988, they built a new store a few doors north of the old loca-
tion, which they operated until their retirement in October 2005.
He was a member of St. John United Methodist Church,
Columbus Grove. He enjoyed fishing, hunting, going to Penn-
sylvania hunting, woodworking and carving. He was very
proud of his family and especially enjoyed the grandchildren
and attending their various activities.
He was a member of the Northwest Ohio Pharmaceutical
Association, the Ohio State Pharmaceutical Association and
the National Society of Compounding Pharmacists. He served
on several local boards, among which were the Putnam
County Planning Commission, Home Health Agency and the
Columbus Grove Board of Appeals. He served several terms
as president of the Columbus Grove Chamber of Commerce.
He was a member of the Republican Central Committee, the
Bow Benders Hunt Club, the Columbus Grove Archery Club,
which he co-founded, and the Putnam County Precinct Com-
mittee. He served on the Putnam-Hancock-Seneca Counties
Boy Scouts Council. He had been an Eagle Scout and served
as a den master and Scout leader. He had been a member of
the Columbus Grove Lions Club.
Following his retirement, he got easily bored and took a new
direction in his life. He hooked up with the pharmacy at Norton
Sound Hospital, Nome, Alaska. He loved Alaska, especially in
winter, and it opened his horizons dramatically. Recently he
decided to expand his horizons again and began working with
the Ohio State Penitentiary System in Marion and Chillicothe.
Survivors also include a son, Mark (Wendy) Altstaetter, of
Jefferson, Ga.; a daughter, Jennifer (Terry) Marvin, of Find-
lay; nine grandchildren, Todd Marvin, Megan Ridenour, Kirk
Ridenour, Miranda Ridenour, Thayne Clymer, Allie Elrod,
Audrey Elrod, Jacob Altstaetter and Jeremy Altstaetter; a
brother-in-law, James (Barb) Wriggelsworth, of Lima; and a
sister-in-law, Anita (Barry) Rowe, of Virginia Beach, Va.
Services will begin at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. John United
Methodist Church, Columbus Grove. Pastor Gary Ginter will
officiate. Burial will be in Cairo East Cemetery, Cairo.
Friends may call from 6 to 8 p.m. today and 2 to 4 and 6 to
8 p.m. Wednesday at Hartman Sons Funeral Home, Columbus
Grove, and one hour prior to services Thursday at the church.
Memorial contributions may be made to American Cancer
Society, St. John United Methodist Church, the Columbus
Grove Archery Club or the charity of the donor’s choice.
OTTAWA
Matthew A. Yohe
Matthew A. Yohe, 18, died Feb. 9, 2012, at his residence.
He was born June 11, 1993, in Denver to Patrick and Faye
Bellman Yohe, who survive in Ottawa.
Mr. Yohe was a 2011 graduate of Ottawa-Glandorf High
School. He was a volunteer with Putnam County Habitat
for Humanity and loved to race Go Karts. He was a die hard
Pittsburgh Steelers Fan.
Survivors also include a brother, Christopher Yohe, at
home; two sisters, Melissa (Carey) Lewis, of Mentone, Ind.,
and Carrie (Chris) Jordan, of North Webster, Ind.; mater-
nal grandparents, Richard and Betty Bellman, of Leipsic;
paternal grandparents, Lowell and Martha Yohe, of North
Manchester, Ind.; and six nieces and a nephew.
Arrangements were handled by Love Funeral Home, Ottawa.
Memorial contributions may be made to the suicide sup-
port group To Write Love On Her Arms at www.twloha.com
or TWLOHA, P.O. Box 2203, Melbourne, FL, 32902.
Condolences may be expressed at www.lovefuneralhome.
com.
OBITUARIES
Gerten/Recker
COLUMBUS GROVE —
Harold and Judy Gerten,
of Columbus Grove,
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Sherri,
to Michael Recker, son of
Dennis and Kathy Recker,
of Kalida.
The bride-elect is a gradu-
ate of Columbus Grove
High School and attends
Michigan State University’s
graduate program for a
degree in Doctor of Veteri-
nary Medicine.
Her fiance is a graduate
of Kalida High School and
Owens Community College
with a mechanical degree.
He is employed by Grob
Systems in Bluffton as a
fabrication detailer.
The couple will
exchange wedding vows
May 19, 2012, at St.
Michael’s Catholic Church
in Kalida.
Sullivan/Markward
OTTAWA — Mr. and Mrs.
Kirk Sullivan, of Ottawa,
announce the engagement
of their daughter, Brittni, to
Dustin Markward, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jerold Markward,
of Ottoville.
The bride-elect is a gradu-
ate of Lourdes University.
She is employed by St. Rita’s
Medical Center.
Her fiance is employed by
M and W Trailors, Inc., of
Ottoville and also coaches
soccer for Ottoville High
School.
The couple will exchange
wedding vows on June 30,
2012.
ENGAGEMENTS
It’s Your Garden
Program
The Putnam County
District Library in Ottawa
is having “It’s Your Gar-
den” program March
7 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.
Master gardener member
Keith Kahle will present
a guide in preparation
for spring planting. All
are welcome to attend
this free program. For
any questions, call the
library at 419-523-3747.
For more programs, visit
www.mypcdl.org.
Mystery Lovers
Book Club
The Putnam County
District Library in Ottawa
will have a Book Talk on
March 21 at 1 p.m. The
title is “‘A’ is for Alibi”
by Sue Grafton, and
registration is required
so enough books can be
ordered. The Mystery
Lovers Book Club will
meet on Wednesdays at 1
p.m. every other month.
Some of the authors
being read are: Anne
Perry, Debbie Macomber,
Susan Albert, Mary Jane
Clark, Paul Gaus, Joan
Hess, and Sue Grafton.
For any questions call the
library at 419-523-3747
and ask for Jan.
UPCOMING
LIBRARY
PROGRAMS
CLOVERDALE — St. Bar-
bara’s Holy Name Society’s
‘all you can eat fish and
chicken fry’ is this Sunday,
from 4 to 7 p.m. at the parish
hall in Cloverdale. You can
dine in or carry out. Cost
is $8 for adults and $4 for
children. The dinner includes
fish, chicken potatoes, green
beans, garlic toast and cole-
slaw. The event is open to
the public. All proceeds go to
the St. Barbara’s Holy Name
Society.
PUZZLE ANSWERS
WEEKLY PUZZLE ON PAGE V3
COMMUNITY
Saturday
Boys Basketball
Ottawa-Glandorf 75
Leipsic 54
OTTAWA — T.J. Metzger
scored 17 points for
Ottawa-Glandorf while
Michael Rosebrock fin-
ished with a double-double
in the nonleague win. Rose-
brock scored 16 points and
pulled down 14 boards
for O-G (12-5) while Matt
Kaufman scored 11 points.
Ty Maag scored 21 points
for the Vikings, Zach Kuhl-
man had 17 points and
Devin Mangas added 11
points.
Fort Jennings 53
Delphos Jefferson 48
FORT JENNINGS — Tyler
Wideman scored 16 points
for the Musketeers in the
victory over the visiting
Wildcats. Cody Warnecke
finished with 13 points and
8 boards for Fort Jennings
(8-9) and Kurt Warnecke
had 14 points. Nick Dunlap
scored 17 points for Jeffer-
son (1-10) and Shayn Klinger
scored 11 points.
Kalida 57, Ayersville 25
AYERSVILLE — Kalida
scored just 1 point to Ayers-
ville’s 3 in the first quarter
but turned it on the second
as the Wildcats went off for
a 28-4 quarter en route to the
win. Kalida is 12-5 overall
and Ayersville is 1-16. Ben
Schroeder scored 16 points
for Kalida while Austin
Horstman chipped in with
12 points and Drew Stech-
schulte scored 9 points.
21 points for the Rams
(6-12) and Lane Hurley
added 20 points.
Girls Basketball
Kalida 41, Leipsic 34
LEIPSIC — Kalida out-
scored Leipsic 15-3 in the
third quarter and went on
to win the PCL battle on
the road. Julia Vandemark
scored 9 points for Kal-
ida (10-9, 3-3), which had
nine players score. Emily
Gerten’s 15 led Leipsic (11-8,
3-4) and Molly Ellerbrock
added 9 points.
Continental 48
Patrick Henry 46
HAMLER — Leva Weller’s
13 points helped Continental
slip by host Patrick Henry
while Taylor Williamson
delivered 8 points for the
Pirates.
Friday
Ottawa-Glandorf 58,
St. Marys 54
ST. MARYS — Noah Bram-
lage led a balance Titans’
effort with 13 points and O-G
went on to beat St. Marys in
WBL play.
Michael Rosebrock scored
11 points for O-G (11-5, 4-3)
while Matt Kaufman had 9
points. J.D. Meyer and Gar-
rett Fledderjohann each
had 15 points for St. Marys
(5-11, 1-6) and D.J. Manning
scored 13 points.
Kalida 61, Miller City 55
MILLER CITY — Kevan
Unverferth struck for 17
points and Kalida picked up
a Putnam County League
win over host Miller City.
Ben Schroeder scored 13
points for Kalida (11-5, 4-2)
while Nathan Kortokrax
scored 11 points. Brent Her-
miller netted 15 points for
Miller City (11-7, 4-2) and
Russell Neise had 10 points.
Continental 38
Ottoville 28
CONTINENTAL — Conti-
nental began the game with
a 10-5 edge after a quarter
and outscored visiting Otto-
ville 15-5 in the final quarter
for the PCL win.
Bret Slattman scored 14
points for the Pirates (5-11,
2-3) and Spencer Ord-
way had 11 points. Kevin
Schnipke had 7 points for
Ottoville (3-13, 0-6).
Thursday
Fort Jennings 63
Perry 40
PERRY TOWNSHIP – Fort
Jennings’ Macy Schroeder
scored 18 points, with four
3-pointers, in the Muske-
teers’ victory over Perry.
Morgan Schroeder added
10 points for Fort Jennings.
Teysha Upshaw paced
Perry with 16 points. Abbie
Patton had 12 points and a
pair of 3-pointers.
Fort Jennings is 8-10. Perry
is 3-15.
Leipsic 64,
Van Buren 41
LEIPSIC – Leipsic’s Emily
Gerten tossed in 23 points,
with three 3-pointers, to
ignite the Vikings over Van
Buren.
Leipsic’s Molly Ellerbrock
and Amber Gerdeman both
scored 14 points for the
Vikings.
Leipsic led 40-23 at the
half.
The Vikings are 11-7, 5-4
in the Blanchard Valley
Conference.
Ottawa-Glandorf 40
St. Marys 35
OTTAWA – Kristen Miller
led Ottawa-Glandorf with 12
points in a victory over st.
Marys.
Elissa Ellerbrock had nine
points for the Titans.
Ashleigh Falk paced St.
Marys with 12 points. Rea-
gan Aller had 10 points.
O-G is 7-11, 3-5 in the WBL.
St. Marys is 3-15, 1-7 in the
WBL.
Ada 40,
Columbus Grove 34
COLUMBUS GROVE –
Ada’s Taylor Willke scored
18 points to lead Ada past
Columbus Grove.
Anna Ricker, Nikki Stech-
schulte and Sydney McCluer
all scored nine points for
Columbus Grove. Ricker
also had 11 rebounds.
Ada is 10-8, 4-4 in the
NWC. Columbus Grove is
8-9, 4-4 in the NWC.
PREP ROUNDUP WATCH FOR IT
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about an award you
received, or an upcoming
event you want to promote.
Just tell us about it!
E-mail info@putnamvoice.com
WE’LL TELL
THE COUNTY
COMMUNITY
putnamvoice.com
V6
February 15 - 21, 2012
See Bob Schmersal for
Ahl your auto needs.
419-296-1385
bobschmersal@tomahl.com
Bob
Schmersal
Your Putnam County Connection at
Tom Ahl
617 King Ave. • Lima
Diller Furniture
www.dillerfnefurniture.com
Hours: Mon. & Wed. 10-8:00 • T, Th, Fri. & Sat. 10-5
Conforms to Your Unique Shape
Provides Unsurpassed
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Diller Furniture
Open
Sunday
1-4
Additional
10% OFF
Rt. 65 in Ottawa
Toll Free:
888-523-5441
10% OFF ANY
SERVICE
REPAIR OVER
$100.00
Must present coupon
Expires March 15, 2012
Oil Change
Special
$
22
95
Up to 5 quarts of conventional oil.
Dexos and synthetic
oil incur extra charge.
Limit one per customer.
Must present coupon
Expires March 15, 2012
Tire Rotation &
Wheel Balance
With Free Brake Inspection
$
39
95

Must present coupon
Expires March 15, 2012
$1.00 Off
Basic and
Super Premium
Car Wash
Must present coupon
Expires March 15, 2012
Winter Service Specials
PV PV PV PV
Mark Your Calendar
www.OttawaHealthFair.com
April 28, 2012 ∙ Ottawa-Glandorf High School
• Submitted photo
Dylan Kleman attempting to pin Hunter Allen of Ada.
Kleman pinned Allen in 1:57. Kleman became the wrestler
with the most wins in Columbus Grove School history,
breaking Kyle Blankemeyer’s record of 105 career wins.
Area gymnastics groups compete in Michigan
The girls from Halker’s Gold
Gymnastics competed in the
Athlete Warrior Challenge in
Warren, Mich., Feb. 3-5
The results are as follows
in categories:
Vault, bars, beam, floor, all
around
Level 8
McKenzie Whitacre: 8.125
(19th), NA, 8.500 (9th),
9.000 (11th), NA
Kelsey Martz:8.700 (8th),
9.475 (3rd), 9.200 (6th),
9.275 (5th), 36.650 (6th)
Abigail Schroeder: 9.200
(2nd), 8.900 (13th), 9.025 (8th),
9.250 (7th), 36.375 (8th)
Makenna Johnson: 8.325
(15th), 6.450 (18th), 8.675
(16th), 9.075 (12th), 32.525
(17th)
Team: 05.550

Xcel - Gold
Autumn Sprunger: 8.700
(12th), 8.800 (9th), 9.300
(1st), 9.575 (1st), 36.375 (6th)
Jacee Harwell: 8.575 (14th),
9.325 (5th), 8.800 (8th), 9.575
(6th), 36.275 (8th)
Morgan Burns: 8.475 (15th),
9.275 (6th), 9.500 (1st), 9.600
(5th), 36.850 (3rd)
Saige Thomas: 8.650 (13th),
9.500 (2nd), 8.600 (10th), 9.625
(3rd), 36.375 (5th)
Nataya Schwiebert: 8.900
(7th), 9.000 (8th), 9.250 (2nd),
9.750 (1st), 36.900 (1st)
Team: 111.375 (1st)
Level 4
Tygre Troyer: 9.100 (10th),
NA, 8.900 (10th), 9.075 (4th),
NA
Autumn Searfoss: 9.250
(6th), 9.050 (5th), 9.350 (3rd),
9.075 (3rd), 36.725 (3rd)
Level 5
Emma Brinkman: 8.700
(4th), 9.025 (2nd), 8.550
(13th), 8.575 (13th), 34.850
(7th)
Elizabeth Bourassa: 9.125
(1st), 8.475 (5th), 8.950
(6th), 8.700 (8th), 35.250
(3rd)
Taylor Born: 8.450 (9th).
7.800 (18th), 8.925 (8th),
8.850 (10th), 34.025 (13th)
Lyndie Hazelton: 8.800 (5th),
8.850 (3rd), 8.425 (14th), 8.500
(11th), 34.575 (6th)
Team: 105.525
Level 9
Torie Allgire: NA, 8.425
(10th), 7.600 (17th), 8.475
(16th), NA
Level 3
Marisa Hermiller: 9.125
(3rd), 9.425 (1st), 8.900 (5th),
8.900 (6th), 36.350 (2nd)
Marie Gerding: 8.800
(11th),8.450 (7th), 9.200
(2nd), 9.350 (1st),
35.800 (4th)
Lilly Lacey: 8.650 (12th),
8.425 (8th), 8.750 (9th), 8.700
(11th), 34.525 (7th)
Mallorie Knueven: 9.000
(6th), 7.700 (13th) ,
8.650 (11th), 9.000 (4th),
34.350 (9th)
Reese VanOss: 8.950
(9th),NA, 9.000 (4th), 9.000
(5th), NA
Mia Verhoff: 9.525 (1st),
8.725 (5th), 9.400 (1st), 8.775
(7th), 36.425 (1st)
Lila Baxter: 9.050 (7th),
8.100 (13th), 8.850 (8th),
9.075 (1st), 35.075 (6th)
Morgan Halker: 9.050
(10th), 8.800 (5th), 8.950
(8th), 8.500 (15th), 35.300
(9th)
Elizabeth Schroeder: 8.825
(13th), NA, 9.100 (6th),8.700
(11th), NA
Team: 109.775
• Submitted photo
Ottoville girls turn back Delphos St. John’s
OTTOVILLE — It’s no easy
task taking down Ottoville.
Delphos St. John’s took a
good shot and led by eight
after three quarters.
So Ottoville did what it
does best: It got the ball in to
6-foot-2 Abby Siefker.
Siefker scored seven of
her game-high 13 points in
the final quarter to post a
42-37 come-from-behind
girls basketball victory over
Delphos St. John’s on Satur-
day at Ottoville.
Ottoville, ranked No. 1 in the
state in Division IV, is 18-0. The
Blue Jays stand 13-6.
There were a few anxious
moments for the Big Green.
St. John’s ran off a 9-0 run to
close the third quarter with a
35-28 lead.
Siefker finished with 13
points, five rebounds and a
block. Lauren Koch scored
eight points, four in the final
quarter, for Ottoville.
The Blue Jays were led
by a solid inside game
by Shelby Reindel, who
had eight points and 11
rebounds. Courtney Grot-
house had nine points.
Ottoville led 15-9 after the
first quarter and 24-19 at the
half. But when Reindel, Jes-
sica Recker and Erica Saine
knocked down 3-pointers
back-to-back-to-back the Jays
pulled out to a 35-28 lead after
three quarters.
Siefker opened the fourth
quarter with a layup and a
foul shot for a three-point
play. She made another foul
shot and then knocked in a
layup off a lob. That brought
the Big Green within 35-34.
Megan Bendele’s layup
gave the Big Green the lead
to stay, 37-35, with 4:08 left.
The Big Green started the
fourth quarter with a 12-0
run, with Siefker scoring
seven.
The Blue Jays were 1 of
8 from the field in the last
quarter.
Ottoville won the boards,
30-25. From the field, Ottovi-
lle shot 41 percent and was 0
of 6 on 3-pointers. St. John’s
shot 39 percent and was 5 of
15 on threes.
Kleman hopes the tight
game pays off down the tour-
nament trail.
Grove wrestlers compete
at NWC championship
Team Scores
1. Delphos Jefferson 291
2. Lima Central Catholic
279
3. Columbus Grove 240
4. Bluffton 234
5. Spencerville 209
6. Allen East 182½
7. Paulding 127
8.Ada 85
9. Lincolnview 42
Coach Wilson (DJ) was
voted coach of the year
Curtis Miller (DJ) and
Zach Wilson (BL) were
voted Most Valuable
Wrestler
Ten Columbus Grove
wrestlers placed at NWC
Championships held at the
new Columbus Grove gym.
Tregg Keysor was the lone
champion for the Bulldogs.
Alec Gladwell was runner
up. Brett Sampson, Dylan
Kleman, Brandon Benroth
placed 3rd. Christian Stech-
schulte, Hunter Giesige,
Gavin Windau, Adam John-
son, Alex Shaffer placed 4th.
Miller hired to
coach Grove football
COLUMBUS GROVE
— For former Elida High
School and University of
Mount Union football stand-
out Kyle Miller, becoming
a head coach has always
been at the top of his list.
At a special board meet-
ing Wednesday, Columbus
Grove hired the 23-year-old
Miller as the new head foot-
ball coach. Miller takes over
a team that went 7-3 last
season. The head coaching
position became open this
past November when Scott
Palte resigned. Palte went
46-27 and made the playoffs
twice (2006, 2009) during his
seven-year tenure.
Xcel Gold girls from Halker’s Gold Gymnastics competed
in the Athlete Warrior Challenge in Warren, Mich., Feb. 3-5
SPORTS
AUCTIONS AUCTIONS AUCTIONS
200
REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE FOR SALE
LOTS ACREAGE FOR SALE
300
RENTALS RENTALS
UNFURNISHED
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
500
EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT
BUSINESS & SERVICE
DIRECTORY
600
GENERAL CONTRACTING
700
MERCHANDISE MERCHANDISE
800
TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION
LIVESTOCK
800
TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION
SNOWMOBILES
TRUCKS
5.7 acres SOLD! 24.8 acres
dense woods (1+ acre cleared
frontage) can be split in 2 par-
cels. Kalida 419-393-4243.
2 BEDROOM 1 bath apartment
at Kalida Golf Course. Washer
/Dryer hook-up, garage, no
pets. Call 419-303-8186
2 BEDROOM 1 bath apartment
in Ottawa, washer & dryer, air,
garage. No pets. Call 419-538-
6567
DRIVER
OTR DRIVER NEEDED
Class A CDL with tanker &
HAZMAT endorsement re-
quired. Minimum 1 year ex-
perience. Clean MVR; must
pass DOT physical and drug
testing. Full-time position.
Full benefits, vacation, holi-
day pay and 401K plan. Call
419-225-5279 between the
hours of 8:00am and
4:00pm Monday thru Friday.
DRIVERS
Drivers needed for a small
company. The pay is 30%
of 80% of the load gross
and home almost every
weekend. 2 years OTR re-
quired. Call 419-230-3436.
DRIVERS
DRIVERS NEEDED
We are looking for a few
good drivers that are inter-
ested in a family oriented
environment. We are a refri-
gerated fleet traveling east
of the Mississippi. We offer
competitive pay and a com-
plete benefit package with
attention to family needs.
Please call Jeff Hall at:
HTI Hall Trucking Express
419-423-9555 or stop in at
110 Bentley Court,
Findlay, Ohio.
DRIVERS
DRIVERS
∂ Semi / Tractor Trailer
∂ Home Daily
∂ All No Touch Loads
∂ Excellent Equipment
∂ Medical Insurance
∂ Eye & Dental
Reimbursement
∂ 401K Retirement
∂ Paid Holidays - Shutdown
Days
∂ Safety Bonus Paid
Weekly
∂ Minimum Age "23"
∂ Class "A" CDL Required
Require Good MVR
& References.
Call Chambers Leasing at:
1-800-526-6435
DRIVERS
DRIVERS WANTED
JOHNSRUD TRANSPORT,
a Food Grade Liquid carri-
er, is looking for Class A
CDL tank drivers from the
Lima area for regional work.
Home Flexible weekends.
5 years driving experience
required. Will train for tank.
Great Pay & Benefit pack-
age. For further info, call
Jane @ 1-888-200-5067
DRIVERS
FLATBED DRIVER
WANTED
Class A CDL & 1+ year over
the road experience neces-
sary. Health insurance.
Home regularly.
Call 800-535-5085
DRIVERS
Local Company. New pay rate.
Excellent benefits package.
401 (k) paid vacation, holidays,
CDL-A 2 years experience
www.cevelogistics.com
419-232-3969
EOE
DRIVERS
Looking for Class A & B
delivery drivers. Must be
able to handle all freight.
Additional pay for handling
freight. Some overnight
runs, home on weekends.
Please send resumes and
pay expectations to mstem
_resumes@yahoo.com
DRIVERS
Miller’s Textile Services in
Wapakoneta has an immedi-
ate opening for a full time
tractor trailer driver for 2nd
shift. This position requires
a daily trip to Defiance and
several other locations,
Monday thru Friday, deliver-
ing and picking up product
in carts. Must have an Ohio
class A CDL with excellent
driving record with two
years minimumdriving expe-
rience and excellent attend-
ance record. Must be able
to push/pull carts to
load/unload trailer and lift up
to 50 lbs.
We offer competitive wages
with a benefit package that
includes medical, dental,
vision, life and disability
insurance, 401k, etc. We
are an Equal Employment
Opportunity/Affirmative
Action, M/F employer.
Qualified candidates should
email their resume to:
vroby@millerstextile.com
or fax to: 419-738-6528.
GENERAL
Part-Time Alarm Monitoring
position available 2nd and
3rd shifts. Must be
bondable. Background and
drug testing required. Sub-
mit resume to:
FISHERL@NWOSS.COM
DRIVERS
Pohl Transportation
has a NEW
Sign On Bonus!
$3,000!
Call 1-800-672-8498 for
more info or visit:
www.pohltransportation.com
∂ Up to 39 cents/mile with
Performance Bonus
∂ 1 year OTR – CDL A
∂ Pay thru home on week-
ends
DRIVER
The Council on Rural
Services
is seeking a Bus Driver to work
30 hours per week at our Kids
Learning Place in VanWert.
Minimum requirements are a
high school diploma or GED,
CDL with school bus endorse-
ment (we may assist with ob-
taining), ability to lift a minimum
of 40 pounds, and the ability to
work a flexible schedule.
Minimum starting wage: $8.73,
(without CDL) and $10.91 (with
CDL). To apply please visit our
website at www.
councilonruralservices.org or
send cover letter and resume
to: wmoorman@councilon
ruralservices.org
FINANCIAL
RETAIL
LENDER
First Federal Bank is seek-
ing a full-time Retail Lender
for our Lima Allentown of-
fice. This position requires
mortgage, consumer lend-
ing and cross-selling prod-
ucts and services to gener-
ate new business for the
bank and providing excep-
tional customer service. Mini-
mum of two years of mort-
gage lending, consumer
lending and sales experi-
ence.
First Federal offers a friend-
ly, professional work envi-
ronment, competitive prod-
ucts and excellent customer
support, plus competitive
pay, 401 (k), ESPP, quarter-
ly bonuses, and more.
If you would like to be
considered for this position,
please apply directly online
at www.first-fed.com by
clicking on the careers link
requisition #12-0011.
No phone calls please.
EOE
TRADES
Experienced Industrial
Painter/Sandblaster
Lima area.
Call Frank 614-327-1001
GENERAL
MAINTENANCE
MANAGER
Supervises 5-6 employees
Electrical, mechanical and
organizational skills re-
quired
Background in:
∂ H.V.A.C.
∂ PLUMBING
∂ HOUSEKEEPING
∂ RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
∂ BASIC COMPUTER
SKILLS IS A PLUS
COMPETITIVE SALARY
FAMILY INSURANCE
401K WITH EMPLOYER
MATCH
VACATIONS
SEND RESUMES TO:
1700 SHAWNEE ROAD
LIMA, OHIO 45805
GENERAL
Now hiring part-time produc-
tion employees. Good work
ethic and positive attitude
desired. Must be motivated,
organized and caring.
Will work around school
schedules. Paying $8.00/
hour to start during training
period. Please submit
resumes to Production, PO
Box 209, Cairo, OH 45820.
GENERAL
PRODUCTION
POSITIONS
100 Openings
Need transportation? We
have you covered. Pyramid
Staffing is currently accept-
ing applications for the cook-
ie factory. Transportation is
available for all three shifts .
All shifts are available.
$8.50 per hour with a $.20
differential for second and
third shift. Long term posi-
tions. If you worked there be-
fore, you can call the Impact
office and check on
rehireability and scheduling.
We will be taking applica-
tions from 11am to 3pm..
Monday thru Friday at:
116 N. West St..
GENERAL
Seasonal
Employee
Heritage Cooperative is hir-
ing for seasonal employees
for Ada Fertilizer and
Harrod Fertilizer locations.
Applicant must meet mini-
mum qualifications:
∂ Class "A" CDL With Tank-
er Endorsements
∂ Good Customer Service
∂ Willing to Work Overtime
∂ Clean Driving Record
Applications can be picked
up at Ada Fertilizer or
Harrod Fertilizer locations.
HEALTH CARE
DIRECTOR
OF NURSING
Lima Manor, a 96 bed skil-
led nursing and rehabilita-
tion facility in Lima, Ohio is
seeking a Director of Nurs-
ing. Responsibilities include
successful implementation,
oversight and management
of nursing policies, proce-
dures and efficient practices
including areas in quality as-
surance, regulatory compli-
ance, budget and payroll
compliance, survey readi-
ness, case management,
and more. Qualified candi-
dates will possess a current
Registered Nursing license
in the state of Ohio and will
have a minimum of 3 years
of long-term care experi-
ence, previous leadership
and/or DON experience pre-
ferred. We offer excellent or-
ganizational culture, com-
pensation and benefit pack-
age. Deadline to apply is
February 29, 2012.
Please submit resume with
cover letter and salary
requirements to:
Lima Manor
Attn: Administrator
750 Brower Rd.
Lima, Ohio 45801
Fax: (419) 227-1392
HEALTHCARE
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPIST
Full-time, part-time, and
PRN available immediately.
Services provides home
health and outpatient.
Salary, hourly, per visit with
excellent benefits and sign
on bonus to be negotiated.
Midwest Rehab, Inc.
485 Moxie Lane
Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-3405
mwrehab@live.com
HEALTHCARE


JOB FAIR
Tuesday February 14th
10:00 am. - 12:00 pm.
and
Wednesday February 15th
10:00 am - 12:00pm.

Baton Rouge Health Serv-
ices Community is expand-
ing service delivery
and is seeking qualified pro-
fessional staff in the follow-
ing roles in both ourinpatient
medical facility and our
home health agency:

RN/LPN
Nursing Assistants and
home health aides
Therapy Staff including
OT’s,PT’s,OTA’s and
COTA’s
Medical Office Assistant
Cook
Housekeeping
Transition Coach RN
Maitenance/floor tech

Please bring resume as
screening interviews will be
conducted.

Baton Rouge Senior
Health Services
2440 Baton Rouge
Lima, Ohio 45805
HEALTHCARE
PART TIME
POSITION
Patient Account
Service
Representative
HealthPro, a respected,
trusted, sought after, and
leading medical billing com-
pany in the area is looking
for a part-time Patient Ac-
count Service Representa-
tive to work 3:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m. Monday - Friday.
Responsibilities include re-
sponding to patient tele-
phone inquiries regarding
their account status, corre-
sponding with insurance
companies and other relat-
ed parties, updating account
information in the billing sys-
tem and providing quality
and efficient patient account
services.
Preferred candidates will
have an Associate’s Degree
in Business Management,
Healthcare Management or
related area of study. One
to three years of industry re-
lated work experience
and/or a customer service
experience preferred. Equiv-
alent combinations of work
experience and education
will be considered.
HealthPro promotes person-
al values of honesty, loyalty,
integrity, and client service
with our team members and
our clients. We offer a pleas-
ant and positive working en-
vironment and excellent
compensation. All candi-
dates must identify the posi-
tion of interest and provide
an email address, salary his-
tory and expectations to be
considered.
Email resume and cover let-
ter to:
recruiting@
healthpromedical.com
or mail to
Human Resources
P.O. Box 1524
Lima, OH 45802
by Monday, February 20th
Equal Opportunity
Employer
HEALTHCARE
PRN
LPN or RN
Seeking on-call nurses to
provide a range of psychiat-
ric nursing duties in our out-
patient and crisis services.
Must have current State of
Ohio RN or LPN license and
experience in mental health.
Able to work flexible hours
including evenings, week-
ends, and holidays.
Send resume to:
CPS-32RNLPN
ATTN: Human Resources
799 S. Main St.
Lima OH 45804
or apply online at www.
coleman-professional
.com EOE
HEALTHCARE
ST. RITA’S
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES
LAUNCHES NEW
CAREER WEBSITE
We would like to take this
opportunity to introduce to
you St. Rita’s Professional
Services (SRPS) career
website. SRPS currently
has openings for a Regis-
tered Nurse and Licensed
Paractical Nurse.
Interested candidates can
submit applications and
resume by visiting:
www.srpsprofessionals.org
St. Rita’s Professional
Services is an Equal
Opportunity Employer
PRFESSIONAL
Product Engineer
Freudenberg-NOK (www.fn
st.com) in Findlay is a grow-
ing global leader in manufac-
turing sealing rings for the
automotive industry. We
are looking for a Product
Engineer with a BSME or
equivalent with 5-10 years
experience. Plastic injection
molded part and/or
steering/suspension/drive
line part design background
a plus. Primary responsibili-
ties include; product man-
agement, product develop-
ment, validation test devel-
opment, quoting, material
selection, design for
manufacturability, and close
customer collaboration.
We offer comprehensive
benefit package of
Health/Dental/Vision/Life
Insurance, Life Insurance,
ST/LT Disability, 401(k),
Profit Sharing, paid holidays
and vacation.
Qualified candidates please
apply on line at:
http://www.freudenberg-nok.
com/careers/careers.htm
PROFESIONAL
MANUFACTURING
ENGINEER
As a result of our expanding
business Toledo Molding
and Die, Inc., a full service
automotive plastics supplier
with multiple locations, has
openings for Manufacturing
Engineers at their Delphos
Ohio facility.
The position interfaces with
production, customers and
suppliers and is responsible
for manufacturing functions
related to current model pro-
duction and future model
programs. Responsibilities
include continuous improve-
ment of assembly and mold-
ing processes and trouble-
shooting equipment. Candi-
date should possess strong
communication, interperso-
nal, and problem solving
skills and have the desire
and demonstrated ability to
work in a team environment.
A Bachelors Degree in Engi-
neering is preferred, but an
Associates degree in Engi-
neering would be consid-
ered with manufacturing ex-
perience;
Toledo Molding and Die of-
fers a competitive salary
and benefit package. Quali-
fied candidates may email
their resume and cover let-
ter with salary
history/requirements in confi-
dence to either location be-
low:
hrdelphos@tmdinc.com
with a subject of Job# 12-14
or to:
Toledo Molding & Die, Inc.
Attn: Human Resources
Manager
24086 ST RT 697
Delphos, OH 45833
An E.O.E. M/F/D/V
PROFESSIONAL
County
Extension
Educator
Allen County / Maumee Val-
ley EERA / 4-H Youth Devel-
opment. Experience with
leadership, teaching, evalua-
tion, teamwork, committees,
and collaboration with di-
verse clientele and youth
needed. Master’s degree
required. Competitive sal-
ary, excellent OSU bene-
fits, flexible hours. EEO /
AA Employer. Job Opportu-
nities, Position Descriptions,
To Apply: http://extensionhr
.osu.edu/jobs.html
TRADES
AGRI EQUIPMENT
TECHNICIAN
Repair agricultural equip-
ment, Combines, tractors,
diesel engines, hydraulics,
electronics, etc. Up to
$25.86 per hour based on
experience. Experience with
Heavy Equipment? Agri
Equipment? Excellent me-
chanical skills? We have
openings in: Upper Sandus-
ky, OH and Washington
Courthouse, OH.
Apply online at http://
candidate.ohiocat.com
TRADES
Wastewater
Collection
Supervisor
Currently accepting re-
sumes for a full time waste-
water collection supervisor.
Responsibilities include di-
rect, supervise and coor-
dinate the activities of the
wastewater collection oper-
ations as directed by the
Wastewater Collection Su-
perintendent. Duties in-
clude budgeting and finan-
cial planning of the division;
monitor the design and
construction of wastewater
collection capital improve-
ments and daily division
Operations and Mainte-
nance as directed by the
Superintendent. Must have
proficient computer skills in
Microsoft Office and perform
intranet and internet op-
erational skills. Training
and experience require-
ments are high school
graduate or equivalent, As-
sociate’s degree (preferred)
from an accredited univer-
sity, four to six years super-
vision, related experience
and/or training; or the
equivalent combination of
education and experience.
Mechanical, electrical knowl-
edge and hands on experi-
ence also required. Public
employment wage and ben-
efits package. Annual salary
range: DOQ; $40,000 -
$50,000. Please submit re-
sume with cover letter and
references to Box # 5050
C/O The Lima News, 3515
Elida Rd, Lima, Ohio 45807
by February 29, 2012.
No calls please.
#1 29 Ga. Metal
Siding & Roofing
Only $2.15 / linear foot
or $67.90 / square
Ridge, Screws, J-Channel,
Corners. Other Trims available.
Insulation: Fiberglass rolls, Sin-
gle bubble & Blown Insulation.
Contractor & Lumber Yard
discounts available.
$$$ MFR DIRECT - SAVE $$$
501 METALS
Call Today!!! 419-657-2510
STAINLESS STEEL Cook
stove. Really nice. $500. Call
419-296-8614 or 419-788-8880
FINDLAY HORSE
MAN’S GREAT LAKES
APPALOOSA
SWAPMEET
Sunday February 19th
9am. University of Findlay
Western Farm. Admis-
sion $2.00 419-348-7064
2000 DODGE DURANGO, 4.7
V8, automatic, Drives perfect.
New snow tires. 3rd row cloth
interior. $3,800. 419-224-0407
1997 Ski-Doo MXZ 583 Snow-
mobile. Looks good. Runs
great. Many extras. $1,500 /
best offer. Call 419-234-4722
1987 DODGE DAKOTA, pickup
truck, V6, 67,000 miles with
top. $1,400/best offer. Call 419-
230-2273
WEEKLY RARE
COIN AUCTION
Howard’s Coin Shop
128 E. Main Street, Leipsic
Gold, Silver, Rare
Coins & More
Tyler Abel, Auctioneer
OHIO LICENSE #2011000138
Tuesday 12:00pm
** REGIONAL DRIVERS **
Sidney, Ohio based company that
is very fnancially stable seeks
Regional Drivers due to growth.
We offer the following:
* $0.40/mile with Annual Raises
* Home Weekly (Average 36 hours)
* 4 weeks paid vacation (1ST Year)
* Insurance & 401K
* Qualcomm Satellites
* Ave weekly pay 2011 over $1100
* Primarily run Midwest & Southeast
Require CDLA and 1 year recent experience. No
felonies or DUIs. Call 800-497-2100 or apply at
www.ceioh.com
CLASSIFIED V7
putnamvoice.com
February 15 - 21, 2012
• Submitted photo
Fort Jennings High School Homecoming court
WHAT WE’RE UP TO ….
HOME PHOTOS AND MORE!
So you think you have a pretty neat photo of a family mem-
ber, pet or fun event? We’d love to see it.
E-mail it to info@putnamvoice.com and we’ll publish it on the
Web and we might just publish it here too.
putnamvoice.com
V8
February 15 - 21, 2012
Get Tickets Now!
for the National Broadway Tour
lu7uu 8k ll8 8., voo Wort, Ou l =l9.238.NlAC (ó722} l www.oµocvw.orç l
T
ic
k
e
ts
$
2
9
-
$
4
6
at the at the
March 3
2 SHOWS
2 PM & 7 PM
Sponsored in part bv
The Tonv Award winning musical that has
magicallv woven music, dance, poignancv and
laughter into a glorious '7UDGLWLRQ`
of musical theatre'
Group Discounts Available
Box OIfce Hours: M-F, 12-4PM
Celina 419-394-2317 Kenton 419-674-4156
Celina PEH 419-394-2010 Kenton PEH 419-674-4174
Van Wert 419-238-2422 Huntsville 937-593-0515
Van Wert PEH 419-238-0515 Columbus Grove 419-659-2191
419-641-2661
www.carterlumber.com
carterlumber.com
CELINA
419-394-2010
COLUMBUS GROVE
419-659-2191
KENTON
419-674-4174
VAN WERT
419-238-0515
3 Bags for
$
10
00
SALT SALE!
$
265
00
INFRARED PORTABLE
ELECTRIC iHEATER
#IH-1500W
(69285)
*40 lb. Pellets only
*
•Infrared technology is extremely
effcient •Whisper quiet •Heats
a room evenly from foor to ceiling
•Safe for kids & animals
Up to 68% OFF
List Price
On All New
Kitchen Cabinets!
Now Through
January 31, 2012!
LOOKING FOR
WINDOWS OR SIDING?
Looking For Price?
Looking For Quality?
LOOK NO FURTHER...
CHEROKEE has the Best Prices
and Best Quality!
“We can save you hundreds of dollars”
COMPARE!!
Local Owned & Operated
Your Hometown Windows & Siding Company
CHEROKEE CONSTRUCTION
Lakeview and Findlay
CALL NOW, CALL TODAY 419-424-9310
www.cherokeeconstinc.com
OTTAWA — The SS Peter
and Paul School kindergarten
students are thankful for the
community helpers in Ottawa
who provide them with the
services they need. Last week
the students were visited by
a police officer, a nurse, and
a postal worker. The help-
ers shared how they help the
community and explained
about the tools they use to
help them do their job. Miss
Tanya from the post office
helped the children address
envelopes. Later the kinder-
garteners made Valentines for
their parents, placed them in
the envelopes and took a walk
to the post office. The children
were excited to mail their own
Valentines. The students also
walked across the street to
the bank where they met more
community helpers, watched
coins and bills be counted and
even saw the safe the where
money and valuables are kept.
The SPPS kindergarteners
are happy to live in Ottawa, a
community filled with people
who provide what they want
and need.
• Submitted
photo
Students from
SS Peter and
Paul School
are shown in
front of the
Ottawa Post
Office as they
prepare to
send Valen-
tines to their
parents.
SPPS students thankful
for community helpers
Members of the Fort Jennings 2012 Homecoming Court include (from left): miniature
attendant Abbie Browning; freshmen Connor Wallenhorst and Emily Klir; juniors Brandon
Kohli and Lori Bruskotter; King Cody Warnecke and Queen Kelsey Von Lehmden; seniors
Adam Krietemeyer and Megan Kehres; sophomores Spencer Dray and Min Metcalfe; and
miniature attendant Trent Siefker
• Submitted photo
Miller City class of 1943 reunion
NANCY KLINE • Putnam Voice
OACC inducts new members
Amy Sealts (left), of OACC, and Kathy Schnipke, of Ag Credit and OACC chairperson of
the Board (right), introduced new members Kristen Gerding-Heffner (second left), of The
Performing Arts Center, and Christine Clymer, of Putnam County Health & Diagnostic
Center, during last week’s monthly chamber meeting.
The remaining members of the Miller City class of 1943, including (from left) Tom Riepen-
hoff, Floyd Roof, Pauline Bockrath and Elmer Koenig met recently at The Meadows of
Ottawa-Glandorf.
What is going on
in Putnam County?
Every Wednesday check out the Voice
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